Summary of “Live Like You Could Lose Everything, But Know There’s Nothing To Lose”

Most people don’t want to assume greater responsibility, and thus, greater freedom.
The more responsibility and security you choose to have, the more you are enabled to be then do and then have.
When you chose greater responsibility over your life and the welfare of others, you can’t help but be compelled to live at a higher standard.
You have a reason, no, a responsibility to be and do your very best in everything you do.
Such a sense of responsibility provides more than enough motivation and urgency to push through exhaustion and sometimes despair.
Here’s the paradox, you have absolutely nothing to lose.
There is No Downside “When I had nothing to lose, I had everything. When I stopped being who I am, I found myself.” - Paulo Coelho.
There’s nothing more beautiful than improving the lives of other people.

The orginal article.

Summary of “How to care about work less-but not do less of it”

We live in an age of “Total work.” It’s a term coined by the German philosopher Josef Pieper just after World War II-describing the process by which human beings are transformed into workers, and the entirety of life is then transformed into work.
Work becomes total when all of human life is centered around it; when everything else is not just subordinate to, but in the service of work.
The solution to our over-worked state isn’t to do less work; it’s to care less about it.
There are many ways to train yourself to care less about work.
The better option is to care less about work because we care more about other things.
To get started, we need to become less attached to our notions of work.
Once you’ve detached the notion of success from that of happiness, you need to work out how else to find that satisfaction-but without actually achieving anything.
Or we could insist upon working less without caring less about work.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Attempt to Read a Book Every Week”

I started reading a new book every week two months ago.
I share the books I read with my Postanly Newsletter subscribers every Friday.
“If you don’t have time to read, you don’t have the time to write. Simple as that.” says Stephen King.Reading opens your heart to new ideas, new cultures, and new worldviews.
You don’t have to spend a whole month reading a single book.
Even insanely busy and succesful people like Warren Buffet, Elon Musk, Bill Gates, Tim Ferriss, Ryan Holiday MAKE time to read. “I just sit in my office and read all day” says Warren Buffet.
Life is too short to read books you don’t really want to read.Tim Ferriss, New York Times Best-Selling Author says, he reads 1-4 books per week.
“If I’m going for speed, I’ll use the following, which can help you 2-3x your word-per-minute rate in 15-20 minutes without sacrificing comprehension: Scientific Speed Reading: How to Read 300% Faster in 20 Minutes It takes some practice, but it works when time is of the essence.”It’s now 80/20 for me - what you read is much more important than how much or how quickly you read.” says Tim.Why One a Week?First, figure out why: why one books a week?
Don’t just read a book a week because you want to crush a goal or embrace successful people’s habits.

The orginal article.

Summary of “If You’re Too Busy for These 5 Things, Your Life Is More Off Course Than You Think”

Organizing Your Life I don’t think I’m alone in being slightly scattered and sloppy about certain areas of my life.
If you’re bedridden, who cares how organized the other areas of your life are? It’s so easy to put our health on the side, such as forgoing sleep, overconsuming stimulants, and making poor eating habits.
When you organize your spiritual life, you become clear on what your life is about.
The fastest way to move forward in life is not doing more.
Thus your life will continue getting better and more in line with your ideal vision.
If you’re not tracking the key areas of your life, than you’re probably more off course than you think.
Conclusion It’s really easy to get off course in life.
We can ensure we get where we want in life by organizing ourselves, planning for our future, tracking our progress, heightening our mindset, and hustling.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Passing Over: How Reading Lets Us Live a Thousand Lives”

Someone once asked the great short story writer Jorge Luis Borges “Don’t you regret spending more of your life reading than living?”.
“There are many ways of living, and reading is one of them When you are reading, you are living, and when you are dreaming, you are living also.”What does Borges mean? Isn’t living, well, living?
“Looking back into your own past, among the landmarks of your life, you will find that great readings occupy a place no less significant than actual happenings - for instance, a long and adventurous journey through strange lands, which you undertook in a certain year, may in retrospect appear no less memorable than your first exploration of A la recherche du temps perdu; or again, you might realize that your encounter with Anna Karenina, or with Julien Sorel proved more momentous than meeting most of your past acquaintances. Who is to assess the relative significance, the specific weight that should be ascribed to these diverse experiences in the shaping of your personality?”Our memories are not so different from the stories we find in books.
One time, an older girl I did not know came up to me and said, “Why are you reading books? It’s a beautiful day. Go out live a little!”.
Even as an adult, someone will occasionally tell me to put my books away and go live.
Reading is not living, and every moment spent in a book is a life less well-lived.
Here’s something else to think about - what if reading makes you live more?
“Those of us who have been true readers all our life seldom realize the enormous extension of our being that we owe to authors. We realize it best when we talk with an unliterary friend. He may be full of goodness and good sense, but he inhabits a tiny world. In it, we should be suffocated. My own eyes are not enough for me. in reading great literature I become a thousand men and yet remain myself. Like the night sky in the Greek poem, I see with a myriad of eyes, but it is still I who see. Here, as in worship, in love, in moral action, and in knowing, I transcend myself; and am never more myself than when I do.”The cat has nine lives as a boy who read, I guess I had a thousand.

The orginal article.

Summary of “The Top 5 Regrets of the Dying”

How you choose to spend your time, or your life, is up to you.
At the end of your life, what do you want to be remembered for? There are many popular, introspective self-help books right now on what the dying are thinking, and what they regret most.
She stared longingly out the window admiring the small tree and squirrels playing, as if thinking back on her life.
Take the time to enjoy what’s good about your life, whether it’s a loving family, a great circle of friends, a safe roof over your head, a stable job, and food on the dining room table.
Don’t spend your whole life looking ahead. Appreciate what you have now, in the moment.
I wish I’d had the courage to live a life true to myself, not the life others expected of me.
If you’re looking for love, or a certain lifestyle, get the rest of your life in order to make room for these things.
Do you have any tips on living your life to the fullest? Let me know on Twitter.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Escaping From a Dire Diagnosis on Match.com”

“Maybe if you’re hoping to date an ornithologist,” she said, shaking her head.She and I composed a straightforward profile.
Right away Nance wanted me to “Wink” at a cute and much younger guy.
As someone who had been online dating for months, he had assured me that our date was pretty much perfection.
A chemo drip in her arm, Nance said, “You don’t have to sleep with him, but would you go out again?”.
The whole dating game seemed more and more like a pathetic diversion.
“You’re a dating success,” Nancy said, but her boast had no oomph.
A friend would be joining Nance and me to hang out for the afternoon and evening.
“Life is for the living,” Nance would say.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Brain Hacking: 7 Steps to Upgrade Your Mind’s Software”

Er, our beliefs are like the software that runs on the computer.
Our beliefs, whether we’re aware of them or not, affect everything in our life.
We look for evidence to confirm what we already believe, while ignoring information that discredits our current beliefs.
In his brilliant book Poor Charlie’s Almanack, Charlie Munger points out that throughout history, many of the world’s most successful people were very wary of their confirmation bias, and actually went out of their way to challenge their own beliefs.
We set up experiments to test out our own beliefs.
Ask yourself: “What is the thought that’s creating that emotion?” Ask yourself: “What is the belief that’s creating that thought?” Now that you’ve isolated your belief, set up an experiment to test its validity.
Analyze the results and confirm or discredit the old belief.
The thought is: “I have so much to do. If I don’t work today, I’ll fall behind on schedule.” The belief is: “The only way to reach my full potential and achieve my goals is to work as hard as possible.” What would I do if this belief was false and the opposite was true? I would work less and relax more.

The orginal article.

Summary of “9 Hard Things You Have to Do to Move Forward with Your Life”

Maybe it’s the life lessons I was forced to learn the hard way, or the toll of loss and failure I had recently endured, but a decade ago, in the midst of a panic attack on my 27th birthday, I had to admit to myself right then and there that the youthful world of possibility I once felt now seemed dead inside me.
You have to admit, you’ve spent a lot of your life subconsciously belittling yourself.
Being able to distinguish needs from wants is essential in every walk of life.
Never let go of an outcome you truly need in your life, but be reasonably flexible on the outcomes you want but could live fine without.
Constantly criticizing yourself is just as counterproductive as doing nothing, because you will never be able to build new positive changes into your life when you’re obsessively focused on your flaws.
Yes, being grateful seems simple enough, but a grateful state of mind is unbelievably hard to maintain when life disappoints us.
Thus, thinking about others instead of oneself helps solve feelings self-consciousness and inadequacy, which in turn makes you feel a lot less broken and alone when you’re struggling to move your life forward.
What else would you add to the list? What’s one hard thing you do that has helped you move your life forward? Leave a comment below and share your thoughts.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Never retire, said a Japanese doctor who studied longevity and lived to 105”

Dr. Shigeaki Hinohara, credited with building the foundations of Japanese medicine and helping make Japan the world leader in longevity, often practiced what he preached.
The physician, chairman emeritus of St. Luke’s International University, and honorary president of St. Luke’s International Hospital recommended several basic guidelines for living a long, healthy life in an interview with Japan Times journalist Judit Kawaguchi.
In the interview he explained that the retirement age in Japan was set at 65 years old back when the average life expectancy was 68.
Now, people are living much longer – the average life expectancy in Japan as of 2015 was almost 84 years – and so they should be retiring much later in life too.
Worry less about eating well or getting more sleep, and have fun.
“We all remember how as children, when we were having fun, we often forgot to eat or sleep. I believe that we can keep that attitude as adults, too. It’s best not to tire the body with too many rules such as lunchtime and bedtime.”
“When a doctor recommends you take a test or have some surgery, ask whether the doctor would suggest that his or her spouse or children go through such a procedure. Contrary to popular belief, doctors can’t cure everyone. So why cause unnecessary pain with surgery? I think music and animal therapy can help more than most doctors imagine.”
“Pain is mysterious, and having fun is the best way to forget it. If a child has a toothache, and you start playing a game together, he or she immediately forgets the pain. Hospitals must cater to the basic need of patients: We all want to have fun. At St. Luke’s we have music and animal therapies, and art classes.”

The orginal article.