Summary of “How This Anxious Introvert Handles Large Events”

If you only kinda know me you might think I’m a confident extrovert, but if you really really know me, it’s more clear: I’m an introvert, and one who gets slightly anxious during prolonged exposure to large groups.
Introversion is quintessentially “Does being around other people give you energy or take energy away?” Introverts can be proverbial life of the party but then need time alone to recharge.
My own introversion is compounded by low level anxiety in large group settings, especially when the social dynamics start to approximate high school – you know, groups of people, some of whom know each other and others who don’t.
A. Depth Not Breadth When Meeting New People at Conferences: The routine went like this – end up at a conference with 100+ amazing people.
It’s fine if I end up seeing a bunch of people but, really, if I can have meaningful conversations with just five, 10, 15 people over the course of a day, that’s a win.
D. Pull People Aside for 1:1s: As Joe Greenstein knows from an annual conference we both attend, I’m a big fan of catching up over a 1:1 walk, even offsite from the event.
How about the other anxious introverts out there – what are your strategies for conferences and events?
Get attendee lists in advance to identify folks you know who are attending or people with whom you have mutual friends/interests.

The orginal article.

Summary of “How to Teach Employees Skills They Don’t Know They Lack”

After spending billions of dollars a year on corporate learning, U.S. companies probably assume that their employees have the knowledge and skills they need to carry out their jobs.
One global technology company my team works with, for example, discovered that, on average, its sales employees didn’t understand or know about 22% of its product features, even though they believed they did.
It’s often more prominent among experienced staff, which is particularly problematic because, as the go-to people in their circles, they often pass incorrect or incomplete information and skills on to others via to peer-to-peer learning and training.
How does a company, manager or individual employee correct a competency gap about which no one is aware? As a physician who studies brain function, biological variation and how people learn, I have some suggestions.
Corporate training programs need to be redesigned to better engage learners and empower them to admit what they don’t know.
Better learning models are instead adaptive-that is, molded to each person’s needs by probing what they know and don’t know, then offering tailored content as the learner performs well or struggles.
When corporate learning programs prompt employees to admit to that they’re guessing in the same way, they, too, begin to see the previously hidden gaps in their skills and knowledge.
With a mindful approach that allows learners to probe their knowledge, uncover what they don’t know, and admit when they are unclear, incompetence is uncovered and, thus, no longer unconscious: Employees know what they don’t know and their employers can do something about it.

The orginal article.

Summary of “By Frank Ntilikina”

I got invited to come over and play in the Jordan Brand Classic.
So we arrive at the arena in Brooklyn and there are a bunch of players there.
My brothers would take me to the court to play one-on-one, and they would beat my ass.
Then we would come back home and play NBA 2K. And at least on the video game sometimes I would beat their ass.
I knew even when I was eight years old that I wanted to play in the NBA some day.
One day, I will never forget, I wanted to play NBA 2K. So I went to Brice’s room, and his door was closed.
Then at 16 and 17 I got to go play overseas in the FIBA under-18 tournament and the Jordan Classic and I even got to go to Toronto for Basketball Without Borders.
We had to get back on the plane to France that night so I could play in the finals, and when we were in the air, I said to my mom, “O.K., all your sons have reached their dreams. Now you can relax.”

The orginal article.

Summary of “Boston University’s CTE Breakthrough and the NFL’s Burden of Knowledge”

On the days I hate football the most, I wonder about a number: How many NFL players don’t know the full risks of CTE? How many whose job it is to rattle their brains for our entertainment know that even minor bumps can-do-add up to something terrible? Studies of the general public have found that awareness of the link between football and concussions correlates with income and education, as does parental willingness to let children play in the first place.
Who sits down athletes to tell them what they’re risking and what they might already have suffered? By the time players reach the NFL, they might be a dozen or more years into their football careers.
Is it their new team that lays the ugly truth out, an employer with every incentive to keep the player on the field? Or is it the league, which spent years denying any link between the sport and CTE? How many players saw that Bennet Omalu, the researcher who inspired the film Concussion, estimated that more than 90 percent of professional football players suffer from some level of CTE? What percentage of the NFL’s active rosters saw this summer’s American Medical Association study of the brains of 111 former NFL players that found CTE in 110 of them?
Perhaps you make the case that it’s incumbent on players to research the risks of football on their own.
After the BU study published in the Journal of the American Medical Association came out in July, a number of beat writers cased their respective locker rooms, asking player after player what they thought of the CTE risk.
“I’m not going to change my career path. I’m playing the game I love.” And in San Francisco, then-49ers tight end Vance McDonald spoke of the power of a CTE link, even as the hypothetical study he was dreaming of was the subject of the conversation: “I think honestly that the day that something is released that can connect football to [CTE], it’s going to change the game dramatically.” There is a difference between having a sense that football carries brain-injury risks and having a full accounting-percentages, specifics, diagnoses, stages of disease progression-of what those risks are and what the personal outcome is.
There are players now who know the risks of football and who choose to play regardless.
“After learning all of this,” the retiring Ferguson wrote of the clarity he gained when he began researching CTE, “I feel a bit betrayed by the people or committees put in place by the league who did not have my best interests at heart.” He should feel betrayed, as should many of his fellow players.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Bruce Springsteen on Broadway: The Boss on His ‘First Real Job'”

Though I don’t know if I’d be doing this without the experience of doing them.
It happens every time we go to do a tour, you know?
The guys I know who tried it really gave a good shot at it.
It’s one of the nicest feelings in the world for a songwriter because you know what it is to be without that appetite.
Just for your kids – your kids really don’t know much about your life, you know? We had our kids late, I was 40 when our first son was born, and they showed a healthy disinterest in our work over all the years.
As I say in the book, I know a lot of kids who wouldn’t mind seeing 50,000 people boo their parents.
I don’t know how many would want to see those people cheer their parents.
I’m not using my voice – you know, you’re not screaming.

The orginal article.

Summary of “The Vampire Problem: A Brilliant Thought Experiment Illustrating the Paradox of Transformative Experience – Brain Pickings”

When faced with the most transformative experiences, we are ill-equipped to even begin to imagine the nature and magnitude of the transformation – but we must again and again challenge ourselves to transcend this elemental failure of the imagination if we are to reap the rewards of any transformative experience.
In Transformative Experience, philosopher L.A. Paul illustrates this paradox and examines how we are to unbind ourselves from it in a simple, elegant thought experiment: If you were offered the chance to become a vampire – painlessly and without inflicting pain on others, gaining incredible superpowers in exchange for relinquishing your human existence, with all your friends having made the leap and loving it – would you do it?
If you can’t know what it’s like to be a vampire without becoming one, you can’t compare the character of the lived experience of what it is like to be you, right now, a mere human, to the character of the lived experience of what it would be like to be a vampire.
When you find yourself facing a decision involving a new experience that is unlike any other experience you’ve had before, you can find yourself in a special sort of epistemic situation.
If you want to make the decision by thinking about what your lived experience would be like if you decided to undergo the experience, you have a problem You find yourself facing a decision where you lack the information you need to make the decision the way you naturally want to make it – by assessing what the different possibilities would be like and choosing between them.
As it turns out, like the choice to become a vampire, many of these big decisions involve choices to have experiences that teach us things we cannot know about from any other source but the experience itself.
This brings out another, somewhat less familiar fact about the relationship between knowledge and experience: just as knowledge about the experience of one individual can be inaccessible to another individual, what you can know about yourself at one time can be inaccessible to you at another time.
How to access that invaluable perspective – what Seamus Heaney called “Your own secret knowledge” – is what Paul explores in the remainder of her immensely insightful Transformative Experience.

The orginal article.

Summary of “USC-Texas revisited: LenDale White and what happened after fourth-and-two”

Today: Trojans running back LenDale White, the final installment in a four-part series revisiting the 2006 Rose Bowl game between USC and Texas.
LenDale White rips open a pack of cheap cigars, packs in some green leaves and rolls a blunt.
White, a former USC running back, loves football – loves it – even though it pains him.
The game reopens painful memories for USC, but for White, the raw hurt has never disappeared.
Seven years out of the NFL, White is spending the holiday at his friend’s house, a messy place with mismatched furniture and three dogs.
Still, White knows Bush’s accomplishments at USC eclipsed his own: 3,159 yards rushing and 57 total touchdowns.
He believes the play has come to define him, and he wonders: How many times do you hear people talking about LenDale White as USC’s career leader in touchdowns? It’s not O.J. Simpson, Charles White or Marcus Allen.
White, USC said, had been aggressive on the sideline during the game and was yelling at players and coaches near USC’s bench.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Five Things I Learned from Master Investor, Chris Dixon”

In fact I don’t think the idea of how to think critically ever really crystallized for me until one day I found Dixon reading both the New York Times and the Wall Street Journal.
Turns out computers and life are a lot about self-reliance and figuring things out by bashing your head against them until you get them working.
4) Start Small, Build BigWhen most people set out to build a new company they try to boil the ocean.
If you can’t master the basics you sure as hell can’t handle the Lotus Palm.Start small, grow big.5) Design with the Strengths of the SystemWhen you decide what you want to do, whether it’s write a book, start a business or quit your job and travel that world, you’ll want to cut with the grain, not against it.
If you’re going to start a new business, pick something you’re interested in and know better than anyone else not something you read about last week that sounds cool.
Dixon once showed me a little game he’d designed on a new kind of hand held computer, called a Palm Pilot.
The Roots of YourselfNow that Dixon is a famous business man people probably want all kinds of things from him.
You didn’t know you were teaching me anything, Chris, but you did and I listened and remembered.

The orginal article.

Summary of “The most wonderful words in science: ‘We have no idea yet!'”

I’d much rather live in a Universe where we discover that today’s view of physics is comically naïve.
You can peek into the future right now by exploring the biggest things we already know that we don’t know about the Universe.
Most of the observable Universe consists of four basic particles called fermions.
The bulk of the energy density of the Universe is devoted to dark energy, about which we know even less, except that it’s busy pulling the Universe apart.
What – if anything – is outside the observable Universe? What – if anything – came before the Big Bang? There are also open questions about basic elements of existence.
What are space and time? We have learned recently that space is much more than an abstract backdrop on which events of the Universe play out.
Someone might reasonably ask: why bother? Does it matter how many cousins the electron has, or whether the Universe is finite or infinite? To me, those seemingly abstract questions help us answer the deepest questions we all face: why are we here, and how should we live our lives? Think how different our modern mindset is from that of 1,000 years ago.
Discovering the basic structures and ordering principles of the Universe will reveal something even more fundamental about our place in the natural world.

The orginal article.

Summary of “‘Curb Your Enthusiasm’ Oral History: Larry David on Crazy Auditions, Art of Cringe”

Larry David’s Curb Your Enthusiasm returns to HBO for its ninth season on Oct. 1.
Larry David I finished Seinfeld, then I did a movie.
Cheryl Hines The first I heard about Curb, it was actually just being called Larry David Special on HBO. So it started out as a one-hour special, and the idea was Larry returning to stand-up comedy, and they wanted to do sort of a mockumentary of his return to stand-up.
Not surprisingly, the first part was funnier than the second part because what Larry really was was somebody who had learned to take his point of view and translate it through a dramatized version of characters.
They said, “OK, J.B., you’re going to improv with Larry directly.” And I had no idea I was going to be improving with Larry directly.
You know, you actually improved directly with Larry – I had no idea.
Larry is standing in the middle of the room, and this is exactly what I said to Larry, verbatim: I walk up to Larry as Leon, I said, “OK, Larry, let’s do this, baby.” You know, this is improv, right? I said, “OK, let’s improv.” And since this is improv, I said, “I don’t know Larry, I might fuck around and slap you in the face.” And that’s exactly what I said to him, and Larry looked at everybody else like, “What the, who the hell is this guy?”.
She said, “No, Curb Your Enthusiasm. I live for Larry David.” And I thought, “OK, first of all, who looks like you that says, ‘I live for Larry David?’ ” But [it] also told me how broad and accessible Larry had become as a comic voice.

The orginal article.