Summary of “New Ikea report finds that people don’t feel at home in their homes”

3 minute Read. Every year, Ikea Group and INGKA Holding publishes a research report on how people live in and relate to a specific aspect of their homes.
In other words, 35% of people who live in cities don’t feel at home in their house or apartment.
Almost a quarter of people who live with others feel more comfortable outside of their homes altogether.
On the other hand, people report a creeping unease with their living spaces: 53% of young families don’t get a sense of belonging from their residential home.
“Life at home is changing, profoundly, all over the world,” the report concludes.
As the writer Sarah Amandolare pointed out a few years ago, “Home” has become less permanent and more transient than ever, and, as a result, we’ve stopped thinking of our homes as “Self-expression.”
Ikea, of course, has a stake in helping people feel like they can create a sense of belonging, regardless of where home is-and a real shot at doing so, given its scale and ubiquity in cities.
Rather than suggesting a new sofa, the report ends with an interactive quiz that asks about how you feel at home, mapping your answers on a pictograph and offering you a personalized “Manifesto” of affirmations about finding alone time and building community.

The orginal article.

Summary of “How to Craft A Life You Don’t Need to Escape From”

Instead of wondering when your next vacation is, maybe you should set up a life you don’t need to escape from.
The point of the quote is rather than only enjoying our life while on vacation, holiday, or weekend, we should strive to make our lives the ones we want to be living-every day of the week.
Rather than seeing vacation as your annual opportunity to escape life craft a life you don’t need to escape from.
In those cases, there is still opportunity to craft a life you do not need to escape from.
What matters at the end of our life is not the house we lived in, the car we drove, or the possessions we purchased.
Those who are most satisfied with life are those who appreciate the current season of life they are in and learn to make the most of it.
Given the nature of their constant existence, how can we learn to appreciate the life we have in the midst of these trials? First, we embrace the reality of their existence.
If you want to craft a life you do not need to escape from, you can do so.

The orginal article.

Summary of “The age of envy: how to be happy when everyone else’s life looks perfect”

To explore the role that envy plays in our use of social media, Kross and his team designed a study to consider the relationship between passive Facebook use – “Just voyeuristically scrolling,” as he puts it – and envy and mood from moment to moment.
The results were striking, he says: “The more you’re on there scrolling away, the more that elicits feelings of envy, which in turn predicts drops in how good you feel”.
No age group or social class is immune from envy, according to Andrew.
In her consulting room she sees young women, self-conscious about how they look, who begin to follow certain accounts on Instagram to find hair inspiration or makeup techniques, and end up envying the women they follow and feeling even worse about themselves.
While we are busy finding the perfect camera angle, our lives become a dazzling, flawless carapace, empty inside but for the envy of others and ourselves, in a world where black cats languish in animal shelters because they are not “Selfie-friendly”.
“Envy is wanting to destroy what someone else has. Not just wanting it for yourself, but wanting other people not to have it. It’s a deep-rooted issue, where you are very, very resentful of another person’s wellbeing – whether that be their looks, their position or the car they have. It is silent, destructive, underhand – it is pure malice, pure hatred,” she says.
She believes envy is not innate; that it starts with an experience of early deprivation, when a mother cannot bond with her baby, and that child’s self-esteem is not nourished through his or her life.
Perhaps each of us also needs to think more carefully when we do use social media actively, about what we are trying to say and why – and how the curation of our online personas can contribute to this age of envy in which we live.

The orginal article.

Summary of “When It’s Time to Say Goodbye to the Old House”

At 11:53 a.m. on March 31, 2015, I received a text from Dad. “I just dropped off the keys to the houseand said a prayer one last time on behalf of the family,” it read. The house in question was the first concrete thing he’d bought in America way back in 1979, a modest, nondescript one-story suburban starter home we’d moved out of some 26 years and three months earlier, in the winter of 1989.
He treated the old house like a child he’d had to leave behind, but had never forgotten.
For the ten years we lived in it, the old house was where Dad brought his grieving, cataract-afflicted mother from India – for him, a place of pain, anger, and loss – to live out her remaining years, haunted by the losses of her husband and several sons.
In the years that followed the old house, time unspooled its cruel inevitabilities on Dad, taking away his mother, his friends from work.
As we were closing the books on the sale of the old house, word came that our family’s ownership of Dad’s childhood home back in India was in jeopardy.
A combination of legal ambiguity and a local absence of heirs to the property – Dad’s parents and all of his siblings who stayed behind had passed away – had, for all intents and purposes, eroded our claim to the house.
There’s a story, some parts apocryphal, some parts embellished by memory: Dad, hunkering down in the Old House for Hurricane Alicia in the summer of 1983, which had been slated to be the worst to hit Houston in 20 years.
Dad ended the text with a blessing for my older sister and me – “God’s gift to us when The family lived there,” the place where we learned “To crawl, walk, and speak.” Saying goodbye, he wrote, accepting that we no longer owned the house, “Was a little emotional.” For years, I’d thought of the old house as another sibling; reading the text, it suddenly seemed more like a long-suffering family member we were finally taking off life support, as if he were coming to terms with the end of some grand adventure.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Why You Should Watch SNL Like a Sport”

Seemingly in response to something Birbiglia’s character said about a certain cast member’s work on the show, Tami Sagher’s character tells him, “I’m glad you’re keeping score.” Birbiglia says, “It’s the only live sporting event of comedy,” to which Gillian Jacobs’s character responds, “But comedy isn’t a sport.”
Whether SCTV in the ’80s or Mr. Show in the ’90s or Chappelle’s Show in the ’00s or Key and Peele in the ’10s, shows that produced better sketches more frequently have come along, but SNL has lasted because of how singularly exciting it is when something really hits.
If a sketch is bad, you won’t be able to deny it’s bad. And just like sports, you can analyze exactly why it was bad: “The premise didn’t totally make sense for the target of satire.” “The timing was off.” “Didn’t really have an ending.” “Didn’t really have an ending.” “Didn’t really have an ending.” That’s part of the fun! If I had a nickel for every time I Gchatted “They took too long to establish what was supposed to be funny” to a friend, I’d have, like, 50 nickels! There just isn’t much use comparing it to other comedy shows.
Though a great SNL sketch, especially when clipped online, can offer a similar experience to any great sketch show, watching SNL live is unlike any other experience on TV. Well, you know, except sports.
Actually watching SNL makes up only part of how I enjoy following the show like a sports team – and not even a large part.
If you’ve seen Don’t Think Twice, you can imagine that when a new cast member joins the show, all his friends at home are both really happy and really resentful.
All in all, sounds good, right? How can you start? Read Live From New York, Tom Shales and James Andrew Miller’s definitive oral history of the show.
Lastly, use the off-season months to follow rumors of cast moves and to think about what the show is or isn’t doing, and what it might mean its future.

The orginal article.

Summary of “How To Feel Amazing Before 8AM”

How you feel about the world determines how you see it.
You may be one of those people who feel you are above something like this.
“Stressful activities have no place before bedtime. They can induce your body to secrete the stress hormone cortisol, which can make you feel more alert. Chill out and steer clear of anything non-chilled out.” - Kimberly SnyderThis is very simple.
In the book The Blue Zones: Lessons for Living Longer From the People Who’ve Lived the Longest, Dan Buettner explains that people who live to be over 100 usually start their day with a purpose.
Most people feel the same way today as they felt yesterday.
In order to become a new person and create a new future - you need to act in ways that produce new emotions, and strategically generate the emotions you seek to feel.
In the book, Spark: The Revolutionary New Science of Exercise and the Brain, John Ratey and Eric Hagerman show that fitness charges your brain up and gets you into a learning and heightened state.
“It is easier to change a man’s religion than to change his diet.”― Margaret MeadThe food you put into your body directly influences how well your brain, body, mind, and emotions work.

The orginal article.

Summary of “The Miracle of the Mundane”

On a bad day, all of humanity’s failures feel unbearably personal: coyotes wandering city streets due to encroaching wildfires, American citizens in Puerto Rico enduring another day without electricity or potable water in the wake of Hurricane Maria, neo-Nazis spouting hatred in American towns, world leaders testing missiles that would bring the deaths of millions of innocent people.
Why aren’t we reaching for more than this? Isn’t art supposed to inspire or provoke or make people feel emotions that they don’t necessarily want to feel? Can’t the moon block out the sun without a 1980s pop accompaniment? So much of what is created today seems engineered to numb or distract us, keeping us dependent on empty fixes indefinitely.
Can’t we do better than this, reach for more, insist on more? Why does our culture make us feel crazy for trying?
There will always be more victories to strive for, more strangers to charm, more images to collect and pin to our vision boards.
Selin wants more than the hopelessly mundane acquaintanceships that everyone around her seems to accept.
We might find ways to support each other more radically, more selflessly, without distractions, without anticipating a celebratory end point: That might allow us to generate the kind of beauty and connection and honesty that Dickinson and Mozart and Stegner brought us, the kind of blazing majesty that burns through the confusion and bewilderment, that feels intimate and personal, that lights up each new moment with endless possibility.
We are called to plant these seeds in our world: to dare to tell every living soul that they already matter, that their seemingly mundane lives are a slowly unfolding mystery, that their small choices and acts of generosity are vitally important.
We have to recognize that when we feel conflicted and sick about our place in the world, that’s often true because our world was built to sell us things and to make us feel inadequate and needy.

The orginal article.

Summary of “I Joyfully Decluttered These 5 Things to Boost Happiness”

My happiness is rooted instead in a sense of freedom, of living on purpose, and in inner calm.
To boost happiness, I needed to make space for the questions.
Much of happiness is a choice and the result of not putting our hope in transient things.
Without a doubt one of the most impactful ways I boosted happiness in my 40’s was by remembering that I am the boss of my thoughts.
Nice things and opportunities are lovely gifts, but for health and happiness purpose trumps pleasure.
There is constant temptation to conform in this world but I’ve never found happiness in being who I’m not.
We can boost happiness by listening in and then offering our unique perspective.
At 47 I’ve likely walked out more than half of my story but my happiness grows more robust than ever.

The orginal article.

Summary of “What are our ethical obligations to future AI simulations?”

Kent’s perspective is that different lives are preferable to multiple copies of a single life.
Despite what Tolstoy says about unhappy families, many miserable lives would be identical in their drabness.
Now recall Kent’s virtual worlds full of sims, and his replication inferiority principle – that a given number of different lives has more worth than the same number of identical ones.
Despite what Leo Tolstoy says about the particularity of unhappy families in the opening line of Anna Karenina, it seems likely that the immense number of miserable lives would be, in their bleak drabness, all pretty much identical.
His book The Age of Em imagines a society in which all humans upload their consciousness to computers so as to live virtual lives as ’emulations’.
Could we ever make virtual lives that lay claim to real aliveness in the first place? ‘I don’t think anyone can confidently say whether it’s possible or not,’ says Kent – partly because ‘we have no good scientific understanding of consciousness.
The prospect of virtual consciousness does raise genuinely fresh and fascinating ethical questions – which, Kent argues, force us to confront the intuitive value we place on variations in lives and demographics in the here and now.
It’s hard to see any strong philosophical argument for why a given number of different lives are morally superior to the same number of identical ones.

The orginal article.

Summary of “There’s a big problem with immortality: it goes on and on”

What sort of life would that be? Immortality – the film is suggesting – might be a curse, rather than a blessing.
The moral philosopher Samuel Scheffler at New York University has suggested that the real problem with a fantasy of immortality is that it doesn’t make sense as a coherent desire.
A desire for immortality is thus a paradox: it would frustrate itself were it ever to be achieved.
There is something both deeply and persistently appealing about the idea of immortality, and that cannot be dispelled by simply pointing to examples where immortality would be a curse.
On the face of it, a desire for immortality most obviously seems to be a response to the fear of death.
Immortality might itself turn out to be one of them.
The contrast with immortality as being somehow unable to die is clear.
Immortality is, obviously enough, an impossible fantasy – hence it cannot be a genuine solution to the unfortunate yet elemental facts of the human condition, nor an answer to the fraught complexities surrounding euthanasia as regards both social policy and moral judgment.

The orginal article.