Summary of “Race, Barriers and Battling Nerves: A Candid Conversation With Oscar’s Only 4 African-American Directing Nominees in 90 Years”

If this elite group were expanded to include all black directors, it would add only Britain’s Steve McQueen, who earned his nomination in 2014 for helming 12 Years a Slave.
With the March 4 ceremony looming and the racial makeup of the Academy and the industry at large under increased scrutiny, THR gathered the quartet for a candid conversation about how success can feel like failure, the doors Black Panther has opened and why not one of these guys was able to enjoy his big night.
PEELE Part of the cultural learning curve with this, too, is tied up with this thing that every time a black achievement happens, it’s a black achievement.
Jordan’s film is not a full black cast, but it’s a black movie and it’s also not a black movie.
Lee, a few years ago, you said as part of a THR Roundtable that you hated when white people wrote for black people.
“SINGLETON There are two sides of this coin. The Last Emperor was a huge hit when it came out, and Bernardo Bertolucci is Italian, not Chinese. But he did his homework. Steven Spielberg did The Color Purple. Black people assailed against that when it came out, but it’s a classic among African-Americans now. But for every one of those films that was made by someone who was from another culture exploring something that they were interested in, there are these stacks of where black people have had to say,”OK, at least they tried.
One of my favorites is Glory, where the Matthew Broderick character is in a lot of ways [director] Edward Zwick saying, “I don’t know the black experience, but I see through the eyes of this character who is empathizing with the black experience.” With Get Out, I wanted to make a movie that ripped the rug out of this idea of the one good white character evil and see what that would do.
Do you have a black superhero movie in your back pocket?

The orginal article.

Summary of “How To Make Better Decisions”

We still make bad decisions, not just in purchasing goods, but everywhere.
It’s baffling how often we choose to decide under its influence, despite having all the tools we need to fight it.
What’s remarkable is how small a circle we can get away with, yet still be successful.
No matter how many black spots are left, keeping track of where they are allows you to shine your proverbial flashlight on them later, but not go there before you’re ready.
It’s impossible to pick the perfect job when completely switching career fields, but being aware of how little you know, you can consult with experts, steer clear of big responsibilities at first, and prioritize what you’ll learn.
Knowing How Much You Need To KnowOnce you’ve determined where your wisdom ends and how much there is to attain for your specific decision altogether, another question presents itself, and it makes all the difference: how big is the gap between the two?
No two situations are alike and this isn’t a hard rule, but thinking about whether you can push the edges of your circle of competence, and how far you’d have to drive them to avoid complete failure, is worth your while.
If your good decisions compound, maybe we’ll read about you someday.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Don’t Know What You Want? Improve These 7 Universal Skills”

What does success look like? What do you want from life? What career do you want?
We think it’s the worst thing in the world if you don’t know what you want to do in life.
One of the biggest thinking errors that I’ve made was that I thought I needed to know what I exactly wanted to do with my life.
The truth is that no one knows what they truly want.
So it’s not important to know exactly what you want to do with your life.
It’s not even realistic to boldly claim “I know what I want!”.
If you can’t decide what direction you want to go in life, that’s automatically your #1 goal in life – to figure out where you want to go.
Persuasion: Learn how to get what you want in an ethical way.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Ten phrases smart people never say”

These phrases carry special power: They have an uncanny ability to make you look bad even when the words are true.
No matter how talented you are or what you’ve accomplished, there are certain phrases that instantly change the way people see you and can forever cast you in a negative light.
These phrases are so loaded with negative implications that they undermine careers in short order.
Saying it’s not fair suggests that you think life is supposed to be fair, which makes you look immature and na├»ve.
These overly passive phrases instantly erode your credibility.
Even if you follow these phrases with a great idea, they suggest that you lack confidence, which makes the people you’re speaking to lose confidence in you.
There will always be rude or incompetent people in any workplace, and chances are that everyone knows who they are.
These phrases have a tendency to sneak up on you, so you’re going to have to catch yourself until you’ve solidified the habit of not saying them.

The orginal article.

Summary of “In praise of slow thinking and Socratic ignorance”

Between a relentless news cycle and deep ideological divides, we feel pressure to take positions quickly, often on stories that are still developing, or on topics we know little about.
At the risk of ending up on some bad list myself, I propose that Donegan’s experience proves that slow thinking is the antidote to the Information Age.
To embrace slow thinking is to allow for shifts in opinion.
The difference between them was that the politician thought of himself as wise, whereas Socrates admitted ignorance.
In Plato’s Apology of Socrates, Plato writes that Socrates left the encounter thinking of the politician, “Well, although I do not suppose that either of us knows anything really beautiful and good, I am better off than he is-for he knows nothing and thinks that he knows. I neither know nor think that I know. In this latter particular I seem to have slightly the advantage of him.” Ever since, Socratic ignorance has been the hallmark of wisdom in Western thinking.
In the words of the Taoist sage, Lao Tzu, who dictated the Tao Te Ching in the sixth century BC, “One who knows does not speak; one who speaks does not know.” It should be noted that in Taoist lore, he was pressed to share the Tao when leaving society for a solitary life in the mountains.
That’s why slow thinking is not just wise-it’s also a revolutionary act right now.
Deliberate undecidedness, refusing to choose and know it all, is a kind of intellectual rebellion against the relentless pressure to get with the socially appropriate program-whatever it happens to be within your ideological and informational bubbles.

The orginal article.

Summary of “When a Therapist Puts Buddhism Into Practice”

Mr. Epstein’s desk and the books that surround it are tucked away from the uncluttered space in which he sits with patients.
Mr. Epstein, who has had his private practice since 1986, was in his teens when he first felt drawn to the spiritual and professional paths he would pursue.
There were “Little bits of Buddhism floating around” at Harvard in those days, Mr. Epstein said, as the age of psychedelia gave way to the age of consciousness studies.
Mr. Epstein flashes a sense of humor with some frequency in person, one that mischievously cuts against the soberly reflective presence you might expect from the books.
Despite his gentle disposition, Mr. Epstein is tough-minded.
The problem with the ego, according to Mr. Epstein, is that it wants so badly to know.
We then incessantly repeat these stories to ourselves “Under our breath,” as Mr. Epstein writes in the new book.
Despite his good shape, Mr. Epstein, in the middle of his seventh decade, is not far from the phase of life about which he counseled his father.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Build Your ‘Meaningful Network’ to Maximize Your Impact”

What ‘Meaningful Networks’ Look LikeWho are the people you personally care about, who in turn care about you? That’s your network.
If you want to build an effective network, you must focus on what you can do for other people, not what they can offer you.
It’s your Meaningful Network that will make it possible for you to have the impact with your career and life that you desire.
Bringing people from your Unfamiliar Network into your Familiar Network by making initial contact and forming a connection.
Bringing people from your Familiar Network into your Intimate Network by getting to know them well, understanding your commonalities, and finding ways you can be helpful to them.
Bringing people from your Intimate Network into your Meaningful Network by investing in making their life better in an important way.
To make the giant leap with someone from Unfamiliar Network to Familiar Network, rely on these three acts:.1.
One of the best ways to help others in your network is to expand their respective networks.

The orginal article.

Summary of “My year of living ignorantly: I entered a news blackout the day Trump was elected”

Like a lot of people I know, I’m a news junkie.
All day long there’s Apple News on my phone and Twitter on my browser.
Throughout the 2016 US presidential campaign season, my wife and son learn to measure the thoroughness of my daily intake of news by how furiously I chop vegetables for dinner, fuming at All Things Considered.
No one enjoys this news blackout of mine more than my wife.
In part, I’ve shut myself off from news that makes me angry.
After nine months of ignorance, I know only this: now that I no longer check the news every 15 minutes-now that I trash, unread, every email that comes in screaming of fresh crisis-I no longer live in a constant state of alarm.
We spend so much time consuming news, Jennifer says, that we don’t have any energy or emotion left to do anything about it.
I’m not sure it’s any different from the privilege of sitting back and consuming news and getting upset, knowing it doesn’t affect you.

The orginal article.

Summary of “It Took Apple Executive Angela Ahrendts 1 Sentence to Drop the Best Career Advice You’ll Hear Today”

As the SVP of retail strategy at Apple, Angela Ahrendts is one of the highest-ranking executives at the most valuable company in the world.
Not everyone thought Ahrendts had what it took to successfully lead others.
Ahrendts recently spoke to ABC journalist Rebecca Jarvis for her popular podcast No Limits.
Asked about the worst career advice she ever received, Ahrendts tells of the time she was working at a big corporation and a human resources manager told her that she needed to make changes-like not talking so emotionally with her hands-if she wanted to be considered “CEO material.”
At the recommendation of the company, Ahrendts traveled to Minneapolis to meet with a coach, where she would be filmed and critiqued.
“I was supposed to be there for a couple of days, and I went for a couple of hours,” explains Ahrendts.
Authenticity doesn’t mean sharing everything about yourself, to everyone, all of the time.
It does mean saying what you mean, meaning what you say, and sticking to your values and principles above all else.

The orginal article.

Summary of “How Haiti became poor”

It matters in part because of the history of Haiti, and the history of racist discourse about Haiti.
Jonathan Katz, a journalist and former AP correspondent in Haiti who wrote The Big Truck That Went By about Haiti’s 2010 earthquake and the cholera epidemic that followed, has a longer thread spelling out how these narratives about Haiti were generated and how they work.
You’d then have to not know that Haiti was forced to borrow some money to pay back that ridiculous debt, some of it from banks in the United States.
You’d have to not know that in 1914 those banks got President Wilson to send the US Marines to empty the Haitian gold reserve [You’d] have to not know about the rest of the 20th century either-the systematic theft and oppression, US support for dictators and coups, the US invasions of Haiti in 1994-95 and 2004.
In short, you’d have to know nothing about WHY Haiti is poor, and WHY the United States are wealthy.
That’s where they really tell on themselves Because what they are showing is that they ASSUME that Haiti is just naturally poor, that it’s an inherent state borne of the corruption of the people there, in all senses of the word.
Racists have needed Haiti to be poor since it was founded.
While Haiti’s revolution was an early, signature event in world history-the first time a European power would be overthrown by an indigenous army-the causes of Haiti’s poverty are basically identical with those of almost every poor nation around the world: a history of exploitation, bad debt, bad geopolitics, and bad people profiting off of that poverty.

The orginal article.