Summary of “12 Books That Made Me Think”

Though there is no objective best book or most-thought provoking book, I do think there is a best book for you, right now.
The best rule of thumb to discover these books is to find people with similar reading tastes to you, and then ask them for the best books they read when they were in a spot in their lives similar to what you’re currently going through.
I’ll assume, since you clicked on an article called “12 books that made me think,” you are asking which books impacted me.
In that vein, below are a compilation of the books that made me smarter at different points in my life.
I don’t agree with all the points made in these books and often the book forced me to do the valuable work of understanding and articulating why I disagreed.
If you haven’t read any of them, then I think starting with whichever book seems most interesting is the best way to go.
Get a free guide of the 8 strategies I use to read 60 books a year, and 67 must-read books for entrepreneurs - including the best books on business, life, and the philosophy of work.
If you liked this article, you might want to download a free guide of the 8 strategies I use to read 60 books a year, and 67 must-read books for entrepreneurs - including my favorite books on business, life, and the philosophy of work.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Dread accompanies me through life but it is not without consolation”

My parents’ deaths, occupying polar positions on a spectrum of suddenness, infected my life with a persistent dread; they suffused my life with an incurable anxiety, a dread that did not require an identifiable object.
An anxiety is a lens through which to view the world, a colouration that grants the sufferer’s experiences their distinctive hue.
My trajectory through the world is thus informed, at every step, by the anxieties that afflict me.
Søren Kierkegaard suggested in The Concept of Anxiety that one of existentialism’s hard-fought rewards – our encounters with true freedom – comes with the terrible burden of encounters with dread and anxiety.
Anxiety taught me the place that death has in my life.
The upending of this world’s order by my parents’ deaths and my resultant anxiety made me suffer a conceptual shift in my understanding of its workings; it became a philosophical commonplace for me to believe in claims about this world’s malleability through our conscious, emotional, not-entirely rational understanding of it.
To believe that there was a final end to my life, a purpose, a destination, an intended teleology, was to be infected with an anxiety that I was not fulfilling my purpose in life, that I was ‘wasting’ my life.
Because of my anxieties, I have come to understand why I’m the philosopher I am, why I hold the views I do, why I do not trust that there is an inherent, essential, meaning or purpose to life.

The orginal article.

Summary of “It’s Time to Say It: Retirement Is Dead. This Is What Will Take Its Place”

The truth is that we are doing an enormous disservice to society by setting retirement as an end goal to a long career.
Advances in longevity are making supporting retirement for another 20 to 30 years impossible for 90 percent of all U.S. workers, whose only source of income is Social Security, which only pays from an average of just over $1,300 per month to a max of just over $2,600 per month.
While paid media ads that talk about retirement planning seem to be everywhere, the reality is that very few people are actually benefiting from retirement savings or planning.
Even if you’re lucky enough to be among the 20 percent, who have a $1 million-plus net worth and enough saved up to retire, there is some evidence that the classic notion of retirement may actually be harmful to your health.
Even the unhealthy group reduced their likelihood of dying by 9 percent if they delayed retirement.
What amazes me is that every financial institution’s white paper, study, or promotional piece about retirement planning is missing one critical thing: any mention of continuing to work! We need to wake up.
Rather than perpetuate the mythology of work as penance and retirement as a time to be liberated from it, what if you replaced the concept of retirement with that of a third act in which you can continue to create value and receive value for those things that you truly love to do, while you also establish a balance with other personally fulfilling activities you may want to do more of?
The bottom line is that the old rules were built for an economy and a society in which retirement was seen as a release from bondage-the liberating act from a lifetime of work.

The orginal article.

Summary of “A Stoic Guide To Navigating The Modern Workplace”

Below are Stoic exercises and strategies, pulled from the new book The Daily Stoic, that will help you navigate your workplace with better clarity, effectiveness, and peace of mind.
DON’T MAKE THINGS HARDER THAN THEY NEED TO BE.”If someone asks you how to write your name, would you bark out each letter? And if they get angry, would you then return the anger? Wouldn’t you rather gently spell out each letter for them? So then, remember in life that your duties are the sum of individual acts. Pay attention to each of these as you do your duty … just methodically complete your task.”
We would never let another person jerk us around the way we let our impulses do.
Seneca, On the Brevity of Life, 20.2.Every few years, a sad spectacle is played out in the news.
We must not get so wrapped up in our work that we think we’re immune from the reality of aging and life.
Who wants to be the person who can never let go? Is there so little meaning in your life that your only pursuit is work until you’re eventually carted off in a coffin?
Epictetus, Discourses, 4.3.6b-8.The dysfunctional job that stresses you out, a contentious relationship, life in the spotlight.
Don’t forget to ask: Is this really the life I want? Every time you get upset, a little bit of life leaves the body.

The orginal article.

Summary of “10 questions that help you figure out your passions”

Sometimes figuring out what you should be doing with your life or career can be challenging.
Are you jealous of her prestige or advanced degree? The travel she does? The amazing suits? The money? How do you feel about the crazy hours she works and the fact that she has no personal life?
Identifying people of whom you’re jealous, and which specific aspects of their work or life you wish you had for yourself, can help you determine the specific components of a job or life that you want.
Check out these surprising ways people found their dream careers-and how you can too.
After we found a way for him to incorporate that desire to create art into his life, he was able to live more deeply in accordance with his passions.
As you may have noticed with these questions, how you spend your free time is revealing.
How you spend your unexpected free time is even more telling-when you arrive somewhere early, assuming you don’t bury yourself in your cell phone, how do you spend your time? How you choose to spend your volunteer hours is a powerful source of information about your passion.
The way you choose to use your skills and time can tell you a lot about where your passions are, especially if they help improve others’ lives.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Don’t Know What You Want? Improve These 7 Universal Skills”

What does success look like? What do you want from life? What career do you want?
We think it’s the worst thing in the world if you don’t know what you want to do in life.
One of the biggest thinking errors that I’ve made was that I thought I needed to know what I exactly wanted to do with my life.
The truth is that no one knows what they truly want.
So it’s not important to know exactly what you want to do with your life.
It’s not even realistic to boldly claim “I know what I want!”.
If you can’t decide what direction you want to go in life, that’s automatically your #1 goal in life – to figure out where you want to go.
Persuasion: Learn how to get what you want in an ethical way.

The orginal article.

Summary of “The Strange Order of Things by Antonio Damasio review”

Antonio Damasio, a professor of neuroscience, psychology and philosophy, sets out to investigate “Why and how we emote, feel, use feelings to construct our selves and how brains interact with the body to support such functions”.
From the very start, among the earliest primitive life forms, affect – “The world of emotions and feelings” – was the force that drove unstoppably towards the flowering of human consciousness and the creation of cultures, Damasio insists.
The idea on which he bases his book is, he tells us, simple: “Feelings have not been given the credit they deserve as motives, monitors, and negotiators of human cultural endeavours.” In claiming simplicity, it is possible the author is being a mite disingenuous.
“Feelings, and more generally affect of any sort and strength,” Damasio writes, “Are the unrecognised presences at the cultural conference table.” According to him, the conference began among the bacteria, which – who? – even in their “Unminded existence assume what can only be called a sort of ‘moral attitude'”.
Damasio, whose books include The Feeling of What Happens and Self Comes to Mind, is a scientist but also a convinced, one might say a crusading, humanist.
Also called to the table is Spinoza – on whom Damasio has written at length – and his emphasis on conatus, the essential force by which all things strive to persevere, and which had for Spinoza the same significance that homeostasis has for Damasio.
There are echoes here too of William James, that most endearing of philosophers, as when Damasio pauses for a brief, Jamesian consideration of the anomalous fact that for all the hi-tech sophistication of modern life, we still cling to the primitive pleasure and reassurance of the domestic fireplace.
While ever ready to salute his predecessors and peers, is wholly his own man, and The Strange Order of Things is a fresh and daring effort to identify the true spring and source of human being – of the being of all living things – namely feeling.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Best movies on Amazon Prime: 100 top films list”

If you aren’t using your Amazon Prime account to sit back and binge some of the best movies ever made, you are really not using it to its full potential.
Even if you’ve never seen “Troll 2,” just watching this documentary about one of the worst movies ever made is a lot of fun.
Spike Lee’s first movie for Amazon Studios delves into the massive gang violence in Chicago.
In one of Tom Cruise’s classic thrill movies he plays a NASCAR driver whose ego makes him one of the hottest drivers on the circuit.
Steven Soderbergh takes the blueprint of the “Ocean’s Eleven” movies and strips everything studio about it to create a wonderful heist movie topped by the chemistry between Channing Tatum and Adam Driver.
Tom Cruise just keeps on chugging, and arguably is making better “Mission: Impossible” movies than ever before.
Wilder breaks new ground on how sex and sexuality is viewed in movies.
It’s one of the strangest movies you’ll ever see, but you have to see it.

The orginal article.

Summary of “4 Things We Think We Need Today that Won’t Matter at All in the Long Run”

It didn’t take long before I realized the course my life had taken up to that point had been the product of other people’s ideas, opinions and decisions.
Fast forward to today, and as I awoke this morning I marveled at my life.
Well, the first step is we stopped wasting so much time and energy on things that don’t matter.
You don’t need any of that social validation and distraction in your life!
It’s the strength of your conviction that determines your level of personal achievement in the long run, not the number of people who agree with every little thing you do.
Here’s a new mantra for you: “This is my life, my choices, my mistakes and my lessons. As long as I’m not hurting people, I need not worry what they think of me.”
In the end, you can spend your life feeling sorry for yourself, cowering in the comfort of a recliner, wondering why there are so many problems out in the real world, or you can be thankful that you are strong enough to endure them.
The obvious first step in this arena is convincing yourself to get up and do the uncomfortable things that need to be done.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Quanta Magazine – Illuminating Science”

Zircons are crystalline minerals containing silicon, oxygen, zirconium and sometimes other elements.
In research published in 2015, Bell and her coauthors presented evidence for graphite embedded within a tiny, 4.1-billion-year-old zircon crystal from the same Jack Hills.
In almost every place scientists look, they are finding evidence of life and its chemistry, whether it is in the form of fossils themselves or the remnants of life’s long-ago stirrings.
Isotopes of potassium and argon in Apollo samples suggested bits of the moon suddenly melted some 500 million years after it formed.
Zircons also provide tentative physical evidence of a late-era hellscape.
Some zircons do contain “Shocked” minerals, evidence for extreme heat and pressure that can be indicative of something horrendous.
Many are younger than 3 billion years, but Bell found one zircon suggesting rapid, extreme heating around 3.9 billion years ago – a possible signature of the Late Heavy Bombardment.
“All we know is there is a group of recrystallized zircons at this time period. Given the coincidence with the Late Heavy Bombardment, it was too hard not to say that maybe this is connected,” she said.

The orginal article.