Summary of “Why I Hope to Die at 75”

So I am not talking about bargaining with God to live to 75 because I have a terminal illness.
I am talking about how long I want to live and the kind and amount of health care I will consent to after 75.
The claim is that with longer life, an ever smaller proportion of our lives will be spent in a state of decline.
It tells us exactly what we want to believe: that we will live longer lives and then abruptly die with hardly any aches, pains, or physical deterioration-the morbidity traditionally associated with growing old.
Although he didn’t die from the heart attack, no one would say he is living a vibrant life.
At age 75 we reach that unique, albeit somewhat arbitrarily chosen, moment when we have lived a rich and complete life, and have hopefully imparted the right memories to our children.
Certainly if there were to be a flu pandemic, a younger person who has yet to live a complete life ought to get the vaccine or any antiviral drugs.
Is making money, chasing the dream, all worth it? Indeed, most of us have found a way to live our lives comfortably without acknowledging, much less answering, these big questions on a regular basis.

The orginal article.

Summary of “The remote UK community living off-grid”

“I have been here 23 years. I don’t think it is very remote really in the sense that people think about remoteness – but its inaccessibility, which I think is appealing.”
“As the children get older we want them to have the independence to build their own dwellings here.”
“I have now been here for five years. I came here as a couple, with our son, but we have now split up but still both live here.”
“My wife, Gill, and I came up here for a holiday and we got hooked on the idea of living here.”
“For one thing, I’d always wanted to build my own house and Gill liked the idea as there was a good primary school here for our three children.”
“I like living here because I like to know where everything comes from, to know myself what the situation is with my electricity and what to do when it goes wrong and the same goes for the water too.”
“Everybody expects washing machines now here and everybody has one apart from me. I’m the last person washing by hand here.”
“There is a proper sense of community here, which I think is lacking in other parts of the country.”

The orginal article.

Summary of “This Is How People Can Actually Afford to Live in Seattle”

Since 2010, Seattle has increased in population size by a whopping 18.7 percent, the fastest rate of growth among the biggest 50 cities in the United States.
For perspective, the Seattle Times noted that the city’s population growth of 114,000 in the first seven years of this decade was roughly the same amount it grew in the previous 30 years, back to 1980.
Among the 50 largest US cities, Seattle was one of just three so skewed toward the top, alongside San Francisco, the metropolis with which it is so often compared.
In May, the Seattle City Council passed a new tax on large businesses that it hoped would raise $47 million to fund affordable housing development and homelessness services, only to reverse course and repeal the plan a few weeks later under pressure from the local business community.
Per the National Low Income Housing Coalition, at minimum wage-currently a sliding scale from $11.50 to 15.45, based on size of employer and benefits-you’d have to earn $61,160 in order to afford what it described as a modest one-bedroom at Fair Market Rent in Seattle.
West Seattle and Columbia City were known until recently as havens for cheap rent, thanks to the relative inconvenience of getting downtown, but even those neighborhoods are starting to change.
Minimum Wage: Emily Fisher, who moved to Seattle from her hometown in Montana eight years ago, lives in the Magnolia neighborhood tucked away in the city’s northwest.
So how do people actually afford to live in Seattle? The lazy answer is to land a lucrative tech job.

The orginal article.

Summary of “What to Eat to Live to 100”

I aspire to live an incredibly long, happy, and healthy life.
The book is fantastic and I highly recommend it for anyone who is looking to live a longer, happier life.
Food Guidelines to Live By:.95% of your food should be plant-based.
Knowing your sense of purpose, or reason for living, has been shown to add up to 7 years of life expectancy.
Attending faith-based services 4 times per month has been shown to add 4-14 years to your life.
Committing to a life partner can add up to 3 years of life expectancy.
Here’s to a long, happy, healthy, and fulfilling life!
Rew Merle writes about living well, including good habits for happiness, health, productivity, and success.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Why the French don’t show excitement”

Most French learners can recall the day that a classmate first uttered the phrase ‘Je suis excité’ only to have their teacher hem and haw uncomfortably before explaining that the word excité doesn’t signal emotional but rather physical excitement.
“I think it’s safe to say I express excitement often and outwardly,” said bilingual Australian Dr Gemma King, who teaches French language and cinema at the Australian National University in Canberra, noting that when she speaks French, it is another story entirely.
Like other untranslatable terms like Japan’s shinrin-yoku or dadirri in aboriginal Australian, it seems as though the average French person doesn’t need to express excitement on the day to day.
For Julie Barlow, Canadian co-author of The Story of French and The Bonjour Effect, this is largely due to the implied enthusiasm in the word ‘excited’, something that’s not sought after in French culture.
“I think there is something cultural about the greater level of reservation French people tend to show in everyday conversation,” Dr King said.
Those who are unable to show the proper emotional detachment within French society can even be perceived as being somehow deranged, something that is exemplified by the pejorative labelling of former President Nicolas Sarkozy as ‘l’excité’, due to the zeal he shows in public appearances.
In reaction, Couturier continued, the French revolutionaries fought back against these masks and this hypocrisy – something that the French maintain today by expressing their emotions as truthfully as possible to avoid appearing inauthentic.
“I used to judge Americans because I thought they were always too ecstatic, always having disproportionate reactions,” he told me years later, though now, he added, “I feel like I have two worlds in my head, one in French and one in English. I feel like the English world is a lot more fun than the French one.”

The orginal article.

Summary of “What happened when migrants moved into my family’s Sicilian village”

35, is from Ekiti state in Nigeria, and he reached Sutera four months ago after a trek covering 6,000km.
“At the end of the 1950s, when Rosario was a small boy, Sutera was a town of 5,000, with six food stores, five taverns, a cobbler and a blacksmith.”The streets at dusk were filled with miners and farmers, and the tavern lights stayed on until late in the evening,” he remembers.
The people of Sutera began emigrating in search of work across Europe, often in the German town of Dillingen, or in Woking, Surrey, where there is still a sizeable community of Suterese people.
Now, more than half a century on, the population of Sutera has dwindled to 1,200 inhabitants.
The town of Sutera, almost entirely populated by older people, had long since filled its cemeteries to capacity.
Sutera joined a resettlement programme that funds towns to host a certain number of migrants.
Leaning on a railing, he watched a group of elderly men sitting on a bench and told me that if, five years ago, people had told him that he would soon be living in a small Sicilian village he would have laughed in their faces.
For Sutera, which clings to the base of Mount San Paolino in central Sicily, the arrival of migrants has been a boon.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Elle Mills is the celebrity every YouTuber wants to be. But her fame came at a price.”

The titles on Mills’s channel are reminiscent of other prank videos on YouTube: “I LEGALLY MARRIED MY SISTER’S BOYFRIEND.” “I THREW MYSELF A GRADUATION CEREMONY.” And like many others on the platform, she has a set, familiar introduction to each of her videos: “Hi. I’m Elle Mills.”
Elle Mills and her mother, Janette Prejola, catch up after a day of work.
Justin Park watches as Elle Mills says goodbye to her younger bother, Jay Mills, who was returning to college after a holiday break this month.
After graduating from high school, Mills decided to put all of her effort into becoming a famous YouTuber.
Suddenly, the fans who would once tell Mills that they thought her content was funny were talking about how the video made them emotional, or how she helped them come out.
“The best way I can describe what I’m going through right now is like going through kindergarten to college in one night,” Mills said in the video, “But still being expected to get straight A’s, and not letting anyone down.”
“The best way I can describe what I’m going through right now is like going through kindergarten to college in one night,” Mills said in a January video.
Soon after the video went live, Mills started to look at the comments about it on social media.

The orginal article.

Summary of “The bad behavior of the richest: what I learned from wealth managers”

If nearly a decade interviewing the wealth managers for the 1% taught me anything, it is that the ultra-rich and the ultra-poor have a lot more in common than stereotypes might lead you to believe.
In conversation, wealth managers kept coming back to the flamboyant vices of their clients.
One of the London-based wealth managers I interviewed said that a willingness to accept with equanimity behavior that would be considered outrageous in others was an informal job requirement.
Clients, he said, specifically chose wealth managers not just on technical competence, but on their ability to remain unscandalized by the private lives of the ultra-rich: “They have to pick someone they want to know everything about them: about Mother’s lesbian affairs, Brother’s drug addiction, the spurned lovers bursting into the room.” Many of these clients are not employed and live off family largesse, but no one calls them lazy.
Discussion of poverty has become almost impossible without moral outrage directed at lazy “Welfare queens”, “Crackheads” and other drug addicts, and the “Promiscuous poor”.
The wealthy people I studied not only had wealth managers but often dedicated staff members who killed negative stories about them in the media and kept their names off the Forbes “Rich list”.
The poor can end up being “Resident nowhere” because no one will allow them to stay in one place for very long; as the sociologist Cristobal Young has shown, the majority of migrants are poor people.
So while the behavior of the ultra-rich gets an ever-widening scope of social leeway, the lives of the poor are foreshortened in every sense.

The orginal article.

Summary of “New Ikea report finds that people don’t feel at home in their homes”

3 minute Read. Every year, Ikea Group and INGKA Holding publishes a research report on how people live in and relate to a specific aspect of their homes.
In other words, 35% of people who live in cities don’t feel at home in their house or apartment.
Almost a quarter of people who live with others feel more comfortable outside of their homes altogether.
On the other hand, people report a creeping unease with their living spaces: 53% of young families don’t get a sense of belonging from their residential home.
“Life at home is changing, profoundly, all over the world,” the report concludes.
As the writer Sarah Amandolare pointed out a few years ago, “Home” has become less permanent and more transient than ever, and, as a result, we’ve stopped thinking of our homes as “Self-expression.”
Ikea, of course, has a stake in helping people feel like they can create a sense of belonging, regardless of where home is-and a real shot at doing so, given its scale and ubiquity in cities.
Rather than suggesting a new sofa, the report ends with an interactive quiz that asks about how you feel at home, mapping your answers on a pictograph and offering you a personalized “Manifesto” of affirmations about finding alone time and building community.

The orginal article.

Summary of “How to Craft A Life You Don’t Need to Escape From”

Instead of wondering when your next vacation is, maybe you should set up a life you don’t need to escape from.
The point of the quote is rather than only enjoying our life while on vacation, holiday, or weekend, we should strive to make our lives the ones we want to be living-every day of the week.
Rather than seeing vacation as your annual opportunity to escape life craft a life you don’t need to escape from.
In those cases, there is still opportunity to craft a life you do not need to escape from.
What matters at the end of our life is not the house we lived in, the car we drove, or the possessions we purchased.
Those who are most satisfied with life are those who appreciate the current season of life they are in and learn to make the most of it.
Given the nature of their constant existence, how can we learn to appreciate the life we have in the midst of these trials? First, we embrace the reality of their existence.
If you want to craft a life you do not need to escape from, you can do so.

The orginal article.