Summary of “Six things parents can do to raise kids to be confident decision-makers”

Here are some ways parents can help their kids become confident and ­independent decision-makers who know themselves.
Green suggests using words such as “Seems like” and “Sounds like” to help a child identify what she is feeling: “Sounds like you are unsure if you want the cat. Seems like you’re feeling a little stuck.” Developing kids’ awareness of their emotions helps them calm down and make a choice.
After you’ve helped your child voice her struggle and get in touch with her gut, let her know it is her decision.
“I hear parents of all age kids say things like, ‘I just really want her to go out for the robotics club because I know that she loves that stuff,'” Green says.
You can also help kids get in touch with how they felt when they didn’t follow their inner compass – especially when peers complicate behavior.
Let your kids know you feel regret, too, and help them find a way to work through the discomfort of it, such as writing the regret down on a piece of paper, crumpling it into a ball and throwing it into the trash, or folding it into a paper airplane and sending it away.
You also can deconstruct the decision and help them think through what might be helpful the next time they have a choice to make.
What’s mentionable is manageable: Why parents should help kids name their fears.

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Summary of “The Dangers of YouTube for Young Children”

Which gave him an idea: “If she is going to like it, the kids around the world should like it.” He created a YouTube channel and uploaded the video.
So what message are very young kids receiving from the most popular YouTube videos today? And how are they being shaped by these videos?
To be clear, it’s hard to make videos that very young children can learn from.
How about restricting toddler videos to the YouTube Kids app? Toddler content could, in effect, be forbidden on the main platform.
If video makers wanted their work on the YouTube Kids app, they’d have to agree to have it only on the Kids app.
The issue of inappropriate videos popping up in YouTube Kids has received a good deal of national press-but society can live with a tiny sliver of bad things slipping through the company’s filters.
It’s a small issue compared with kids watching billions of videos on regular YouTube.
The toddler videos that ChuChu is posting on YouTube are cultural hybrids, exuberant and cosmopolitan, and in a philosophical sense they presuppose a world in which all children are part of one vast community, drawing on the world’s collective heritage of storytelling.

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Summary of “How to Teach Your Kid Colors”

When my daughter was very young, we would read the toddler classic Brown Bear, Brown Bear, What Do You See? In the story, the title character spots a red bird, a yellow duck, a blue horse, a green frog, a purple cat, a white dog, a black sheep and a goldfish.
It’s a lovely book, but now I know it’s probably not a great one for teaching a kid her colors.
We like to use color words “Prenominally,” meaning before nouns.
We’ll often say things like “The red balloon,” instead of using the postnominal construction, “The balloon is red.”
Say “The balloon is red,” for example, and you will have helped to narrow “Red-ness” to being an attribute of the balloon, and not some general property of the world at large.
This helps kids discern what about the balloon makes it red.
In her study, when kids heard the color words postnominally, their learning improved significantly.
The takeaway: Instead of saying “The red balloon,” say “The balloon is red.” Or change up the title of your favorite toddler book: “Brown Bear … oops, I mean bear who is brown.”

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Summary of “Improve Homework Time With These Concentration Hacks for Kids”

While the kids do their homework, do your own work of the non-digital variety-sorting through mail, signing papers, writing thank you notes, journaling, drafting that novel in your head or making your to-do list for the next day.
For longer stretches of study time, you might give your kid two or three “Complaining minute” tickets that they can use as needed.
While it’s nice to have a dedicated space for homework, your kids may absorb more material if they move around the house while studying.
Explains study coach Ana Mascara: “Let’s say you study for math in the kitchen, and then you study for math in the library, and then you study for math on the bus, the brain is going to be like, ‘Huh. She’s using these math formulas in a lot of different environments. Maybe these math formulas are crucial to Ana’s survival. Let us solidify these math formulas because hey, she’s using them everywhere, so they must be important, right?'” I know that when I write, being able to meander around the house helps me gain clarity-I often find new perspectives in new environments.
A study found that while performing a repetitive task, four- and six-year-olds who pretended to be a familiar character such as Batman persevered significantly longer than those who remained themselves.
Here’s a good one for kids who are little too old for the Batman thing.
Study after study links exercise with academic improvement.
Schedule a play break between the last school bell and homework time.

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Summary of “Instead of Lecturing Your Kids, Write Them Notes”

I wrote a whole book about the importance of understanding kids’ perspective in order to solve discipline problems.
I learned this when I nearly tripped over my daughter’s backpack in our front hall, for what seemed like the hundredth time.
I’d told her so many times to hang up the backpack as soon as she walked in the door! We even bought a dedicated cabinet to serve as the backpack station, and installed hooks for each child’s bag.
I wrote: “Dear Ava, I don’t like lying down on the floor. Please hang me up. Love, Your Backpack.” I left it on the backpack and put away my own belongings.
Nearly an hour later, Ava burst into the kitchen holding the note in one hand and her backpack in the other.
“Mommy, look what I found! It’s so silly. Backpacks can’t write.”
Following her, I saw that she’d hung up the backpack on the designated hook, without complaint.
Creativity to come up with a way to discipline through notes or a few carefully chosen words.

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Summary of “Why Do Kids Vomit So Much?”

Why Do Kids Vomit So Much? : Shots – Health News Why do children throw up so often and so colorfully? When should parents be worried? All your childhood vomit questions answered.
Kids seem to vomit at the drop of a hat, causing parental panic.
The mechanism of vomiting, or emesis, is the same in kids and adults.
“There are numerous, numerous causes.” Though gastroenteritis, or the stomach flu, is the most common cause of vomiting in children, vomiting doesn’t always point to the stomach flu.
Even if it’s a stomach bug that’s likely to pass quickly, a pediatrician can help by prescribing anti-emetic drugs like ondansetron, which was originally developed to quell vomiting in chemotherapy patients.
In some cases, vomiting is a sign of something more serious, like cyclic vomiting syndrome.
Watch out if your kid experiences repeated episodes of vomiting that last for hours or even days.
Above all, say both physicians, it’s important for parents to trust their instincts if they think their kid’s vomiting is more than just a stomach bug.

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Summary of “Why Kids Need More Play Time”

We’ve learned that play enhances brain structure, helps kids practice empathy and makes them more creative and innovative.
You don’t need to move to the woods so your kids can frolic in streams all day to give your family more healthy play time.
Some parents of middle schoolers told me that having their kids deeply involved in extracurriculars they love is what has kept them mostly safe during a time of peer pressure and emotional disarray.
Denise Pope, one of the authors of Overloaded and Underprepared: Strategies for Stronger Schools and Healthy, Successful Kids, tells the New York Times that young children need an hour of play time for every after-school scheduled hour.
Dr. Robert Murray, the lead author of the AAP report The Crucial Role of Recess, tells me, “Parents can absolutely help their child find safe, interesting environments for them to explore-but it’s important to let him or her self-direct.” He suggests playgrounds, beaches and streams, woods and parks, fields, the zoo, local farms or indoor spaces where kids can pretend play with peers.
Then parent-friends will start texting me: “What are you up to today? Wanna bring the kids to library story time? Or princess ballet class? Or go watch a movie?”And I often want to say “Yes!” It would be easy to strap my kid into the car and do any one of those things.
Playgrounds are barren as every other kid is off at chess or tae kwon do at 3:30 PM. A project called Let Grow is addressing that issue, connecting local parents who want to give their kids more independence by doing less for them.
Once you find other likeminded moms and dads, you might consider setting up a play street, in which community members transform a residential city block a car-free space for children and families to play together, say, either weekly or monthly, or lobby schools to start their own play clubs, in which they keep their gyms or playgrounds open till dinnertime for self-directed free play.

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Summary of “Apps Like mSpy, Teen Safe, and Family Tracker Can Help You Spy on Your Kids-But at What Cost?”

With tracking technologies such as mSpy, Teen Safe, Family Tracker, and others, parents can monitor calls, texts, chats, and social media posts.
A parent’s desire to spy might have less to do with keeping kids safe, and more to do with a burning desire to lower his or her own anxiety.
The researchers asked the kids about whether their parents respected their privacy.
“There’s a lot of research indicating that kids who grow up with overly intrusive parents are more susceptible to those mental health problems, partly because they undermine the child’s confidence in their abilities to function independently,” says Laurence Steinberg, a professor of psychology at Temple University and author of Age of Opportunity: Lessons From the New Science of Adolescence.
According to Darling, kids are more likely to feel their privacy has been invaded when parents intrude on personal issues, like eavesdropping on a conversation or secretly reading their texts.
Most kids realize that parents have legitimate authority over safety issues, such as making rules about drug use and knowing where kids are going after school.
In many communities, a parent’s desire to spy might have less to do with keeping kids safe, and more to do with a burning desire to lower his or her own anxiety.
Still, it’s probably safe to say that most parents who download spy apps aren’t doing it to have quality conversations with their kids.

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Summary of “Raising Free-Range Kids In An Age Of Helicopter Parenting Is Tough”

Raising Free-Range Kids In An Age Of Helicopter Parenting Is Tough : Shots – Health News Research suggests kids who have more freedom and independence grow up to be less anxious and depressed.
In the age of helicopter parenting, giving kids freedom to roam can be difficult.
Randall knows this isn’t the norm for today’s parenting style, where kids are shuttled from one supervised, structured activity to another.
Randall’s heart was pounding, but she felt confident defending her parenting – partly because she had connected with a group called Free Range Kids, which promotes childhood independence, and gives families the information they need to push back against a culture of overprotection.
Even as she talked about the benefits of giving kids independence, of free time, and of self-directed play, she realized that addressing the individual parents was only half the battle.
Because even if they have the facts, parents could still feel uncomfortable if they’re the only ones affording their kids these freedoms.
While on the surface might not sound all that appealing, failure is how kids learn how to overcome obstacles, try out new ideas, and become resilient.
By trying to give kids a leg up, scheduling every free minute with karate or Little League or music lessons, parents are in fact doing them enormous harm.

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Summary of “Are Trampolines Safe for Kids”

Trampolines have only gotten more popular in recent years, and they’ve gotten safer, too, with nets and spring covers-so are they still a broken leg waiting to happen?
The American Academy of Pediatrics “Strongly discourage[s]” kids using backyard or home trampolines because of the risk of injuries.
The American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons takes a dim view of trampolines as well, pointing out the statistics on injuries before reluctantly suggesting some safety measures.
One of them: just keep kids under six off trampolines entirely.
A net should stop people from falling off the trampoline, and it makes sense that pads over the springs should reduce spring-related injuries.
The doctors’ groups say they keep seeing injuries even from trampolines with nets and pads.
If you want to prevent as many of those possibilities as you can, here’s what you’ll have to do according to the AAOS:.Don’t let kids under six on the trampoline at all.
For my kids, who occasionally ask if we can get a trampoline or if they can visit some friend-of-a-friend who has one? I distract them with video games.

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