Summary of “‘Bull Durham’ at 30: The Making of an All-Time Sports Movie Classic”

“If I got one shot to direct,” he remembered thinking, “I’ll make a sports movie I would like to see.” At that point, Shelton already had the idea for Bull Durham.
“You cannot make a movie about a right fielder and a third baseman,” Shelton said, “Because they don’t interact.”
At first, Shelton pitched Bull Durham as Lysistrata in the minors.
The actor’s emergence as a box-office draw, Shelton said, led to Orion Pictures financing the baseball movie.
Shelton called the weathered stadium and the city “The perfect place” to shoot the movie.
Shelton filmed one for Clown Prince of Baseball Max Patkin, who plays himself, but cut it.
“Nuke doesn’t even know what he’s getting and Crash, it’s what he’s always wanted,” Shelton said.
Unlike Crash, who set the minor league home run mark before retiring, Shelton never got a final moment of glory.

The orginal article.

Summary of “The Warriors Upped the Stakes This Offseason”

The Warriors won their third title in four seasons in a sweep, and LeBron James wasn’t even on the floor in the final four minutes of Game 4 because the Cavaliers were getting pummeled so badly.
Dynasties have defined the NBA every decade-Bill Russell’s Celtics to Magic Johnson’s Lakers to Michael Jordan’s Bulls-but it’s different with the Warriors: It’s felt like the road has been too easy, just like many fans and pundits feared it would be when Kevin Durant decided to join the Warriors on July 4, 2016.
Every team faces its own kind of adversity-David West even hinted after Game 4 that Golden State had behind-the-scenes issues that the public has “No clue” about-but it doesn’t change the fact that the Warriors still tip the scales on the court.
The Warriors are here to stay, as is the feeling from some fans that they’re ruining the NBA by turning every season into an inevitability.
The Warriors may be too good, but coaches, executives, and players around the league have an unsatisfied hunger to defeat them.
The offseason hot stove is already burning up just three days after the Warriors’ win.
Regardless of where he goes, his next team will need the talent and cerebral qualities necessary to defeat the Warriors.
No one expected the Warriors to turn into a force when Curry’s ankles couldn’t stay healthy and Draymond Green was just a second-round reserve.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Why The NBA Abandoned Roy Hibbert”

Just before Anthony’s dunk could find the bottom of the cup, 26-year-old defensive stud Roy Hibbert, Indiana’s 7-foot-2 tree of a center, managed to get his outstretched left arm between Anthony and the rim.
The league learned new tricks, and Hibbert didn’t.
“It’s surprising to me. I’ve talked to Roy about this, but he could still be playing in the league right now,” said Frank Vogel, Hibbert’s former coach in Indiana, who was recently let go by the Magic.
Hibbert was so good at doing this that LeBron James, seemingly frustrated with Hibbert and what he perceived to be uncalled fouls against the big man, once referred to it as “His verticality rule,” saying that officials allowed him to make use of it more than other players.
As Hibbert continued to protect the rim well, that skill by itself became less valuable in a changing NBA. Take, for example, the Pacers’ 2014 playoff series against No. 8 seed Atlanta, in which the Hawks surprisingly took top-seeded Indiana to seven games.
Much like a dog who’s bound by the constraints of an electric fence, Hibbert opts to stay tethered beneath the free-throw line on defense when he can, both so he can shut down shots at the rim and because his mobility isn’t good enough to defend in open space.
Hibbert spent just over 71 percent of his time on defense beneath the free-throw line on defense from 2013-14 through 2015-16, the third-highest rate in the league over that span, according to data tracked by ESPN Analytics and NBA Advanced Stats.
At the same time that Hibbert was struggling to have the same impact defensively, other players – ones with more mobility and better foot speed – began learning how to perfect the notion of verticality.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Bojan Krkic: ‘I had anxiety attacks but no one wants to talk about that. Football’s not interested'”

Perhaps it is no surprise that when he retires he hopes to teach football, and life, to young players.
“In footballing terms it went well but not personally. I had to live with that and people say my career hasn’t been as expected. When I came up, it was ‘new Messi’. Well, yes, if you compare me with Messi but what career did you expect? And there are lots of things that people didn’t know. I didn’t go to the European Championship because of anxiety issues but we said I was going on holiday. I was called up for Spain against France, my international debut, and it was said that I had gastroenteritis when I had an anxiety attack. But no one wants to talk about that. Football’s not interested.”
I went to the Under-17 World Cup in July and no one knew me; when I came back, I couldn’t even walk down the road. A few days later I made my debut against Osasuna, three or four days later I play in the Champions League, then I score against Villarreal, then Spain called.
“Bojan had been built up as a player to mark a generation. In his absence, Spain began the most successful era in history. After four years he departed the Camp Nou. He has played for six clubs in the seven seasons since.”It would have been easy to stay at Barcelona and not play but I needed to go,” he says.
“Maybe at times I should have been more patient but I’ve always been honest making decisions [to move]; I always wanted to play.
“One thing people have said to me, is that if I had been more of an hijo de puta, a cabrón And the higher up you get the more you have to be one. But I say: ‘I can’t.’ And when I have tried to play a nastier role on the pitch, I’ve lost it completely.”
“And the most important thing isn’t the trophies, it’s the experiences, what you lived, what’s here in your heart, what you know, what you live. No one can ever steal that from you. And those people who spoke ill of you, they’ll forget. If Víctor Valdés, the greatest goalkeeper in Barcelona’s history, has been forgotten, how could they not forget me? And then it’ll be just me and what will be left will be the pride, the moments, unique moments lots of players have never lived.”
“I love football and no one will ever take that from me. I’m proud of my career, proud of what I have lived, and even if there are hard moments, including this year, you have to be strong. I will always love football, always, I’m still young, I enjoy playing, and I have no intention of stopping yet.”

The orginal article.

Summary of “Will Ichiro Be Our Last Universally Beloved Superstar?”

Ichiro will go down as one of the greatest ballplayers of all time, both in his native Japan and in his adopted U.S. His accomplishments in either leg of his career are dizzying in their extremes.
Ichiro was something even rarer, perhaps, than a generational baseball talent: He was, and is, universally beloved.
To watch Ichiro was to take delight in baseball, even if he was speeding past your infielders.
“He’s really nervous right now,” his interpreter explained to Jordan as Ichiro giggled and covered his face.
The sum of our knowledge of non-baseball Ichiro doesn’t go much beyond the fact he is married and loves dogs.
Part of this mysteriousness, surely, has to do with a language barrier: Ichiro has spent the better part of two decades in a country whose language he did not speak when he arrived, becoming in the process MLB’s first Asian superstar.
How could you resent someone whose most heartily expressed opinion is a love of baseball? Ichiro was everything to everyone, a superstar who could be anything you wanted him to-and do everything, to boot.
For now, we’re getting an exit so calculatedly understated and graceful that you can’t help but admire it-a thoroughly Ichiro way to say goodbye to the plate.

The orginal article.

Summary of “NBA Commissioner Adam Silver Has a Game Plan”

Beyond being one of the biggest providers of sports programming, it has expanded its lines of business into adjacent areas: the WNBA; the NBA G League, a developmental league; the NBA 2K League, an e-sports league based on the NBA’s video game NBA 2K; NBA League Pass, a popular video streaming service of live games; and a host of experiments with leading technology platforms including Facebook, YouTube, and Tencent.
The 2018 Los Angeles All-Star game was the 55th anniversary of the first All-Star game we played in Los Angeles in 1963.
S+B: What role do you think video games, in particular, play in the NBA’s fan ecosystem? How is their significance similar to or different from, say, what you said about social media?SILVER: We’ve always believed that, to an extent, young fans become engaged with the NBA through our video games, and by learning about the players and the teams, they’re more likely to want to engage in the live product.
We think there’s an opportunity to capture a new kind of fan, one who currently isn’t necessarily watching our games on television, but is more of a gamer, and is interested in NBA content and enjoys playing our NBA 2K game.
We saw an opportunity to create a league with our partner Take-Two around our NBA 2K game, using a new set of competitors who are professional gamers.
What if a mobile user gets an alert that a game is close, or that Steph Curry is going for 50 points, or that a game is going down to the wire? How do we then provide an opportunity for them with one click to buy some portion of the game that they can watch on their phone? Maybe we’ll be able to set the price based on the amount of content consumed rather than selling the entire game for a set price.
Tencent has been very focused on discovery: for example, on how it alerts users that there’s an interesting part of the game on, or that a player that users have already demonstrated an interest in is playing.
Bob Johnson, the founder of BET, when he was the owner of the Charlotte franchise, said watching an NBA game [on TV] is like watching one of the old silent movies.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Inside the Confidential N.F.L. Meeting to Discuss National Anthem Protests”

The owners were intent on finding a way to avoid Trump’s continued criticism.
The Buffalo Bills owner Terry Pegula sounded anguished over the uncertainty of when Trump would take another shot at the league.
The owners kept returning to one bottom-line issue: Large numbers of fans and sponsors had become angry about the protests.
After the Miami Dolphins owner Stephen Ross raised the idea of a “March on Washington” by N.F.L. players and owners, Eric Reid, Kaepernick’s former teammate and the first player to kneel alongside him, brought the discussion back to Kaepernick.
Anquan Boldin, a former N.F.L. wide receiver who was at the meeting, said that owners needed to be spokesmen, too.
“Letting people know it’s not just the players that care about these issues, but the owners, too,” Boldin said.
Before the meeting ended, owners had quoted Thomas Paine, invoked Martin Luther King Jr.’s Selma march and expressed great hope for what they all could accomplish together.
“Today owners and players had a productive meeting focused on how we can work together to promote positive social change and address inequality in our communities. NFL executives and owners joined NFLPA executives and player leaders to review and discuss plans to utilize our platform to promote equality and effectuate positive change. We agreed that these are common issues and pledged to meet again to continue this work together.”

The orginal article.

Summary of “The Disgrace of Minor League Baseball”

The collective bargaining agreement that governs MLB gives a team control over a player for either four or five minor league seasons, then his first six full major league seasons.
You won’t get rich making $35,000 per year, and it’s still not a great look for a league that pulls in $8 billion a season, but you can live on $35,000, as opposed to the $6,000 or so most minor league baseball players will make each season.
Even basketball players don’t have it as good as minor league hockey players.
In the ECHL, the lowest level of affiliated North American hockey, the rookie minimum for the current season is $460 per week, which isn’t much, but still beats the $1,160 per month minor league baseball players make.
So why do minor league basketball and hockey players get a better deal than minor league baseball players, despite those leagues’ parent clubs bringing in less money overall? It’s not because basketball and hockey owners are less interested in maximizing profits at all costs-many baseball owners have a stake in another pro team, and even if the people running the NBA, NHL, and MLB aren’t literally the same people, they all went to the same business schools and hang out at the same golf courses.
Plus, the crop of underpaid minor league baseball players includes not only Americans with nothing more than a high school education, but Latin American players, many of whom grew up in poverty, and who’d have to leave the country if they chose to pursue another career.
Minor league hockey players, unlike minor league baseball and basketball players, are unionized.
There are numerous reasons why paying minor league baseball players a living wage, and not screwing around with their big league service time, would be beneficial for MLB clubs as well.

The orginal article.

Summary of “From Atop the College Basketball World to the Middle of Nowhere”

Today, the Hustle, one of 26 G League teams, are in town to play the South Bay Lakers.
For players like Davis, John Wall, and DeMarcus Cousins, Kentucky was a launchpad for long NBA careers.
Some now play in Europe, others in Asia, and many more in the G League.
He’s played for a G League team that no longer exists and international leagues that are tiers below the country’s premier league.
He’s been fined for altercations, brawls, and calling out Manny Pacquiao for playing in the same league as him in the Philippines.
“Playing basketball abroad, you kind of feel like you don’t have a life. I mean, you don’t have a life. This is my life, essentially. It consumes everything.”
“We were kids playing together, highly touted kids at one of the biggest basketball schools in the country with the best fan base,” Harrison says.
Teague says he’s always made a point to chat up former Kentucky players whenever he runs into one, whether it be at an NBA game, a G League game, or maybe a run in the summer.

The orginal article.

Summary of “The 10 Biggest Questions Heading Into the NFL Offseason”

Seven teams will head into 2018 with new head coaches and/or front-office personnel, and a handful more have made changes at the general manager position.
Scheme changes, locker-room culture shifts, and salary cap purges are common among regime changes as new coaches and GMs look to bring in “Their guys,” ditch the players that are not, and create a competitive team.
Will pending superstar contract negotiations stall? Steelers running back Le’Veon Bell is looking for a long-term contract and has already indicated he’s willing to sit out or retire if the team tries to franchise-tag him for a second straight year.
Add in tight end Antonio Gates, defensive end Julius Peppers, running backs Adrian Peterson and Frank Gore, safety Kam Chancellor, pass rusher Cliff Avril, and a slew of other aging vets that could decide to call it a career and a few teams could look a whole lot different in 2018.
The overhaul’s already started, of course, and following the Seahawks’ 9-7 finish, head coach Pete Carroll fired offensive coordinator Darrell Bevell, defensive coordinator Kris Richard, offensive line/assistant head coach Tom Cable, and a few other position coaches-all moves that signaled a desire to return to the type of football Carroll wants his team to play.
The question now is whether that coaching purge will extend to the team’s roster.
Not only did Philly head coach Doug Pederson’s system make Carson Wentz an early favorite for the MVP award, but that quarterback-friendly scheme helped Nick Foles lead the team to a championship after the team lost Wentz for the year with a torn ACL. The NFL’s a copycat league, and plenty of teams were paying attention to what Pederson-and a few other forward-thinking coaches around the league, including his former boss Andy Reid-did this year to stress defenses with run-pass options, option runs, and play-action looks.
Add the Redskins, a team that may incorporate some of Kansas City’s offensive stylings to help smooth Smith’s transition, to that list, and there should be a handful of other teams that work those concepts into their offenses.

The orginal article.