Summary of “100 Percent Is Overrated”

The idea of a fixed mindset, in which people are smart or not smart, stands in contrast to a growth mindset, in which people become intelligent and knowledgeable through practice.
In her 2006 book The New Psychology of Success, psychologist Carol Dweck described the two: People with growth mindsets believe that the harder they work, the smarter they get.
The group most damaged by fixed-mindset thinking is high-achieving girls, Boaler argues, because it’s girls who are told by society that they probably won’t be as good as boys at math and science.
Speaking of percentages, math is a good example of the importance of avoiding the fixed mindset.
The idea of a “Math person” or a math gene is a primary reason for so much math nihilism, math failure, and “Math trauma,” as Boaler called it on Monday.
When kids get the idea that they “Aren’t math people,” they start a downward trajectory, and their career options shrink immediately and substantially.
There is also the common idea of a wall in math: People learn math until they hit a wall where they just can’t keep up.
In no other discipline but math are people so given to thinking, instead of I need to practice, just Well, I’m not good.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Gordon Ramsay’s food approach helped my family of autistic eaters.”

The behaviors that Gordon Ramsay models on the show have completely changed my family’s relationship to food.
Some people would call us “Picky eaters.” Medical professionals would call us “Sensory avoidant in relation to food.” To further complicate dinnertime, my kids have vastly different tolerances around food.
Then the way they related to food started to change.
He gives feedback on flavor and texture, and sometimes, after critiquing the presentation, even Ramsay finds that something he thought would be awful actually tastes “Quite nice.” Whether he knows it or not, Gordon is mimicking the advice of my daughter’s occupational therapist: Engage food with all your senses.
You can identify ways in which it’s familiar to other things you’ve eaten or find senses that aren’t overwhelmed by food.
For my kids, food was just food; if one version of a slider was bad, all sliders were bad. But Gordon never just says “Yuck.” Instead, he explains why he doesn’t like a dish: The vegetables are underdone, the meat is overcooked, the presentation is unappealing, or the spices aren’t on point.
Ultimately, what Gordon Ramsay and Hell’s Kitchen did was to change our family conversation around food.
Gordon Ramsay elevated our family’s food experience into something that’s more fun for all of us.

The orginal article.

Summary of “The California Sunday Magazine”

In a go-time effort to get in front of Omar, Doris pulled an impressive feat of freeway pilotage: She went early to the house show in Commerce, jetted 20 miles to the Roxy in West Hollywood for the Swedish artist’s gig, showed her face, then sped back to Commerce to just barely catch Cuco’s last few songs.
Doris attributes part of this to Omar’s self-incubated musical gifts - she doesn’t need to pay an engineer if Omar’s the one cutting the track with his own tools, and she doesn’t need to pay studio fees if the studio is the garage of his parents’ home.
At the very beginning of their partnership, Doris got Omar into A & R meetings, to be greeted with lukewarm enthusiasm about how to market an indie-pop Latin artist.
In 2017, Omar released a mixtape, Songs4u, and followed it up with his biggest hit to date, “Lo Que Siento.” Doris claims it was his real breakthrough, with a rapid-fire accumulation of seven-digit streams on SoundCloud and seven on Spotify, outplaying his other tracks by a few million clicks.
“The song is a lovebird dedication of warbly guitars and singsong rap verses, where Omar swaps Spanish verses and English bars. Today, one could take sensitive boys in hip-hop for granted, assuming that the SoundCloud wave of underage emo rappers plus Drake would have cleared the way for Cuco. But Omar still gets some flak.”It’s very normal for me to be expressive and emotional because that’s the music I listen to,” he says, listing off the emo bands of his youth, like Being as an Ocean and Capsize.
It’s not just Omar’s dream to be Cuco; it’s lots of folks’ dreams to help make Cuco possible.
Doris talks about how Omar could easily get “Lost in the sauce.”
Her nail art is mauve with square tips and clear rhinestones at the cuticle; in a gothic font, one hand spells “OMAR,” the other “CUCO.” I catch her by craft services, which is a tarped-off table under the covered car park, scattered with empty bottles of soda and whiskey, Trader Joe’s snacks, and languid kids ripping bong hits around a box fan.

The orginal article.

Summary of “My Wife and I Didn’t Tell Our Children About Her Cancer”

In 2009, Marla’s radiologist called to tell her that she had early-stage breast cancer.
Our kids were 8, 9, and 11 at the time, and though they understood then that she was undergoing treatment, we never told them the news we soon learned from Memorial Sloan Kettering’s head of breast-cancer oncology: Marla had a triple-negative cancer cell, the fiercest of them all.
I always joked with Marla, once she had been diagnosed: “I’m not sure what you’re afraid of more, cancer itself or the thought of my being responsible for the kids as a single parent.” I’m pretty sure it was the latter.
Marla didn’t want her girls to savor; she wanted them to sail, and that meant less information-not a lie, but a lacuna.
Marla refused to let family time together feel too precious, too heightened, too sad. How does one fight cancer on the sly? When Marla needed Neulasta shots for her bone strength, she slipped the doctor into our house quietly in the evenings, while the kids were upstairs doing their homework.
Marla was lucky enough to enroll in medical Hail Marys at Dana-Farber Cancer Institute that kept her alive.
The girls were confused as to why they were suddenly “Gifted” Marla’s favorite running tank tops, but she could no longer wear them-they exposed the port that had been inserted near her bra line, an essential catheter due to hardened arm veins from years of infusions and blood draws.
At Thanksgiving, Marla and I gathered the kids at the kitchen table and told them the story we’d spared them.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Who Killed the Weekend?”

What my son was mourning wasn’t the end of a great weekend, but the fact that those two days hadn’t seemed like a weekend at all; they were barely distinguishable from the five days before it.
How did my son end up as unfamiliar with the concept of the weekend as the Dowager Countess in Downton Abbey? The weekend was an early-20th-century victory of organised labour.
If the weekend doesn’t exist, neither does the time to forge face-to-face connections or participate in our communities.
Hobbies are declining, but a hobby is exactly the kind of activity that adds value to the weekend.
The side hustle is a weekend thief, but in a time of stagnant incomes, many must choose income over time.
Reclaiming unoccupied time at the weekend may be the most successful parenting strategy of all.
Since my son’s bemoaning of the weekend, our family has become better at declaring certain weekend days “Off”.
The goal is that every weekend includes at least a little unoccupied time, devoid of economic compulsion, to see what might happen.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Child holiday anxiety: how to prevent behavior problems at Christmas, Hanukkah, and New Year’s.”

Think about ways you can work routines into your holiday traditions, too-maybe every night before bed your kids get to add a new ornament to the tree or sing a holiday carol together.
The more ways you can incorporate consistency into the holiday season, the more grounded your kids will feel.
Another reason kids act out around the holidays is because we have expectations for their behavior that we haven’t communicated to them.
We expect they won’t make fart jokes at Aunt Gertrude’s and then scold them when they do, but did we ever actually tell them that Aunt Gertrude doesn’t like fart jokes? The holidays are full of strange situations and rituals-“We’re throwing kids into situations that they might not have had a lot of practice for,” says Stephanie Lee, a clinical psychologist at the Child Mind Institute’s ADHD and Behavior Disorders Center in New York-so talk with your kids about them beforehand.
Many kids experience a kind of anticipatory anxiety before big events, in which they feel excited but also nervous about what to expect.
Speaking of gifts, how should parents deal with them? Klein says fewer presents are better than more, because kids can get overwhelmed by so much stuff and the anticipation of opening it all.
By getting involved, kids learn how meaningful it is to give gifts and can also imagine how much it would sting if someone rejected a gift they spent time and effort on.
Our kids feel this stress and respond to it-and it shapes how we engage with our kids, too.

The orginal article.

Summary of “What it’s like to be the parent of an Instagram influencer kid”

What it’s like to be the parent of an Instagram influencer kid.
The influencer marketing industry is on track to be worth $5 billion to $10 billion by 2020, and children are a growing part of Instagram’s influencer economy.
Of Instagram’s 800 million users, as of September 2017, 80% of them follow a business, and the company reports that more than 60% of these people say they discover new products on Instagram.
Though Instagram influencing has exploded over the past five years, Marans estimates that the platform’s biggest kid stars, like the twins Mila and Emma Stauffer, have popped up only in the last few years.
Many parents of child influencers started using Instagram after their children already had popular YouTube followings or traditional modeling careers.
A kid influencer can command about $100 per 1,000 followers per post, according to Kyle Hjelmeseth, the founder of the influencer management company God and Beauty.
Clements started taking them for traditional auditions and, on the recommendation of a friend, started their Instagram page, which blew up after a bunch of beauty influencers shared their photos.
“If kid is performing in typical ad, we know what laws apply. That’s because that kid is going to a set, missing school, and that’s where the child’s welfare comes in,” she says.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Report: big tech is collecting children’s data at an alarming rate”

Along with those adorable photos, they are sharing crucial data about their children that big tech companies are harvesting.
In late November, Anne Longfield, England’s children’s commissioner – tasked with promoting and protecting the rights of children – published a report titled “Who Knows What About Me,” which examines how big tech collects data on children and what the potential dangers can be.
In the report, Longfield argues that parents are exposing their children’s data at an alarming rate.
The report calls on parents and schools to examine the type of gadgets children play with, like smart speakers, wifi-powered toys, and gaming apps, all of which are collecting data on kids.
Data shared by parents about children is collected at an alarming rate Potential dangers for children no longer just entail speeding cars and strangers with candy.
Smart devices are watching children too – and collecting their data Smart toys have already garnered plenty of criticism for leaving children’s data like location vulnerable.
Longfield writes in the report that “The amount of data inferred about children was of real concern.” Families are now being targeted with products because they are essentially being watched every time they’re online.
What will all this data on children mean for their future? While the report highlights current safety concerns for children’s data privacy, it also mentions some troubling future possibilities.

The orginal article.

Summary of “The Overprotected Kid”

Parents now routinely tell their children never to talk to strangers, even though all available evidence suggests that children have about the same chance of being abducted by a stranger as they did a generation ago.
At the core of the safety obsession is a view of children that is the exact opposite of Lady Allen’s, “An idea that children are too fragile or unintelligent to assess the risk of any given situation,” argues Tim Gill, the author of No Fear, a critique of our risk-averse society.
Paradoxically, Sandseter writes, “Our fear of children being harmed,” mostly in minor ways, “May result in more fearful children and increased levels of psychopathology.” She cites a study showing that children who injured themselves falling from heights when they were between 5 and 9 years old are less likely to be afraid of heights at age 18.
Children’s faces began to appear on milk cartons, and Ronald Reagan chose the date of Etan’s disappearance as National Missing Children’s Day.
David Finkelhor is the director of the Crimes Against Children Research Center and the most reliable authority on sexual-abuse and abduction statistics for children.
In all my years as a parent, I have never come upon children who are so inwardly focused, so in tune with each other, so utterly absorbed by the world they’ve created, and I think that’s because in all my years as a parent, I’ve mostly met children who take it for granted that they are always being watched.
In the old days, when children were left on their own, child power hierarchies formed fairly quickly, and some children always remained on the bottom, or were excluded entirely.
We can no more create the perfect environment for our children than we can create perfect children.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Don’t Call Kids ‘Smart'”

“You can tell kids that they’ve done something fantastic, but don’t label them as smart.”
The idea of a fixed mindset, in which people are smart or not smart, stands in contrast to a growth mindset, in which people become intelligent and knowledgeable through practice.
The subtleties of the ways in which we praise kids are related to the mindsets those kids develop.
The group most damaged by fixed-mindset thinking is high-achieving girls, Boaler argues, because it’s girls who are told by society that they probably won’t be as good as boys at math and science.
Speaking of percentages, math is a good example of the importance of avoiding the fixed mindset.
The idea of a “Math person” or a math gene is a primary reason for so much math nihilism, math failure, and “Math trauma,” as Boaler called it on Monday.
When kids get the idea that they “Aren’t math people,” they start a downward trajectory, and their career options shrink immediately and substantially.
There is also the common idea of a wall in math: People learn math until they hit a wall where they just can’t keep up.

The orginal article.