Summary of “Colin Kaepernick’s settlement with the NFL was a big win for the leader of the league’s protest movement.”

On Friday, the NFL and representatives for Colin Kaepernick and Eric Reid announced that they had settled a grievance suit with the two players over alleged collusion to keep them out of the league because of their protests during the anthem.
“For the past several months, counsel for Mr. Kaepernick and Mr. Reid have engaged in an ongoing dialogue with representatives of the NFL. As a result of those discussions, the parties have decided to resolve the pending grievances,” the NFL and Kaepernick and Reid’s attorneys said in a joint announcement.
Bleacher Report’s Mike Freeman reported that NFL teams were speculating the settlement with Kaepernick alone could have been in the $60 million to $80 million range.
Kaepernick filed his grievance against the league in October 2017, alleging that one or more teams had colluded with each other and/or the league to keep him out of the NFL because of his decision to kneel during the national anthem in the 2016-17 season as a protest against police brutality and systemic racism.
Reid, who was the first player to join Kaepernick’s protest movement when they played together on the San Francisco 49ers, alleged in his grievance that he’d been blackballed for continuing to protest following Kaepernick’s exclusion from the NFL. Reid, who did not drop his grievance after signing a deal with the Carolina Panthers this season, recently re-signed with the team, getting a three-year contract worth more than $21 million.
The 31-year-old Kaepernick still does not have a job in the NFL after two seasons without a contract.
It’s unclear what will happen in the future on that front, but it seems as though that question will now be answered in negotiations between the league and the NFL Players Association and not unilaterally by Roger Goodell and the NFL’s owners.
It’s also unclear whether Kaepernick will ever get another chance to play in the NFL. If this settlement proves anything it’s that there was no good reason for him to be kept off NFL rosters in the first place-and there’s still no good reason for him to be kept from playing in the NFL going forward.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Nike’s Big Gamble on Colin Kaepernick”

For the past two years, Nike has kept Colin Kaepernick on the bench despite an endorsement partnership that dates back to 2011.
Kaepernick’s protest made him hugely controversial, and during the past two years, Nike hasn’t used the former 49ers quarterback as a spokesman even though he was under contract.
On Monday, Nike introduced Kaepernick as the face of its 30th anniversary “Just Do It” campaign, kicking off a new deal worth millions of dollars, comparable to the most lucrative deals Nike gives out to NFL players.
Kaepernick is suing the NFL, a Nike partner, alleging he’s been blacklisted for inspiring a wave of protests.
He’s misreading the situation if he thinks that Nike re-signed Kaepernick for political reasons.
Kaepernick and Reid aren’t the only people in this story who are suing former employers-in August, four women who used to work at Nike headquarters filed a class-action lawsuit that said Nike systematically paid women less than men and turned a blind eye to sexual harassment.
Maybe Nike figures that the far right is going to throw a tantrum no matter what the NFL and its corporate partners do, and if that’s going to happen they might as well sell some athleisure to people who don’t find Kaepernick’s message of racial equality offensive.
Nike betting on Kaepernick is encouraging for those of us who find his message not only inoffensive but worthy.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Colin Kaepernick’s movement endures, but its supporters are more fragmented than ever”

For Reid and other defecting players, the coalition had become the NFL’s hand-picked safe alternative to Kaepernick and the kneeling players; the league had lured them with promises of social commitment and big money to cover for the real purpose of sabotaging their movement and ending the protests.
Interviews over four months with multiple players, representatives and league insiders show how the cause Kaepernick started has been slowly fractured by frustrations, unreconciled resentments and missed opportunities to fight for real change – a potentially unifying movement that fell apart for reasons that to some observers seem inevitable in retrospect.
In 2016, along with Boldin, he formed the advocacy group that would become the Players Coalition, growing it to roughly 50 players over the following year and a half.
Along the way, they engaged Goodell and Vincent about ways the league and players could partner on issues important to the players.
The second meeting, in Washington a few weeks later, contained even more tension, according to multiple players and union members who were there.
“You’ve been fine with the players being out front on this issue,” he said at one point, “And you were happy with our players taking a beating from the right and being characterized as anti-cop, anti-America, anti-military, and that’s bulls – t.”.
As one of the only white players in professional sports taking a public and active stand in solidarity with the protesting players, the rifts were particularly painful to him.
“We’ll see if the league will keep its word or if the players got taken,” says a former player.

The orginal article.

Summary of “The Culture War at the Heart of American Football”

The episode has served as a founding myth for the phenomenon of modern football, a game that now extends beyond sports.
Ever since, football has grown as a central institution in American life; on its face a truly multi-ethnic undertaking, one where common ground can be found between the lines and politics can be forsaken at least for a few hours.
While football and football media rose in stature as American institutions, other pillars were collapsing.
New York Times journalist Roy Reed wrote of a 1969 football Saturday in Birmingham that: “Football has probably replaced church-going as the number one social function in the South. And it’s more than just the favorite sport. It is now a religio-social past-time, a psychic device for the release of tensions and a vehicle for doing business.” Reed’s observation was correct, and football has supplanted religion even well beyond the South now, but the replacement has been seamless because football’s a lot like church.
As a civic religion, football has married Max Weber’s protestantische Ethik, American capitalism, the worship of great men, and the individual narratives of sacrifice and superhuman feats.
Even after Trump won the presidency, he returned to football often as red meat during rallies, bragging that his disparagement had been the cause of Kaepernick’s joblessness.
While many people expressed alarm earlier this year at the brazen militarism of Trump musing out loud about holding military parades on American streets for holidays, few fathomed that weekly football games already emulate the function of military parades, showcasing the kind of firepower that the country’s military uses to vaporize homes and flatten cities.
While comparisons of football and war are perhaps over-determined, in responding to that challenge, the NFL revealed itself to be a shade of America’s most enduring war, the one that cleaves brother from brother and threatens the foundations of power.

The orginal article.

Summary of “NFL quality of play isn’t worse in 2017, but Colin Kaepernick might make it better”

The problems so far in 2017 have been concentrated on offense, and while it might be reasonable to interpret that as defenses doing a better job of employing personnel, rotating pass-rushers and employing smarter coverage concepts, the argument instead seems to be that offenses – and quarterbacks, in particular – are playing worse than ever.
The only reason anybody would be nostalgic for the quarterback play of 20 years ago, relative to now, would be that they remember the stars of 1997 as compared to the full breadth of NFL quarterback play today.
As Jason Lisk of The Big Lead noted last year in a must-read story, people have been complaining about the decline in both the quality of NFL play and the abilities of quarterbacks for 25 years now.
For whatever flaws Kaepernick has as a quarterback, a look at history suggests that there hasn’t been a single quarterback in the post-merger modern NFL to play like Kaepernick did in 2016 without getting another shot at a job afterward.
Free-agent quarterback Colin Kaepernick told Shaun King of the Fair Punishment Project that he is working out and ready to play if a team comes calling.
The Patriots quarterback says he’s admired Colin Kaepernick’s game and that the QB is “Certainly qualified” to play in the NFL. Dolphins receiver Kenny Stills is asking why the NFL and its players failed to support Colin Kaepernick and his national anthem protests last season.
Teams might want a quarterback who knows their system having gone through camp, but in a league in which Jacoby Brissett can go from Patriots third-stringer to Colts starter in eight days, it’s hard to believe Kaepernick can’t even make his way onto a roster whatsoever.
Watching so many NFL teams willfully make ignorant choices and then complain about the lack of quarterback options while leaving a clearly qualified candidate on the sidelines makes it seem like the quality of decision-making in the modern NFL is far worse than the quality of play.

The orginal article.

Summary of “I Wore a Colin Kaepernick Jersey to an NFL Game”

I was wearing a red San Francisco 49ers number 7 Colin Kaepernick jersey.
A few weeks earlier, a sadistic Sports Illustrated editor had floated the idea of a reporter walking around an NFL game in a Colin Kaepernick jersey, as a way to explore what it’s like being a Kaepernick loyalist at a time when the entire NFL is shunning if not blackballing him.
One man pointed me out to his friends and shook his head; his friend next to him wore an O.J. Simpson jersey.
Wearing a Kaepernick jersey now indicates that you’re aligned with his politics, too.
We arrived and were there for maybe two minutes when a man at the next tailgate spotted the Kaepernick jersey and came rushing over, in excitement.
Mirrielees had a Kaepernick jersey at home, she said, and she had bought one for her son, too.
Had Mirrielees worn her Kaepernick jersey here, you could imagine her experience would’ve been vastly different than mine.
No one else in the lot seemed particularly concerned with a guy walking around in a Kaepernick jersey; they were too busy getting drunk.

The orginal article.

Summary of “No Country for Colin Kaepernick”

Through the season, even as he regained the starting gig for 11 games, Kaepernick continued his demonstration.
Kaepernick faced near-universal revulsion from NFL team offices, and fared little better among the sports commentariat.
Despite the increasing likelihood that he will lose his spot in the NFL, Kaepernick has persisted in his activism.
A month after Kaepernick began his protest, Terence Crutcher was shot and killed by Officer Betty Shelby in Tulsa, Oklahoma; and Keith Lamont Scott was shot and killed by officers in Charlotte, North Carolina, who admitted that video showed no “Absolute definitive, visual evidence” that he’d provoked them.
Kaepernick saw his own protest as an extension of the Black Lives Matter movement and of the raucous protests that erupted in each of those cities.
After years of media and political backlash against the tactics of Black Lives Matter, from efforts to criminalize marches to proposed legislation that might allow drivers to kill protesters with impunity to wild claims that the movement’s strategies actually kill people, Kaepernick simply chose not to stand.
One of the popular arguments early on against Kaepernick was that he was too privileged, and that his protest had no real skin in the game.
Already, the NFL faces the prospect of boycotts and a further erosion of its stained public image if Kaepernick isn’t signed.

The orginal article.

Summary of “deadspin-quote-carrot-aligned-w-bgr-2”

In terms of statistics, physical attributes, and professional accomplishments, Austin Davis is indisputably worse at quarterbacking than Colin Kaepernick, with whom the Seahawks briefly flirted and who passed for a respectable 4:1 TD:INT ratio last season on one of the NFL’s worst teams, doing so despite the supposed weight-loss issues that are still brought up when discussing Kap’s inability to get a job.
So of course he declared that Kaepernick was good enough to be a starting quarterback, causing a great deal of confusion among pundits who openly wondered why a team wouldn’t want an extra starting-caliber quarterback on its roster.
You already know how many writers out there are willing to push out excuse after excuse as to why Kaepernick has been shunned.
You can see this dynamic in Benoit’s followup post, where instead of doing anything to actually back his assertions about how a bunch of shitty QBs are better than Kap, he claims that 90 percent of the league agrees with his take that Kaepernick is not a proper pocket passer, a bit of racially-coded language that had its varnish stripped away years and years ago.
To sign Kaepernick, a team must be willing to take on the distraction that follows lightning rods.
Just last month, Giants owner and spineless tit John Mara said his team got more angry calls about potentially signing Kaepernick than they did about any other issue, which is weird because a) this is the team that re-signed Josh Brown after a horrifying DV incident, and b) why on Earth should any team give a FUCK what fans think when making vital personnel moves? I can guarantee that the Giants are hardly alone in turtling away from Kap, whose greatest sin was openly decrying institutional racism in America, out of fear.
It doesn’t matter why the NFL doesn’t want Kaepernick.
Maybe he’ll get a flyer this summer when someone gets hurt in training camp, but to me, it’s more likely that a desperate team turns to an even more obscenely unqualified alternative instead. Fucking Rex Grossman will get a sniff before Kaepernick does.

The orginal article.