Summary of “What Happens If I Don’t Like Fiona Apple?”

Claustrophobia is the overarching theme, even if it isn’t, of the album that came out of Apple’s exile.
In between hangs the kind of Apple-isms that have always clanged in my ear – mouthfuls of the kind of poetry that was once limited to high school but now stalks us all on Instagram – not to mention the insufferable repetition of words and phrases and the obnoxious holding of never-ending notes like “Youuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuu.” At the end of “I Want You to Love Me,” Apple discharges a lengthy, high-pitched throat warble that reminds me of Andie MacDowell’s dolphin-like vocalization.
Carrie Battan’s use of the term “Feral authenticity” to describe Apple’s oeuvre – based on her penchant for avoiding the public – recalled my mother’s duo-syllabic reaction to Apple but not much else.
Felt “Disproportionate” because of Apple’s absence for so long and because it is “Of the moment in its theme and feel.” That includes its lyrics on the sort of gender issues we are currently confronting – not to mention Apple’s transcendence of musical boundaries, mixing disparate genres from cabaret to hip-hop – and that raw home-recorded style that opposes today’s ubiquitous hyper-produced singles.
Wilson noticed the piano that Apple forefronted in the past melded into layers of rhythm and percussion and vocals, her monotonous deep bluesy voice fracturing into a wider range of pitches.
After all of that, Wilson’s final words could have very well been all he had written: “[M]aybe you just find Fiona Apple a bit much.
I’m less troubled after speaking to Wilson and researching Apple herself.
Profile from March, Apple continues to display a photograph of Graham on her piano, the one she played on Fetch the Bolt Cutters.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Only at the Met: An Oral History of the World’s Most Glamorous Gala”

Cardinal Dolan, who I got to know quite well during the Heavenly Bodies dinner, he likes his food and he was appalled about how small the portions were.
Growing up, I was persecuted for being gay, for being different, for having flamboyant style in rural Missouri.
Seeing her documentary Madonna: Truth or Dare and seeing her love of her dancers and the gay community, I would think, Well you know what? Madonna will be my friend one day.
Fast forward to 2017, when she was my date to the Met gala and we went into the video booth.
There I am dancing with Madonna; I’m making a music video with Madonna, who is dressed in my designs.
You almost forget the environment you’re in and then you’ll walk into the bathroom and be like, “Oh my God, there’s Jennifer Aniston! Oh my God, Sarah Jessica Parker.” You know what I mean?
I know Cass Bird was in there for awhile and she would take all the photos and I even have some cool photos.
You always can snap good photos in the bathroom, that’s for sure.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Stop a Worry Becoming Catastrophic: How to Talk to Your Kids About the Coronavirus”

‘There will soon be no avoiding having to talk to your kids about the novel coronavirus, with the Covid-19 outbreak now spreading to every continent of the globe.
“Do you know how many people have died? Like, 50!”.
How did a group of Australian schoolchildren living in a country town half a world away know anything about an outbreak of disease that was, at that time, largely confined to China? And why did they care?
There will soon be no avoiding having to talk to your kids about the novel coronavirus, with the Covid-19 outbreak now spreading to every continent of the globe.
I asked a child psychiatrist, Dr Karen Gaunson, and a children’s media literacy expert, Saffron Howden, for their thoughts on how to talk to kids about the coronavirus outbreak.
Explain all the hard work that is happening here to protect them, all the doctors and nurses who are here to help us, that we have good hospitals and medicines, highlight how everyone across the world is working together to look after each other, to find vaccines and treatments.
Use the discussion as an opportunity to explore and learn about new things together – for example, how our bodies fight off viruses and that different symptoms of sickness are a sign we are working to get well; or how viruses make us sick and the things we can do to reduce our risk.
Give them a frame of reference that they can understand drawing on their past experience, for what the sickness might be like, or quarantine and how long it will go for.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Trust Me, You Don’t Want to Know What Happens to Email You Send”

For those unfamiliar with email tracking, it is a technology first introduced in the early ’90s that places an invisible image pixel into a sender’s email notifying them when an email has been opened or clicked.
“The basic idea,” said Dr. Haitao Xu, an Assistant Professor in the School of Mathematical and Natural Sciences at Arizona State University focusing on the intersection of cybersecurity and user privacy, “Is that every time a recipient opens an email, their browser will automatically download the invisible image pixel from the email tracker’s server.” During this process, says Xu, the tracker’s server collects information about the recipient, allowing it to notify its client when, how many times, where, and from what device a recipient opened the email.
“Various businesses have a high demand for email tracking services,” said Xu, who conducted with University of California San Diego postdoctoral researcher Shuai Hao a 2018 study titled Privacy Risk Assessment on Email Tracking.
According to Sydney Li, a writer, and researcher for the Electronic Frontier Foundation who has written extensively about the privacy concerns that email tracking poses, invasive email tracking happens regularly over unencrypted connections.
Li pointed out that third-party email tracking technologies are sharing users’ email addresses across different emails they open, and across different devices, and building a profile of their online life.
Merchant referenced data from a 2017 study from email intelligence business One More Company that claimed that “19 percent of all ‘conversational’ email is now tracked. That’s one in five of the emails you get from your friends. And you probably never noticed.”
“As for tracking email messages,” Rosen said, “If you know that your emails are being checked, if you know that people know when you read them, then it’s going to compel you to check an email faster.”
We want to be connected, even if that means secretly tracking people to see when they open your email.

The orginal article.

Summary of “A dirty secret: you can only be a writer if you can afford it”

Let’s start with me: I’m not sure how or if I’d still be a writer without the help of other people’s money.
I did not know what this writer, who I thought was single, paid in rent, or all the other ways that they might have been able to cut corners, that I, a mother of two, could not cut, but even then, it felt impossible to me that this writer was sustaining themselves in any legitimate way without some outside help.
I don’t know this writer and don’t know how, actually, they lived.
What I do know is, when the panel was over, I wanted to take the microphone back and say loudly to the students that what this writer said was, at least in part, a lie.
According to a 2018 Author’s Guild Study the median income of all published authors for all writing related activity was $6,080 in 2017, down from $10,500 in 2009; while the median income for all published authors based solely on book-related activities went from $3,900 to $3,100, down 21%. Roughly 25% of authors earned $0 in income in 2017.
The median income of all published authors for all writing related activity was $6,080 in 2017.
There is the feeling that the choices that we’ve made outside of writing: who we married, whether or not we had children, the families we were born to, will forever hinder our ability to make good work.
To be a writer is a choice, after all, and I continue to make it.

The orginal article.

Summary of “How Dating Became a ‘Market'”

In the modern era, it seems probable that the way people now shop online for goods-in virtual marketplaces, where they can easily filter out features they do and don’t want-has influenced the way people “Shop” for partners, especially on dating apps, which often allow that same kind of filtering.
The behavioral economics researcher and dating coach Logan Ury said in an interview that many single people she works with engage in what she calls “Relationshopping.”
“People, especially as they get older, really know their preferences. So they think that they know what they want,” Ury said-and retroactively added quotation marks around the words “Know what they want.” “Those are things like ‘I want a redhead who’s over 5’7”,’ or ‘I want a Jewish man who at least has a graduate degree.
Ury went on, there’s a fatal flaw in this logic: No one knows what they want so much as they believe they know what they want.
The fact that human-to-human matches are less predictable than consumer-to-good matches is just one problem with the market metaphor; another is that dating is not a one-time transaction.
Let’s say you’re on the market for a vacuum cleaner-another endeavor in which you might invest considerable time learning about and weighing your options, in search of the best fit for your needs.
In dating, especially in recent years, the point isn’t always exclusivity, permanence, or even the sort of long-term relationship one might have with a vacuum.
The marketplace metaphor also fails to account for what many daters know intuitively: that being on the market for a long time-or being off the market, and then back on, and then off again-can change how a person interacts with the marketplace.

The orginal article.

Summary of “How ‘Harriet The Spy’ Made Me Into A Writer”

In 1995, I found someone who finally made sense to me: Harriet M. Welsch.
For those unfamiliar, Harriet M. Welsch is the hero of Harriet the Spy, whom I met first through the Nickelodeon movie and then through Louise Fitzhugh’s 1964 novel, on which the movie was loyally based.
Harriet is 11 years old, an aspiring writer, and a diligent spy.
To some, this might seem like a barrier to truly living, as it does to Harriet’s father when he tells her, “You’re going to find that sometimes just experiencing things can be enough.” But young Harriet is unmoved, insisting, “That’s how I experience things. With my notebook.”
Harriet invigorated my desire to be a writer, but she also normalized my desire to be alone, to observe, to remember.
That Harriet is treated gently by Fitzhugh and, within the text and film, by her nanny Ole Golly, delivers a clear message: Living like Harriet isn’t bad, it just might have bad consequences.
It might sound hyperbolic to say this fictional 11-year-old gave me permission to cultivate the aspects of my personality that would turn me into not just a writer but a good writer, but the values I still see in Harriet the Spyhave been echoed in the reading I’ve done throughout my life.
An especially resonant idea is that of the importance of maintaining close correspondence with oneself, put forth as well in Joan Didion’s, “On Keeping a Notebook.” And though I’m sure Didion didn’t expect to be compared to Harriet M. Welsch, bear with me while I do just that.

The orginal article.

Summary of “In Praise of Kirsten Dunst, the Most Underrated Actor of Her Generation”

Kirsten Dunst was honored with a star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame in August 2019.
There were many reasons to believe Justine really did “Know things”, but none more compelling than that Justine was played by Kirsten Dunst, and it’s hard not to believe that Kirsten Dunst is someone who knows things.
Dunst has built one of the most fascinating and varied Hollywood careers of any actor in her generation by refusing to limit herself to a genre, demonstrating facility with comedy and tragedy alike, working with visionary auteurs, and seeking out the kind of challenging roles which would undoubtedly have earned a male actor untold critical accolades, but which don’t prevent Dunst from being described in profile after profile for her blonde and dimpled good looks, rather than her clear intelligence and wild talent.
Dunst has played all of these things, but much in the same way that her physicality defies easy categorization, thanks to eyes that have an uncanny ability to narrow and lengthen like a cat’s as it prepares to pounce and a smile that reveals teeth that remind you their purpose is to bite, every one of Dunst’s roles subverts the commonly held idea of whatever archetype she’s portraying.
While Dunst certainly has her own bombs, they feel different because they feel reflective of a quality of Dunst’s that is rare in Hollywood: She acts like she has nothing to prove.
Perhaps because Dunst has been in the industry for so long, or perhaps because she experienced her own difficulties with life in the public eye, but Dunst tends to go for projects which are unified because they all feature Dunst in roles that are quietly revelatory.
Because so much like Justine, Dunst just knows things.
Dunst knows things, and by watching her, we grow to know things, too.

The orginal article.

Summary of “We’re Teaching History Wrong”

Good historical thinking is by no means a magical solution to our information woes, as demonstrated by Wineburg’s reports of what trained historians do while trying to navigate the web to find information about nonhistorical topics.
Wineburg advocates, teachers of history can offer the kind of education in how to think that helps students understand all of the information they encounter online much better.
In our conversation, which has been edited and condensed for clarity, we talked about right-clicking, the Trumpian appropriation of “Critical thinking,” and historians’ frustrating and endearing tendency toward hedging.
Rebecca Onion: How does the kind of education we need in order to be smart about the internet differ from the critical thinking module I took in eighth grade, back in 1991?Sam Wineburg: It irks me to no end “Well, is just critical thinking. We don’t need ’21st-century skills.'” And my response is that if we could get a necromancer to bring Socrates back to life, and sit him in front of a computer, he wouldn’t know about keywords and he wouldn’t know about search engine optimization, and he wouldn’t know how to put words in quotation marks in Google, so that Google searches for them contiguously.
So hopefully in 1991, you were taught to not decouple information from its source, and to think of the motivation and intention behind a particular document, that it wasn’t self-evident information presenting itself de novo, but it came with a purpose and it was written down or said to achieve a particular aim.
Most recently a researcher at Data & Society did a report about evangelicals that found that they think Google is a neutral source.
So that’s a piece of knowledge that’s important for people using the internet to fact-check or to think about the quality of information.
I feel like now we are living in nonambiguous times, and so I often run into a problem where I feel like I should be writing pieces that are definitive: “What you think you know about the Confederacy is wrong, and here’s why.” I think this time is testing us in a lot of ways, and one of the ways is: Do we keep on showing people that history is a never-ending inquiry that opens up into layers of questions? Or do we put all of that aside for a minute, because questions don’t win fights?

The orginal article.

Summary of “Stars Claire Danes and Wilson Cruz Look Back at ‘My So-Called Life'”

Wilson Cruz changed that with his depiction of Rickie, a proudly rebellious high school sophomore who was a key member of Angela Chase’s social circle.
As a true confidant to Claire Danes’ Angela, Rickie was both a TV trendsetter and a wonderfully ordinary teen.
Danes took a break from shooting “Homeland” in Morocco to chat with Cruz for Variety’s 2019 Pride Issue.
“I remember dancing with you to ‘Sweet Dreams,'” Danes tells Cruz.
Claire Danes: Wilson, can you remember what we did 25 years ago?
CD: We were all kind of venturing forth into a big unknown.
CD: Jared [Leto] had done a Noxzema commercial, so he was big time.
CD: We went through the gauntlet of auditions to get the pilot.

The orginal article.