Summary of “Ace Your First Impression: Then Follow These 7 Steps to Keep Impressing”

So how do we do this in business? How can you make the impression you want, and then keep impressing them enough to create a lasting relationship?
For YPO member Heather Shantora and her company, success is all about relationships.
Shantora always gets to know the people she’s working with, and she sincerely cares about them.
Shantora expresses her enthusiasm for the possibilities when she says, “My frame of mind is one of learning from one another and innovating in new and creative ways. Instead of trying to one-up each other, we can leverage each other’s strengths. To me, this is the epitome of working smarter, not harder.” By working together, you can make both your industry and your individual business that much stronger.
Unlike some CEOs, Shantora believes her job requires her to be intimately involved in the finer details of the business.
“For me, it’s important that at every level of the business, I am able to meet an individual in their role and know about their day and job. They are consistently surprised that I know and care about the details.” Some CEOs don’t get involved at this granular level, but for Shantora, “I don’t comprehend how one can make decisions about the business if they don’t.” Another reason for this approach is “Knowing which dark corners of the business to probe. Working ‘in’ the business is actually as important as working ‘on’ the business,” she explains.
Listening to a variety of opinions helps your company grow and helps you become a better CEO. Shantora explains, “Diversity of minds enables me to identify my own blind spots, and I use that to become a better leader.” Don’t be afraid of being challenged.
Jim Collins’ research in Good to Great shows that a consistent feature of great CEOs is humility, and to Shantora, the underdog mentality requires humility in abundance.

The orginal article.

Summary of “20 Years Ago, Jeff Bezos Said This 1 Thing Separates People Who Achieve Lasting Success From Those Who Don’t”

Twenty-three years later, he’s one of the richest people in the world.
Bezos built Amazon around things he knew would be stable over time, investing heavily in ensuring that Amazon would provide those things – and improve its delivery of those things.
So the effort we put into those things, spinning those things up, we know the energy we put into it today will still be paying off dividends for our customers 10 years from now.
Focusing on things that won’t change does not guarantee success – but it provides as close a foundation for success as you will find.
Focus on collecting knowledge …. Competing is a fact of professional life: with other businesses, other products, other people.
You can know enough smart people that together you know almost everything.
The goal of networking is to connect with people who can provide a referral, help make a sale, share important information, serve as a mentor, etc.
That’s how successful people weather the storm when times are tough, and become even more successful when business is booming.

The orginal article.

Summary of “How to Make the Right Connections When You Don’t Already Have an “In””

What if you don’t know the right people who can help you?
Perhaps you’re new to your field, or you’ve changed locations – but regardless of the reason, the problem is the same: if you’re starting with the wrong connections, how can you hope to work your way into the right ones? That’s a challenge I discuss in my new book Entrepreneurial You, and here are four strategies to consider.
Your existing contacts likely want to help you – they just don’t know how, especially if your new realm is outside their area of expertise.
You could say, “I’d love to consult for Google one day. Do you know anyone who works there that you might be able to introduce me to?” Or you could sort by title and tell your friends, “I’m interested in making connections with anyone you know who is a vice president of human resources. Do you know anyone with that role?”.
People’s level of closeness to their LinkedIn contacts varies; be prepared for them to say they don’t actually know the person well, or at all.
Next, be willing to accept “Six degrees of separation.” Of course, it’s much easier when your friends know the right people and can introduce you directly.
If you’re willing to take the extra time and effort to cultivate multiple chains of connections, you can often end up in the right place.
Finally, you can create content to attract the right people to you.

The orginal article.

Summary of “JK Rowling’s 8 Rules of Writing”

Last month, I brought to your attention Neil Gaiman’s rules of writing.
He’s not the only accomplished writer who ascribes to a set of rules.
Today, I want to introduce you to JK Rowling’s rules of writing.
She’s shared a lot of terrific writing wisdom, but in my opinion, these are her eight best rules.
The funny thing is that, although writing has been my actual job for several years now, I still seem to have to fight for time in which to do it.
Write what you know: your own interests, feelings, beliefs, friends, family and even pets will be your raw materials when you start writing.
Your writing clarifies, corrects, and often reveals your beliefs, experiences, and feelings.
There are things you know that you have no idea you know-but your subconscious does, and that stuff will filter into your writing.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Ask These 9 Questions Before Every Meeting To Avoid Wasting Time”

A meeting can solve problems or convey information without an endless Slack thread. The key is preparation, and asking yourself the right questions.
Before you get your team together for another pointless meeting, ask the following questions to ensure that it’ll be the most productive use of everyone’s time.
If it’s not just about checking in, go a step further and ask yourself-what do you hope to get out of it? In a 2016 Fast Company story, Stephanie Vozza cited a Microsoft study that revealed most meetings aren’t properly planned, and 67% are held without an agenda.
It doesn’t have to be major-employee engagement software provider TINYpulse starts their staff meeting at 8.48 a.m., an odd but memorable time.
E-commerce company Etailz does a Q&A at the end of the meeting, which turns into a stare off if no one says anything, as reported in a previous Fast Company story.
If they’re hearing about them for the first time in the meeting, you’ll have to allocate extra time for clarifications.
Of course, meetings are for discussion, but if all you have in your “Agenda” is “Discuss x, y, z,” you might end the meeting and realize that no one knows what they should do next.
As Shivani Siroya, CEO of fintech startup Tala, previously told Fast Company, “Walking into any meeting, it’s important to remember that everyone in the room is sacrificing part of his or her day to be there. And when you treat people’s time with the reverence it deserves, suddenly, meetings become a force for good in your day, rather than the thing you had to do.”

The orginal article.

Summary of “How to Connect with Yourself in a World Designed to Distract You”

A thought is planted in us so carefully that suppressing it feels like denying our most basic instincts.
If, on occasion, we do look inward, we feel a sense of emptiness and fear.
A good sign of having lost connection with yourself is that your true instincts feel like distractions, and distractions feel like true instincts.
Is there a way to rediscover that connection with ourselves? To feel centered, and confident about who we are; to understand our emotions, feelings, and desires clearly; to know our strengths and acknowledge our limitations?
Sometimes we are at peace with the world, but also feel a longing for something better.
The reason is, our mind is telling the body what to feel, based on what the mind is thinking.
Quick exercise: Close your eyes and try to discern the shape of your hand by feeling the electrical impulses on the skin, and the gentle blood flow in the veins.
If you are able to discern only the index finger, or just the thumb, then become more sensitive to what you are feeling, until you can feel your entire hand.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Stephen Sondheim, Theater’s Greatest Lyricist”

Miranda: How do you clear your desk and write the next thing?
He’d been a mystery writer, you know.
Miranda: Can you think of any times you’ve surprised yourself in the writing process?
You think, “Oh, I didn’t know I could – oh, that’s good!” You know, writing’s full of surprises for oneself.
We were on the subject of “Finishing the Hat” from “Sunday in the Park With George,” one of Sondheim’s most celebrated songs, and maybe the greatest song ever written about the self-induced spell of the creative process.
You must know that the great thing about writing and creating is, time disappears.
Then for a moment you let in the depth and intensity and range of Stephen Sondheim’s feeling for the past half-century.
Sixty years of iconic theatrical moments, and they exist as a result of the specific way Stephen Sondheim feels.

The orginal article.

Summary of “10 Things Incredibly Likable People Never, Ever Do”

Some people are incredibly likable because of the things they do.
Some people are incredibly charismatic because of the things they do.
Some people are incredibly likable because of the things they don’t do.
Taking responsibility when things go wrong instead of blaming others isn’t masochistic; it’s empowering, because then you focus on doing things better or smarter next time.
If you find yourself trying hard to control other people, you’ve decided that you, your goals, your dreams, or even just your opinions are more important than theirs.
Those are all “Things.” People may like your things, but that doesn’t mean they like you.
The higher you rise and the more you accomplish, the more likely you are to think you know everything and to tell people everything you think you know.
Think about what went wrong, but only in terms of how you will make sure that, next time, you and the people around you will know how to make sure it goes right.

The orginal article.

Summary of “18 Hard Things to Do If You Want to Be a Successful Leader”

Becoming a successful leader is synonymous with becoming the best version of yourself-it’s that simple and also that difficult.
To be successful as a leader, you need to identify goals, take measured actions, and get results, because at the end of it all leaders are measured by what they are able to deliver.
Successful leaders are visionaries who have learned to overcome any fear of taking chances.
Successful leaders demonstrate to others what’s possible.
Being accountable as a leader means not only taking responsibility for what you do, but also being accountable for what you do not do.
A genuinely good character is the hallmark of a successful leader who inspires others.
Successful leaders will forge forward and create a path even if no one is following, because they know if it’s compelling enough and meaningful enough, people will show up and they will follow.
To be a successful leader you have to invest in yourself.

The orginal article.

Summary of “How This Anxious Introvert Handles Large Events”

If you only kinda know me you might think I’m a confident extrovert, but if you really really know me, it’s more clear: I’m an introvert, and one who gets slightly anxious during prolonged exposure to large groups.
Introversion is quintessentially “Does being around other people give you energy or take energy away?” Introverts can be proverbial life of the party but then need time alone to recharge.
My own introversion is compounded by low level anxiety in large group settings, especially when the social dynamics start to approximate high school – you know, groups of people, some of whom know each other and others who don’t.
A. Depth Not Breadth When Meeting New People at Conferences: The routine went like this – end up at a conference with 100+ amazing people.
It’s fine if I end up seeing a bunch of people but, really, if I can have meaningful conversations with just five, 10, 15 people over the course of a day, that’s a win.
D. Pull People Aside for 1:1s: As Joe Greenstein knows from an annual conference we both attend, I’m a big fan of catching up over a 1:1 walk, even offsite from the event.
How about the other anxious introverts out there – what are your strategies for conferences and events?
Get attendee lists in advance to identify folks you know who are attending or people with whom you have mutual friends/interests.

The orginal article.