Summary of “Ramona Shelburne on living pregnancy and motherhood out loud”

You’re not supposed to lose out on opportunities in the enlightened, post-“Lean In” workplace, but let’s be real.
No, the one thing I connected with deeply from watching Serena’s journey was how empowering it was to see a woman live a vulnerable period of her life out loud.
There were times I had to raise my hand to come out of the game and risk whatever consequences came with that.
I’d earned that respect, and rather than take the easier way out by pulling me out of the rotation, I could sit out of writing on Game 3 and come back for Game 4.
Later, after LeBron committed to the Lakers, I had to text my SportsCenter producer, Hilary Guy, and say I had about 45 minutes in me, but then I had to get out of the chair and lie down.
In college, I’d watch our football team on my way out to the softball field for practice.
A player would get hurt, and everything would stop for 30 seconds or so while the trainers checked him out.
What I’m asking is why do those “Consequences” have to be negative? Can we open ourselves to the idea that living out loud and standing behind your choice to have a family – or not to have a family – might actually make a woman stronger, more powerful and better at what she does?

The orginal article.

Summary of “The Most Important Question of Your Life”

“In the day-to day trenches of adult life, there is actually no such thing as atheism. There is no such thing as not worshiping. Everybody worships. The only choice we get is what to worship.”This, I suspect, is profound even beyond the examples of day-to-day worship that he gives to prove his point.
Even people who don’t openly talk about their object of worship do worship something, and this something can be identified in their day-to-day actions.
If you formulate a question in a way that can be answered, you can temporarily come to a happy conclusion.
Every answer can be re-opened with a new question.
There is always something more, and what distinguishes people and what they worship is when they stop asking the next question.
Because many different things work depending on the context and the person, it’s worth having an open mind even if you are comfortable settling for your own personal answer to the last question.
The TakeawayIt all begins with the question of what it is we worship, a question we all answer either explicitly, by abiding to some philosophical framework, or implicitly, by how we live and what we pay attention to.
The most important question in life may well be: How do we deal with the mysterious? The best answer doesn’t try to explain the mysterious away.

The orginal article.

Summary of “What the Grieving Orca Tells Us”

“They pull these little pranks when they know people are watching them,” says Balcomb.
“That’s a lot of energy and you can’t help but think it feels good-or weird. You’re buoyant and then suddenly under the influence of gravity. I don’t think anyone has seen her breach for quite a long time.”
Giles describes Tahlequah as an “Incredibly attentive mother” that played with her first calf, Notch, more than most orca moms.
“Think about a female going through those pregnancy hormones, growing a fetus, and then losing it-twice,” says Giles.
“It’s a little bit of anthropomorphism, but I think she was letting everyone else know she was grieving,” he says.
“They’re very intelligent. They know people are out there: I’ve seen them look at boats hauling fish out in nets. I think they know that humans are somehow related to the scarcity of food. And I think they know that the scarcity of food is causing them physical distress, and also causing them to lose babies.”
There is no way of knowing for sure if that’s what Tahlequah was doing.
Many scientists would undoubtedly accuse Balcomb of inappropriately casting human feelings and motivations onto another species, without extraordinary evidence for his extraordinary claims.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Yuval Noah Harari on what 2050 has in store for humankind”

How can we prepare ourselves and our children for a world of such unprecedented transformations and radical uncertainties? A baby born today will be thirty-something in 2050.
What should we teach that baby that will help him or her survive and flourish in the world of 2050 or of the 22nd century? What kind of skills will he or she need in order to get a job, understand what is happening around them and navigate the maze of life?
Since nobody knows how the world will look in 2050 – not to mention 2100 – we don’t know the answer to these questions.
If you lived, say, in a small provincial town in Mexico in 1800, it was difficult for you to know much about the wider world.
People all over the world are but a click away from the latest accounts of the bombardment of Aleppo or of melting ice caps in the Arctic, but there are so many contradictory accounts that it is hard to know what to believe.
Since we have no idea how the world and the job market will look in 2050, we don’t really know what particular skills people will need.
If you try to hold on to some stable identity, job or world view, you risk being left behind as the world flies by you with a whooooosh.
In the past, it was a relatively safe bet to follow the adults, because they knew the world quite well, and the world changed slowly.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Marlon Brando, on Location”

“Every time you turn around, some Japanese is giving you a present. They’re crazy about giving presents,” Brando observed.
“Give me a ring around then,” Brando said, finally.
Murray, as I knew, was only one member of what some of the “Sayonara” company referred to as “Brando’s gang.” Aside from the literary assistant, the gang consisted of Marlon Brando, Sr., who acts as his son’s business manager; a pretty, dark-haired secretary, Miss Levin; and Brando’s private makeup man.
The year of that meeting was 1947; it was a winter afternoon in New York, when I had occasion to attend a rehearsal of Tennessee Williams’ “A Streetcar Named Desire,” in which Brando was to play the role of Stanley Kowalski.
He’d come to reclaim the “Gift” packages of candy and rice cakes that Brando had already opened and avidly sampled.
“Ah, Missa Marron Brando, it is a missake. They were meant for derivery in another room. Aporogies! Aporogies!” Laughing, Brando handed the boxes over.
One of the most memorable film scenes Brando has played occurs in the Kazan-directed “On the Waterfront;” it is the car-ride scene in which Rod Steiger, as the racketeering brother, confesses he is leading Brando into a death trap.
Many years later, Stella Adler, Brando’s former drama coach, described Mrs. Brando, who died in 1954, as “a very beautiful, a heavenly, lost, girlish creature.” Always, wherever she lived, Mrs. Brando had played leads in the productions of local dramatic societies, and always she had longed for a more brightly footlighted world than her surroundings provided.

The orginal article.

Summary of “”Write a Sentence as Clean as a Bone” And Other Advice from James Baldwin”

Ninety-four years after his birth James Baldwin remains an intellectual, moral, and creative touchstone for many Americans-whether writers, critics, or simply people trying to live well in the world.
Baldwin was an accomplished novelist, a legendary essayist, and an important civil rights activist-and most importantly for our purposes here, the man knew how to write a great sentence.
The story of what can happen to an American Negro writer in Europe simply illustrates, in some relief, what can happen to any American writer there.
If there is no moral question, there is no reason to write.
I’m an old‐fashioned writer and, despite the odds, I want to change the world.
I don’t try to be prophetic, as I don’t sit down to write literature.
The bottom line is this: You write in order to change the world, knowing perfectly well that you probably can’t, but also knowing that literature is indispensable to the world.
If you are going to be a writer there is nothing I can say to stop you; if you’re not going to be a writer nothing I can say will help you.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Isaac Asimov: Becoming Educated”

You may learn critical knowledge and key reasoning skills from books filled with facts, but this knowledge and reasoning will be limited in their scope without a broad imagination.
It’s often said that the best way to learn or to be educated is to teach, and there is a truth to that because teaching forces you to dig down to a core understanding that many neglect.
The best of the best only have one job: to evoke a sense of curiosity in you and to teach you to enjoy learning for its own sake.
“You valued learning and you taught me to value it. Once I learned to value it, the rest came without trouble.”
Very few people can recall the details of what they learned in school, but everybody can tell you their favorite part of a gripping story or the first time they picked up a great non-fiction.
Every experience we have and every lesson we learn is another information point that leads to a form of education.
Isaac Asimov lived a life that placed a high value on learning, and in the process, he showed us what it means to become educated and the steps worth taking to get there.
We associate knowledge with non-fiction, but great fiction is perhaps an even greater container of wisdom.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Inside the Slow-Motion Disaster on the Southern Border”

“Just, you know, put yourself in his shoes. You hear all this crying, there’s a lot of stress, and, you know, he has to do his job.”
Border Patrol Agent: My parents, you know, when I was young they were they were migrant workers, so they would commute to California, you know for the season-for the grape season.
My dad actually was born in Mexico in Matamoros and then he immigrated with my grandfather back in the day, immigrated to Brownsville as a resident alien and then, you know, my parents, you know, they got married, money was hard, right? So, they’d have to go, you know, work the fields and do that hard labor to make ends meet.
Border Patrol: You go down to the Rio Grande River it’s, you know, there’s brush.
Border Patrol: You know, a lot of people, they think we’re the bad guys because, you know, poor people, they’re trying to come to better their lives and we’re stopping them.
Sister Norma Pimentel: It’s important to know that families are not being attracted to our country, they simply are fleeing a reality in their homeland.
You know, because that’s the policy that’s intact right now, Right? So, he can’t deviate from it, you know.
Guatemalan mother: If they took my child away, I don’t know.

The orginal article.

Summary of “A More Or Less Definitive Guide To Showing Up For Friends”

Showing up for other people is hard to describe, but you know it when you see it, or when someone does it for you.
The thing about showing up is that it’s not exactly easy.
Truly showing up for others requires you to do something that can be even harder – to show up for yourself first.
Showing up for yourself is what will allow you to be a better and more present friend/partner; will prevent resentment, one-sided relationships, and burnout; and will help you figure out exactly what showing up for your people should look like in practice.
Occasionally, we’ll get to make a grand enough gesture to light up several bulbs at once, but for the most part, showing up is best done one small, quiet act by small, quiet act.
As firm believers in the power of showing up – as people who have showed up for others, and who have felt the transformative, life-saving power of having people show up for us – we’ve put together a long list of ways to show up for your loved ones.
Because the more of us who show up for each other regularly, the more strands of lights we collectively turn on, and the brighter all of our paths become.
If you know in your heart that you *haven’t* been showing up for them, be honest about it.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Why the Secret to Getting Ahead in Your Career Is ‘Weak Ties'”

For real progression, we need to embrace so-called weak ties “Who will swiftly and dramatically change our lives for the better.”
Weak ties are the people we have met, or are connected to somehow, but do not currently know well.
Because you are likely to have the same interests and disinterests, these close ties can limit who you know and what you think.
Weak ties, on the other hand, “Know things and people that we don’t know. Information and opportunity spread farther and faster through weak ties because weak ties have fewer overlapping contacts.” We don’t assume that they think the same things we think or like the same things we like, so we’re more thoughtful when we talk to them.
“In this way, weak ties promote, and sometimes even force, thoughtful growth and change.”
As Joy writes, embracing weak ties also makes us feel left alone.
Reaching out to an old boss for career or life advice can help the world seem more manageable.
If you’re worried that your weak ties will think it’s strange or presumptuous of you to reach out to them-people like to he helpful.

The orginal article.