Summary of “Tiny houses are marketed as a housing solution, but I hate mine”

Tiny houses are marketed as a housing solution, but I hate mine.
Small backyard houses get a lot of attention as a solution to the housing crisis, but it’s a different idea in theory than it is when you try to put it into practice.
In built-up cities with little extra land and residents who fight development, adding tiny cottages in backyards is one way to help address the housing shortage.
I also question how well tiny homes make sense as a solution for long-term housing-and in some cases, as in the even tinier houses sometimes used as housing for people experiencing homelessness, I wonder if they can sometimes distract from other, more systemic solutions that are necessary.
A few miles away from me, a village of 8-by-10-foot tiny houses on wheels is under construction for homeless youth, with a separate communal kitchen and communal bathrooms.
While there’s no official definition for a tiny house, they’re generally said to be around 500 or fewer square feet, making my place somewhat medium-size as far as tiny houses go.
Startups have also tried to speed up adoption, from Cover, which makes custom designs affordable, to Node, which builds tiny homes in factories to reduce construction cost, to Rent the Backyard, which gives homeowners a free tiny house in exchange for a cut of the rent.
We need more solutions, including different housing tech that can lower construction costs and salaries that are in line with the cost of living, and tiny houses, while cute, can’t fix those issues alone.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Outrage at the family making $350,000 but “struggling” doesn’t help anyone.”

If you live in a house, your children likely go to a better school than the public school available to the children who live here.
So the question is, at $1.4 million, how much should a family earn, in salary, to afford this home? This smallish home, zoned for a below-average school, in a neighborhood that is not unsafe but is much less safe than other neighborhoods in the city.
70 for food PER DAY$400 for clothes PER MONTH$650 for vacation PER MONTH$500 for entertainment PER MONTH. These people aren’t struggling.
Take the food budget: $70 per day for a family of four works out to less than $6 per meal per person.
Try living on $14k/yr SSDI!- Rachel Wolf October 1, 2019 It should be noted that there is no actual family chronicled here.
The source is a blogger named Sam Dogen who constructed a supposed ledger as “An example budget of a dual-income household with two kids.” Dogen, who blogs at a site called Financial Samurai, told me he modeled it after “An aspirational budget that I would consider having if I have two kids and stayed in San Francisco, where I’ve lived since 2001.” He came up with the $350,000 family salary based on a recent report indicating that the median home in San Francisco would require a minimum salary of $343,420.
No amount of real anger at a fake budget will change the reality that housing prices in many places are so high that, yes, if you’re not making what seems to be an obscene amount of money, you can’t afford to live what has long been the definition of a middle-class existence.
Could our fictional family move to Muskegon, Michigan, instead of living in an expensive city? Sure.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Poet and Philosopher David Whyte on Anger, Forgiveness, and What Maturity Really Means”

“A creature without any needs would never have reasons for fear, or grief, or hope, or anger.” Anger is one of the emotions we judge most harshly – in others, as well as in ourselves – and yet understanding anger is central to mapping out the landscape of our interior lives.
This undervalued soul-mapping quality of anger is what English poet and philosopher David Whyte explores in a section of Consolations: The Solace, Nourishment and Underlying Meaning of Everyday Words – the same breathtaking volume “Dedicated to words and their beautiful hidden and beckoning uncertainty,” which gave us Whyte on the deeper meanings of friendship, love, and heartbreak.
Stripped of physical imprisonment and violent reaction, anger is the purest form of care, the internal living flame of anger always illuminates what we belong to, what we wish to protect and what we are willing to hazard ourselves for.
Such a reconsideration renders Whyte not an apologist for anger but a peacemaker in our eternal war with its underlying vulnerability, which is essentially an eternal war with ourselves – for at its source lies our tenderest, timidest humanity.
What we have named as anger on the surface is the violent outer response to our own inner powerlessness, a powerlessness connected to such a profound sense of rawness and care that it can find no proper outer body or identity or voice, or way of life to hold it.
What we call anger is often simply the unwillingness to live the full measure of our fears or of our not knowing, in the face of our love for a wife, in the depth of our caring for a son, in our wanting the best, in the face of simply being alive and loving those with whom we live.
Our anger breaks to the surface most often through our feeling there is something profoundly wrong with this powerlessness and vulnerability Anger in its pure state is the measure of the way we are implicated in the world and made vulnerable through love in all its specifics.
Anger truly felt at its center is the essential living flame of being fully alive and fully here; it is a quality to be followed to its source, to be prized, to be tended, and an invitation to finding a way to bring that source fully into the world through making the mind clearer and more generous, the heart more compassionate and the body larger and strong enough to hold it.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Ancient dog bones tell us what was on the menu for both dogs and humans”

Dogs have been living alongside us for at least 12,000 years, eating many of the same things we do – both given or scavenged.
A team of researchers used this strategy in a contemporary Indigenous community in two Nicaraguan villages, and found, by and large, dogs and humans dine from the same menu.
The idea of using dog remains to decipher what humans ate has been around since the late 1970s.
Since the 1970s, archaeologists have applied this idea with varying levels of success, finding dog diets both mirroring and diverging from that of humans.
The scientists compared dog and human diets, and discovered that dogs mirrored human diets at the community level, over the villages as a whole.
Dogs may eat a lot of things humans don’t – not just bone and poop, but also low-status or taboo foods.
Confirming the ability to use dogs as proxies for humans is difficult because of the complex nature of that relationship, which varies widely across time and space.
If dog populations generally share the same menu as the people they live alongside, canines might be the key to unlocking new data on ancient diets – and therefore revealing how we feasted our way from the past to the Anthropocene present.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Why You Should Live Like You’re Immortal”

When you live your life according to that philosophy, it doesn’t make sense to do anything that takes a long time to pay off.
If you think that life is short, why on earth would you do hard things? It doesn’t make sense.
How different would you live if I told you that you’re never going to die?
“Think of yourself as dead. You have lived your life. Now take what’s left and live properly.”
To me, living properly means that I’m satisfied with my life.
Once you’re working on building a LIFE, it’s not helpful to think like that.
Being present is a great thing, but like many things in life, don’t overdo it.
That’s why I like to live like I’m immortal.

The orginal article.

Summary of “How a Trip to Disneyland Changed My Trans Family Forever”

A few days later I got up in the middle of the night to go to the bathroom and saw my dad wearing a frilly nightgown.
My dad wasn’t living as a woman, but she had started taking hormones and growing out her hair.
Their ringleader said, in the snottiest voice she could muster, “Jessica told me your dad’s a transsexual.”
That year, my dad’s 40th-birthday present was a week in Disneyland as a woman.
We’d been walking around Disney for days with my dad dressed as a woman and no one cared.
Didn’t hear my dad saying she couldn’t go back, she couldn’t keep pretending, she couldn’t be a man anymore.
They’d chosen a date in the summer when my dad would start going to work at her one-hour photo store as a woman named Hilary.
When summer ended, I’d go to a new school where no one knew that Hilary used to be my dad. I wasn’t changing schools just because my dad was changing genders, but I definitely blamed her.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Why do sloths move so slowly?”

Just why sloths move so slowly is due to some peculiar evolutionary tricks.
Modern-day sloths – the three-toed sloth and the two-toed sloth – are much smaller versions of the sloths that inhabited the prehistoric world.
Becky Cliffe, a British zoologist who works at Costa Rica’s Sloth Conservation Foundation, says it is only when you see sloths in the wild that you truly appreciate just how slow they are.
“It could also be a way for the sloths to get extra protein,” she says, noting that sloths have sometimes been seen to lick the algae growing on their fur.
“Their fur is almost completely water resistant, and impedes a lot of parasites. Sloths have fewer parasites than other mammals of a similar size.”
Cliffe’s years watching sloths in the Costa Rican jungle has given her much insight into their behaviour.
“They’re not lazy. The howler monkeys that live in the forests sleep for up to 18 hours a day, and the sloths only sleep for around 10.”.
Had sloths not ended up living in a hot, humid environment covered in trees, they might be sprightlier, living at a quicker pace.

The orginal article.

Summary of “The Quest for the Multigenerational City”

“I get very overwhelmed when I try to clean it,” she tells me when I arrive on the doorstep of her condo one hot Tuesday evening in June.She’d submitted a request for volunteer help through Capital City Village, a nonprofit in Austin, Texas, that helps older people age in their homes and communities, and I, a volunteer, had responded.
According to the U.S. Census Bureau, the Austin-Round Rock metro area has the second-fastest growing population of people older than 65 in the country, and the fastest-growing population of people between 55 and 64.But where were all these older people? I certainly didn’t see them in my day-to-day life, working as an editor at Austin’s city magazine.
“For most of human history, for those few people who actually survived to old age,” he writes, “Elders were cared for in multigenerational systems, often with three generations living under one roof.” Multigenerational living is largely born of necessity, writes Gawande; as soon as young people have the economic means to strike out on their own, they do, leaving the previous generation to fend for itself.
The group ended up producing the Age-Friendly Austin Action Plan, which focuses on issues like housing, transportation, and healthcare access-all challenges for older people on fixed incomes in a booming metro facing rising rents.
“As people get more and more isolated, that increases their chance of getting a physical illness or becoming depressed or anxious,” Hoffman says.
“We have tribal brains. There are very few people who are really excellent hermits.”
For all of the growth and glitz that have come with Austin’s latest boom, this is still a town founded on a come-as-you-are weirdness, a place where people could just paint chairs.
If, at 32, I have just finished the first third of my life, what will it feel like when I am beginning the last third? I like talking to people whose major life decisions have already happened-who they’ll marry, whether or not to have kids, where they’ll live, what they’ll do there.

The orginal article.

Summary of “A Burst of Light: Audre Lorde on Turning Fear Into Fire”

In our interior experience as individuals, as in the public forum of our shared experience as a culture, our courage lives in the same room as our fear – it is in troubled times, in despairing times, that we find out who we are and what we are capable of.
Seventeen days before she turned fifty, and six years after she underwent a mastectomy for breast cancer, Lorde was told she had liver cancer.
Audre Lorde from Literary Witches, an illustrated celebration of trailblazing women writers.
It’s a matter of my everyday living and making decisions.
I’ve worked very hard for that approach to living inside myself, and everything I do, I hope, reflects that view of life, even the ways I must move now in order to save my life.
No matter how sick I feel, I’m still afire with a need to do something for my living.
Lorde lived nearly another decade after her diagnosis, during which she was elected Poet Laureate of New York State.
Complement this particular portion of A Burst of Light, an explosive read in its totality, with Alice James on how to live fully while dying, Descartes on the vital relationship between fear and hope, and Seneca on overcoming fear, then revisit Lorde on the indivisibility of identity and the courage to break silence.

The orginal article.

Summary of “‘It is an act of insanity to stay in the U.S.:’ Why this 63-year-old teacher ditched Massachusetts to retire in the highlands of Panama”

Mary Taft lives with her two daughters, seven cats and two dogs in a mansion in Panama – and she wouldn’t have it any other way.
Panama – a lush, mild-weather town in the Panamanian highlands that’s popular with expats – checked nearly all their boxes.
“It is an act of insanity to continue to stay in the U.S.,” she adds, noting that in Panama crime is low, you more rarely see guns, and life can be more affordable.
In 2018, Mary moved to Panama with her two daughters – and she’s staying put.
The pensionado program: “The pensionado visa is the most popular visa for retirees,” says Jackie Lange, an expat since 2010 who now runs a Panama relocation program – and it gives retirees throughout Panama deep discounts on everything from airfare to restaurants.
” Her advice is that you “Follow your lawyer’s directions, provide what s/he asks for, and show up in Panama at their direction and do what they say.” She says that getting a driver’s license in Panama is also complicated.
The cons of living in Panama: Though Panama has better roads and infrastructure than plenty of other Central and South American nations, some rural areas are still lacking.
Americans used to prompt customer service might be a bit hard-pressed to adapt to the slower pace of life in Panama.

The orginal article.