Summary of “It Took Apple Executive Angela Ahrendts 1 Sentence to Drop the Best Career Advice You’ll Hear Today”

As the SVP of retail strategy at Apple, Angela Ahrendts is one of the highest-ranking executives at the most valuable company in the world.
Not everyone thought Ahrendts had what it took to successfully lead others.
Ahrendts recently spoke to ABC journalist Rebecca Jarvis for her popular podcast No Limits.
Asked about the worst career advice she ever received, Ahrendts tells of the time she was working at a big corporation and a human resources manager told her that she needed to make changes-like not talking so emotionally with her hands-if she wanted to be considered “CEO material.”
At the recommendation of the company, Ahrendts traveled to Minneapolis to meet with a coach, where she would be filmed and critiqued.
“I was supposed to be there for a couple of days, and I went for a couple of hours,” explains Ahrendts.
Authenticity doesn’t mean sharing everything about yourself, to everyone, all of the time.
It does mean saying what you mean, meaning what you say, and sticking to your values and principles above all else.

The orginal article.

Summary of “How Haiti became poor”

It matters in part because of the history of Haiti, and the history of racist discourse about Haiti.
Jonathan Katz, a journalist and former AP correspondent in Haiti who wrote The Big Truck That Went By about Haiti’s 2010 earthquake and the cholera epidemic that followed, has a longer thread spelling out how these narratives about Haiti were generated and how they work.
You’d then have to not know that Haiti was forced to borrow some money to pay back that ridiculous debt, some of it from banks in the United States.
You’d have to not know that in 1914 those banks got President Wilson to send the US Marines to empty the Haitian gold reserve [You’d] have to not know about the rest of the 20th century either-the systematic theft and oppression, US support for dictators and coups, the US invasions of Haiti in 1994-95 and 2004.
In short, you’d have to know nothing about WHY Haiti is poor, and WHY the United States are wealthy.
That’s where they really tell on themselves Because what they are showing is that they ASSUME that Haiti is just naturally poor, that it’s an inherent state borne of the corruption of the people there, in all senses of the word.
Racists have needed Haiti to be poor since it was founded.
While Haiti’s revolution was an early, signature event in world history-the first time a European power would be overthrown by an indigenous army-the causes of Haiti’s poverty are basically identical with those of almost every poor nation around the world: a history of exploitation, bad debt, bad geopolitics, and bad people profiting off of that poverty.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Seven Things No One Tells You About Your Twenties”

What a Roth I.R.A. is has not yet been incepted into your brain.
It’s time to talk about getting off of your parents’ cell-phone plan.
You don’t know any cool bars in your home town.
IKEA. Did everyone learn about plants in some seminar? Like, a seminar held at some dog funeral I wasn’t invited to? Do they do dog funerals? Or more like a classy wake?
People project their age-related insecurities onto you.
TRAVEL! Play with your dog while you still can! I didn’t grow up with a dog, O.K.?! I don’t know how to react when they die! Do I make you a casserole? Bring you a new puppy? The most emotional I’ve ever felt about a pet was when my frog Clarence escaped.
I’m not heartless-dogs are great! But, like, human great? Aunt Carol great? Piano-teacher-you-didn’t-really-like great? Some of you, I didn’t even realize you had a dog! And now it’s like Princess Di all over again? I don’t know.
People don’t want a casserole, even if their dog just died.

The orginal article.

Summary of “A Heart Risk Factor Even Doctors Know Little About”

“People don’t know about it, physicians don’t know about it, and we have to get an education program out there, but that’s expensive,” said Dr. Henry N. Ginsberg, the Irving Professor of Medicine at Columbia University and a leading expert on lp(a).
“It’s sort of a double whammy,” said Dr. Donald Lloyd-Jones, a cardiologist at the Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine who helped write the American Heart Association’s cholesterol guidelines.
Heart disease risk jumps for those in the 80th percentile, with lp(a) levels above 60, and climbs sharply for the 5 percent of the population with lp(a) levels between 150 and 300, according to Dr. Ginsberg at Columbia.
Many people at high risk do not fit the typical profile of a person with heart disease.
Her LDL and total cholesterol levels were low, and at age 39, her Framingham risk score, which gauges heart disease risk, put her odds of having a heart attack in her 40s at just 1 percent.
Further testing showed she had high lp(a), which she believes she inherited from her father, who died of a heart attack at age 50.
Since high lp(a) is hereditary, those who have it often have a parent, sibling or grandparent who suffered a premature heart attack or stroke.
Since his heart attack, Mr. Harper of “The Biggest Loser” has embarked on a newfound mission to raise awareness about heart disease and to urge people to get tested for lp(a).

The orginal article.

Summary of “How to Counter the Circus of Pseudoscience”

In hospitals we hold morbidity and mortality meetings trying to show where we have failed, what we need to change, how we can do better.
In the face of such doubt, it is not surprising that some individuals, even those who are intelligent and well educated, are swept away by the breezy confidence of health gurus, who are full of passionate intensity while the qualified lack all conviction, to borrow from Yeats.
In short, the less you know, the less able you are to recognize how little you know, so the less likely you are to recognize your errors and shortcomings.
For the highly skilled, like trained scientists, the opposite is true: The more you know, the more likely you are to see how little you know.
This may explain how an Australian celebrity chef named Pete Evans cannot only promote the health benefits of a Paleo diet but also feel knowledgeable enough to make pronouncements on fluoride, sunscreen and vaccinations.
How can an aerodynamics engineer speak with authority on the matter when he or she has not even bothered to research the events at Roswell and is not even aware that there are alien dissection videos freely available on the internet?
Countering the online health gurus is especially difficult when they offer the irresistible cocktail of medical language muddled with a much more pleasing aesthetic than medicine, far from the clinical world of linoleum and antiseptic, a better place where patients’ conditions are diagnosed with metaphors and treated with poetry.
Of course what they say is always half right, which is how pseudoscience works.

The orginal article.

Summary of “How baring and sharing online increases social conformity”

According to Foucault, the dynamics of the Panopticon bore an uncanny resemblance to how people self-monitor in society at large.
Yes, social media might spell the end of bourgeois respectability; but doesn’t it also embolden people to be frank and open, to free themselves of inhibitions and say what they mean, without shame? Foucault suggested mass surveillance could squash free speech and thought, and enlist the cooperation of those surveilled.
Perhaps social media inoculates people against such compulsion.
We might be the democratic citizens that philosophers have longed for since the time of Socrates: people willing to lay bare their lives for the sake of discussion and debate, people for whom nothing is hidden or out of bounds.
Social media provides a public space that often operates more like a private venue, where many people express themselves knowing that those watching will agree – or, particularly for internet trolls, in the belief that there they won’t suffer the consequences of what they say online, as if protected by the mediation of technology.
When people post online, it is always for a supposed audience; it is never purely gratuitous.
People unburden themselves to their followers in the hope that their needs will be validated, their opinions affirmed, their quirks delightfully accepted.
There is no better way to divide and subdue a people, and seduce them into self-regulation, than to expose their perversions but promise absolution.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Bono: U2, State of the World, What He Learned From Almost Dying”

How did you envision Songs of Experience in relation to Songs of Innocence, its companion album from 2014?I had this idea of your younger self talking to your older self for quite a while.
Can you be more precise? Like, what songs do you think came directly out of your near-death moment?It’s not so much songs as .
The full name of the song is “Señor.” Does that help explain?No, I think that is Bob putting you off the trail.
Your song asks, “Jesus, what have you got for me?” Well, what do you think he has got for you?There is an unbelievable release in letting go.
We asked Paul McCartney, “Where did you get all those incredible chords in those Beatles songs?” And he said, “Well, you know, we were a rock & roll band, but to get good gigs we had to do weddings. Like posh weddings. We had to learn Gershwin, all that stuff.” And I went, “No, I didn’t know.” And Paul says, “Oh, yeah, we got better-paying gigs.” And I went, “Ah!” It was like, “Note to self and Edge: Let’s get into musical theater. Let’s think about that.”
How will you measure success for Songs of Experience?I would like it to have famous songs, so that when we play them in our live show people don’t go, “What is that? Should we go to the bathroom now?”.
Which songs do you think will become famous?I know that “You’re the Best Thing About Me” is going to be one of them.
For example?Some people, in a very sane way, are thinking, “Why do you want to do this? Why do you want our songs on the radio?” And I say that, if we believe in our songs, we have to use any medium we can find to reach people.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Tim Ferriss Says You Need This Superpower to Achieve Mental Toughness”

We know that Tim Ferriss is a New York Times best-selling author.
What many don’t know about Tim Ferriss is that he has bi-polar depression and was moments away from committing suicide during his college years.
In this TED Talk, Ferriss speaks of what he calls the superpower that saved his life: stoicism.
The philosophy, according to Ferriss, has grown like wildfire in the top ranks of the NFL as a means of mental toughness training.
“Think about it as an operating system for thriving in high-stress environments and making better decisions,” says Ferriss.
Ferriss developed an exercise that he calls “Fear-setting,” and he suggests you do quarterly, at least.
Here are the five critical questions Ferriss asked himself, as he practiced his fear-setting.
Ferriss reminds us that the hard problems and choices, what we most fear doing, are never solved with comfortable conversations.

The orginal article.

Summary of “The Truth About Those ‘Alien Alloys’ in ‘ UFO Story”

Alloys are mixtures of different kinds of elemental metals.
Even most naturally occurring gold on Earth is an alloy made up of elemental gold mixed with other metals, like silver or copper.
For crystalline alloys – those in which the mixture of atoms forms an ordered structure – researchers use a technique called X-ray diffraction, Nyman said.
“From my scientist’s perspective, that’s the kind of question I’d be asking. Maybe, if it has to do with world politics, and we want to know where the metal comes from, maybe there’s some analysis that can lead you to where it was mined, or what country uses that particular alloy, that kind of thing.”
Even if a chunk of alloy that hadn’t been seen before did fall to Earth from outer space, both Nyman and Sachleben agreed that it wouldn’t necessarily have come from an alien craft.
Sachleben said, alloys strike the planet regularly – space-traversing alloys like those found in fairly common nickel-iron meteorites – leaving behind telltale signs.
“The company modified buildings in Las Vegas for the storage of metal alloys and other materials that program contractors said had been recovered from unidentified aerial phenomena. Researchers also studied people who said they had experienced physical effects from encounters with the objects and examined them for any physiological changes. In addition, researchers spoke to military service members who had reported sightings of strange aircraft.”
In an email to Live Science regarding these metal alloys, Blumenthal said, “We printed as much as we were able to verify. Can’t go beyond that.”

The orginal article.

Summary of “O.G.’s Only”

He’d be like, “I’m gonna start you because I have to – because you’re the second pick – but if you’re not playing good, McMillan’s gonna play all the minutes. Then I’m gonna start you again in the third quarter because I have to. Sh*t, then I’m not gonna let you back in the game, ‘cuz you can’t do nothing for me.”
We loved to play, but really that’s how me and my friends stayed out of trouble.
There was never a time my father would say, you know, “Nice game, you played great.” It was always, “You coulda did better.” I remember games where I would have 50 points, no lie, and he was still like, “Look here, motherf*cker, you still ain’t sh*t. You don’t play defense good, you don’t do this or that, you coulda had 60 or 70.” At that age, I would cry when he really gave it to me.
If we wasn’t up 40 on the team that he thought we should be up 40 on, he’d sit the starters until we proved we would play harder.
MJ was on the bench most of the game – I didn’t understand that it was just preseason and MJ doesn’t play hard like that in a preseason game.
I’m checking Michael, and I see Phil Jackson start calling plays – four, five, six times in a row, he’s calling plays for Michael.
Near the end of the game, I’m sitting on the bench, and MJ comes over to our bench – comes right up to me while the game is still going on.
Two years ago, me and Shawn went back to Seattle because our sons were playing each other – his son played for Washington, mine played for Oregon State.

The orginal article.