Summary of “Are you a leader or a manager? Here’s the difference”

If you have a management title, you may think of yourself as a leader.
There are some stark differences between how leaders and managers motivate people toward common goals.
Halelly Azulay, founder and CEO of TalentGrow LLC and author of Employee Development on a Shoestring, says the main difference between leaders and managers is that leaders attract a following who believe in their vision, while managers have people who do work for them without necessarily any intrinsic buy-in to a particular vision.
“The primary distinction between a manager and a leader is that you don’t have to hold a management job title to be a leader, and a leader doesn’t have to have formal power over direct reports,” says Perkins.
While not all managers are leaders, both argue managers will be more successful if they develop their leadership skills.
These small steps can help you hone your emotional intelligence and help you become a better leader.
Being an effective leader requires listening to feedback.
Instead of telling people what to do, leaders ask for input from their team and create an engaged workforce who feel that their input makes a difference.

The orginal article.

Summary of “If Strategy Is So Important, Why Don’t We Make Time for It?”

Almost every leader wants to make more time for strategic thinking.
Yet in another study, a full 96% of the leaders surveyed said they lacked the time for strategic thinking.
First, it’s important to remember that strategic thinking doesn’t necessarily require large amounts of time; it’s not about taking endless sabbaticals or going on leadership retreats.
As productivity expert David Allen told me when I interviewed him for my book Stand Out, “You don’t need time to have a good idea, you need space. It takes zero time to have an innovative idea or to make a decision, but if you don’t have psychic space, those things are not necessarily impossible, but they’re suboptimal.”
Even with limited time and the same amount of responsibilities, it’s far easier to think strategically if you can clear the decks by doing simple things such as writing down all of your outstanding tasks in one place, so you can properly triage them and aren’t constantly interrupted by the feeling that you forgot something.
Second, it’s useful to be clear on where your time is actually going.
It’s not the easiest project to keep up, but the resulting data was invaluable in terms of helping me understand exactly where and how I was spending my time.
By becoming aware of the disincentives to make time for strategy – and taking proactive steps to embed strategic thinking into your life and professional schedule – you can stand up for a goal that you, and 97% of other leaders, recognize as critical.

The orginal article.

Summary of “If Strategy Is So Important, Why Don’t We Make Time for It?”

Almost every leader wants to make more time for strategic thinking.
Yet in another study, a full 96% of the leaders surveyed said they lacked the time for strategic thinking.
First, it’s important to remember that strategic thinking doesn’t necessarily require large amounts of time; it’s not about taking endless sabbaticals or going on leadership retreats.
As productivity expert David Allen told me when I interviewed him for my book Stand Out, “You don’t need time to have a good idea, you need space. It takes zero time to have an innovative idea or to make a decision, but if you don’t have psychic space, those things are not necessarily impossible, but they’re suboptimal.”
Even with limited time and the same amount of responsibilities, it’s far easier to think strategically if you can clear the decks by doing simple things such as writing down all of your outstanding tasks in one place, so you can properly triage them and aren’t constantly interrupted by the feeling that you forgot something.
Second, it’s useful to be clear on where your time is actually going.
It’s not the easiest project to keep up, but the resulting data was invaluable in terms of helping me understand exactly where and how I was spending my time.
By becoming aware of the disincentives to make time for strategy – and taking proactive steps to embed strategic thinking into your life and professional schedule – you can stand up for a goal that you, and 97% of other leaders, recognize as critical.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Trump Kim summit: Who are North Korea’s running bodyguards?”

The world once again got a glimpse of Kim Jong-un’s suited running bodyguards as they escorted his motorcade in Singapore.
The bodyguards running alongside Mr Kim’s limousine and those who walk in close proximity to him are part of something called Central Party Office #6, or formally, it’s known as the Main Office of Adjutants.
Walking, riding ahead, or in advance of Mr Kim are between three to five bodyguards including the director of the Main Office of Adjutants.
Despite carrying firearms, the bodyguards’ main defence for Mr Kim are their skills of observation, and neutralising any perceived threat with their hands and bodies.
Kim Jong-un’s bodyguards, in contrast to his father, are fewer in number and have a less obtrusive presence.
Guard Command personnel undergo a similar selection and vetting process as Mr Kim’s bodyguards in the Main Office of Adjutants.
In fact most bodyguards rotate out of the latter department into the GC. Recent observation and reporting about Mr Kim’s visit to Singapore noted that three planes arrived to the city state from Pyongyang.
While the running bodyguards are a striking image, it is the additional and not immediately visible layers of security further out that are the most sophisticated and extreme in the lengths they will go to ensure the preservation of the Kim dynasty.

The orginal article.

Summary of “5 Ways to Project Confidence in Front of an Audience”

Whether you’re presenting on an analyst call or speaking to your entire organization in a town hall meeting, you’re being judged on your confidence and competence, not just your content, and the way you appear and how you sound matters.
A study on CEOs giving IPO road-show presentations found that even hardened financial advisors judge a leader’s “Competence and trustworthiness” within as little as 30-seconds.
“In the military, it all starts with how you’re dressed the first time you meet a subordinate. Always dress a little better than everyone else and you’ll look confident.” You’ll note that he said a little better.
James Citrin, a leading CEO recruiter, once advised job candidates to dress 25% “More formal” than the prevailing dress code at the company.
In his book, Thinking, Fast and Slow, Nobel prize-winning psychologist Daniel Kahneman writes, “If you care about being thought credible and intelligent, do not use complex language where simpler language will do.”
You gain credibility and respect when you’re able to articulate complex ideas in simple language.
Before an important presentation, consider gathering a few people to watch a dress rehearsal, even if it’s in your office or even your living room, rather than practicing alone in a mirror.
One tip is what body language experts call “Open posture.” Having two hands, palms facing up, above the waist would be considered open.

The orginal article.

Summary of “5 Behaviors of Leaders Who Embrace Change”

Part of the issue is how organizations view the human aspect of the closing date, which is usually treated as the end of the transaction, when it’s really just the start of change.
Leaders in the M&A environment are managing an organization that hasn’t existed before.
In this environment, change agility needs to be part of the new organization’s and leaders’ DNA. It can’t just exist in a few people in the organization; it needs to be the way business gets done.
Successful change-agile leaders at all levels in the organization respond to changes in the business environment by seizing opportunities, including throwing out old models and developing new ways of doing business.
Change-agile leaders demonstrate five integrated behaviors that, together, create a competitive advantage for the organization.
Promote calculated risk-taking and experimentation: Robert Kennedy, paraphrasing George Bernard Shaw, said, “There are those who look at things the way they are, and ask why. I dream of things that never were, and ask why not?” Too often, our traditional organizations’ first response to a risk is to ask, “Why?” Change agility requires leaders to ask “Why not?” and to establish opportunities for pilots, prototypes, and experimentation.
Change-agile leaders and organizations are replacing functional silos with formal and informal organizations that allow for the rapid flow of information and decision-making around a product, customer, or region.
Seeing the opportunity to improve the employee experience and create cost efficiencies across the learning organizations, she brought together her fellow learning leaders.

The orginal article.

Summary of “IDEO CEO Tim Brown believes that creativity will be the solution to automation”

Novogratz is one of the best examples I know of a creative leader who puts radically new ideas into action.
Creativity isn’t solely the domain of traditional artistic fields.
Just as technology now impacts every area of our lives, not just the computer-powered parts, creativity often involves abstract thinking that connects disparate parts of our experience to address the challenges at hand.
Drawing parallels to past opportunities allows us to extrapolate a solution in the absence of more compelling data.
As it’s one of the few things that automation will struggle to wrestle from us, creativity is going to be vital to survival in the future.
As the pace of innovation speeds up, disrupting entire industries, we must hold dear what is uniquely ours: The ability to understand human behavior and creatively solve for human needs.
Creative leadership doesn’t require being a lone genius: It requires setting some design constraints for how you work, and flexing a few basic behavioral muscles that you already have.
Think about the way an athlete trains to stay fit: As a creative person, if I don’t train every day, I won’t be effective.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Want to Hear a Great Leader In Action? They Will Often Say These 3 Things”

Being a leader in people-centric work cultures differs drastically from managers in toxic workplaces who bark out demands and use century-old tactics like fear and negative reinforcement to motivate.
Truly effective leaders get their people from the neck up through influence – the positive actions that connect them with the people they lead. But for many of us, when we end up telling stories to our kids and grandkids about the leaders who made a difference in our lives, we remember the words they spoke.
You may think a leader speaks with charisma and bravado.
Here’s what you’ll hear from the most effective and humble leaders.
Great leaders put their ego aside, because admitting to being human and making mistakes actually increases trust.
By acknowledging someone else’s effort for going above and beyond, a leader makes that person look good by shining the spotlight on their individual contributions, which he or she deserves.
Bad leaders will use this phrase to instill fear in workers and establish positional authority, which is contrary to what great leaders do.
On the flip side, great leaders are absolutely confident in their people’s abilities; they have an internal faith mechanism that will explore every avenue, solicit every opinion and input, and ask the question, “How can we, as a team, make this happen?”.

The orginal article.

Summary of “With Xi’s Power Grab, China Joins New Era of Strongmen”

Almost no one would have described China as genuinely democratic before the latest move, which was announced without fanfare on Sunday; the country remains a one-party state with extensive control over political, social and economic life.
Mr. Xi’s gambit ended a period of collective and term-limited leadership begun by Jiang Zemin, who held the same post as Mr. Xi from 1993 to 2003, that many had hoped was leading China toward greater rule of law and openness.
Whatever the chaos of Boris N. Yeltsin’s era in 1990s, democracy was taking root when Mr. Putin came to power – in a relatively free and fair election, no less.
President Trump’s critics say that while he may not yet have eroded democracy in the United States, his populist appeals and nativist policies, his palpable aversion to the media and traditional checks on power, and his stated admiration for some of the strongest of strongmen are cut from the same cloth.
Mr. Putin has long cited such flaws to shore up his power at home; the campaign to interfere in the 2016 presidential election in the United States seemed intended, in the first place, to discredit American democracy still more.
The “Contagion” of 1989, which saw popular protesters bring down Communist governments in Central and Eastern Europe, infected China, too.
Mr. Xi, as a result, believes that only stability can ensure his vision of China’s revival and emergence as the world’s power.
In last fall’s Communist Party congress, Mr. Xi even presented China as a new model for the developing world – a thinly veiled argument that the United States and Europe were no longer as attractive as they once were.

The orginal article.

Summary of “but Are Oblivious to Their Weaknesses”

Yet what we see when we administer 360-degree feedback surveys on behalf of these leaders is that the executives with really low scores in one or more areas are often completely unaware of their fatal flaws.
Let us explain what we mean by a “Fatal flaw.” Everyone has weaknesses, but over the course of administering assessments to tens of thousands of leaders, we have found that most of the time that mild weaknesses do not impact a person’s overall effectiveness.
These are weaknesses that are so extreme that they can have a dramatic negative effect on a leader, seriously hampering their contribution to the organization and their career progress.
Why are weaknesses and fatal flaws so hard for us to spot in ourselves? Here’s our theory.
Weaknesses – especially fatal flaws – are the opposite.
Fatal flaws are “Sins of omission.” They’re a result of inaction, of the leader not doing something.
We occasionally do find leaders whose fatal flaws are “Sins of commission” – like a boss with a terrible temper, or an executive who lies – but those people are very rare.
If roughly one-third of leaders have a fatal flaw and you are sitting in a management meeting, look to your right and then to your left.

The orginal article.