Summary of “The AI revolution in science”

An important recent advance in AI has been machine learning, which shows up in technologies from spellcheck to self-driving cars and is often carried out by computer systems called neural networks.
DEEP LEARNING How a neural network with multiple layers becomes sensitive to progressively more abstract patterns.
MACHINE LEARNING The use of algorithms that find patterns in data without explicit instruction.
A system might learn how to associate features of inputs such as images with outputs such as labels.
NEURAL NETWORK A highly abstracted and simplified model of the human brain used in machine learning.
REINFORCEMENT LEARNING A type of machine learning in which the algorithm learns by acting toward an abstract goal, such as “Earn a high video game score” or “Manage a factory efficiently.” During training, each effort is evaluated based on its contribution toward the goal.
SUPERVISED LEARNING A type of machine learning in which the algorithm compares its outputs with the correct outputs during training.
TRANSFER LEARNING A technique in machine learning in which an algorithm learns to perform one task, such as recognizing cars, and builds on that knowledge when learning a different but related task, such as recognizing cats.

The orginal article.

Summary of “AI is changing how we do science. Get a glimpse”

Their field lends itself to AI and machine-learning algorithms because nearly every experiment centers on finding subtle spatial patterns in the countless, similar readouts of complex particle detectors-just the sort of thing at which AI excels.
Particle physicists strive to understand the inner workings of the universe by smashing subatomic particles together with enormous energies to blast out exotic new bits of matter.
In 2012, for example, teams working with the world’s largest proton collider, the Large Hadron Collider in Switzerland, discovered the long-predicted Higgs boson, the fleeting particle that is the linchpin to physicists’ explanation of how all other fundamental particles get their mass.
At the LHC, a Higgs boson emerges from roughly one out of every 1 billion proton collisions, and within a billionth of a picosecond it decays into other particles, such as a pair of photons or a quartet of particles called muons.
Physicists still rely mainly on their understanding of the underlying physics to figure out how to search data for signs of new particles and phenomena.
Troyanskaya combined hundreds of data sets on which genes are active in specific human cells, how proteins interact, and where transcription factor binding sites and other key genome features are located.
To train the program-a deep-learning system-Zhou exposed it to data collected by the Encyclopedia of DNA Elements and Roadmap Epigenomics, two projects that cataloged how tens of thousands of noncoding DNA sites affect neighboring genes.
Like master chefs who start with a vision of the finished dish and then work out how to make it, many chemists start with the final structure of a molecule they want to make, and then think about how to assemble it.

The orginal article.

Summary of “A leading happiness researcher says we’re giving our kids bad advice about how to succeed in life”

Here are a few of the most damaging things many of us are currently teaching our children about success, and what to teach them instead. What we tell our kids: Focus on the future.
Children do better, and feel happier, if they are learn how to stay in the present moment.
Studies even suggest that happiness makes you 12% more productive.
The way we conduct our lives as adults often communicates to children that stress is an unavoidable part of leading a successful life.
It’s no surprise that research shows that children whose parents are dealing with burnout at work are more likely than their peers to experience burnout at school.
These tools help children learn to tap into their parasympathetic “Rest and digest” nervous system.
Giving your kids downtime will help them to be more creative and innovative.
So it’s important to encourage children’s natural instincts to care about other people’s feelings and learn to put themselves in other people’s shoes.

The orginal article.

Summary of “The More Senior Your Job Title, the More You Need to Keep a Journal”

Information comes at them more quickly, more people than ever before demand their time, and they’re told that the myriad decisions piled in front of them are all important.
The best thinking comes from structured reflection – and the best way to do that is keeping a personal journal.
I kept a journal through my 12 years as chairman and CEO and have since recommended it to people moving into any senior position for the first time.
Many will opt to keep a journal on their computer or iPad. While that may be more efficient, the point of keeping a journal is not efficiency but to reflect and slow things down so that learning is maximized.
With so many benefits of keeping a journal, why do so few leaders do it?
Because a journal requires reflection, it’s best done during quiet periods, which are rare for any leader.
Slowing things down leads to better-thought-through, more effective judgement and to learning what to do more of and what to change.
A personal journal should be part of any leader’s toolkit.

The orginal article.

Summary of “In the knowledge economy, we need a Netflix of education”

Such a solution would adapt to the user’s needs and learn how to make ongoing customized recommendations and suggestions through a truly interactive and impactful learning experience.
In many ways the entertainment model is a good framework for knowledge management and learning development applications.
The solution for the learning and development industry would be a platform that can make education more accessible and relevant – something that allows us to absorb and spread knowledge seamlessly.
Just as Netflix delivers entertainment we want at our fingertips, the knowledge and learning we need should be delivered where and when we need it.
Using artificial intelligence and machine learning, solutions can now aggregate, curate and personalize learning processes and content.
New AI-driven platforms will deliver the content your knowledge workers need at the right time and place.
Curation: Using AI and machine learning will be key to curate relevant and contextual content to your team at the right time and at the point of need.
In the end, let’s use AI and machine learning to help advance our employees’ learning and career paths – and not to replace them.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Why Do Employees Quit on Their Bosses? Because They Never Get Asked These Important Questions”

There is a high commitment on the part of these leaders to give employees the right exposure and skills that fit their strengths, a well-defined career track, and meaningful work; there’s also a commitment to identifying next-generation leaders to carry the torch so high-performing cultures are sustained.
Part of growing employees is ensuring them of an engaging and positive work experience.
Over the decades, it has interviewed tens of thousands of employees to find the core of a great workplace, resulting in its “Q12 Engagement Survey.”
If you’re a leader or manager and your employees were asked the following about you, how would you do in this assessment?
Here’s a fact: When employees don’t get the tools, training, time, development, clear expectations, vision, or resources to do their jobs well, they experience low morale.
Great managers don’t just tell employees what’s expected of them and leave it at that; instead, they frequently talk with employees about their responsibilities and progress, especially during those first few months on the job.
Asking these questions fosters a sense that employees are doing meaningful work, belonging, and making a difference.
Asking smart follow-up questions will help such managers understand where each employee is coming from.

The orginal article.

Summary of “How to Get Excited About Topics That Bore You”

For me, graduating from high school was thrilling in that I would never have to touch a math or science book again.
As I’ve discovered from both personal experience and research, it is possible to learn to like – even to grow to love – subject areas that look boring or that you once loathed.
The first step in building passion for a subject you don’t like is to identify a reason to learn it.
Most people need to go back and forth between focused and diffuse modes in order to learn a topic.
Only years later, after the army helped me form a motivational mental contrast, did I persist long enough at individual problems to discover that I could indeed learn math and science.
Build a collection of neural “Chunks.” When we’re learning something new that doesn’t come naturally to us, we often skim instead of internalizing.
Each day of focused learning, followed by an evening’s sleep, strengthens your new neural patterns, which are “Chunks” of learning.
Like me, you’ll be surprised at what you can find yourself learning to love.

The orginal article.

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Kids have too much stuff, says any parent who has waited for a child to scurry off to school so she could ninja-sneak all the lonely, untouched toys out of her just-Kondo’d space and into the local donation bin.
Friends online gave me some great non-toy gift options for birthdays and holidays-museum memberships, baseball game outings, donations to cool nonprofits in the child’s name-but one idea that really fascinated me was stocks.
Stocks are something I would have never, ever considered-when I read the suggestion, I actually thought someone had misspelled “Socks.” But there are some companies that are making the process of giving stocks simple enough for the financial un-savvy, turning it into an ongoing learning activity.
The hope is that kids will gain a sense of ownership over their financial future.
These are fractions of shares-say $25, $50 or $100 worth of stock, based on your budget.
The child can go online any time to see how the stock is performing, learning why its value may be going up or down.
If a kid is really into it, parents might want to use an app called BusyKid for $12 a year.
When the child completes tasks on the chore list, he can opt to use his allowance to invest in stock.

The orginal article.

Summary of “10 Uncomfortable Things You Should Do if You Want to Be Happy and Successful”

The reality is, you’ll only succeed once you force yourself to do things that you don’t necessarily want to.
“Everything you want is out there waiting for you to ask. Everything you want also wants you. But you have to take action to get it.”- Jules RenardToo often, people don’t achieve the success they want simply because they are not willing to ask for it.
Unless you’re just naturally a morning person, setting the alarm clock for earlier than usual is a sure shot way to take you out of your comfort zone.
When you learn to say no when necessary, you’ll free up your time and energy for the things that matter most in your life.
If you work hard on something, why dismiss any positive feedback that deservingly comes your way? When you learn to accept compliments you’ll gain the chance to see yourself as your peers do, and odds are you’re confidence will soar.
To really master small talk, learn to become fascinated by it and the person wielding it.
Write out the things you’re “Going to do tomorrow”, create a schedule for these tasks, keep yourself accountable and imagine how great you’ll feel once they’re accomplished.
“If you aren’t in over your head, how do you know how tall you are?”- T.S. EliotAs we start to invest in ourselves and grow, we become more aware of the people and things that were previously holding us back.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Want to Create Your Own Apps? Apple Will Teach You How to Code-for Free”

Maybe you have a cool app in mind that you would like to develop, but you don’t know whom to hire to code it, much less have the money.
No problem: For DIY types of people, Apple has released a free app development curriculum in the iBooks Store.
While the curriculum is designed for high school and community college students – and select schools will start offering the curriculum this fall – you don’t have to attend school to learn to code in Swift, Apple’s programming language.
In case you aren’t aware, you can also learn to code with Swift using Swift Playgrounds.
Granted, downloading a set of textbooks and teacher guides isn’t the same as taking classes; then again, for many people self-paced learning is the best kind of learning.
You can learn to code whenever you have time, not on someone else’s schedule.
The app economy is already huge, and the automation economy – and the need for the ability to, if not program, at least understand the technology and issues underlying automation programming – will grow exponentially in the years to come.
Plenty of people already do: According to Apple, Swift Playgrounds has been downloaded more than one million times, and the add-on “Everyone Can Code” has been downloaded nearly half a million times.

The orginal article.