Summary of “A Seder Feast in Provence, With Roots in Ancient Rome”

In some periods, “Jewish men living in the carriero could only be horse traders, secondhand clothing and furniture dealers, or tailors,” said Ms. Levy, using the term for ghetto in Shuadit, a Hebrew-French-Provençal dialect that is almost extinct.
Jewish men and women alike had to wear a yellow item of clothing when outside the ghetto, to denote their difference.
In 1791, when French Jews were finally granted citizenship, most Jews still living in Carpentras moved to cities, including nearby Avignon and Marseille.
Many have served the synagogue as its rabbi; she continues the tradition as a historian and volunteer.
Her great-grandmother Noémie Cohen Bédaride “Was one of the last to bake coudoles in the synagogue’s oven,” Ms. Levy said, using the Shuadit word for matzo.
Dr. Meyer Benzekrit, the synagogue’s current president, believes that the ancient synagogue of Carpentras will once again become the heart of a vital Jewish community.
Ms. Levy makes her own crunchy brassados with matzo meal.
To start her Seder meal, Ms. Levy serves chicken soup with a mashed hard-boiled egg and crushed matzo.

The orginal article.

Summary of “10 unmistakable habits of utterly authentic people”

Authentic people are deeply in tune with who they are and what they want.
Authentic people don’t expect others to play a role either.
Their commitment to being authentic gives other people the freedom to live authentically too.
Authentic people have too much self-respect to put up with people who treat them badly or have ill will toward them, and they have too much respect for other people to try to change them.
Authentic people don’t live a go-along-to-get-along lifestyle.
Authentic people, on the other hand, are accountable.
Authentic people don’t sit at their desks thinking, “Well, if my boss would just make this job worthwhile, I’d do a better job.” The carrot-and-stick approach just isn’t relevant to them.
Authentic people don’t have that anxiety because they would never try to change themselves to influence someone else’s opinion.

The orginal article.

Summary of “7 International Cities Where You Could Live in Luxury Without Breaking the Bank”

An echo of peace permeates the city, emanating from the many ornate Buddhist temples lying within the old city walls.
Your riad costs you just over $400 a month, and you navigate the city with a monthly rail pass that you bought for just about $15. The exchange rate sits at.11 cents for every Moroccan Dirham, so you’ll have a large budget for weekend spa tratments at the hamams.
You could eat a full meal at a restaurant there for just $4, get yourself a nice bottle of wine for just $10, navigate the city for just $21 per month and rent a three-bedroom apartment in the heart of the city center for just over $500 a month.
Though the city is notorious for having been the murder capital of the world during the reign of terror of Pablo Escobar, crime rates have dropped significantly in the years since his death.
The city champions culture by way of art and gastronomy-you could eat a nice meal at a restaurant for just $2 or cook at home in your $300-ish apartment in the center of it all.
Getting around the city is simple, too, since La Paz boasts the world’s longest and highest urban cable car network, the Mi Teleférico.
The Vltava River bisects this capital city, nicknamed “The City of a Hundred Spires” for its tapering conical and pyramidal skyscrapers.
Prague is actually ranked number 44 on the Nomad Index of the best cities in the world for expats.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Sullivan: Things Are Better Than Ever. Why Are We Miserable?”

Deneen doesn’t deny any of the progress Pinker describes, or quibble at the triumph of the liberal order.
We’ve forgotten the human flourishing that comes from a common idea of virtue, and a concept of virtue that is based on our nature.
His response to the sixth great mass extinction of the Earth’s species at the hands of humans is to propose that better environmental technology will somehow solve it – just as pharmaceuticals will solve unhappiness.
Equally odd for an evolutionary psychologist, he sees absolutely no problem that humans in the last 500 years have created a world utterly different than the one humans lived in for close to 99 percent of our time on the planet.
Deneen sees paradox in human life, tragedy even; he respects the wisdom of the aeons that Pinker is simply relieved we have left behind; and he has a perspective that Pinker – despite his vast erudition and intelligence – doesn’t seem to grasp.
We have no common concept of human flourishing apart from materialism, and therefore we stand alone.
We have, after all, imperfectly controlled weapons of mass destruction, and humans have never invented a weapon we haven’t used.
There are times when an irrational and massive aberration in human history – mass circumcision – needs to be subjected to reason.

The orginal article.

Summary of “My quest for Instagram stardom left me in financial ruin”

The now-26-year-old was having brunch with friends and buying new outfits online – and documenting it all on her Instagram account.
“I wanted to tell my story about this young millennial living in New York,” Calveiro, who has more than 12,000 followers on Instagram, told The Post.
As Instagram influencers show off the latest fashion trends and their exotic vacations, mere mortals are breaking the bank trying to keep up.
According to Fashionista, you would need to spend about $31,400 a year “To maintain the standards of physical beauty represented daily in our Instagram feeds.”
Calveiro would treat herself to monthly $200 shopping sprees so she wouldn’t be seen on Instagram wearing the same outfit twice.
“A lot of it was recycled content,” Calveiro said of her posts.
Old habits die hard, although Calveiro’s trying to make them more realistic.
Looking back, Calveiro regrets blowing so much money.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Is the ‘Digital Nomad’ Life as Good as It Sounds?”

As a millennial with a college degree, no debt or dependents, more or less unlimited professional autonomy, and a passport, I am a case study in what it means to be free to live and work where I choose.
How does someone live when they can work wherever they please? It’s a question I should have been able to answer for myself just by looking in the mirror.
A 2015 forecast of employment trends by the World Economic Forum cited flexibility as “One of the biggest drivers of workplace transformation around the globe.” A Gallup poll from the same year found that 37 percent of Americans have worked remotely at some point in their lives, a fourfold increase since 1995.
These outfitters, which manage locations all over the world, introduce their clients to one another, set them up in communal housing, and take care of the logistical hassles that can eat into the productivity of anyone trying to work while on the move.
These new digital-nomad companies make it their business to solve the significant problems that come up when trying to get work done while abroad. But can they solve the problem of other people?
“Think about it: people who can work remotely and live this lifestyle are often the ones who have reached a point where they’re very good at what they do and they’re very self-motivated,” he says.
Each of the Bali workers had gone through WiFi Tribe’s semi-rigorous selection process, which involves a $300 application fee, completion of a Meyers-Briggs personality test, and a series of Skype interviews, conducted by Kallweit and Gerke, that include questions like “What do you like about a community?” and “Why do you love the people you love?” WiFi Tribe’s acceptance rate is about 17 percent.
Even James Nylen, a programmer from Alabama who told me within minutes of meeting that he had been “Really skeptical about the community aspect of all this,” seemed to have acclimated to the new kind of living and working situation.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Why Is It So Hard for Clothing Manufacturers to Pay a Living Wage?”

Plus, as brands are wont to remind people, most of them don’t own the factories that produce their clothes, meaning they neither pay for the garment workers’ wages nor determine what those wages are.
If the intricacies of a living wage weren’t enough to grapple with, there is also the notion of the minimum wage – that is, the lowest wage that a country’s local or federal government says employers are legally bound pay their workers.
Not only does a country’s minimum wage rarely square up with the concept of a living wage, but it can also differ by orders of magnitude.
“Lots of codes of conduct talk about a living wage and we have no evidence of factories paying a living wage; lots of codes of conduct talk about right of workers to join or form a union of their own choosing and that rarely happens,” he says.
“People will say, ‘Why haven’t you done it before?’ or ‘If it’s such a small premium to pay for such a big difference to those people, why don’t you just absorb it within your own profit margins?'” But paying a living wage can have immediate, tangible benefits, something Stochaj discovered in the two years the “Fair Share” project has been brewing.
“Consumers have basically reset what they expect to pay, and this is putting more pressure on brands to either find ways to lower prices – and hence pay lower wages – or lose market share.”
Which is to say, if brands wanted to pay their workers a living wage today, they could.
In December, Labour Behind the Label noted that it would cost H&M only 1.9 percent of the $2 billion it made in 2016 to pay all its Cambodian workers the additional $78 per month they would need to achieve a living wage.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Live your best life with the help of Tim Herrera of “

The Smarter Living section of the New York Times was created to help its readers live their best life and its editor, Tim Herrera, practices what the section preaches.
We caught up with Tim to ask him about the inspiration behind the new Times section, where he sees it going in the future, and what he’s been reading and saving to Pocket lately.
You are the editor of Smarter Living, the service journalism section of The New York Times that aims to help its readers understand the world and make the most of it.
People expect a lot from The Times, and we do our best to live up to those expectations.
You also write the weekly Smarter Living newsletter, which is a recap of The Times’ best advice for living a more fulfilling life.
How do you decide what Smarter Living is going to cover next?We’re lucky that we’re defined more thematically than topically, so our main driving force behind stories is just anything that helps readers live better lives.
What type of impact do you hope Smarter Living has on its readers? And where would you like to see the section go in the future?We have a pretty simple mandate: Help readers live better lives.
We’re really excited to develop more products and “Things” that help readers do that, so definitely something to keep an eye out for this year.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Don’t Be Fooled by Smoke and Mirrors: 12 Traits of Truly Authentic People”

In a world of increased narcissism and a decreased capacity to effectively read people, how can we discern genuine, authentic people from narcissistic manipulators? Even more, how can we challenge our perceptions and not automatically believe the artificially perfected information that is presented in our newsfeeds?
Authentic people live by a code of values and morals; however, they are more than willing to listen to the opinions of others and are open to learning from their mistakes.
Authentic people wholeheartedly accept other people for who they are.
In general, authentic people exude a genuine presence that puts others at ease, leading people to naturally gravitate toward them.
Authentic people find that having meaningful experiences and strong bonds with others make life worth living.
Authentic people live by the old adage, “You are the average of the five closest people you surround yourself with.” Instead of hanging around others who are disingenuous, authentic people choose to surround themselves with people who share the same values and morals that they do.
Authentic people do not make decisions based on their egos and do not need admiration from others in order to feel good about themselves.
Authentic people live by their values, are consistent, and do not need other’s approval to feel good about themselves.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Dread accompanies me through life but it is not without consolation”

My parents’ deaths, occupying polar positions on a spectrum of suddenness, infected my life with a persistent dread; they suffused my life with an incurable anxiety, a dread that did not require an identifiable object.
An anxiety is a lens through which to view the world, a colouration that grants the sufferer’s experiences their distinctive hue.
My trajectory through the world is thus informed, at every step, by the anxieties that afflict me.
Søren Kierkegaard suggested in The Concept of Anxiety that one of existentialism’s hard-fought rewards – our encounters with true freedom – comes with the terrible burden of encounters with dread and anxiety.
Anxiety taught me the place that death has in my life.
The upending of this world’s order by my parents’ deaths and my resultant anxiety made me suffer a conceptual shift in my understanding of its workings; it became a philosophical commonplace for me to believe in claims about this world’s malleability through our conscious, emotional, not-entirely rational understanding of it.
To believe that there was a final end to my life, a purpose, a destination, an intended teleology, was to be infected with an anxiety that I was not fulfilling my purpose in life, that I was ‘wasting’ my life.
Because of my anxieties, I have come to understand why I’m the philosopher I am, why I hold the views I do, why I do not trust that there is an inherent, essential, meaning or purpose to life.

The orginal article.