Summary of “96-Year-Old Secretary Quietly Amasses Fortune, Then Donates $8.2 Million”

Ms. Bloom’s will allowed for some money to be left to relatives and friends, but directed that the bulk of the fortune go toward scholarships of Ms. Lockshin’s choice for needy students.
Like Ms. Bloom, Leonard Gigowski, a shopkeeper from New Berlin, Wis., who died in 2015, left his secret $13 million fortune to fund scholarships.
While her aunt’s wealth was a surprise, Ms. Bloom’s quiet plan to help students was not, Ms. Lockshin said.
Over her 67 years with the firm, Cleary Gottlieb Steen & Hamilton, it grew to its current size, with more than 1,200 lawyers, as well as hundreds of staff members, of which Ms. Bloom was the longest tenured, said Paul Hyams, a human resources executive for the firm who became good friends with Ms. Bloom over his 35 years working there.
Even when she married, Ms. Bloom kept her given name, which was indicative of her independent nature, said a cousin, Flora Mogul Bornstein, 72.Nearly all the money was in Ms. Bloom’s name alone, Ms. Lockshin said, adding that it was “Very possible” that even Mr. Margolies did not know the size of his wife’s fortune.
Ms. Bloom agreed to move to a senior residence mainly because “She wanted to find a good bridge game,” said Ms. Bornstein, a retired social worker.
Ms. Lockshin said an additional $2 million from Ms. Bloom’s bequest would be split between Hunter College and another scholarship fund to be announced.
Ms. Bloom’s view of education was informed by her own public school experience and by working with successful lawyers from highly rated colleges and law schools, he said.

The orginal article.

Summary of “How Living Colour Reignited Rock’s “Cult of Personality””

“The hair,” Reid said, “Was a different texture.” Despite having chops and a loyal following in the biggest city in the country, Living Colour for years couldn’t land a record deal.
“One of the most frustrating things,” Calhoun said, “Is the ignorance of people who will not admit or deal with the fact that black people invented rock ‘n’ roll.” By making songs about the perils of hero worship, racism, and gentrification, Living Colour forced listeners to reckon with uncomfortable truths.
Reid had spent the early part of the decade touring with jazz-funk drummer Ronald Shannon Jackson’s Decoding Society and originally formed Living Colour as a side project.
In 1985, seeking change, Reid, journalist Greg Tate, and producer Konda Mason cofounded the Black Rock Coalition, an organization with the stated mission of “Creating an atmosphere conducive to the maximum development, exposure, and acceptance of Black alternative music.”
In addition to Glover, the new Living Colour lineup was bolstered by fellow New Yorkers Calhoun, an award-winning Berklee College of Music grad, and Muzz Skillings, a bassist with rock and jazz experience.
In October 1989, before Living Colour’s four-night run with Guns N’ Roses and the Stones at the Los Angeles Coliseum, Reid and Calhoun gave a live radio interview.
Keith Richards came to Living Colour’s dressing room and shook Reid’s hand.
These days, Reid looks back on Living Colour’s rise with a mix of pride and incredulity.

The orginal article.

Summary of “The abolitionist Benjamin Lay was a hero ahead of his time”

In September 1738, Benjamin Lay, a radical Quaker barely four feet tall, filled an animal bladder with bright red pokeberry juice, then tucked it into the secret compartment of a book.
Benjamin Lay was a throwback to that early, radical phase of Quaker history.
Even though Lay was born 22 years later, he was a throwback to that early, radical phase of Quaker history.
When Lay discovered slavery in the Quaker city of Philadelphia, where at the time about one in 11 was enslaved, and when he realised that many of these slaves were owned by wealthy Quakers, he flew into a rage.
Called a ‘Pythagorean-Christian-Cynic philosopher’ by Benjamin Franklin, Lay had a special interest in Diogenes, the founder of Cynic philosophy and a vegetarian who chose to live life in accordance with nature.
Diogenes lived for a time in a pithos, a large jar used for storage, not unlike the small cave where Lay made his home.
Quakers in the 18th century, led by their wealthy slaveowning elite, bear the original blame because of their unrelenting attacks on Lay.
In the end, radical Quakerism, the solidarity of seafaring culture, firsthand knowledge of the struggles of enslaved people, a pantheistic commitment to animals and nature, all shaped by his understanding of subversive Greek philosophy, made Lay a revolutionary far ahead of his time.

The orginal article.

Summary of “The five habits that can add more than a decade to your life”

People who stick to five healthy habits in adulthood can add more than a decade to their lives, according to a major study into the impact behaviour has on lifespan.
When the scientists calculated average life expectancy, they noticed a dramatic effect from the healthy habits.
Compared with people who adopted none of them, men and women who adhered to all five saw their life expectancy at 50 rise from 26 to 38 years and 29 to 43 years respectively, or an extra 12 years for men and 14 for women.
“When we embarked on this study, I thought, of course, that people who adopted these habits would live longer. But the surprising thing was how huge the effect was,” said Meir Stampfer, a co-author on the study and professor of epidemiology and nutrition at the Harvard TH Chan School of Public Health.
Only 8% of the general population followed all five healthy habits.
The five healthy habits were defined as not smoking; having a body mass index between 18.5 and 25; taking at least 30 minutes of moderate exercise a day, having no more than one 150ml glass of wine a day for women, or two for men; and having a diet rich in items such as fruit, vegetables and whole grains and low in red meat, saturated fats and sugar.
Part of the problem is that many people struggle to give up smoking, and the continuous peddling of unhealthy food, as well as poor urban planning, which can make it hard for people to exercise, also feed in, he said.
“People can get stuck in a rut and think it’s too late to change their ways, but what we find is that when people do change their ways, we see remarkable benefits.”

The orginal article.

Summary of “Millennials are struggling. Is it the fault of the baby boomers?”

“Intergenerational war doesn’t reflect how people feel about the issues or how they live their lives as families,” says Torsten Bell, director of the foundation.
A complex mix of reasons includes the financial crisis, austerity and reluctance by successive governments to radically tackle the challenges of housing, health, social care, employment and a woefully deregulated market at a time when people are living so much longer – but no baby-boomer banditry.
“We have people with degrees doing Mickey Mouse jobs and young people who will have no occupational pension and no house to sell to see them through old age. That’s not the fault of mum and dad. If we think that, we are tackling the wrong problems. It’s not about redistributing the crumbs from the rich man’s table but restoring fairness.”
Only a third of millennials own their own home, compared with almost two-thirds of baby boomers at the same age.
A third of millennials will, it is predicted, have a lifetime of renting with less space, poorer conditions, longer commutes and more insecurity than the baby boomers experienced.
Although precise definitions differ, broadly speaking millennials are those people born between the early 1980s and the late 1990s.
On current trends, given high rents, low wages, Brexit and, for some, the debt of university tuition fees, will millennials have sufficient funds in retirement? Under auto-enrolment, 5% of a wage by 2019 will go into a pension pot, but on a low income, will increasing numbers of millennials opt out? In several decades’ time, millions of older people may be dependent on housing benefit, living in rented accommodation, and surviving on a state pension, which currently at ¬£7,000 a year, is already not fit for purpose.
Ed Lewis, 36, LondonLewis lives in a house-share with four other people while working fulltime for a campaigning organisation.

The orginal article.

Summary of “There’s no philosophy of life without a theory of human nature”

A strange thing is happening in modern philosophy: many philosophers don’t seem to believe that there is such a thing as human nature.
The existence of something like a human nature that separates us from the rest of the animal world has often been implied, and sometimes explicitly stated, throughout the history of philosophy.
Now, if human nature is real, what are the consequences from a philosophical perspective? Why should a philosopher, or anyone interested in using philosophy as a guide to life, care about this otherwise technical debate? Let’s explore the point by way of a brief discussion of two philosophies that provide particularly strong defences of human nature and that are aligned with cognitive science: existentialism and Stoicism.
The Stoics thought that there are two aspects of human nature that should be taken as defining what it means to live a good life: we are highly social, and we are capable of reason.
On closer examination, it is clear that for the Stoics, human nature played a similar role to that played by the concept of facticity for the existentialists: it circumscribes what human beings can do, as well as what they are inclined to do.
The parameters imposed by our nature are rather broad, and the Stoics agreed with the existentialists that a worthwhile human life can be lived by following many different paths.
It’s not only modern science that tells us that there is such thing as human nature, and it’s no coincidence that a number of popular modern therapies such as logotherapy, rational emotive behaviour therapy and cognitive behavioural therapy draw on ideas from both existentialism and Stoicism.
There is no single path to a flourishing human life, but there are also many really bad ones.

The orginal article.

Summary of “SB-827 failed in California, but there’s still no good alternative to building more housing”

While of course more density would mean change, and people for understandable reasons tend to be mildly averse to seeing communities they have roots in changing, there’s good reason to believe looking at the simple wage comparisons undercounts the benefits of more density.
For most people, it means direct access to other people, who serve as customers and co-workers and suppliers.
Lionel Fontagn√© and Gianluca Santoni find that heavily populated areas offer higher labor productivity and higher pay because “Denser commuting zones seem to offer a better match between employers and employees.” The more people there are around, the more kinds of businesses you can have and the more finely specialized they can be, making it more likely that any given person would be well-suited to work at someplace or other in town.
In other words, while you might fear that an influx of new people would drive down wages and undo the benefits of cheaper housing, the academic literature suggests the reverse.
The modern economy is made of people, and places with more people feature deeper and more competitive markets with more productivity, higher wages, and more options for both workers and consumers.
To get a country like that, there’s simply no good substitute for building more places for people to live in areas that are expensive.
The deeper labor markets provided by density allow people to find jobs they are better at and that make them happier, while people being in proximity to one another allows them to be more innovative and productive.
If we don’t do it, people will still find a place to live, but their life prospects will be permanently the worse for it.

The orginal article.

Summary of “The Book of LifeThe Book of Life”

One of the most basic facts about time is that, even though we insist on measuring it as if it were an objective unit, it doesn’t, in all conditions, feel as if it were moving at the same pace.
Time moves more or less slowly according to the vagaries of the human mind: it may fly or it may drag.
Life, whatever the dieticians may urge, it seems like the priority should not be to add raw increments of time but to ensure that whatever years remain feel.
The aim should be to densify time rather than to try to extract one or two more years from the fickle grip of Death.
Why then does time have such different speeds, moving at certain points bewilderingly fast, at others with intricate moderation? The clue is to be found childhood.
Childhood ends up feeling so long because it is the cauldron of novelty; because its most ordinary days are packed with extraordinary discoveries and sensations: these can be as apparently minor yet as significant as the first time we explore the zip on a cardigan or hold our nose under water, the first time we look at the sun through the cotton of a beach towel or dig our fingers into the putty holding a window in its frame.
We don’t need to make art in order to learn the most valuable lesson of artists, which is about noticing properly, living with our eyes open – and thereby, along the way, savouring time.
‘What if life were given back to me – what infinity! I’d turn a whole minute into an age’ Faced with losing his life, the poor wretch recognises that every minute could be turned into aeons of time, with sufficient imagination and appreciation.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Steps to take to live an active and happy life when you’re old”

What makes Lask, Lee and White particularly notable is that all of them have found a way to forge active lives past 81, the average life expectancy for someone living in New York City.
Through social workers, friends of friends and neighbors, the center tracked down 20 older New Yorkers living active lives – a mixture of rich, poor, black, white, Hispanic, Asian – and followed them through their daily routines from 2015 to 2017.
“Some people live with health and other challenges as the main plot of their lives,” says Columbia’s Block.
Some of the people in the project who had the least income had some of the richest views of life.
“It’s such a reality for people in their 80s.” Many of them told her that they had lived a full life and were ready to go, she says.
Removed from the daily hustle to work, life in the last decades can be a time to savor living.
Many people think about the financial implications of retiring and recognize that they might have health problems at the end of their lives, but beyond that they haven’t worked out a plan for what might be decades of living once they are retired.
“If you ask people about their lives and stories and motivations,” she says, “It brings out the best in them. We don’t have a ritual to allow people to share their stories and to feel validated.”

The orginal article.

Summary of “‘Social media has poisoned us’: young Britons on why they are unhappy”

Young people are often sold the lie they need to get to university to get where they need to be.
University has become desirable because of the freedom it gives young people who have never lived away from home.
Mental health problems are incredibly common among young people.
Schools put unbelievable amounts of pressure on young people with studying.
Schools must stop scaring pupils into studying by threatening that they will be dropped from the course because this has a terrible impact on young people’s mental health.
‘Social media has poisoned young people’: Joe, 24, self-employed, East Midlands.
The whole text generation has taken a lot of character out of young people’s communication and left a lot of them strangers to themselves.
Brexit is one of the things giving young people like me the impression that the electorate is dragging this country down the toilet.

The orginal article.