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No matter how big or small your home is, if you’re not naturally a tidy person then keeping it clean can be a bit of a challenge.
For a while, I thought I was just destined to live in a mess – until I started cleaning in sections.
The idea here is to get seven areas to clean that should take you an hour or less.
Think: What could I realistically clean in an hour? Don’t ever have a “Section” that’s going to take much longer than that.
If you have a bigger one, then you may need to expand that initial cleaning over a few weeks.
After that initial clean, come up with a maintenance schedule you know you can stick to.
I clean my living area on Wednesday evenings, which happens to coincide with when I catch up on television shows I enjoy on Hulu.
Have your own hacks for keeping your place clean? Let us know what you do in the comments.

The orginal article.

Summary of “7 insights from Stoicism that will change the way you approach life”

“Were all the geniuses of history to focus on this single theme, they could never fully express their bafflement at the darkness of the human mind. No person would give up even an inch of their estate, and the slightest dispute with a neighbor can mean hell to pay; yet we easily let others encroach on our lives – worse, we often pave the way for those who will take it over. No person hands out their money to passersby, but to how many do each of us hand out our lives! We’re tight-fisted with property and money, yet think too little of wasting time, the one thing about which we should all be the toughest misers.” – Seneca.
Booker T. Washington observed that “The number of people who stand ready to consume one’s time, to no purpose, is almost countless.” A philosopher, on the other hand, knows that these intrusions prevent us from doing the thinking and work we were put here to do.
Time? Time is our most irreplaceable asset-instead of striving to make more of it, we can far more easily just stop wasting so much of it.
No one has ever escaped it – though a lot of people have spent incredible amounts of their time trying to.
“Let us prepare our minds as if we’d come to the very end of life. Let us postpone nothing. Let us balance life’s books each day … The one who puts the finishing touches on their life each day is never short of time.” – Seneca.
On the back, it has Marcus Aurelius’s quote: “You could leave life right now. Let that determine what you do and say and think.” Except I cut off the last part – as a reminder that there isn’t even time to go through the whole line.
With death constantly “On our lips” as Montaigne put it, or with, as Shakespeare said, every third thought on our grave, we have an easier time rejecting pointless trivialities and we develop a keen sense of priority and time.
How did you feel reading those? Hopefully invigorated and inspired to seize each and every day and remember how fleeting our time really is.

The orginal article.

Summary of “There’s Now a Name for the Micro Generation Born Between 1977-1983”

“Then we hit this technology revolution before we were maybe in that frazzled period of our life with kids and no time to learn anything new. We hit it where we could still adopt in a selective way the new technologies.”
If you’re getting all nostalgic reading this, chances are that you were born between 1977 and 1983.
It’s only seven years – not enough to count as a generation – but our experience is unique to us.
We were the last kids to make it all the way to grown up without pervasive technology.
We were the first twenty-somethings to learn how to use iPods and internet on our phones, how to text and online date.
We straddle a gap, exist between two worlds, and have, in some ways, lived two separate lives instead of one.
The idea is there’s this micro or in-between generation between the Gen X group – who we think of as the depressed flannelette-shirt-wearing, grunge-listening children that came after the Baby Boomers and the Millennials – who get described as optimistic, tech savvy and maybe a little bit too sure of themselves and too confident.
Of course, not everyone born during any generation fits into the mold – just most of us – and our experiences can vary due to gender, economics, race, culture, etc.

The orginal article.

Summary of “What Happened To Black Lives Matter?”

Top activists in the movement – like Alicia Garza, cofounder of the Black Lives Matter network of organizations, Charlene Carruthers of the Black Youth Project 100, and others – met to privately discuss how to move forward in Trump’s America.
“Even if you look at the black Greek letter organizations, they have certain structures so that if something strays too far, there’s something to rein it in. That hasn’t happened with Black Lives Matter or the Movement for Black Lives. It’s not to say it has to happen, but people are unclear about what they are coming to these organizations for.”
In the summer of 2015, the Movement for Black Lives launched a conference on the campus of Cleveland State University where, one evening, the families of multiple young people who had been killed by the police shared personal testimony recounting the tragedy in their lives.
“Whether or not you call it Black Lives Matter, whether or not you put a hashtag in front of it, whether or not you call it the Movement for Black Lives, all of that is irrelevant. Because there was resistance before Black Lives Matter, and there will be resistance after Black Lives Matter.” In recent public appearances, she’s said she gave it language – that the movement was a “Continuation” of a uniquely American struggle led by black people.
Friends and colleagues say Garza grew fiercely protective of the hashtag – so much so that she moved to make Black Lives Matter and the Movement for Black Lives into two separate entities, encouraging others around her to do the same.
A former labor organizer with a degree from the University of California, San Diego, Garza has often said the movement is “Leaderful, not leaderless.” The formation of the Movement for Black Lives amounted to the creation of a power structure inside the movement, one that Garza leads.
The Movement for Black Lives has said it’s “Focused on a hopeful and inclusive vision of Black joy, safety, and prosperity.” That is to say they like policy, just not that much: “We recognize that not all of our collective needs and visions can be translated into policy, but we understand that policy change is one of many tactics necessary to move us towards the world we envision.” And the group has focused on different policy initiatives: Since the November meeting, the Movement for Black Lives has engaged in an action involving freeing jailed mothers who couldn’t afford bail, and a land-rights campaign.
Some activists bristle at the idea of the Black Lives Matter movement breaking up, arguing that the issues confronting the movement now are a part of how political movements evolve.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Why Fathers Leave Their Children”

The child is a chance to turn things around and live a disciplined life.
According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, black single fathers are more involved in their kids’ lives than white single fathers at this stage.
The key weakness is not the father’s bond to the child; it’s the parents’ bond with each other.
The fathers often retain a traditional and idealistic “Leave It to Beaver” view of marriage.
The father begins to perceive the mother as bossy, just another authority figure to be skirted.
Suddenly there’s a new guy living in the house, a man who resents the old one.
The good news, especially from the Edin-Nelson research, is that the so-called deadbeat dads want to succeed as fathers.
Mayor Rahm Emanuel, a vocal leader in this cause, had Green recite his poem “Something to Live For” at his inaugural in 2015, and this Sunday the two of them will be appearing together to honor role model fathers on the South Side.

The orginal article.

Summary of “7 Things You Have to Stop Believing to Live a Successful Life On Your Own Terms”

Or as one of our course students put it on a coaching call this morning: “My mind seems to be jam-packed with all these beliefs that just lead me in the opposite direction of my dreams, which is living a successful life on my own terms.”
In light of our student’s realization, and our collective human struggle to think better and live better, here are some super common faulty beliefs you need to let go of if you want to live a successful life on your own terms.
Even the most seasoned entrepreneurs and creative types I know, who basically live on their own terms in every imaginable way, still get caught up in the overplayed idea of fame and fortune being symbols of success.
Stop believing that you should feel more confident before you take the next step.
Stop believing that more planning and thinking will yield you better results.
Stop believing that focusing more on your goals is the answer.
Seasoned achievers who live on their own terms know they must guard their time and energy closely.
If you want to overcome your struggles and live a happier life, your best bet is to spend more time communicating with people who share these same intentions.

The orginal article.

Summary of “How To Be Free From All Emotional Blocks And Fears”

Literally, you have designed every detail of your life to protect yourself from the fears and internal conflicts you aren’t willing to face.
You bury your childhood traumas, your fears, and your emotional insecurities.
Said Tony Robbins, “You always get out of life exactly what you tolerate.” You’ve learned to tolerate living with your fears and internal conflicts.
Rather than fixing them, they construct the most bizarre relationships and life to protect themselves from facing their fears or traumas.
You Are Not Your FearsThe first step in living a life of freedom is to realize that you are not your fears.
Herein lies why most people build their lives around their fears.
You can only do this by exposing yourself directly to your fears and emotional problems.
Build your entire life around your fears like most people.

The orginal article.

Summary of “How to become financially independent in 5 years”

Given our assumptions, here are your target savings rates and a simplified financial picture of what it would take to retire in 5, 10, 15 and 20 years.
In order to be financially independent in five years, you’re going to need to ratchet your savings rate all the way up to 82% of your income.
If you want to give yourself a little more breathing room and still become financially independent 10 years from now, you’re going to need to boost your savings rate to 66.5% of your income.
Out of your monthly income, $2,771 will go to savings and you’ll have $1,396 to live on.
You’re up for saving hard to be financially independent, but maybe you have other debts you’re carrying or aren’t willing to make the extreme adjustments needed to save at a higher rate.
Your savings rate is 53.7%. For those earning $50,000, your annual expenses will need to be under $23,150 a year so that you can save the other $26,850.
If you’ve got a little more time and want to set your sights at being financially independent 20 years from now, you can drop your savings rate to under half of your income and land at 43%. If you’re earning around $50,000, you’re going to need to live on $28,500 a year.
Out of your monthly income, $1,792 will go to savings and you’ll keep the larger portion, $2,375, to live on.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Bill Gates has a message for every college grad who wants to change the world”

We have only begun to tap into all the ways it will make people’s lives more productive and creative.
The third is biosciences, which are ripe with opportunities to help people live longer, healthier lives.
In the early days of Microsoft, I believed that if you could write great code, you could also manage people well or run a marketing team or take on any other task.
You can start fighting inequity sooner, whether it is in your own community or in a country halfway around the world.
Like our good friend Warren Buffett, I measure my happiness by whether people close to me are happy and love me, and by the difference I make in other people’s lives.
When you tell people the world is improving, they often look at you like you’re either naive or crazy.
Once you understand it, you start to see the world differently.
If you think things are getting better, then you want to know what’s working so you can accelerate the progress and spread it to more people and places.

The orginal article.