Summary of “How to Love: Legendary Zen Buddhist Teacher Thich Nhat Hanh on Mastering the Art of “Interbeing” – Brain Pickings”

That’s what legendary Vietnamese Zen Buddhist monk, teacher, and peace activist Thich Nhat Hanh explores in How to Love – a slim, simply worded collection of his immeasurably wise insights on the most complex and most rewarding human potentiality.
At the heart of Nhat Hanh’s teachings is the idea that “Understanding is love’s other name” – that to love another means to fully understand his or her suffering.
That’s why to love means to learn the art of nourishing our happiness.
If our parents didn’t love and understand each other, how are we to know what love looks like? The most precious inheritance that parents can give their children is their own happiness.
To love without knowing how to love wounds the person we love.
To know how to love someone, we have to understand them.
Often, when we say, “I love you” we focus mostly on the idea of the “I” who is doing the loving and less on the quality of the love that’s being offered.
The remainder of How to Love explores the simple, profoundly transformative daily practices of love and understanding, which apply not only to romantic relationships but to all forms of “Interbeing.” Complement it with John Steinbeck’s exquisite letter of advice on love to his teenage son and Susan Sontag’s lifetime of reflections on the subject, then revisit the great D.T. Suzuki on how Zen can help us cultivate our character.

The orginal article.

Summary of “MST3K creator Joel Hodgson on 30 years of making fun of movies.”

Hey, thanks for coming to Mystery Science Theater 3000,” host and show creator Joel Hodgson says with the friendly, sleepy air of a TGI Fridays host already deep into a weeknight shift.
In the past 30 years, MST3K has undergone many well-documented ups and downs-a pickup by Comedy Central, Hodgson’s departure, the addition of new host Mike Nelson, a pickup by what was then known as the Sci-Fi Channel, cancellation, years of absence, Hodgson’s return and an accompanying Kickstarter campaign, the addition of new host Jonah Ray for its two seasons at Netflix-but its core remains fundamentally the same.
“A lot of people don’t know this, but I read for the part of Woody for Cheers,” Hodgson tells me by phone.
MST3K is now based, like Hodgson, in Los Angeles, but the move to the coast hasn’t endangered its longevity: not counting an 18-year gap that produced no new episodes, the show has endured multiple cast and production changeovers and outlasted all imitators.
“Most of the time they’re mostly just wishing they were 13 again, and I can’t do that. There’s a funny disconnect that happens, where you are forever a certain age while you’re a viewer.” Hodgson’s solution has included making a break from the past with Jonah Ray as the new host and a supporting cast that now includes Hampton Yount, Baron Vaughn, Patton Oswalt, Felicia Day, and Rebecca Hanson.
“I’m 58 years old,” Hodgson explains.
Having just completed a six-week, 41-show tour with Ray, Hodgson has gotten a chance to see the fondness of new fans firsthand.
Where the show will be in 30 years remains an open question, but Hodgson never considered it lasting this long or anticipated it would have the legacy and impact it’s had, one that would lead to everyone from Dan Harmon to The Name of the Wind author Patrick Rothfuss pitching in on the new episodes.

The orginal article.

Summary of “The legacy of PlayStation creator Ken Kutaragi, in 24 stories”

Kutaragi formally took over Sony Computer Entertainment, with many speculating that he would take over the rest of Sony as well.
Mark Wozniak, one of the first Sony employees to work on PlayStation in the U.S., and brother of former Jobs collaborator Steve Wozniak, praises Kutaragi’s ability to get ideas off the ground.
That’s why you would always hear Ken Kutaragi complain about the other top management at Sony.
After our collaboration with Nintendo fell apart, Kutaragi came up with the ambitious idea for Sony to make the PlayStation itself.
Later, Sony opened a formal PlayStation Korea office and I moved out there.
Essentially, they’d take over the top floor and they’d just like, deck it out with all the latest upcoming – not just PlayStation technology, but the latest Sony technology and whatever they were working on.
Moving on Ken Kutaragi left his role as president of Sony Computer Entertainment in 2006, the first step in a series of moves that led to him departing Sony altogether.
Former Sony Computer Entertainment chairman Shigeo Maruyama, for example, says he still sees Kutaragi from time to time, and that the two often reminisce about their time at Sony and how they were able to change the course of the video game industry.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Full Q&A: Tesla and SpaceX CEO Elon Musk on Recode Decode”

I think it’s probably fair to say that Tesla has advanced sustainable energy by at least five years, conservatively, and maybe closer to 10, and then if we continue to make progress, we might advance it by 20 years.
The toll on Musk and Tesla’s employees What is the toll on you? What has been the toll on you and your employees? How do you think about that?
Self-inflicted wounds and sleep deprivation I want to get into Tesla specifically, and about the recent results, which I think people were surprised by.
Do you think about them? Do you think about them at all? Like Ford or Mercedes or anyone? Or if they’re doing anything that’s interesting, or Google? Which one of them, do you think, is the furthest ahead or closest to you all?
Best to my knowledge, no one has a good generalized solution except … and I think no one is likely to achieve a generalized solution to self-driving before Tesla.
Yeah, I think what fires me up about Tesla is, I think we’ve got the most exciting product roadmap of any company in the world.
We’ve got the Model Y, the compact … midsize, more midsize SUV. The Tesla Semi, which is gonna be great for taking … Because semis are in constant use and use a tremendous amount of fuel, so the Tesla Semi, I think, can have a huge effect, positive effect on -.
Why Tesla won’t make a scooter It’s been a really fascinating discussion, and I will think about buying an electric car, probably not.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Anne Lamott on Love, Despair, and Our Capacity for Change – Brain Pickings”

Perhaps Keats had it slightly wrong – perhaps truth is love and love is truth.
At the same time, the truth is that we are beloved, even in our current condition, by someone; we have loved and been loved.
Love has bridged the high-rises of despair we were about to fall between.
Love has been a penlight in the blackest, bleakest nights.
Love has been a wild animal, a poultice, a dinghy, a coat.
There is the absolute hopelessness we face that everyone we love will die, even our newborn granddaughter, even as we trust and know that love will give rise to growth, miracles, and resurrection.
Love and goodness and the world’s beauty and humanity are the reasons we have hope.
We swim through the world, fragile and disoriented, buoyed only by love, transformed only by love.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Ellie Kemper on her journey from Onion headlines to Kimmy Schmidt to memoir writing”

Ellie Kemper has made a career out of playing sweet, unflaggingly optimistic characters like cheery receptionist Erin on The Office and the Emmy-nominated title role in Unbreakable Kimmy Schmidt.
Even in an email or something, I think that voice comes across.
Because I’m certainly-I guess I shouldn’t say this-I haven’t had a life exciting enough to be called a memoir, I don’t think.
I’m going to drop the termite comparison, but the point is when I’m watching something like this, you think, “Well, okay, how is this happening?” I see it unfolding before me, and then all of the sudden, it’s being made into this beautiful whole, as in W-H-O-L-E, and I don’t notice it happening individually.
I would start to worry, “Wait. Are these writers writing Erin according to how they’ve observed me behaving?” And then I would get worried about that, but I think there’s definitely some similarities between me with both of those characters.
So if there is no movie, I will feel happy with the way all the characters’ stories are wrapped up, but I think it would be fun to just see if I can do it for them.
I feel corny saying this, but I was inspired when I was playing Kimmy because I do think she’s an inspirational character.
I think how they manage to be so funny while doing that is really insane, because they did pull that off in every single character.

The orginal article.

Summary of “The Kavanaugh Accusations: What Teens Think”

Many of the teens I talked with said that the allegations against Kavanaugh, if true, should disqualify him, especially given that he has not apologized for his alleged actions but rather denied them.
“I have less experience living through life and knowing what’s right and what’s wrong,” said John, a 17-year-old from Seattle who identifies as a “Very mild conservative, somewhere in the middle.” “But I think that most people around me have a pretty educated view on what’s right and what’s not in those regards.”
Laurence Steinberg, a psychologist at Temple University and the author of Age of Opportunity: Lessons From the New Science of Adolescence, notes that most teens are of course mature enough to know right from wrong.
That’s not the same as arguing, as so many commentators have, that teens are less aware of the consequences of their actions.
Steinberg says the reason the Supreme Court treated minors as it did isn’t “Because they don’t know better-that doesn’t even figure into the discussion-it’s because they have difficulty behaving in ways that are consistent with what they know,” Steinberg says.
“Depending on where they go to school and where they live, especially state by state, the type of sex ed and therefore their attitudes about this can really differ,” Ivy Chen told me.
As of 2016, California, where she teaches, requires middle and high schools to provide “Comprehensive” sex-ed classes, which cover puberty, reproduction, and sexual health, as well as relationships, gender identity, sexual orientation, and consent.
Chen says she brings up the latter concept generally as early on as fourth grade, telling kids, “Some people like hugs and some people don’t like hugs.”

The orginal article.

Summary of “People Like You More Than You Know”

A new research paper, published last week in Psychological Science, reports that the common concern that new people may not like us, or that they may not enjoy our company, is largely unfounded.
Erica Boothby of Cornell University, and her colleagues Gus Cooney, Gilliam Sandstrom, and Margaret Clark, of Harvard University, University if Essex, and Yale University, conducted a series of studies to find out what our conversation partners really think of us.
The researchers observed the disconnect in a variety of situations: strangers getting acquainted in the research laboratory, first-year college students getting to know their dorm mates over the course of many months, and community members meeting fellow participants in personal development workshops.
In each scenario, people consistently underestimated how much others liked them.
The discrepancy in perspectives happened for conversations that spanned from 2 minutes to 45 minutes, and was long-lasting.
For much of the academic year, as dorm mates got to know each other and even started to develop enduring friendships, the liking gap persisted.
Not knowing what our conversation partners really think of us, we use our own thoughts as a proxy-a mistake, because our thoughts tend to be more negative than reality.
As the paper’s authors state, “Conversations are a great source of happiness in our lives,” but they could bring us even greater joy if we only realized that “Others like us more than we know.” Which is a good thing to keep in mind as you survey the imposing room of strangers at your next cocktail party, mix and mingle reception, or company happy hour.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Scientists Say They’ve Found The Driver of False Beliefs, And It’s Not a Lack of Intelligence”

Scientists think they might have the answer, and it’s less to do with lack of understanding, and more to do with the feedback they’re getting.
Receiving good feedback also encourages us to think we know more than we actually do.
“If you think you know a lot about something, even though you don’t, you’re less likely to be curious enough to explore the topic further, and will fail to learn how little you know,” says one of the team members behind the new study, Louis Marti from the University of California, Berkeley.
For the research, more than 500 participants were recruited and shown a series of colored shapes.
The test takers had no clues as to what a Daxxy was or wasn’t, but they did get feedback after guessing one way or the other – the system would tell them if the shape they were looking at qualified as a Daxxy or not.
The team behind the tests says this plays into something we already know about learning – that for it to happen, learners need to recognise that there is a gap between what they currently know and what they could know.
So if you think vaccinations are harmful, for example, the new study suggests you might be basing that on the most recent feedback you’ve had on your views, rather than the overall evidence one way or the other.
Ideally, the researchers say, learning should be based on more considered observations over time – even if that’s not quite how the brain works sometimes.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Yuval Noah Harari: the myth of freedom”

Theologians developed the idea of “Free will” to explain why God is right to punish sinners for their bad choices and reward saints for their good choices.
If our choices aren’t made freely, why should God punish or reward us for them? According to the theologians, it is reasonable for God to do so, because our choices reflect the free will of our eternal souls, which are independent of all physical and biological constraints.
Humans certainly have a will – but it isn’t free.
If governments succeed in hacking the human animal, the easiest people to manipulate will be those who believe in free will.
In order to survive and prosper in the 21st century, we need to leave behind the naive view of humans as free individuals – a view inherited from Christian theology as much as from the modern Enlightenment – and come to terms with what humans really are: hackable animals.
If humans are hackable animals, and if our choices and opinions don’t reflect our free will, what should the point of politics be? For 300 years, liberal ideals inspired a political project that aimed to give as many individuals as possible the ability to pursue their dreams and fulfil their desires.
If we understood that our desires are not the outcome of free choice, we would hopefully be less preoccupied with them, and would also feel more connected to the rest of the world.
Second, renouncing the myth of free will can kindle a profound curiosity.

The orginal article.