Summary of “The inside story behind the funniest baseball card ever made”

Thirty years ago – in what otherwise would have been a forgotten minor league set – Comstock appeared on one of the most memorable baseball cards ever made.
I never had a major league baseball card of myself, until 1988.
The cool part of that 1988 card is it became a sought-after error card within the Topps set.
Honestly, another minor league card was a reminder of how my career was going.
You had to sign a contract to do the baseball card, which covered a bunch of stuff and said you agreed that your photo would show up in the set.
So many of those guys were future major leaguers, and it was pretty obvious the card company needed them in the set.
Their mom showed them the card awhile back, and they loved it.
Fans bring the card to the field and want me to sign it.

The orginal article.

Summary of “‘Oh my God, how can we do this?'”

STEPHEN VOGT: My brother Danny, who was 13, we were avid Giants fans, avid baseball fans, always playing baseball, pretending to be the Giants, playing video games.
The biggest thing for us, as kids, was we didn’t understand the difference between the players and the owners, it was, “Why would they lock out? Why would they strike? Why would they stop playing baseball?”.
Our club president, Claude Brochu, was a promoter of playing with replacement players.
How we had pieced that team together, how the people fit, Don Mattingly would have been a shoo-in Hall of Famer if that season had been played.
The strike started careers, but mostly, it ended careers: 57 players played their final major league game in August 1994, 19 played their final game on Aug. 11, 1994.
We did a study of how much money the players would otherwise have gotten paid, and what they did get paid, if we had taken the clubs’ proposal.
We all knew that the game was bigger than the players who played it.
If any big league player has a problem with it, I’ll take the heat, I made you play.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Love, Death and Volleyball: The Four-Decade Run of a Trailblazing Gay Sports League”

“Welcome to the Gotham Volleyball Drag Tournament 2018!”.Tournament players are decked out in wigs, heels, gowns, tutus, copious eye shadow, hand fans, butterfly wings and body-hugging foliage.
The volleyball league continued to expand, reaching 300 members by 1989, a time when AIDS was decimating New York City’s gay population and many in the LGBTQ community turned to the group for support and relief.
In the volleyball league, he found not only an outlet for tension but also a love interest: Heriberto Estrada, who was then the commissioner.
The Gotham Volleyball League, then part of the Manhattan Community Athletic Association of New York in the mid-1980s.
Of course, the gay volleyball community was not immune to AIDS itself.
Another player, who has published 20 crossword puzzles in The New York Times, composes gay-themed crossword puzzles sprinkled with volleyball clues for Gotham’s newsletters.
Players usually head around the corner to Gym Sportsbar, which became New York City’s first gay sports bar when a pair of Gotham guys, Nick Leonard and Rick Schmutzler, opened it in 2005.
The Gotham Volleyball contingent at the NYC Pride March in 2018.As the league has evolved, its emphasis on philanthropy has grown.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Can Lacrosse Work As a Professional Sport?”

“The defensive position,” repeats Rabil, “Is, like: What about the 1 percent of rabid lacrosse fans? Are they going to get ticked off?”.
After 11 seasons as an attacker for Major League Lacrosse-the now-18-year-old professional outdoor league where Rabil was drafted first overall in 2008, won two championships, set an all-time scoring record, made a name and some money, and eventually felt stifled and unheard-Rabil announced that he and his brother, Mike, would be building an entirely new operation, populated by nearly all the sport’s best players, called the Premier Lacrosse League.
Rabil won two NCAA championships at Johns Hopkins and three at the professional level: two in the MLL, where he averaged more than four points a game, and one in the winter indoor National Lacrosse League.
Hogan’s previous coach, Bill Belichick, is an old lacrosse head: He played at Andover and Wesleyan; his daughter is the head women’s coach at Holy Cross, and he knew about Rabil back in his Johns Hopkins days.
Rabil skips into the room accompanied by 22-year-old Kylie Ohlmiller, who is the top player in the Women’s Professional Lacrosse League, a year-old organization that has recently partnered with the PLL to collaborate on youth initiatives, explore joint sponsorship opportunities, and occasionally share venues.
In fairness, the descriptor has long been rendered essentially meaningless via sweeping overuse, in much the same vein as “Hipster” or “Troll.” What even is a lax bro? Are we talking the lacrosse Spicolis of the world, with their chill vibes and their jam bands, or do we mean the guys who wear mesh pinneys and Chubbies in public and yell “Suns out guns out!!!” in your face? Either is a far cry from the conference’s median attendees: shy little hypebeasty tweens wearing rad kicks and jogger sweats who mob Rabil when he walks by.
Who knows how much better the talent pool, current and aspiring alike, might be if everyone weren’t constantly dealing with the irritating, corrosive logistics of the weekend-warrior lifestyle? Before the second week of PLL play, Rabil visited the New York Mets to drum up some local interest, and rookie stud Pete Alonso, who grew up playing lacrosse in Florida, asked him if they could have a quick toss.
“The reason why he didn’t pursue lacrosse in college is that the pro game wasn’t exciting for him,” Rabil says.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Inside the short, unhappy life of the Alliance of American Football”

Ebersol knew the call had to be about his league, the Alliance of American Football.
Ebersol called Bill Polian, the Hall of Fame general manager, who had signed on as an AAF co-founder, overseeing football operations.
One day during production, Ebersol had asked Tom Veit, the former vice president and general manager of the XFL’s Orlando Rage: If we learn from the XFL’s mistakes, could spring football work?
A spring league, Ebersol says, “Had always been a hook for me” because the XFL was “The only time in my life I ever saw my dad accused of not succeeding.”
Most of all, Ebersol said, their league would be a true alliance among “The fans, the players and the game.” The players would be cared for, with good salaries and funds to help them finish college.
Two weeks later, on March 20, Ebersol and Polian stood onstage and announced the Alliance of American Football, promising to change not only football but the way fans view and bet on the game, with an app that would be ahead of the television feed, allowing fans to gamble before each play.
At the DoubleTree, Ebersol promised to divert more of that money to football operations.
Against all odds, Ebersol had done it: He had produced an actual spring football game, on national television and before 27,000 fans, with a fraction of the funding of the XFL. A section of the crowd chanted his name.

The orginal article.

Summary of “How a 19-year-old prospect is turning the MLB draft upside down”

Stewart is in agreement on a six-year contract worth more than $7 million with the Fukuoka SoftBank Hawks of Japan’s Pacific League, sources familiar with the deal told ESPN. Stewart was the No. 8 overall pick in last year’s MLB draft but didn’t sign after the Atlanta Braves, who believed he was injured, offered him a signing bonus well under the $4.98 million slot value of the pick – around $2 million.
Stewart went to junior college instead and was expected to go early in the second round of this year’s draft – and receive an offer of less than $2 million.
Stewart is expected to finalize the deal by the end of May. Not only does Stewart stand to make more money during his six years in Japan than he would have with an MLB organization, he could potentially return to the United States as a 25-year-old free agent allowed to sign a long-term contract with any of MLB’s 30 teams.
The idea of a player decamping to Japan has been floated over the years by agent Scott Boras, who represents Stewart, in an attempt to extract leverage in an amateur draft system without any.
MLB’s rules require a “Foreign professional” to have spent “All or part of at least six seasons” playing in an “MLB-recognized foreign professional league.” Even though Stewart is American, sources told ESPN that residency determination for foreign players is based on a number of factors, including where a player has played, where he plans to live, as well as his nationality.
If they do not, Stewart could at age 25 join MLB via the posting system, which is used to transfer players between the leagues.
Stewart, after all, is a kid from the Space Coast who played baseball at Eau Gallie High School last year and Eastern Florida State College this season.
Kids from the Dominican Republic and Venezuela and Colombia and all around Latin America do it every day in MLB – and for far less than the millions Stewart will receive.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Shady Numbers And Bad Business: Inside The Esports Bubble”

Kotaku asked over a dozen esports professionals if they believe there is a path towards making money that is on par with the level of investment going into esports right now.
Over the last couple of years, a slew of esports organizations have run clean out of money and slunk off with their tails between their legs: Circa Esports, Allegiance, the Moviestar Esports Channel, and Millenium, not to mention a huge number of journalistic publications covering esports.
“If esports is the next big thing, they don’t want to miss out on it,” said Sabina Hemmi, the CEO of esports analytics firm ELO Entertainment.
“Our esports numbers have previously been criticized as overinflated, as we have seen the $1 billion figure taken out of context without diving into the region and business model splits to understand how we come to that number,” a NewZoo representative told Kotaku.
Pike, who calls esports revenue “a big question mark,” has been grappling with the many unknowns of esports data, including revenue measurement.
“A lot of people who want a sustainable, healthy esports environment want it to be an honest one where we aren’t using fake numbers,” said Sabina Hemmi, the CEO of the esports analytics firm ELO Entertainment.
Reas Thorstensson feels similarly, and he’s had every vantage point on esports: he’s a former Counter-Strike pro who has run the esports team SK Gaming, worked in venture capital and esports analytics, and also co-founded esports tech company Popdog.
Twitch had a short response: “Twitch has been the go-to destination for esports content for years. We’ve been at the forefront of the industry’s growth and success, and we will continue to invest in esports and competitive gaming as a component of our overall content strategy.”

The orginal article.

Summary of “The sour science driving James Harden’s vexing genius”

From an analytical perspective, the trio of GM Daryl Morey, head coach Mike D’Antoni and superstar James Harden have coalesced to form the shrewdest offense in the NBA. Their strategies reformed conventional wisdom and revealed important truths about offensive efficiency – most famously that the pathway to optimizing effective field percentage is marked by a few simple ideas: midrange shots are dumb, and layups, dunks and free throws are brilliant.
An average Harden 3-point shooting foul yields more than 2.6 points.
At age 29, Harden is already the all-time leader in 3-point shooting fouls drawn.
Harden drew a league-leading 120 3-point shooting fouls in 2016-17, then that number dipped to 69 in 2017-18 after the league honed in on his continuation techniques as a point of its officiating emphasis.
Harden adjusted by mastering the step-back 3 this season, drawing 93 3-point fouls in the process.
More than any other player in the league, Harden operates like the refs are marks.
The rulebase – particularly the wildly punitive 3-point shooting foul – is inspiring Harden to chase these calls because the plays are considered so valuable.
Harden is just the first one to fully realize that the sour science of flopping and chasing whistles is highly effective.

The orginal article.

Summary of “The Future of Sports Betting: A Battle Among Industry Players”

Through interviews with more than a dozen people from these various groups, there is a clear sentiment that all parties have a shared, mutual interest in a successful legal sports betting industry in the U.S. But that’s not to say there aren’t disagreements, currently playing out across the country on a state-by-state basis, regarding issues that could shape the future of sports gambling in America for decades to come.
Then there are other issues that relate to in-play betting-a massive and ever-growing piece of the sports betting market that’s enabled by the vast amount of data collected by the leagues and sports data partners like SportRadar and Genius Sports.
That bill would represent the first piece of federal legislation governing the legal sports betting industry in the U.S. While the gaming industry appears to be against such legislation-Slane said it would “Add another level of bureaucracy” for gaming operators already heavily regulated at the state level-the idea is met with virtually unanimous approval among leagues, data providers, mobile betting operators, and other industry participants.
While there are no betting windows available to take wagers in person-New Jersey law still restricts where you can establish a brick-and-mortar betting operation-all one has to do is flip open bookmaker William Hill’s mobile sports betting app and place a wager with the tap of a finger.
While sports betting is now legal in Pennsylvania, mobile sports betting is not, which means that similar offerings are not yet on the cards for the 76ers at their home in Philadelphia.
Despite opposition from state gaming lobbies across the country, most people in the sports betting industry agree that mobile sports betting is the way of the future, if not the present.
Both FanDuel and DraftKings have dominated the mobile sports betting market in nearby New Jersey, and mobile betting itself has come to represent a majority market share of the overall sports betting market in the Garden State.
“There’s no firm reason why any state has to run licensing through the casinos,” according to Matt Kalish, the CRO and co-founder of DraftKings, who noted that the company’s home state, Massachusetts, has proposed a sports betting law allowing mobile operators “Direct licensing [that] wouldn’t run through a casino.” But Kalish notes that, in New Jersey, the company is “Pretty happy” with the state’s sports betting regulations and is “Making it work with whatever framework” is provided.

The orginal article.

Summary of “The Book of Jobu: How ‘Major League’ predicted the future”

“Major League” – the hit baseball comedy that turns 30 years old this week, and that I saw for the first time this month – is basically the Book of Job, and is thus thoroughly timeless.
“Major League” – and the Book of Job – anticipated what we can call the Rebuild Era, or if we’re being cynical about it, the Tanking Era.
While the big league Cubs got killed down on the field below, they watched the Cubs of tomorrow dominate in the minor leagues on those TV screens.
Weren’t rooting against the major league club, mind you, but their plans did involve strangling the team’s hopes for the season by underinvesting.
Their emotions didn’t involve the major leaguers on that club.
We define a successful season for each major league club based on finding pleasure – and avoiding pain.
For the Cubs players themselves, their emotions did depend on those major league games.
Release dateApril 7, 1989Budget$11MBox-office gross$49,797,148Tagline”When these three oddballs try to play hardball,the result is totally screwball.”Rotten Tomatoes “Tomatometer” score82%Sequels”Major League II””Major League: Back to the Minors”Indians home park in filmMilwaukee County StadiumMunicipal StadiumYankees slugger “Haywood”.

The orginal article.