Summary of “Stop Spending So Much Time In Your Head”

I bet you spend A LOT of time in your head. You know, thinking, worrying, stressing, freaking out – call it whatever you want.
“A great many people think they are thinking when they are merely rearranging their prejudices.”
Before I learned that skill, I would spend hours and hours inside my head. Just think about how much you think.
Put your brain to use and think about how you can solve problems.
If you’re constantly thinking, it’s because you haven’t’ trained your mind yet.
You’re probably thinking so much that you’re missing out of life.
If your answer is no, you definitely need to get out of your head. Stop thinking and start feeling.
Now, you might think: “How do I train myself to stop thinking useless thoughts?” Awareness.

The orginal article.

Summary of “The Most Important Skill For Interacting With People”

If you entreat people with love, kindness, empathy, and discernment, they will appreciate you so much.
Even better, ask people how they are really doing in their life.
She is one of the most caring and loving and hardworking people I know.
Day in-and-out, she takes constantly crap from people who don’t appreciate what she does.
There are people in your life that haven’t been thanked for all of efforts in far too long.
You have no idea what the people in your world are currently dealing with.
Send a loving note of appreciation to your spouse/lover.
Wrote William Shakespeare, “They do not love that do not show their love.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Hume is the amiable, modest, generous philosopher we need today”

Posterity loves a tragic end, which is one reason why the cult of David Hume, arguably the greatest philosopher the West has ever produced, never took off.
Hume saw human beings as we really are, stripped of all pretension.
Hume did not just bring human beings down to Earth, he robbed us of any enduring essence.
That’s why Hume had no problem attributing reason to animals.
Hume never explicitly articulated what such a life would consist of, but he arguably did even better: he showed it by his own example.
This fundamental moderation is, I think, another reason why Hume has never become a popular philosopher.
True lovers of the secular, reasonable way of life Hume stood for ought to avoid hysterical condemnations of religion and superstition as well as overly optimistic praise for the power of science and rationality.
Hume modelled a way of life that was gentle, reasonable, amiable: all the things public life now so rarely is.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Yuval Noah Harari on what 2050 has in store for humankind”

How can we prepare ourselves and our children for a world of such unprecedented transformations and radical uncertainties? A baby born today will be thirty-something in 2050.
What should we teach that baby that will help him or her survive and flourish in the world of 2050 or of the 22nd century? What kind of skills will he or she need in order to get a job, understand what is happening around them and navigate the maze of life?
Since nobody knows how the world will look in 2050 – not to mention 2100 – we don’t know the answer to these questions.
If you lived, say, in a small provincial town in Mexico in 1800, it was difficult for you to know much about the wider world.
People all over the world are but a click away from the latest accounts of the bombardment of Aleppo or of melting ice caps in the Arctic, but there are so many contradictory accounts that it is hard to know what to believe.
Since we have no idea how the world and the job market will look in 2050, we don’t really know what particular skills people will need.
If you try to hold on to some stable identity, job or world view, you risk being left behind as the world flies by you with a whooooosh.
In the past, it was a relatively safe bet to follow the adults, because they knew the world quite well, and the world changed slowly.

The orginal article.

Summary of “10 Practical Answers To 10 Powerful Questions”

The other day I received an email from a reader with 10 questions she wanted me to answer.
As I read the questions more carefully, I thought, “I can turn this into an article.” I was truly impressed by the quality of the questions of my reader, Mary.
What’s the one book you suggest everyone to read?
Preferably, you want to read it for at least two hours a day.
Don’t read anything else during the time you read this book.
You’ll never forget the period that you were reading it.
What’s one powerful piece of advice for living a fulfilling life?
Working out, reading, taking classes, spending time with people who matter to you-it’s all investing because these activities have a return.

The orginal article.

Summary of “The Monk’s Tale”

In Montastruc, my uncle settled into a different sort of monkish life, staying so close to home that he once managed to keep a fire burning in the hearth for 77 days straight.
I’m ashamed to admit that during the 26 years Uncle Bill was in France, I visited him only three times.
My uncle’s house is in a quartier of Montastruc known as Escat, a hilltop mini ham-let that consists of four dwellings and the ruins of a 700-year-old castle.
In a village with almost no other foreigners, my uncle was known as l’Américain.
His closest friends in Montastruc-André and Jeannette Touzet, first cousins roughly my uncle’s age-lived together in the same rambling stone farmhouse where their fathers were born.
My uncle met the Touzets during his first Montastruc winter.
Which is not to say that Uncle Bill let his hair down.
“Yes,” Madame Bosc says, “That was us. That was everyone in the village, every­one from every quartier. You wouldn’t allow a person like that to die without being honored. Your uncle created an interest-in the simplicity of his life, in his friendliness. That he came from so far away and took the time to learn about us and to care-that was important.”

The orginal article.

Summary of “Walt Whitman on Democracy and Optimism as a Mighty Form of Resistance – Brain Pickings”

“Progress is never permanent, will always be threatened, must be redoubled, restated and reimagined if it is to survive,” Zadie Smith wrote in her spectacular essay on optimism and despair.
The illusion of permanent progress inflicts a particularly damning strain of despair as we witness the disillusioning undoing of triumphs of democracy and justice generations in the making – despair preventable only by taking a wider view of history in order to remember that democracy advances in fits and starts, in leaps and backward steps, but advances nonetheless, on timelines exceeding any individual lifetime.
Amid our current atmosphere of presentism bias and extreme narrowing of perspective, it is not merely difficult but downright countercultural to resist the ahistorical panic by taking such a telescopic view – lucid optimism that may be our most unassailable form of resistance to the corruptions and malfunctions of democracy.
I can conceive of no better service in the United States, henceforth, by democrats of thorough and heart-felt faith, than boldly exposing the weakness, liabilities and infinite corruptions of democracy.
It will be fully realized that ostensible wealth and money-making, show, luxury, &c., imperatively necessitate something beyond – namely, the sane, eternal moral and spiritual-esthetic attributes, elements Soon, it will be understood clearly, that the State cannot flourish, without those elements.
American Democracy, in its myriad personalities, in factories, work-shops, stores, offices – through the dense streets and houses of cities, and all their manifold sophisticated life – must either be fibred, vitalized, by regular contact with out-door light and air and growths, farm-scenes, animals, fields, trees, birds, sun-warmth and free skies, or it will morbidly dwindle and pale.
I conceive of no flourishing and heroic elements of Democracy in the United States, or of Democracy maintaining itself at all, without the Nature-element forming a main part – to be its health-element and beauty-element – to really underlie the whole politics, sanity, religion and art of the New World.
Complement this particular portion with Iris Murdoch on why art is essential for democracy, Rebecca Solnit on lucid optimism in dark times, and Amanda Palmer and Neil Gaiman’s animated tribute to Leonard Cohen’s anthem to democracy, then revisit Whitman on the essence of happiness and his advice on the building blocks of character.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Liquid water ‘lake’ revealed on Mars”

Researchers have found evidence of an existing body of liquid water on Mars.
Previous research found possible signs of intermittent liquid water flowing on the martian surface, but this is the first sign of a persistent body of water on the planet in the present day.
Lake beds like those explored by Nasa’s Curiosity rover show water was present on the surface of Mars in the past.
The planet’s climate has since cooled due to its thin atmosphere, leaving most of its water locked up in ice.
Marsis wasn’t able to determine how deep the layer of water might be, but the research team estimate that it is a minimum of one metre.
The continuous white line at the top of the radar results above marks the beginning of the South Polar Layered Deposit; a filo pastry-like accumulation of water ice and dust.
So while the findings suggest water is present, they don’t confirm anything further.
In order to remain liquid in such cold conditions, the water likely has a great many salts dissolved in it.

The orginal article.

Summary of “How a boxing trainer survived a murder plot hatched by his wife”

He had been a trainer for some 20 years when Mundo appeared in the little gym in 2005.
Mundo had a plan: “I told Ramon, ‘Look, you’re going to play the hit man. You’re going to buy another phone, a throwaway.'” Mundo explained that the phone would be used as if it were Paco’s.
Later, as Lulu watched, Mundo texted the burner phone back with her offer: $1,000 cash, along with Ramon’s pickup truck.
Mundo started to secretly record his conversations with Lulu, hoping to gather evidence for Ramon.
With the cash in hand, Ramon and Mundo agreed that Ramon should go to the police.
In the interrogation video, a detective asks Mundo, “Has she specifically used the word ‘dead’?” “Yeah,” Mundo responds, pointing to a text message on his phone.
Atkins ultimately determined that “Ramon’s life was seriously in danger.” He asked Mundo to keep recording Lulu.
In one, Lulu tells Mundo that Ramon might sign divorce papers on July 22.

The orginal article.

Summary of “We Have Always Lived in the House”

The house would be the last place I’d see my mother alive.
The floodgates opened then as I hovered on the brink of adulthood, and in rushed the awareness of just how rocky the terrain of life outside the house could be.
He would return to the house where he grew up, which would have been the last place he had seen his sister alive.
How can we go back into the house without her? With her still in the hospital in a coma? I remember feeling my subway pass in my coat pocket, resting against the folds.
The one I’d had when I was growing up in the house.
In the past year Brandon and I bought a house in Atlanta while my father moved back into his.
As we move into this new house, ours to build our lives in, creating memories unaware of and unsure of the future, I’ve been thinking a lot about the house where I grew up, the last place I called home, and who we were then when we lived there.
My father speaks often of the past, of when we were all together, my mother was alive and we all lived in the house.

The orginal article.