Summary of “Quakes and Fires? It’s the Cost of Living That Californians Can’t Stomach”

He has lived through several fires, and the 1994 earthquake that killed 57 people and shook him and millions of other Southern Californians out of bed at 4:30 in the morning.
“The San Andreas Fault is what they politely call ‘overdue,’ and I will be much more comfortable when I’m away from that. But if it wasn’t for the cost of living I probably would have stuck around and taken my chances.”
Fire is an annual affair, and even as climate change stretches the burning season from summer and early fall clear into December, people here accept that pleasant weather and destructive forces are linked.
People who live in Florida and on the Gulf Coast have made a similar peace with hurricanes.
California has 40 million people and has grown through much worse.
Shortly in the aftermath of a disaster, after checking the first aid kit and refilling the fresh water bottles, Californians go back to living.
“People talk about traffic; people talk about the price of homes.”
The state’s median home cost is $500,000, twice the national level, and for decades residents have softened the blow from high home prices and high state and city taxes by using generous federal deductions that lower their taxes.

The orginal article.

Summary of “A Buddhist teacher on what the living can learn from the dying”

Frank Ostaseski is the author of The Five Invitations: Discovering What Death Can Teach the Living and helped found the Zen Hospice Project’s Guest House, the country’s first Buddhist hospice center, in San Francisco during the AIDS crisis.
One is that I assist people who are going through the dying process, helping them to find their best way of dying.
Frank Ostaseski When people are dying, they tend to be pretty honest, and there’s not so much nonsense in the room.
At the end of their life, people realize they were living in too small a story.
I’m talking about ordinary people, oftentimes people who were living on the streets of San Francisco, coming to terms with this thing that had terrified them all their lives.
Life is about relationships Sean Illing You said a minute ago that people, near the end of their lives, care more about their connections with other people than they do anything else.
Death is a mystery, and people who are dying are turning toward mystery, and mystery is this unknowable territory, the land of unanswerable questions.
Dying can teach us to appreciate that everything is always changing Sean Illing What lessons do the dying have to teach the living about how to live better and well?

The orginal article.

Summary of “They're leaving California for Las Vegas to find the middle-class life that eluded them”

Las Vegas is one of the most popular destinations for those who leave California.
So I went to Sin City to see whether, when you add up all the pluses and minuses, there is life after California.
What’s going on here seems different – people leaving not for better jobs or pay, but because housing elsewhere is so much cheaper they can live the middle-class life that eludes them in California.
Not California, but Nevada, where she worked on Hillary Clinton’s presidential campaign in Las Vegas and then joined the staff of a state legislator in the state capital.
Jonas Peterson enjoyed the California lifestyle and trips to the beach while living in Valencia with his wife, a nurse, and their two young kids.
Some companies have made the move from California, and others have set up satellites in Nevada.
Breanna Rawding, 26, manager of marketing communications of Las Vegas Global Economic Alliance, spends time with her dog Bodie in her apartment in Las Vegas.
“I saw articles about millennials leaving California because they were never going to be able to have houses they could afford,” she said.

The orginal article.

Summary of “What Living On $100,000 A Year Looks Like”

People whose upper-class salaries are not keeping pace with their upper-class standards of living, Tankersley says, are often experiencing a lingering effect of the 2008 financial crisis.
NPR’s Lulu Garcia-Navarro spoke to a variety of people in different cities about what their lives look like on $100,000 a year.
Stephanie Culp of Gaithersburg, Md. For the Culp family, a living on $100,000 a year is “Far from destitute – it’s just not enough,” Stephanie Culp says.
Credit card debt, hospital bills and cut work hours led the Culps to declare bankruptcy.
Theresa Sahhar lives just outside of Kansas City, Kan., where the cost of living is relatively very reasonable.
“It’s embarrassing to say that you have to work overtime in order to make enough money to live on,” she says.
Who sells scientific equipment for a living, it doesn’t feel like a fortune.
“The ones where both parents are working seem to be doing fairly well,” he says.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Searching for Motives in Mass Shootings”

By all accounts, mass shootings are now claiming more American lives than at any other point in the past thirty-five years.
Data indicates that mass shootings are contagious and predictable, and that many killers share certain features-notably, as in the case of the shooting earlier this month at a church in Sutherland Springs, Texas, a history of domestic violence.
If the shooter had mentioned ISIS, the motive would be deemed political; if he were nonwhite, it would be racial.
It is impossible to imagine a political terrorist act that is free of personal motives or domestic implications, just as it’s impossible to imagine a domestic crime that doesn’t reflect ideology.
It’s a tautology that every mass shooting involves some degree of mental illness: we would surely count as worthless any definition of mental wellness that was compatible with murdering civilians.
The deficiency of the current categories of motive is particularly evident in the case of Omar Mateen, a twenty-nine-year-old Afghan-American who is said to have abused his widow and a former wife, to have made homophobic remarks, and who, on June 12, 2016, called 911 and claimed affiliation with ISIS, before shooting to death forty-nine people at a gay night club in Orlando that he himself may have frequented.
A CNN headline alluded to “The unknowable Stephen Paddock and the ultimate mystery: Why?” Another article-“One month later, Las Vegas massacre is still a mystery”-placed the shooting “In stark contrast” to the subsequent “Deadly truck attack in New York City, where there were clear ideological or religious motives.”
Of the mass killings in Orlando, Las Vegas, New York, Sutherland Springs, and Rancho Tehama, the two committed by ISIS-invoking Muslims are categorized as terrorist acts; the three committed by white men are “Domestic,” a “Mystery,” or, in the case of the Rancho Tehama shooter, Kevin Neal, “Bizarre.” Donald Trump has used these categories to justify a double standard of responses: terrorist acts are justification for an immigration crackdown, but for a “Domestic issue,” mental illness, or “Pure evil,” as the President classified the Las Vegas shooting, there is no remedy.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Deep beneath the Earth’s surface life is weird and wonderful”

The deep Earth supports an entire biosphere, largely cut off from the surface world, and is still only beginning to be explored and understood.
Deep continental ecosystems will aid the search for underground life on rocky planets such as Mars; deep-sea and sub-seafloor ecosystems, in turn, will help researchers assess the likelihood and possible nature of organisms living on the ocean moons Europa and Enceladus.
It’s an enigma: how did a salt-dependent surface worm get that deep without meeting deadly fresh water?
Although the Beatrix mine is situated in a dry salt pan, it is still an enigma how a salt-dependent surface worm managed to get that deep without encountering a deadly layer of fresh water in between.
Even in the absence of answers, the broader realisation that complex surface life forms can also survive indefinitely in the deep subsurface is good news for the search for life on planets and moons in our solar system.
A similar process of migration could have transported life forms to the deep subsurface long before the surface conditions became inhospitable on Mars, for instance.
This is a provocative issue that we are continuing to investigate because it will tell us how frequently genetic materials are being exchanged between the surface and the deep subsurface.
It stands to reason that, if cosmopolitan species from the surface can survive in the deep subsurface, isolated from their surface brethren, then over a long period of time some organisms might have adapted to even more extreme conditions deeper in the subsurface.

The orginal article.

Summary of “People who own dogs may live longer”

Research has shown that living with pets has certain health benefits: people who own dogs tend to be more physically active and have lower blood pressure.
Since 2001, dog owners in Sweden have had to register their dogs by using an ear tattoo or under-skin chip, so the researchers could also check which of those 3.4 million people owned a puppy.
Dog owners were then compared with pet-less people: those who had a dog were found to have a lower risk of death due to cardiovascular disease or other causes during the 12-year follow-up.
Dog owners who lived alone had a lower risk of cardiovascular disease, as did people who had hunting dogs compared to other breeds.
The exact reasons behind the results aren’t clear: it could be that people who own dogs live longer because they’re more physically active, or are less stressed, Fall tells The Verge.
People who live alone may benefit even more because they’re the only ones taking care of the dog, so they’re forced to go take the pooch out for a walk.
It could be that people who live alone and have dogs have a lower risk of cardiovascular disease because they’re generally healthier to begin with.
Getting a dog is time-consuming and expensive, so if you’re dealing with an important health issue and live by yourself, maybe you’d think twice about it.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Don’t Trade Your Passion Just to Gain the World”

Very few people, if you were to sit across from them over coffee, would proclaim that owning everything in the world is their greatest goal in life.
Too often it seems, we trade our heart’s greatest pursuits and greatest passions for the temporal possessions of this world.
Some of the people I most look up to in life are highly successful in business and live meaningful lives at the same time.
This is a post about the temptation that surrounds each of us, every day, to trade our greatest passions for the things of this world.
Minimalism frees our lives to realign our resources around the greatest passions of our heart.
Have I allowed my greatest passions and most important desires to be usurped by the world around me? Have I chased society’s definition of success rather than my own?
In the end, we’re all going to ask ourselves, “Were the things I devoted my life to worth it?”.
If we discover at that time, that we traded our most meaningful passions for the things of this world, it will be a trade we’ll regret making.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Wild at heart: how one woman and her husband live out in the woods”

Miriam Lancewood has been living off grid, in the wild, for seven years now and she can still pinpoint the exact moment she knew she had truly broken with social norms.
Her husband, Peter, proudly tells me she could beat most men in a fight: “Miriam is the hunter and I’m the cook. She’s much stronger than me. Women are better shots,” he says.
It seems Miriam is not the only woman to think that women are missing out.
Miriam and Peter spent months training for that first winter in South Marlborough, New Zealand: long, demanding treks, first-aid courses; reading survival and foraging books – working out by the spoonful exactly how much flour, pulses, tea bags they’d need.
The question Miriam often gets asked by her readers is how they can afford to live as they do.
“They want to know how to do it.” As in, how to marry a woman 30 years younger? The age gap can be difficult to ignore; Miriam mentions it several times in her book, mainly because other people keep bringing it up.
Miriam and Peter often use the word “Trapped” to describe how other people live.
“You have to have a regular income. You have to settle down.” She laughs: “It scares me just thinking about it.” Miriam describes how men they do meet on their travels will often suddenly open up about their personal lives: “They say they wish their wives would come out hunting with them or if they had a choice again, they would never have children. That was the end of their freedom, they say.”

The orginal article.

Summary of “The Secret Life of Live Mascots”

See what life is like off the field for these living symbols of school pride.
Bevo XV took over the job in 2016, the centennial celebration of a live longhorn’s first game appearance, at the 1916 Texas A&M contest, replacing the previous mascot, a pit bull terrier named Pig.
That’s good for only the second-heaviest live mascot.
“We never make her do anything she doesn’t want to,” explains John Graves, CU’s live mascot program manager.
His new home is an obvious improvement over the living quarters of his predecessors, who have lived adjacent to Tiger Stadium since 1936.
In 1924, head cheerleader Vic Huggins decided his school needed a live mascot to compete with rivals such as NC State, which at the time would trot out a live wolf for games.
“You’d be doing well to be living this ol’ boy’s life right here,” says Don Basnight, Hogan’s grandson, as he pets Rameses XXII with one hand and slips him a handful of sheep feed with the other.
Unlike some live mascots, Rameses’ location is no secret.

The orginal article.