Summary of “Don’t Let Your Inner Fears Limit Your Career”

The majority of management literature is focused on helping leaders conquer their fears.
Through our firm’s work with thousands of executives over 30 years, we have come to believe that unrecognized or unacknowledged core fears are almost always a root cause of professional distress and unattained potential.
From our work, we’ve created a four-step process of rigorous self-reflection that countless executives have used to understand their fears and become better leaders.
Protecting oneself from the imagined consequences of these fears can be helpful – pushing you to work harder and achieve more.
As Suzanne began to see how her unfounded fears were worsening her behavior, she began to understand she didn’t have to meet an unattainable ideal.
Suzanne’s arduous self-examination of her fears has turned her life around.
None of us will ever be free from fear, and it’s unrealistic to expect that we can always put our fears in their place.
Even when the stakes of admitting their fears feel high, leaders are always more effective when they are candid and do the hard work to right-size their fears.

The orginal article.

Summary of “How To Be a Leader That Inspires People to Change”

No matter how old you are or what type of role you have in life, there are times you’re a follower, and there are times you’re a leader.
You see, when people talk and write about leadership, we often assume that you need a title to be a leader.
Look, being a leader has nothing to do with your job.
How do you lead? How do you get people to follow you? How do you get people to listen to your ideas?
“My team is small but has very strong, opinionated people. I find myself playing mediator on a daily basis. It takes up a lot of my time, but I believe in making time for the people side of work. However, it can really be mentally exhausting.”
“But I’m not the leader or manager.” That’s what people often hide behind.
So you might technically not be the leader at your work, family, or group of friends; you can still set the right example.
These are the lessons I’ve learned from studying leaders from all walks of life: From business leaders to spiritual leaders.

The orginal article.

Summary of “A Simple Way to Map Out Your Career Ambitions”

Get the experiences and create a personal experience map.
Create Your Personal Experience Map Since the 70-20-10 ratio says that experiences best accelerate your development, you’ll want to understand which experiences will build your career and the few, most powerful experiences that can close your from/to gap.
A regularly updated personal experience map will help you chart your path.
A personal experience map shows which experiences you want to acquire in the next two to five years to grow your career.
The interviews will provide you with the raw material to create your personal experience map.
Your goal is to sort through this information to find the few experiences that will most accelerate your career.
Select four to seven functional experiences and three to four management experiences you believe will benefit you most and list them on your personal experience map.
The personal experience map is now your guide to continuously grow your high-performing self.

The orginal article.

Summary of “What Self-Awareness Really Is”

A few years ago, my team of researchers and I embarked on a large-scale scientific study of self-awareness.
In 10 separate investigations with nearly 5,000 participants, we examined what self-awareness really is, why we need it, and how we can increase it.
Our research revealed many surprising roadblocks, myths, and truths about what self-awareness is and what it takes to improve it.
1: There Are Two Types of Self-Awareness For the last 50 years, researchers have used varying definitions of self-awareness.
The first, which we dubbed internal self-awareness, represents how clearly we see our own values, passions, aspirations, fit with our environment, reactions, and impact on others.
The second category, external self-awareness, means understanding how other people view us, in terms of those same factors listed above.
In our interviews, we found that people who improved their external self-awareness did so by seeking out feedback from loving critics – that is, people who have their best interests in mind and are willing to tell them the truth.
3: Introspection Doesn’t Always Improve Self-Awareness It is also widely assumed that introspection – examining the causes of our own thoughts, feelings, and behaviors – improves self-awareness.

The orginal article.

Summary of “7 Harsh Truths That Will Improve Your Leadership Skills Overnight”

You don’t manage people; you lead people and manage the work.
Seven Brutal Truths About Leadership If you find yourself in the precarious position of wondering “Where do I stand as a leader,” at some point you must face some brutal truths about what it takes to motivate and inspire on a human, emotional, and psychological level.
The brutal truth that good leaders will first pump the fear out of the room.
Every leader needs to ask a very important, look-in-the-mirror, question: “Does my behavior increase trust?” If you are considering elevating your leadership skills, trust is a pillar your leadership should stand on.
The brutal truth that good leaders are willing to listen to feedback.
Many leaders don’t want to listen to ideas, opinions, and constructive feedback from others about their own leadership.
The brutal truth that good leaders are positive, even when things go bad. Good leaders practice positive thinking.
The brutal truth that good leaders put strict boundaries on themselves.

The orginal article.

Summary of “How to Resist the Lure of Overconfidence”

“Confidence makes individuals appear more competent in the eyes of others, even when that confidence is unjustified and unwarranted,” says Cameron Anderson from the Haas School of Management at the University of California, Berkeley.
Overconfidence can come in many forms, the three most common being overestimation, overplacement, and overprecision.
This is the most ro­­­bust form of overconfidence with a wide reach: it is seen across cultures, professions, genders, ages and levels of expertise.
1) Determine whether the person has actual expertise and competence.
Our brains are hardwired to look for shortcuts, which sends us off looking for proxies that are indicative of expertise.
Bryan Bonner, professor of management at the University of Utah, warns us to be aware of proxies of expertise, singling out confidence as a “Messy proxy” for expertise.
As the research shows, although even overconfident experts can be wrong, in most cases they have a higher chance of getting it right compared with those who lack expertise.
The founder, Elizabeth Holmes, achieved unprecedented success in large part because her supporters took her at her word; most lacked medical expertise, and were enthusiastic about the prospect of a female tech superstar in the same league as Jobs and Gates.

The orginal article.

Summary of “7 Harsh Truths That Will Improve Your Leadership Skills Overnight”

You don’t manage people; you lead people and manage the work.
Seven Brutal Truths About Leadership If you find yourself in the precarious position of wondering “Where do I stand as a leader,” at some point you must face some brutal truths about what it takes to motivate and inspire on a human, emotional, and psychological level.
The brutal truth that good leaders will first pump the fear out of the room.
Every leader needs to ask a very important, look-in-the-mirror, question: “Does my behavior increase trust?” If you are considering elevating your leadership skills, trust is a pillar your leadership should stand on.
The brutal truth that good leaders are willing to listen to feedback.
Many leaders don’t want to listen to ideas, opinions, and constructive feedback from others about their own leadership.
The brutal truth that good leaders are positive, even when things go bad. Good leaders practice positive thinking.
The brutal truth that good leaders put strict boundaries on themselves.

The orginal article.

Summary of “To Be a Great Leader, You Have to Learn How to Delegate Well”

The inverse equation of shrinking resources and increasing demands will eventually catch up to you, and at that point how you involve others sets the ceiling of your leadership impact.
The upper limit of what’s possible will increase only with each collaborator you empower to contribute their best work to your shared priorities.
Your involvement is a mix of the opportunities, mandates, and choices you make regarding the work you do.
How ancillary or essential you are to the success of that portfolio depends on how decisively and wisely you activate those around you.
Regardless of your preferred methodology for delegation, here are four strategies that I’ve found work for leaders at all levels.
This not only clarifies the frequency of touchpoints they will find useful but also gives them autonomy in how the delegated work will move forward.
As Anika considered her obligation to develop others – upskilling, providing tangible leadership experience, and so on – she redefined her leadership mandate to avoid being involved and not being essential: “I lead people, priorities, and projects – in that order – and the work will get done because the right people are focused on the right tasks.”
Staying mindful of these four strategies, working out the kinks like Anika did, and becoming proficient at empowering others to deliver their best builds your capacity to get the job done through the contributions of others.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Make Strategic Thinking Part of Your Job”

How can we implement strategic thinking if we’re not even sure what it looks like?
Rich Horwath, CEO of the Strategic Thinking Institute, found in his research that 44% of managers spent most of their time firefighting in cultures that rewarded reactivity and discouraged thoughtfulness.
In my experience helping executives succeed at the top of companies, the best content for great strategic thinking comes right from one’s own job.
In some cases, shedding the collection of bad habits that have consumed how they embody their role will be their greatest challenge to embodying strategic thinking.
For people to commit to carrying out an executive’s strategic thinking, they have to both understand and believe in it.
One executive I work with habitually takes his strategic insights to his team and intentionally asks for dueling fact bases to both support and refute his thinking.
Sound strategic thinking doesn’t have to remain an abstract mystery only a few are able to realize.
Taking these three practical steps will raise the altitude of executives to the appropriate strategic work of the future, freeing those they lead to direct the operational activities of today.

The orginal article.

Summary of “How the dust in your home may affect your health”

This project, called 360 Dust Analysis, is one of a number of recent efforts that are starting to crack the code on indoor dust.
About one-third of household dust is created inside your home.
We hope our 360 Dust Analysis program will help solve more of the riddle of just what else goes into dust.
How did these molecules end up in people’s bodies? Mostly via inhalation or ingestion of indoor dust.
At least one study found that elevated levels of triclosan, a common antimicrobial agent in hand soaps, were correlated with high levels of antibiotic-resistant genes in dust, presumably from bacteria that live in your home and dust.
To get a full picture of dust sources and hazards, you need to consider the other two-thirds of the indoor dust load, which actually come from outside.
One of the most widespread health issues related to outdoor sources is lead. This potent neurotoxin has accumulated to sometimes extremely high levels in soils and dust after a century of emissions from industrial sources, vehicles burning leaded gasoline and degraded lead-based paints.
Much as Freon in refrigerants and other products caused the degradation of Earth’s protective stratospheric ozone layer and bisphenol A, a plasticizer used in bottles and other consumer products ended up in people’s bodies, there’s concern among scientists that “Better living through chemistry” might result in a string of unintended human health consequences in the realm of dust.

The orginal article.