Summary of “Stop Keeping Score”

That’s why you have to train yourself to stop feeding your ego by keeping score.
I’ve had conflicts in the past about keeping score.
I’ve also seen family members destroy relationships because they kept score.
I think there’s a relationship between keeping score and self-confidence.
Keeping score is something you do to prove a point, right? There’s no other reason I can think of after reading, researching, and talking endlessly about this subject.
I don’t worry about keeping score, because I know that, over a lifetime, the score will always be equal.
It makes no sense keeping score because we all chase the same goals.
Keeping score is a nasty trait that you want to avoid at all costs.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Going against the decluttering craze: the book hoarders who defy Marie Kondo”

Of course, there was a backlash to the backlash, with the expected explanation from Kondo that not all books gotta go.
On the coffee table at the moment are coffee table books: The History of Rap, the book Author: The Portraits of Beowulf Sheehan, which I’m thankfully featured in.
I’m still trying to figure out how she wrote a book that spans 25 years in only 25,000 words.
For 35 years, there was a bright pink bookstore in my town called Remarkable Book Shop.
I’m now able to get rid of books much more easily knowing they’re going to a good home.
If I’m writing about dinosaurs, I’ll have every single book about dinosaurs already in the same section – children’s books, history books, comic books.
It’s a book from a chef in Spain, from the 1890s.
What 30 books does Ms Kondo keep? Are they the same books or does she rotate them? I’d be fascinated to know.

The orginal article.

Summary of “4 Ways Busy People Sabotage Themselves”

When we’re busy and stressed, we often default to working on whatever has the most imminent deadline, even if it’s not particularly important.
We respond to emails and go through the motions of getting things done, without actually stepping back and considering what’s most important to work on.
You might find yourself spending several hours on a task that wasn’t that important to begin with, even though you have a mountain of other things to be doing.
The solution is to step back and work on tasks that are important but not urgent.
Lots of busy people don’t keep enough food in the house.
To get out of the trap of overlooking easy solutions, take a step back and question your assumptions.
So you put it off, week after week, doing the work yourself – even though even reallocating the time spent on one cleaning session would realistically be enough to hire someone else to do it.
With practice, you’ll start to notice when you’re just doing something to avoid doing something else.

The orginal article.

Summary of “4 Ways Busy People Sabotage Themselves”

When we’re busy and stressed, we often default to working on whatever has the most imminent deadline, even if it’s not particularly important.
We respond to emails and go through the motions of getting things done, without actually stepping back and considering what’s most important to work on.
You might find yourself spending several hours on a task that wasn’t that important to begin with, even though you have a mountain of other things to be doing.
The solution is to step back and work on tasks that are important but not urgent.
Lots of busy people don’t keep enough food in the house.
To get out of the trap of overlooking easy solutions, take a step back and question your assumptions.
So you put it off, week after week, doing the work yourself – even though even reallocating the time spent on one cleaning session would realistically be enough to hire someone else to do it.
With practice, you’ll start to notice when you’re just doing something to avoid doing something else.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Chill out! The 10 rules for a perfect fridge”

With a smile and a bin liner, Marie Kondo is about to descend on your fridge.
An Instagram story from her lifestyle brand KonMari.com yesterday ruled that you should always keep your fridge 30% empty – or 70% full, if that means more to you – for shopping and leftovers.
From a purely technical perspective, uncluttering your fridge has undeniable benefits: it ensures the air can circulate freely, meaning the temperature stays steady and the appliance lasts longer.
To break the dream down into more manageable parts, here is a guide to fridge hygiene.
Go for colder when your fridge is full or you’ve just packed it with a big shop on a hot day; to save on energy, a little warmer when it is cold and your fridge is looking a little bare.
Don’t refrigerate hot food: wait for it to cool completely, to avoid contamination and messing up your fridge temperature.
Store all soft fresh herbs like a bouquet, washed and in a glass jar with a little water, well away from the icy back of the fridge.
The rule of thumb is to store like with like: meat with meat and fish with fish; veg and fruit in separate veg drawers; herbs and green leaves away from the icy-cold back of the fridge.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Want to Be Super Successful? Science Says Do Any 1 of These 10 Things”

Jack Canfield, co-author of the Chicken Soup for the Soul series, suggests that you practice visualization 10 minutes a day to “Harness the power of your subconscious mind.”
For people who have trouble closing their eyes and “Seeing anything,” use a pen and paper and write out how you want your day to unfold.
“The day you find someone just as passionate about your goal to hold you accountable will be the day you make your first permanent step towards success,” he says.
One great way to be fully prepared for the day ahead is to make a to-do list, just like Barbara Corcoran from Shark Tank; Jim Koch, founder of Sam Adams; and Jim McCann, founder and CEO of 1-800-FLOWERS. I plan up to six tasks that I want to complete during the day on mine, and the reason this works is twofold.
The dimensions of a Post-It Note are perfect because the size constraint will force you to only write down the most important things that you have to do each day.
Spend as much time as possible doing what you want by maximizing output in minimal time – this is the goal each day.
Now, look at your own day, figure out how you can break it into chunks, and determine what you need to do to spend your time doing what you want to do.10.
Even if you can’t set aside full days to deal with certain issues, you can probably block off certain hours of the day to handle them.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Want to Be Super Successful? Science Says Do Any 1 of These 10 Things”

Jack Canfield, co-author of the Chicken Soup for the Soul series, suggests that you practice visualization 10 minutes a day to “Harness the power of your subconscious mind.”
For people who have trouble closing their eyes and “Seeing anything,” use a pen and paper and write out how you want your day to unfold.
“The day you find someone just as passionate about your goal to hold you accountable will be the day you make your first permanent step towards success,” he says.
One great way to be fully prepared for the day ahead is to make a to-do list, just like Barbara Corcoran from Shark Tank; Jim Koch, founder of Sam Adams; and Jim McCann, founder and CEO of 1-800-FLOWERS. I plan up to six tasks that I want to complete during the day on mine, and the reason this works is twofold.
The dimensions of a Post-It Note are perfect because the size constraint will force you to only write down the most important things that you have to do each day.
Spend as much time as possible doing what you want by maximizing output in minimal time – this is the goal each day.
Now, look at your own day, figure out how you can break it into chunks, and determine what you need to do to spend your time doing what you want to do.10.
Even if you can’t set aside full days to deal with certain issues, you can probably block off certain hours of the day to handle them.

The orginal article.

Summary of “A Traveler’s Guide to KonMari-ing Your Life”

Now, a year and a half after my return to dry land, I’ve divided all of my worldly possessions into two piles on the floor of my bedroom: those to keep on the right, and those to donate on the left.
The pile on the left will keep growing until it does.
Bouncing from place to place, I developed a process for winnowing down my possessions that’s remarkably similar to the now famous KonMari method.
Developed by self-proclaimed tidying expert Marie Kondo-originally in her 2014 book The Life-Changing Magic of Tidying Up and now in the hit Netflix series-the method posits that reducing clutter in one’s home and life can be a path to happiness, in part by getting rid of items that no longer “Spark joy.” Like Kondo’s system, traveling has forced me to reduce my possessions down to the items that are truly important and necessary.
Every time I would move, I’d have to cull everything I’d acquired to fill my rented room or boat cabin down to what would fit into my backpack or, more recently, a 2001 Toyota Camry.
If not for the subsequent years spent as a nomad, my life could have come to resemble Hoarders rather than Kondo’s new reality show.
In June 2014, not long after I’d left South Africa and four months before Kondo published the book that would skyrocket her to fame, I purchased a one-way ticket to Southeast Asia, figuring I’d spend about three months working for a small conservation organization in the jungles of Borneo.
The strong sentimental attachment I’d once given these things was gone.

The orginal article.

Summary of “How to Talk Yourself Into Better Endurance”

A series of studies has changed my mind, and over the past few years I’ve written and spoken about self-talk frequently-which has sparked a common question that I’ve been totally unprepared to answer: once you believe it, how do you actually do it?
Of course, there’s lots of folk wisdom out there on how to deploy self-talk, and some of it is undoubtedly good.
The skeptic in me still wants evidence to back whatever advice I offer, and there hasn’t been much systematic testing of different self-talk approaches for endurance.
Hardy and his colleagues decided to compare the effectiveness of self-talk using first-person or second-person pronouns-that is, the difference between telling yourself “I can do this!” or “You can do this!” They didn’t just pluck this idea out of thin air.
Previous research, for example, has suggested that second-person self-talk enhances public speaking performance and reduces the associated stress, possibly because it enhances “Self-distancing.” Stepping outside your immediate experiences and emotions, and viewing them instead from the detached perspective of a supportive onlooker, allows you to take the fear of failure less personally and to make better decisions.
On separate days, they did two more 10K time trials, using their updated self-talk statements in either first-person or second-person format, in random order.
It’s worth noting that without a control condition, we don’t know if both forms of modified self-talk improved performance to different degrees, or if one made it better and the other had no effect or made it worse.
That’s one obvious avenue for further research, and the broader lesson probably applies to pretty much all advice about self-talk: what works on average may not work for you.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Stop Keeping Score”

That’s why you have to train yourself to stop feeding your ego by keeping score.
I’ve had conflicts in the past about keeping score.
I’ve also seen family members destroy relationships because they kept score.
I think there’s a relationship between keeping score and self-confidence.
Keeping score is something you do to prove a point, right? There’s no other reason I can think of after reading, researching, and talking endlessly about this subject.
I don’t worry about keeping score, because I know that, over a lifetime, the score will always be equal.
It makes no sense keeping score because we all chase the same goals.
Keeping score is a nasty trait that you want to avoid at all costs.

The orginal article.