Summary of “The Best Path to Long-Term Change Is Slow, Simple and Boring”

It’s boring and simple, and if you keep at it, there is a good chance it will work if the book is good.
Why wouldn’t you do that? Well, because it doesn’t work.
It works just often enough for someone to claim it works and sell it to you.
You know what will work? Small actions repeated consistently over a very long period of time.
Incremental change is short-term boring, but long-term exciting.
We often get so focused on the goal that is still way over the horizon that we forget to turn around to see how far we’ve come.
Keeping track of this incremental change helps reinforce why I’m making short-term boring choices.
Because at some point, I’ll look back and see how far I have come, and short-term boring will become long-term exciting.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Stories you’ve never heard”

With New England Patriots quarterback Tom Brady celebrating his 40th birthday on Thursday, we’ve tracked down a collection of confidants to tell their favorite behind-the-scenes stories about the QB. The untold tales span a frustrated 4-year-old golfer, a ruthless enforcer on the intramural basketball court, an unexpected beer-chugging wonder … and everything in between.
Mike Vrabel, Patriots linebacker, 2001-08: “My indoctrination to the goal-line [offense]: I had maybe caught a couple touchdowns and was feeling pretty good about myself, and we went to practice one day and I broke free on a crossing route or something like that. So I start yelling, ‘Tom! Tom! Tom!’ and I’m waving my hands. But he doesn’t throw it to me. I come back, and we’re in the huddle when he says, ‘Mikey, if you ever wave your f–in’ hands and ask for the ball again, I’ll never throw it to you. I know who’s open. I’m the quarterback, I’ll throw it to whoever the f– I want!’ That was the last time I ever called for the ball.”
Rodney Harrison, Patriots safety, 2003-08: “This was when I first got to New England, we had become friends and we were in the weight room. I show up around 6:30 in the morning and he says to me, ‘Good afternoon!’ So the next day, I get the hint, and come in 15 minutes earlier. Same thing: He says, ‘Good afternoon!’ Then the next day it’s 5:45 in the morning, and he makes sure to say it twice: ‘Good afternoon! Good afternoon!’ So I make it at 5:30 the next day and before he could say anything to me, I looked at him and said, ‘Man, I don’t give a damn what you say, Tom, I’m not coming in earlier than 5:30!’ We both laughed at that.”
Matt Cassel, Patriots quarterback, 2005-08: “He’s never willing to give up a rep. I remember when I was in practice, Josh [McDaniels] would be like, ‘All right Cassel, get in there. You’re up.’ And as soon as he put me in, Tom would be like, ‘No, I want to get this one.’ I remember having this conversation with him. He said, ‘Look, as you play this game, you never want to see somebody else doing your job, because everybody is good in this league.'”.
Bill Belichick, Patriots head coach, 2000-present: “When we played golf at Pebble Beach two years ago, on the sixth hole, it’s a big cliff. He’s literally standing out there on the ledge, trying to hit the ball. The caddie is holding him so he won’t like tumble 300 feet to his death into the Pacific Ocean. It’s a golf ball. But I think that’s kind of the competitiveness of Tom. I’m sure there’s a picture of it. I’m thinking to myself, ‘What the hell are you doing?'”.
Kevin Faulk, Patriots running back, 2000-11: “Tom was always businesslike, but he also liked to have fun. So one day, we all walk into the locker room and three tires from Matt Cassel’s car are all at his locker. Nobody knows where the fourth tire is, but Cassel’s car, in the parking lot, is on blocks. They were playing pranks on each other, it was Tom who did it, and Cassel sort of looked around and said, ‘What can I do, man?’ Well, a couple of offensive linemen decided that they wanted to help. They wanted to leave Mr. Brady a little treat for when he was going home from practice. So Brady gets to his car and what does he find: It is filled with a bunch of packing peanuts.”
Sebastian Vollmer, Patriots offensive tackle, 2009-16: “I’m always impressed, because when you walk into that locker room, everyone knows who Tom Brady is. But he introduces himself to every rookie: ‘Hey, my name is Tom Brady. I play quarterback.’ It’s not like, ‘I’m the guy.’ He’s not arrogant. Just humble from the perspective of, ‘I don’t expect you to know me, I am going to prove to you I can play.'”.
Rodney Harrison, Patriots safety, 2003-08: “When we were down in the Super Bowl at Houston [in 2004], it was practice and it was a competitive one. The defense had its way with Tom that day – knocking down balls, forcing incomplete passes – and we were all pumped up. Then I stepped in front and picked Tom off, running down the field, high-stepping, talking trash. When I come back, he started chasing me, throwing footballs at me, yelling obscenities at me. It was unbelievable. Here we are at the Super Bowl, about to play the biggest game of our lives, and this dude is mad – and then wouldn’t talk to me for a day and a half – because I picked him off.”

The orginal article.

Summary of “8 things smart people never reveal about their personal life at work”

TalentSmart has tested more than a million people and found that the upper echelons of top performance are filled with people who are high in emotional intelligence.
Emotionally intelligent people are adept at reading others, and this ability shows them what they should and shouldn’t reveal about themselves at work.
People’s political beliefs are too closely tied to their identities to be discussed without incident at work.
Granted, different people treat politics differently, but asserting your values can alienate some people as quickly as it intrigues others.
There will always be incompetent people in any workplace, and chances are that everyone knows who they are.
A good 111% of the people you work with do not want to know that you bet they’re tigers in the sack.
The same thing happens when you tell people that you’re job hunting.
Have you seen any of the above cause trouble for people at work? Are there any others that you would add?

The orginal article.

Summary of “Productivity advice for the weird”

Your goal is to enable yourself to perform at your very best, every day, and over the course of weeks and months and years.
Some days you just won’t feel it – and that’s fine.
Every single day I know exactly what my meal plan is.
Same for Wednesday, my no-meeting strategy day and the day I catch up on reading all of my articles tagged “Strategy” in Pinboard and allow myself to actually feel things.
Do you wake up knowing exactly what you’re going to do every day?
Is your calendar arranged to match your energy throughout the day?
Just like a great investor knows any individual stock is not going to make or break his portfolio, I know that one day – even a day where I wake up late, eat an insane amount of food, nap half the day, and watch 15 shows on Netflix – is not going to hurt much.
Pinboard & Pocket – Whenever I see something I want to read I bank it for later so I can focus on my current day.

The orginal article.

Summary of “How to Increase Your Self-Confidence & Trust in Yourself”

Self-confidence is a state of being in which the thoughts you have create a belief in yourself and your capabilities.
Cultivating a relationship of trust with yourself is one of the most important things you can do.
“Self-confidence instructs others on how to think about you.” - Brooke CastilloBy the way you treat yourself, you instruct others how to treat you.
Your attitude towards yourself informs others on what kind of attitude to have towards you.
When you like yourself, treat yourself with respect and are free of judgement about yourself, you influence others to do the same.
When you trust in yourself that you are able to bounce back from sadness, disappointment, frustration, depression and any other difficult emotions, then you can enter any situation with confidence.
Do not reject yourself in order to avoid being rejected by others.
Being able to perform under pressure is one of the most effective ways to trust yourself.

The orginal article.

Summary of “12 Books That Will Improve Your Self-Knowledge”

So I’ve made a list of 12 books that have helped me to know myself.
HBR’s 10 Must Reads on Managing Yourself The book’s description starts with, “The path to your professional success starts with a critical look in the mirror.” I can’t agree more.
Ego Is The Enemy by Ryan Holiday This is one of my favorite books of the past year.
I Like Myself! by Karen Beaumont I usually stick to books for grown-ups.
One of my friends bought this book for his daughter a while back.
The Gifts of Imperfection by Brené Brown I only recently read Brené Brown’s book.
Notes To Myself by Hugh Prather This book was recommended to me last year by a reader.
This is one of my all-time favorite books because it’s the most honest book I’ve read. As you can see, there are no books about self-knowledge or self-awareness on this list.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Smart questions to ask at the end of a job interview”

Your questions should be thoughtful, intelligent, and demonstrate that you are serious about the role and the company.
‘Beyond the hard skills required to successfully perform this job, what soft skills would serve the company and position best?’.
Peter Harrison, CEO of Snagajob, tells Business Insider this is a respectful way to ask about shortcomings within the company – which you should be aware of before joining.
Knowing how a company measures its employees’ success is important.
This question shows the interviewer that you care about your future at the company, and it will also help you decide if you’re a good fit for the position, Vicky Oliver writes in her book “301 Smart Answers to Tough Interview Questions.”
Knowing how a company deals with conflicts gives you a clearer picture of the company’s culture, Harrison says.
Asking about problems within a company gets the “Conversation ball” rolling, and your interviewer will surely have an opinion, Oliver writes.
Asking this question will show your interviewer that you can think big-picture, you’re wanting to stay with the company long-term, and you want to make a lasting impression in whatever company you end up at, Harrison says.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Greatest Movie Props of All Time: From Lightsabers to Wilson”

Perry Blake, co-production designer: “It was a totally fabricated prop. We started with the hockey stick, in terms of the size of it. The bottom part was, more or less, like a hockey stick, but we also wanted to make it flat and smooth. As far as I know, there wasn’t anything like this that existed – it’s not like you could go online and buy them, and I don’t remember anybody having them.”We mocked them up and would bring them to director Dennis Dugan, and, you know, Adam is very involved in his movies, so he was testing them out and looking at them and deciding which one he liked best.
We wanted to have one ‘prove-it’ shot that was like a 25ft putt, one where Adam actually made it.
“I remember the day we were shooting that scene, it was basically like, OK, we’re just gonna sit here, and Adam’s gonna shoot the ball from way back there until he makes it in. Everyone was betting on how many it would be: Is it gonna take him more than five shots? Is it gonna take him 10 shots? Finally, when he made it in, everybody went crazy. It was a lot of fun.”

The orginal article.

Summary of “Real Men Might Get Made Fun Of”

If you care, how often do you say something? Maybe you’ll confront your close friends, but what about more powerful men, famous men, cool men, men who could further your career?
One of the subtlest and most pervasive is social ostracism – coding empathy as the fun killer, consideration for others as an embarrassing weakness and dissenting voices as out-of-touch, bleeding-heart dweebs.
Women, already impeded and imperiled by sexism, also have to carry the social stigma of being feminist buzzkills if they call attention to it.
In contrast to these “Warriors,” promises a world in which you can have it both ways: You can be good without ever seeming uncool in front of your buddies, you can be an advocate for social justice without ever considering there might be social forces beyond your ken, you can be a crusader for positive change without ever killing anyone’s buzz, you can be a progressive hero without ever taking identity politics seriously.
It’s an ambitious contortion, and one that affords straight white men a luxurious degree of stasis.
What if fixing Pao’s toxic workplaces hadn’t fallen to her alone? I’m frequently contacted by young women weighing the benefits and costs of calling out sexism in their male-dominated industries.
One of my podcasting friends told me that he does stick up for women in challenging situations, like testosterone-soaked comedy green rooms but complained, “I get mocked for it!”.
I know there’s pressure not to be a dorky, try-hard male feminist stereotype; there’s always a looming implication that you could lose your spot in the club; if you seem opportunistic or performative in your support, if you suck up too much oxygen and demand praise, women will yell at you for that too.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Natalie Morales would like you to know nothing about her, except for one thing”

I know some may say that’s a silly pursuit considering what I do for a living, but I am nowhere near interested in fame.
I know some people get into this business for fame, but I try to keep what I do and that shitty side effect separate.
I really just like acting and filmmaking, and while I’d like to be well-known among my peers as someone fun to work with who does good stuff, I definitely do not want your Aunt Belinda to know any details about me or my dating life.
We hung out a lot as the school year started, during lunch, during our shared acting class, after school.
I know in a lot of places, things are different these days.
That is what I am attracted to; that is what I want to know, want to love, want to defend, want to take care of.
I think it’s important that I tell you that this familiar face you see on your TV is the Q part of LGBTQ, so that if you didn’t know someone who was queer before, you do now.
So while I’ll still insist on privacy, and I still don’t want you to know who I’m dating, you should know that it could be anyone.

The orginal article.