Summary of “25 Ways To Kill The Toxic Ego That Will Ruin Your Life – RyanHoliday.net”

So how do we keep this toxic ego and selfishness at bay? How do we prevent ego from “Sucking us down like the law of gravity?” The primary answer is simple: awareness.
Ego starts saying: it all must be done my way - even little things, even inconsequential things.
Martin Luther King understood that hate is like an “Eroding acid that eats away the best and the objective center of your life.” Hatred is when ego turns a minor insult into a massive sore and it lashes out.
If you let ego think that everyone is out to get you you will seem weakand then people will really try to take advantage of you.
Ego is sensitive about slights, insults and not getting their due.
One of the best strategists of the last century, John Boyd, would ask the promising young acolytes under him: “To be or to do? Which way will you go?” That is, will you choose to fall in love with the image of how success looks like or will you focus on a higher purpose? Will you pick obsessing over your title, number of fans, size of paycheck or on real, tangible accomplishment? You know which way ego wants to go.
If you can accept that you control only the effort that goes in and not the results which come out, you will be mastering your ego.
Ego wants to control everything - but it cannot control other people or their reactions.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Want To Be A Great Storyteller? First, Break These Habits”

You’ve heard dozens of times that you’re more likely to engage your audience when you tell a story in your presentation.
A story that’s powerful and relevant can galvanize people and inspire action.
Your audience won’t understand your story without at least some background information.
Even small doses of narrative evidence can go a long way to backing up the point you want your story to make.
If your story is too drawn out, you risk losing your audience’s attention.
You need dialogue to bring a story to life, and one line can make for a great climax.
You’re telling a story to make your presentation engaging, which means that how you tell it matters just as much as what the narrative entails.
Avoid these traps, and you won’t just tell better stories, you’ll maximize the impact of your overall message, and maybe even leave your audience wanting more.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Theodore Roosevelt on the Cowardice of Cynicism and the Courage to Create Rather Than Criticize – Brain Pickings”

“There is nothing quite so tragic as a young cynic,” Maya Angelou wrote in contemplating courage in the face of evil, “Because it means the person has gone from knowing nothing to believing nothing.”
The poorest way to face life is to face it with a sneer.
There is no more unhealthy being, no man less worthy of respect, than he who either really holds, or feigns to hold, an attitude of sneering disbelief toward all that is great and lofty, whether in achievement or in that noble effort which, even if it fails, comes to second achievement.
The rôle is easy; there is none easier, save only the rôle of the man who sneers alike at both criticism and performance.
It is not the critic who counts; not the man who points out how the strong man stumbles, or where the doer of deeds could have done them better.
The credit belongs to the man who is actually in the arena, whose face is marred by dust and sweat and blood; who strives valiantly; who errs, who comes short again and again, because there is no effort without error and shortcoming; but who does actually strive to do the deeds; who knows great enthusiasms, the great devotions; who spends himself in a worthy cause; who at the best knows in the end the triumph of high achievement, and who at the worst, if he fails, at least fails while daring greatly, so that his place shall never be with those cold and timid souls who neither know victory nor defeat The man who does nothing cuts the same sordid figure in the pages of history, whether he be a cynic, or fop, or voluptuary.
There is little use for the being whose tepid soul knows nothing of great and generous emotion, of the high pride, the stern belief, the lofty enthusiasm, of the men who quell the storm and ride the thunder.
Complement this particular fragment with Leonard Bernstein on the countercultural courage of resisting cynicism, Goethe on the only criticism worth voicing, and philosopher Daniel Dennett on how to criticize with kindness, then revisit Eleanor Roosevelt on how uncynical personal conviction powers social change.

The orginal article.

Summary of “How Your Brain Can Trick You Into Trusting People”

In other words, your brain can instinctively trust people simply because they sound as if they know what they’re talking about.
Khalil Smith at Strategy & Business wrote a fascinating story on the topic a few months ago, in which he cited a study that showed that “Airtime” – how much someone talks – “Is a stronger indicator of perceived influence than actual expertise.”
Put another way, “Whom we trust is not only a reflection of who is trustworthy, but also a reflection of who we are,” researchers wrote in a 2011 study that examined how our unconscious biases affect which people we choose to trust.
We can also train ourselves to be more attentive to signs that we’re placing trust in someone just because we perceive them to be trustworthy or knowledgeable.
Most important: Learn to catch yourself and take a step back when you notice that you’re going along with people who only feel authoritative – either because they project confidence or dominate the conversation – and ask yourself whether they truly are trustworthy.
First, relentlessly seek outside input – oftentimes that can be as simple as asking a friend, “Is my trust misplaced here?” Second, never stop learning, because the more knowledgeable you are about something, the more likely you are to know when someone’s faking it.
How to Tell a Story The stories we tell are how we know who we are.
What We’re Reading How big should your emergency fund be?

The orginal article.

Summary of “How to Spot and Overcome Your Hidden Weaknesses”

The effect creates a vicious loop that boils down to this: The less skilled you are at something, the less likely you are to recognize how unskilled you truly are, and thus you overestimate your abilities.
Conversely, the better we get at something, the likelier we are to see how much more we can improve, which can sometimes lead us to underestimate ourselves.
Those who are exceptionally skilled at something can sometimes think everyone else is at that level, making them unaware of how exceptional their abilities are.
In the influential study that first examined this phenomenon in 1999, researchers found that once people realize how bad they are at something, they’ll readily cop to it and want to improve.
So what can we do to stop embarrassing ourselves with, say, our awful French if we don’t know how awful it is? Research suggests two routes to enlightenment.
The more knowledgeable you are about something, the more you’re able to identify the gaps in your own understanding of it.
Best of Smarter LivingHow to Tell a Story The stories we tell are how we know who we are.
Following the Trail of Online Ads, Wherever It Leads The Times’s advertising reporter talks about how she tracks the online ads that track us.

The orginal article.

Summary of “The Secret Language of Teenage Texting”

As a psychotherapist who primarily treats teenagers, I am very aware how important texting is to teenagers.
Many of the apps teenager’s use involve texting.
As a result it is done via computer websites, many teens may not know who they are texting to.
In addition to adult predators, teenagers use texting as a way to set up drug deals or advertise underground parties and raves.
There are apps parents can install on their teens’ cellphones to monitor their teenager’s texting.
Many teenagers have developed ways to hide their texts in apps on their cellphones and a code language for texting.
This code language makes it very difficult for parents to know what their teen is texting about or who they are texting to.
Knowing these codes can help parents be more aware about what and who their teenager is texting to.

The orginal article.

Summary of “5 Books To Read When You’re Considering Making A Big Change”

Reading books helped me push past that fear, and also gave me some much needed perspective.
If you’re thinking about changing careers, here are a few books you might want to read to help you figure out what to do next.
If you have a crazy dream but don’t know how to start, this book can help you identify your next steps and the level of risk that’s appropriate for you based on your personal circumstances.
Making a career change involves making decisions when we don’t know what’s going to happen.
While Lewis’s book can help you outline and execute your next steps, Duke’s book can help you decide whether that next step is the right one to take in the first place.
Even if you’re not interested in being an entrepreneur, this book offers plenty of lessons on taking on “Risky” endeavors.
If nothing else, this book reinforces that the cliché, “Everything has a silver lining,” really does apply in life.
What if you don’t know what that work should be? This book is a great place to start.

The orginal article.

Summary of “The Résumé: The Winding, Everlasting Career of William H. Macy”

“You know, as I get older I think we all should just fucking say it. Just say it,” he told me.
No. There’s a line in a Dave Mamet film, “Always tell the truth-it’s the easiest thing to remember. And I’ve got a bad memory.” You know, as I get older I think we all should just fucking say it.
As Felicity says, “Our goal is that everyone is blessed.” I think it gives you an edge up if you’re a person who says what he or she thinks and means it and will stand by it.
Which is sort of the essence of art, I think: If you can cut it and still tell your story, then you have to cut it.
So you’d think at the end of the day, “Well, I got praised for some work I don’t think is that good.” Or, “I did great work and nobody saw it.”
You have to convince people, “Wait, I’m an actor, too. Even though I lost my looks you can still hire me.” It doesn’t happen for some people.
Do you think that’s going to get better-or easier-for women moving forward?
I’ve always found at various times in a project, even if I’m just acting, it’s nice to smoke a fatty and think about the whole thing again.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Sandra Oh on ‘Killing Eve'”

Sandra Oh is back, and for the first time in her career, as the lead of a major television show, in Phoebe Waller-Bridge’s drama Killing Eve, which premiered Sunday night on BBC America.
As Eve Porowski, Oh plays a sharp but bored MI5 officer who’s working well below her potential until she becomes fixated on a female assassin named Villanelle who’s been taking hits out on people out across Europe.
Eve is a perfect showcase for Oh: droll and sarcastic with a keen intelligence that sees a challenge in Villanelle.
It’s the kind of role that raises the question: Why isn’t Sandra Oh getting lead roles? In an emotional phone conversation, Oh talked about the heartbreaking revelation she had when she first received the script for Killing Eve, her artistic practice, and hanging out with Prime Minister Justin Trudeau.
With Killing Eve, it’s not so much wanting to kill the other, it’s the fear of killing the other.
Do you think there’s something aspirational in how Eve sees Villanelle? She’s stuck behind a desk, not fulfilling her full potential, whereas Villanelle is.
It’s something Eve is also fascinated by and really probably needs to integrate herself.
Did you ever consider doing a British accent?Oh you know what? I asked them! Early on, it’s like, oh did you need that? Because if it is, I gotta start practicing right now.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Profile: Busy Philipps From ‘I Feel Pretty'”

You probably know Busy Philipps as somebody’s friend.
Of course, Philipps gets paid to post about some things, like the Hidden Valley ranch dressing, and the Campbell’s Well Yes! Soup.
Philipps first realized her Instagram Stories were reaching a wider audience last year, when tabloids began picking up things she said and turning them into posts.
The tabloids especially love when Philipps includes Williams in her Instagram Stories.
Williams does not have her own social-media presence – she swore off the idea of engaging with the internet after she found an “I Hate Jen Lindley” website during her Dawson’s Creek days, Philipps said.
In January, Philipps received a wave of positive and negative feedback after she posted about the death of Williams’s former partner Heath Ledger.
Sitting outside the juice bar, Philipps said the reaction to her posts that day was “Mixed.”
It’s hard, Philipps explained, because Ledger was such a beloved figure, and so many people – people who didn’t even know him! – feel a kind of ownership over his story, and she has to contend with all of that.

The orginal article.