Summary of “Why octopuses are building small “cities” off the coast of Australia”

The first time that divers discovered a “City” of octopuses off the coast of Australia, it seemed like a fluke.
In 2016, divers found another community of octopuses living in dens built from discarded shells.
Researchers now suspect octopuses have been building group habitats for a long time.
These octopuses only live for about three years, so each generation is relatively short.
Over the years, octopuses pushed these mounds against the rocks, burrowed inside, and created dens next to each other.
Using video footage from divers and camera traps, the scientists were able to observe the social behavior of city slicker octopuses.
Building Octlantis might also put the octopuses in danger, since they have to come out of hiding to pile up shells and create burrows.
According to the researchers, Octlantis residents also regularly engage in social behavior that humans have never witnessed between octopuses before.

The orginal article.

Summary of “A History of My Mexico City Home, in Earthquakes”

Our massive pink building, with ten floors, a penthouse, and a deep, two-story garage-one of the few ugly buildings on the block-nearly collapsed in the earthquake of 1985, in which ten thousand or more are thought to have died, mostly as a result of shoddy construction and the lax enforcement of building codes.
On August 24th, I injured my left knee lugging heavy boxes while vacating my apartment in Brooklyn; the owner was selling the building.
Mexico City was given the democratic vote in 1998-before that, the ruling party, the PRI, appointed the city’s mayors-and since then has been governed by a series of center-left mayors who have enforced stricter building regulations.
Recent Chilean quakes have been stronger than those that have hit Mexico, but far fewer buildings have collapsed in Santiago, a newer city.
It’s being reported that perhaps at least three thousand buildings in the city have been heavily damaged; it’s not yet known how many are left uninhabitable.
Some of these buildings are new, their residents victims of the same old corruption that allows builders to cut corners.
El Doctor, our landlord, was moving out; he told Jovi that if the building was saved, he’d sell his apartments.
Outside, a city official was trying to reassure a crowd of neighbors, who were worried that the building was going to fall over onto the school next door.

The orginal article.

Summary of “I live a healthier life now I’m free of the trappings of modernity”

It’s easy to live by your values when times are good, much harder when you’re having a stroke or dying of cancer.
One thing I can say with more confidence is this: if we continue pursuing this political ideology of mass industrialism – which has given us ambulances, dialysis machines, wheelchairs and antidepressants – not only will we continue to harm our physical, emotional and mental health we’ll also wipe out much of life on Earth.
Deconstruct a single ambulance – with its plastics, oils, fluids, copper, acids, glass, rubber, PVC, minerals and steel – and I’ll show you how to lay waste to the very thing all our lives depend upon: the planet.
We create stressful, toxic, unhealthy lifestyles fuelled by sugar, caffeine, tobacco, antidepressants, adrenaline, discontent, energy drinks and fast food, and then defend the political ideology that got us hooked on these things in the first place.
My own approach to healthcare won’t satisfy the critics, the advocates of this strange thing called progress that seems to have us all more stressed and less content.
Your body is always aiming for balance and health, and listening to it is one of the best things you can do.
I made the tough decision to live in the natural world so that I could breathe clean air, drink pure water and create life that allows others the same.
I only managed to do it by stripping away modernity’s bullshit, learning to live with the land, and reducing my bills down to zero.

The orginal article.

Summary of “The ‘Madman’ Is Back in the Building”

I’d listen to Bruce Springsteen sing “41 Shots” and weep in my room while I meditated on police brutality.
The “Madman” had raided my checking account, and there was no overdraft protection for “Sorry, I had a manic episode and rang up $800 worth of novelty T-shirts at Urban Outfitters.” I’d lost friends, an apartment, maybe my job and reputation, too.
During my leave of absence, I’d taken to calling the Bird in the middle of the night, every night, to hear her voice.
“The subway. Confined spaces. Walking through the halls, waiting for everyone to stare at me, and think, The Madman is back in the building.”
I knew I’d need to take medication for the rest of my life and that I’d humiliated myself in front of countless friends and strangers alike.
“Got some meat back on your bones. We’re thrilled to have you back.”
What I’d once viewed as my dream job became a pressure cooker I couldn’t withstand.
The cramped jail cells where we public defenders spend so much of our working day frequently triggered PTSD symptoms, bringing me right back to the claustrophobia of forced confinement.

The orginal article.

Summary of “The concept of Ikigai could be the secret to a long, meaningful life”

If it does, the Japanese concept of ikigai could help.
While there is no direct English translation, ikigai is thought to combine the Japanese words ikiru, meaning “To live,” and kai, meaning “The realization of what one hopes for.” Together these definitions create the concept of “a reason to live” or the idea of having a purpose in life.
In a 2010 survey of 2,000 Japanese men and women, just 31% of participants cited work as their ikigai.
What Makes Life Worth Living?: How Japanese and Americans Make Sense of Their Worlds,” told the Telegraph that how people understand ikigai can often be mapped to two other Japanese ideas – ittaikan and jiko jitsugen.
Matthews says that ikigai will likely lead to a better life “Because you will have something to live for,” but warns against viewing ikigai as a lifestyle choice: “Ikigai is not something grand or extraordinary. It’s something pretty matter-of-fact.”
According to Dan Buettner, an expert on Blue Zones, the areas of the world where people live longest, the concept of ikigai pervades the life of these islanders.
Combined with a particular diet and support network of friends or “Moai,” ikigai is helping people live longer on Okinawa as it gives them purpose, he says, who provides a karate master, fisherman and great-great-great-grandmother, all of whom are more than 100 years old, as examples.
Knowing what your ikigai is not enough – all of these people put their purpose into action, says Buettner.

The orginal article.

Summary of “As Irma’s Winds Rise, So Does a Debate Over TV Storm Reporting”

“Why do these news networks feel the need to put these reporters out there?” read one tweet.
Others pointed out that reporters were standing in conditions that they were advising residents to stay out of.
At the same time, veteran reporters say they take every precaution to stay out of life-threatening situations.
One MSNBC studio anchor, Ali Velshi, addressed the issue directly, saying before 10 a.m. that he wanted to pause the coverage: “I want to take a quick break. I want to reset. I want to find out that our reporters are safe.”
The custom of reporters broadcasting live from hurricanes began with Dan Rather, the former CBS News anchor, in 1961.
Do TV reporters think we wouldn’t believe there’s a hurricane blowing unless they stood in the middle of it? #Irma.
In a Facebook post on Aug. 25, Jacque Masse, a reporter for 12News in Beaumont, Tex., said she covered Hurricane Harvey by herself, acting as an “M.M.J.” – industry jargon for “Multimedia journalist,” or a solo television news reporter.
“Somewhere it’s been ingrained in our minds that there’s a million people that would love to have your job, so if you won’t do it, someone else will,” said Hayley Minogue, a reporter for WKRG, a CBS affiliate in Mobile, Ala., who was covering her first major hurricane from Jacksonville, Fla.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Expat country ranking: Best quality of life in the world, by InterNations”

If you’re thinking of quitting your job where you live and moving abroad for a new life and career, then Portugal is apparently the place to be.
According to one of the world’s most comprehensive reports-Expat Insider 2017-on expats, Portugal has the best quality of life in the world.
InterNations, the networking group which conducted the survey, defines expats “In the classical sense of employees on a corporate assignment.” It had 13,000 respondents, representing 166 nationalities.
They were asked to rate and provide information on what it’s like to live and work in 65 countries that are considered key destinations for expats.
Scores were calculated on 43 factors, including quality of life, ease of settling in, cost of living, and healthcare, to get an overall ranking.
The quality of life sub-index is made up of safety and security, health and well-being, personal happiness, as well as travel and transport.
According to the survey, 93% are satisfied with their life abroad in Portugal and is one of the easiest places in the world to settle in.
89% say they are also are generally happy with their life, and the work-life balance is greatly helped with the “Kind people, nice weather and food, as well as the beautiful places to visit,” said one Brazilian expat in the report.

The orginal article.

Summary of “You’ll Never Be Famous”

By novel’s end, she settles into life as a wife and a mother, and becomes, Eliot writes, the “Foundress of nothing.” It may be a letdown for the reader, but not for Dorothea.
Looking out her window one day, she sees a family making its way down the road and realizes that she, too, is “a part of that involuntary, palpitating life, and could neither look out on it from her luxurious shelter as a mere spectator, nor hide her eyes in selfish complaining.” In other words, she begins to live in the moment.
Rather than succumb to the despair of thwarted dreams, she embraces her life as it is and contributes to those around her as she can.
This is Eliot’s final word on Dorothea: “Her full nature, like that river of which Cyrus broke the strength, spent itself in channels which had no great name on the earth. But the effect of her being on those around her was incalculably diffusive: for the growing good of the world is partly dependent on unhistoric acts; and that things are not so ill with you and me as they might have been is half owing to the number who lived faithfully a hidden life, and rest in unvisited tombs.”
We all have a circle of people whose lives we can touch and improve – and we can find our meaning in that.
Another study found that cheering up a friend was an activity that created meaning in a young adult’s life.
As students head to school this year, they should consider this: You don’t have to change the world or find your one true purpose to lead a meaningful life.
A good life is a life of goodness – and that’s something anyone can aspire to, no matter their dreams or circumstances.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Why We Need to Stop Chasing Success and Start Enjoying Life”

“You live life by analogy, a journey with a pilgrimage to get to the end success, heaven, whatever. You missed the point, you were supposed to dance.”
You work harder and longer hours because you know that if you just keep working, success will come.
You traded the precious moments for eighty-hour work weeks, but you did it.
Perhaps your story isn’t like mine, and at forty you’re still working a dead end job, working to pay the bills.
The point is, no matter how far you get or how hard you work you will always want to get to the next level.
I think about my struggle for success, working during the day and going to school at night.
An ideally located office-this is what it all came down to in the end? It’s very anticlimactic when the new car smell wears off, and all you have is a large payment and more hours at work.
We have a family, and we live through the challenges of life, but we never stop to realize the grace in each moment.

The orginal article.

Summary of “The Urban Revival Is Over”

Over this same period, the suburbs of Sun Belt cities like Charlotte, N.C.; Orlando and Tampa, Fla.; and Denver gained population.
Low-density suburban counties are once again the fastest-growing parts of the nation, according to a deep dive into America’s 3,000-plus counties by the urban economist Jed Kolko, outpacing the growth rates of dense urban counties by a large measure in 2016, when they posted their fastest growth rates since the housing crisis of 2008.
Several factors have come together to potentially stymie the urban revival.
There would have been no urban revival without the sharp declines in violent crime in the 1990s brought on by demographic shifts, more effective policing and other factors.
Companies are competing for space in gentrifying urban districts, taking over old warehouses that might have been converted into apartments.
Two-thirds of people born since 1997, including those who live in cities, want to live in single-family suburban homes, according to a 2015 survey, but the costs make this aspiration prohibitively expensive in most urban centers.
Pre-emption, the use of state law to nullify municipal authority, and President Trump’s threats to withhold federal subsidies from sanctuary cities are creating a sense of siege in many urban areas.
For all the nostalgia about the seamy old days of Times Square, we should not look forward to going back to the urban economic and social dysfunction of the 1970s and ’80s. Stopping or reversing the urban revival would not just be bad for cities.

The orginal article.