Summary of “The Character-Building School of Parenthood”

Your capacity for dealing with disappointments and things outside your control, not just regarding parenting but with the world at large, will grow.
You’ll gain confidence over time, sure, but you’ll also almost constantly be reminded of the character traits you need to work on – be it your patience, flexibility, sense of humor, etc.
Parenting is chock-full of “Opportunities” to make quick decisions and figure things out on the fly.
Without the help of our own parents, friends, neighbors, daycare providers, teachers, random cooing and smiling strangers, us parents would be up a creek.
Hopefully in a healthy way – though it does take time to figure out the balance; one of the best pieces of advice my wife and I received as new parents was to learn how to “Pick battles that are big enough to matter, small enough to win.”
There are grumpy parents aplenty, but if they would just learn to laugh at things a bit more, they’d be much better off.
While plenty of activities will build your physical toughness more than parenting, few things build up one’s mental toughness and resilience more than being a parent.
No matter your position in life – CEO, cubicle automaton, day laborer, stay-at-home dad, entrepreneur, freelancer, trade worker, unemployed – it’s very possible, perhaps even probable, that your greatest, most important role in life will be that of parent.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Life gets better after 50: why age tends to work in favour of happiness”

Academics have found increasing evidence that happiness through adulthood is U-shaped – life satisfaction falls in our 20s and 30s, then hits a trough in our late 40s before increasing until our 80s. Forget the saying that life begins at 40 – it’s 50 we should be looking toward.
He has written a book, The Happiness Curve: Why Life Gets Better After 50, which includes personal stories, the latest data and illuminating interviews with economists, psychologists and neuroscientists.
“Rauch, an author and journalist, adds:”Those most likely to notice the arrow of time are the people without a lot of other change or difficulty in their life.
Life satisfaction statistics for the UK in 2014-15 show happiness declining from youth through middle age, hitting a low at 50 and rising to a peak at 70.
“Yet around the time I turned 40 I noticed this strange feeling of restlessness and discontent. This continued to grow as I got into my 40s to the point where I was 45 and I won the most prestigious award in magazine journalism and that gave me a great feeling of satisfaction with my life for approximately 10 days.”
“All these feelings of discontent and restlessness – and even sometimes worthlessness and this feeling I’d almost wasted my life – kept coming back.”
Rauch tells the Guardian: “That’s a very profound insight because what we’re talking about here is not that the conditions of your life change in some huge way, but how you feel about your life changes.”
As Rauch approaches 60, he feels ever more grateful for his life.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Bad habits you must break to improve your life in 100 days”

Nothing sabotages your creativity and productive life quite like bad habits.
It’s about time you paid attention to the habits that could be hindering your progress in life and career.
It’s easy to say, “I will start when I have more experience, money, time and resources”.
You can actually achieve more in less time when you single task and focus on getting one thing done well.
So you may be wasting a lot more time than you think.
Give yourself time in your life to wonder what’s possible and to make even the slightest moves in that direction.
Give yourself time in your life to wonder what is possible and to make even the slightest moves in that direction.
Make time to check in with yourself about your hopes, dreams, and goals.

The orginal article.

Summary of “The 7 Habits: Begin With the End in Mind”

Because it distills what you ultimately value in life – or at least what you want to value – and what you hope it all adds up to in the end.
When we know how we want people to talk about us at the end of our life, we can start taking action now to make that scenario a reality later.
Those goals aren’t “Bad,” but you’ve probably adopted them mindlessly, and you’ll end up pursuing them merely as things to knock off on a checklist, without thought as to whether they’re what you want, and what difference they’ll make in your character – in who you want to be.
All his life Tolstoy, like Ilyich, strived for status, money, and security – résumé virtues – but it was only when he faced the specter of his death that he realized his great existential mistake.
You have to replace what you’ve been told to center your life on with timeless and unchanging principles and virtues that you want to embody.
Thinking about your general values can be a little abstract; they’re easier to grasp if you think about how you want them to influence the specific actions and spheres of your life.
Write out what values you want to embody in that role and what you want the people you affect in that role to say about you when you’re dead. Be as idealistic as you want.
Just as lawmakers and judges turn to the U.S. Constitution first when making decisions, you should turn to your personal constitution before you make big decisions in your life.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Lessons I’ve learned about success in the last 25 years”

I like writing about timeless lessons for success or key behaviors that lead to success.
I’ve even written about famous failures that will inspire you to success.
Nothing has spurned a more introspective look at achieving success than my turning a half-century old.
If approval equals success for you, know it’s a never-ending quest.
Success is drawn to those who zap energy into a workplace with their enthusiasm, passion, and optimism and repelled by those who sap energy with their pessimism, gossip, and negative attitude.
Lifting others up as you do so, with the intent to go beyond success to significance, is better.
Constant comparison to others is the surest way to undermine your success.
The Navy’s first female Rear Admiral, Grace Murray Hopper, once said “Ships in port are safe. But that’s not what ships are made for.” I’ve so often seen that success depends on the willingness to take risks, learn from them, and keep moving forward.

The orginal article.

Summary of “There’s no philosophy of life without a theory of human nature”

A strange thing is happening in modern philosophy: many philosophers don’t seem to believe that there is such a thing as human nature.
The existence of something like a human nature that separates us from the rest of the animal world has often been implied, and sometimes explicitly stated, throughout the history of philosophy.
Now, if human nature is real, what are the consequences from a philosophical perspective? Why should a philosopher, or anyone interested in using philosophy as a guide to life, care about this otherwise technical debate? Let’s explore the point by way of a brief discussion of two philosophies that provide particularly strong defences of human nature and that are aligned with cognitive science: existentialism and Stoicism.
The Stoics thought that there are two aspects of human nature that should be taken as defining what it means to live a good life: we are highly social, and we are capable of reason.
On closer examination, it is clear that for the Stoics, human nature played a similar role to that played by the concept of facticity for the existentialists: it circumscribes what human beings can do, as well as what they are inclined to do.
The parameters imposed by our nature are rather broad, and the Stoics agreed with the existentialists that a worthwhile human life can be lived by following many different paths.
It’s not only modern science that tells us that there is such thing as human nature, and it’s no coincidence that a number of popular modern therapies such as logotherapy, rational emotive behaviour therapy and cognitive behavioural therapy draw on ideas from both existentialism and Stoicism.
There is no single path to a flourishing human life, but there are also many really bad ones.

The orginal article.

Summary of “A Stoic Guide To Navigating The Modern Workplace”

For in even the most modern seeming professions, a Stoic is able to find peace and clarity.
How can we follow in their timeless footsteps? How can we reap the benefits of this operating system in our own workplace? It’s simple.
Below are Stoic exercises and strategies, pulled from the new book The Daily Stoic, that will help you navigate your workplace with better clarity, effectiveness, and peace of mind.
DON’T MAKE THINGS HARDER THAN THEY NEED TO BE. “If someone asks you how to write your name, would you bark out each letter? And if they get angry, would you then return the anger? Wouldn’t you rather gently spell out each letter for them? So then, remember in life that your duties are the sum of individual acts. Pay attention to each of these as you do your duty … just methodically complete your task.”
Let’s not let emotion get in the way of kathêkon, the simple, appropriate actions on the path to virtue.
Don’t tell me how to dress, how to think, how to do my job, how to live.
We would never let another person jerk us around the way we let our impulses do.
Who wants to be the person who can never let go? Is there so little meaning in your life that your only pursuit is work until you’re eventually carted off in a coffin?

The orginal article.

Summary of “12 Hard Things You Need to Hear About Your Attitude”

Your attitude often reflects your inner resistance to reality.
No matter how hard it is to admit, there are things in your life that aren’t meant to stay.
Design YOUR journey every step of the way! The life you create from doing something that moves you is far better than the attitude you get from sitting around wishing you were doing it.
Let’s use diet and exercise as an example First, you become unhealthy because eating healthy food and exercising feels uncomfortable, so you opt for comfort food and mindless TV watching instead. But then, being unhealthy is also uncomfortable, so you seek to distract yourself from the reality of your unhealthy body by eating more unhealthy food and watching more unhealthy entertainment and going to the mall to shop for things you don’t really want or need.
Your attitude has been bruised by inconsiderate people.
Your attitude is often submissive and waits for validation from others.
Breathe out let go, and just live right now in the moment with a self-validating, self-loving attitude.
Which attitude issue mentioned above often gets the best of you? Who would you be, and what else might you see, if you shifted your attitude in that area of your life?

The orginal article.

Summary of “Finding purpose: 12 exercises to help you discover purpose and passion”

Your mother died? Your wife left? Your husband lost his job? If you know what your primary purpose is in life, these stressful events are much easier to deal with.
Today, to celebrate this site’s twelfth birthday, I want to present twelve alternative exercises for discovering your purpose and passion.
At the end of this article, I’ll give you a list of recommended reading – and tell you what I think is the single best book for discovering passion and purpose.
A couple of these exercises are my own – the hundred-word exercise, for instance – but most are not.
There are plenty of excellent books out there that can help you figure out what you want out of life even if they don’t ask readers to fill out forms our meditate on what’s important.
It’s a ground-breaking short book about how to find purpose even under the worst circumstances.
Duckworth makes a convincing argument that passion and perseverance – or, in Money Boss lingo, purpose and patience – are the best predictors of success.
If you can hone in on a single top-level purpose then doggedly pursue it, your life will be filled with meaning and happiness.

The orginal article.

Summary of “The Spinal Tap That Changed My Life”

As you know by now, the spinal tap led to a rare and debilitating condition called a cerebrospinal fluid leak.
As if a simple CSF leak wasn’t sufficient, I had connected issues that arose from the leak.
We all knew was that Duke seemed to be the best in the business for patching spinal leaks.
The third did, and threw me into agonizing “Rebound high pressure,” where the leak was sealed but I had excess CSF fluid since my body was so accustomed to leaking.
From not knowing if the patching worked, to navigating high pressure, then adjusting medication to try and stabilize pressure, followed by the crushing knowledge that I was back to leaking after I sat too heavily – it was all too much.
The walks came with a lot of pain, but without the “Brain sag” feeling that I felt for five months when leaking.
Many of the CSF leakers who had a hard time getting sealed, or re-leaked months or years later doing something seemingly innocuous.
Despite the stats that say many people leak and re-leak again when their first leaks are difficult to fix.

The orginal article.