Summary of “How to Teach Employees Skills They Don’t Know They Lack”

After spending billions of dollars a year on corporate learning, U.S. companies probably assume that their employees have the knowledge and skills they need to carry out their jobs.
One global technology company my team works with, for example, discovered that, on average, its sales employees didn’t understand or know about 22% of its product features, even though they believed they did.
It’s often more prominent among experienced staff, which is particularly problematic because, as the go-to people in their circles, they often pass incorrect or incomplete information and skills on to others via to peer-to-peer learning and training.
How does a company, manager or individual employee correct a competency gap about which no one is aware? As a physician who studies brain function, biological variation and how people learn, I have some suggestions.
Corporate training programs need to be redesigned to better engage learners and empower them to admit what they don’t know.
Better learning models are instead adaptive-that is, molded to each person’s needs by probing what they know and don’t know, then offering tailored content as the learner performs well or struggles.
When corporate learning programs prompt employees to admit to that they’re guessing in the same way, they, too, begin to see the previously hidden gaps in their skills and knowledge.
With a mindful approach that allows learners to probe their knowledge, uncover what they don’t know, and admit when they are unclear, incompetence is uncovered and, thus, no longer unconscious: Employees know what they don’t know and their employers can do something about it.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Michel de Montaigne on How to Learn a Language Effortlessly”

Many of us want to learn a languages but find that we fail over and over again.
Long-time readers will know I am a fan of Michel de Montaigne, the great skeptic and father of the modern essay.
In his Essays he writes of how he learned fluent Latin “Without books, without grammar without rules, without whips and without tears.”
When people try to develop a new skill, they like to ask, “Well, what’s the best method? What’s the fastest, most efficient and shortest route to success?”.
Why? Because I find people who ask this question often ignore their psychology.
“The Debt Snowball method is similar to the traditional approach except that instead of attacking high-interest rate debts first, you attack low-balance debts first. Why? Because you’ll get the psychological lift of pinging debts off in rapid succession. And if you’re like me, this makes all the difference.”Although you save more money by paying off your higher-interest debts first, this only matters if you don’t give up.
A powerful productivity technique is to do the shortest task on your to-do list first, regardless of importance.
Now, let’s connect this idea with language learning.

The orginal article.

Summary of “A 2×2 Matrix to Help You Prioritize the Skills to Learn Right Now”

It’s more important than ever to learn continuously as the shelf life of skills shorten and career paths meander and lengthen.
So there’s a significant pressure on us all to learn the right stuff.
Learn it right away: high utility, low time-to-learn.
Once you’ve decided what you want to learn, you can use this same framework to zero in on specific skills to focus on.
How would you apply this to your working, learning life? You probably don’t want to learn only about spreadsheeting, and you’re unlikely to have the kind of data we’ve used above at your fingertips.
What would help you the most? Finally being able to use Photoshop, getting a grip on Agile or Waterfall, learning to write more clearly? Are there meta-skills that would help you do all of these things better – like coming across the way you intend to in meetings, or learning to manage your time more productively? You could assign approximate scores for time and utility for each of these and plot a scatter chart like the one above.
Or you could just estimate: Classify the skills on your list as either low or high in utility and time to learn, and place them in the corresponding quadrant.
Since you probably don’t have much time to learn, learn to make the most of what you have.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Possibly Elon Musk’s Biggest Idea Yet”

Today, XPRIZE announced the five finalists advancing in the Global Learning XPRIZE and awarded each finalist a $1M milestone prize.
XPRIZE awarded each finalist for the open source, cutting-edge learning software they have developed for the competition.
“Universal access to education is a major priority for XPRIZE, and we are proud to celebrate the change-making teams making impressive strides to ensure every single child has the opportunity to take learning into her own hands,” said Marcus Shingles, CEO of XPRIZE Foundation.
Chimple is developing a learning platform aimed at enabling children to learn reading, writing and mathematics on a tablet through more than 60 explorative games and 70 different stories.
Kitkit School is developing a learning program with a game-based core and flexible learning architecture aimed at helping children independently learn, irrespective of their knowledge, skill, and environment.
Onebillion is merging numeracy content with new literacy material to offer directed learning and creative activities alongside continuous monitoring to respond to different children’s needs.
“Our five finalists are developing the most promising software solutions to enable children to teach themselves basic reading, writing and arithmetic, as determined by our panel of expert judges,” said Matt Keller, senior director of the Global Learning XPRIZE. “As we move to the final field testing phase, we are one step closer to scaling transformative technology solutions that foster child-driven learning and provide a world-class education for all.”
To field-test the five finalists’ solutions, the Global Learning XPRIZE partnered with UNESCO, the World Food Programme, and the Government of Tanzania.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Possibly Elon Musk’s Biggest Idea Yet”

Today, XPRIZE announced the five finalists advancing in the Global Learning XPRIZE and awarded each finalist a $1M milestone prize.
XPRIZE awarded each finalist for the open source, cutting-edge learning software they have developed for the competition.
“Universal access to education is a major priority for XPRIZE, and we are proud to celebrate the change-making teams making impressive strides to ensure every single child has the opportunity to take learning into her own hands,” said Marcus Shingles, CEO of XPRIZE Foundation.
Chimple is developing a learning platform aimed at enabling children to learn reading, writing and mathematics on a tablet through more than 60 explorative games and 70 different stories.
Kitkit School is developing a learning program with a game-based core and flexible learning architecture aimed at helping children independently learn, irrespective of their knowledge, skill, and environment.
Onebillion is merging numeracy content with new literacy material to offer directed learning and creative activities alongside continuous monitoring to respond to different children’s needs.
“Our five finalists are developing the most promising software solutions to enable children to teach themselves basic reading, writing and arithmetic, as determined by our panel of expert judges,” said Matt Keller, senior director of the Global Learning XPRIZE. “As we move to the final field testing phase, we are one step closer to scaling transformative technology solutions that foster child-driven learning and provide a world-class education for all.”
To field-test the five finalists’ solutions, the Global Learning XPRIZE partnered with UNESCO, the World Food Programme, and the Government of Tanzania.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Hate practicing? This brain hack could help you improve memory and learn faster.”

Researchers at Tel Aviv University in Israel have found people may not need to work so hard to learn new skills or concepts, though they are still in the early stages of their research.
“We have exposed a new mechanism, a new form of learning that is much faster but not less efficient than standard classical learning.”
So how does it work, exactly? The authors believe that something they call “Brief memory activations” could substitute for procedural training, aka the process of “Doing something over and over again until it comes naturally.” Procedural training is how people learn most abilities, from how to ride a bike to how to balance a checkbook.
The concept of brief memory activations is actually quite simple: You teach someone something, and then instead of making them repeat it until they get better, you simply flash images that remind them of what they learned.
People are “Virtually guessing” the first time they take the test, Censor said, but after taking it four times, they usually do 20 to 30% better, which Censor added is a typical learning curve.
It would work to learn algebra, maybe, but probably not abstract physics.
This does suggest you might be able to improve your comprehension with a lot less effort by reminding yourself visually what you learned throughout the day; that’s an insight that has been supported by other research as well.
So the next time you learn a helpful work hack or attend an insightful lecture, write down a short phrase or print out an image to jog your memory.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Possibly Elon Musk’s Biggest Idea Yet”

Today, XPRIZE announced the five finalists advancing in the Global Learning XPRIZE and awarded each finalist a $1M milestone prize.
XPRIZE awarded each finalist for the open source, cutting-edge learning software they have developed for the competition.
“Universal access to education is a major priority for XPRIZE, and we are proud to celebrate the change-making teams making impressive strides to ensure every single child has the opportunity to take learning into her own hands,” said Marcus Shingles, CEO of XPRIZE Foundation.
Chimple is developing a learning platform aimed at enabling children to learn reading, writing and mathematics on a tablet through more than 60 explorative games and 70 different stories.
Kitkit School is developing a learning program with a game-based core and flexible learning architecture aimed at helping children independently learn, irrespective of their knowledge, skill, and environment.
Onebillion is merging numeracy content with new literacy material to offer directed learning and creative activities alongside continuous monitoring to respond to different children’s needs.
“Our five finalists are developing the most promising software solutions to enable children to teach themselves basic reading, writing and arithmetic, as determined by our panel of expert judges,” said Matt Keller, senior director of the Global Learning XPRIZE. “As we move to the final field testing phase, we are one step closer to scaling transformative technology solutions that foster child-driven learning and provide a world-class education for all.”
To field-test the five finalists’ solutions, the Global Learning XPRIZE partnered with UNESCO, the World Food Programme, and the Government of Tanzania.

The orginal article.

Summary of “The Top 5 Skills Every College Student Needs To Acquire Before Graduation”

One Harvard expert has reported that for every 100 young people who start college, only 25 get degrees and good jobs.
If you-or your kid-are bent on earning a bachelor’s degree, how can you stack the deck to make sure an attractive job waits on the other end of four years? Take some advice from Sarah Franklin, the GM of Trailhead, a free online learning environment created by Salesforce, who has made it her mission to help educate students at any age or expertise, on today’s most sought after skills to land their dream jobs at any company.
Here are her words about the top five skills she believes every student should master before graduation.
Today, every company is a tech company, which means every kind of business, from beauty to banking, has a need for individuals who know how to code.
Having basic coding skills under your belt will be a huge asset to you throughout your career, and even if you’re not planning to become the master developer, having that skill on your resume can increase earning power and make you more attractive to employers.
My team has partnered with Atlassian to bring agile courses that will provide the skills needed to build and run agile teams across any business.
Learning to take data and interpret it to create insights that you can use to make better business decisions, is a skill that employers are avidly seeking in today’s data-rich environment.
Visit edX’s class “Knowledge Management and Big Data in Business” to start building your business intelligence skills and begin taking the steps that will differentiate you from other job seekers.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Study of 36,000 students backs Bill Gates’ favorite style of education”

Former Microsoft CEO Bill Gates has said repeatedly that one of his favorite ways of teaching kids is by letting them guide their own education, typically with laptops or tablets, and moving the teacher more into the role of coach.
The style is known as “Personalized learning,” and a study involving 36,000 students just upheld it as a major driver of improvement in reading and math skills.
Conducted by the education consulting company Education Elements, the study spanned five districts across the US for 2-3 years, tracking how students performed on the NWEA MAP test.
Schools often use both hardware and software to help kids learn at their own pace and in the style they prefer most.
The math education tool backed by Netflix CEO Reed Hastings that performs a similar function for multiplication and division and is used by 2 million kids nationwide.
DreamBox, in use by 2 million kids, helps kids make bigger improvements in math the longer they use it, a 2016 Harvard study found.
One study from the RAND Corporation found that among 62 schools using personalized learning, the majority of kids scored higher in math and reading comprehension compared to kids with teachers who stood at the head of the class and lectured to students all at once.
The study found personalized learning helped students: 90% of district leaders said students were more engaged with their education.

The orginal article.

Summary of “The amazing fertility of the older mind”

The effort to master a new discipline may be more than repaid in maintaining and enhancing your overall cognitive health.
Young children brought to a new country seemed to find it far easier to reach fluency than their older siblings or parents, for instance.
Such extended neuroplasticity also seems to be reflected in more recent studies of the brain’s anatomy, revealing that the adult brain is far more fertile than expected, and more than capable of sprouting the connections necessary for profound learning.
A simple lack of confidence may present the biggest barrier – particularly for older learners, past retirement, who may have already started to fear a more general cognitive decline.
The older adults – aged 60 and over – were more reluctant to rely on their memory, preferring instead to laboriously cross-reference the two tables, even though it took significantly more time.
Older people may be more likely to rely on GPS when driving, for instance – even if they remember the route – or they may follow a recipe line by line, rather than attempting to recall the steps.
On the plus side, she has found that simply giving the older adults feedback on their performance – and underlining the accuracy of their memory – can encourage them to rely more on their recall.
Overall, the more active pastime of learning a new skill led to the more efficient brain activity you might observe in a younger brain, while the passive activities like listening to music brought no changes.

The orginal article.