Summary of “‘I don’t look like most people’s idea of a Gypsy'”

What sort of Traveller would come and sleep here on their own? I have covered thousands of miles in my van in a bid to uncover the history of Gypsy Britain.
As one Scottish Gypsy Traveller put it: “There are 80,000 members of the Caravan Club, but I’m not allowed to travel?”.
What is left of these places? What might we learn from them? What redemption might lie there, in a country that still passes new legislation aimed at ending the Traveller way of life? Is it still possible to live on the road? Was the end of the old Gypsy life a tragedy, or was it a case of good riddance to an irredeemably hard and pitiless life on the edge? Above all, I hoped to resolve the biggest question: the question of myself, whether I could make my peace with Gypsy culture.
In the old Romany tradition, you can only call yourself a true Romany Gypsy – one of the kaulo ratti, the black blood – if all your ancestors, as far as you know, are of the tribe.
I do not look like most people’s idea of a typical Gypsy, my blue eyes and fair hair belying my origins, my picture of myself.
For all its flighty connotations, Gypsy culture can be stifling in its demands for living in line with its hidden rules.
The fairs provide a special concentration of Traveller experience, a tincture of what it is to be a Gypsy.
At a horse fair we get to see, just for one day, what life would be like if the world shared our Gypsy priorities.

The orginal article.

Summary of “How Long Do Tardigrades Live?”

When tardigrades have enough food and water to support their bodily functions, they live out the natural course of their lives, rarely lasting for longer than 2.5 years, according to Animal Diversity Web, a database run by the University of Michigan.
Tardigrades can survive for much longer if they go into a state called cryptobiosis, which is triggered when environmental conditions become unbearable.
In this shrunken state, tardigrades mimic death so closely that they’re able to survive in places devoid of water, at temperatures as low as minus 328 degrees Fahrenheit and as high as 304 degrees F. When these mummy-like tardigrades are exposed to water again, they simply reanimate, returning to normal life in a matter of hours.
“So long as the tardigrade can get into the tun, it will cope with anything that you throw at it,” McInnes told Live Science.
McInnes once defrosted a moss sample from a former experiment and found it contained live tardigrades.
The range of risky scenarios that tardigrades can survive has left scientists puzzled by just how these little beasties pull it off.
She cautioned against the prevailing belief that tardigrades are invincible: “They can’t live forever,” she said.
The widely publicized notion that tardigrades can survive in a tun state for 100 years or more is an overstatement, for instance.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Translating “The Americans,” and Seeing a Mirror of My Own American Experience”

My life prepared me to do one job, and this job was translating for “The Americans,” the FX show that wrapped up on Wednesday after six seasons.
He is tempted to defect and live the life he has been living, but for real-to become an American.
By the end of the first season, the Jenningses do trade in their fake, arranged, cynical Soviet marriage for a real American one.
It’s not just that they adopt a psychotherapy-infused, stylistically American way of conducting a relationship; it’s that they opt to create an island of truth, and true love, in the midst of a world in which nothing is true-except their two children, who don’t know that their parents are Soviet spies.
My mother told me as much when we prepared to leave Moscow: the Soviet regime was there for eternity, and my parents were opting to live their finite human lives elsewhere, even if that meant never seeing their mothers again.
He embraced his American life the way Philip Jennings longed to.
Like my parents, the Jenningses return to the Soviet Union in 1987 as Americans.
They will succeed on Russia’s emergent new terms, by emulating the lives of the Americans they once were: by calling their place of work office, wearing American clothes, and driving everywhere, through traffic that will soon become gridlock.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Technology is driving us to distraction”

If technology is for anything, it’s for helping us pursue these kinds of goals.
It’s the perspective that our screens and machines ought to help us circle back on again and again: because whatever we might choose to want, nobody chooses to want to regret.
We trust these technologies to be companion systems for our lives: we trust them to help us do the things we want to do, to become the people we want to be.
If you wanted to train all of society to be as impulsive and weak-willed as possible, how would you do it? One way would be to invent an impulsivity training device – let’s call it an iTrainer – that delivers an endless supply of informational rewards on demand.
You’d want to make it small enough to fit in a pocket or purse so people could carry it anywhere they went.
Then what if you wanted to take things even further? What if you wanted to make everyone even more distracted, angry, cynical – and even unsure of what, or how, to think? What if you wanted to troll everyone’s minds? You’d probably create an engine, a set of economic incentives, which would make it profitable for other people to produce and deliver these rewards – and, where possible, you’d make these the only incentives for doing so.
You don’t want just any rewards to get delivered – you want people to receive rewards that speak to their impulsive selves, rewards that are the best at punching the right buttons in their brains.
In the longer term they can make it harder for us to live the lives we want to live or, even worse, undermine fundamental capacities such as reflection and self-regulation, making it harder, in the words of philosopher Harry Frankfurt, to “Want what we want to want”.

The orginal article.

Summary of “The steps you need to take to move to Spain for a work-free year”

If you have the dream to take a year off – a gap year! – you may find yourself asking an important question.
Why Barcelona? Well, the weather: Barcelona has an average of 310 sunny days a year.
You’ll need to build up a comfy nest egg to finance your year.
A lot of us don’t need to maintain our current income level – because we’d be happy to live a different lifestyle or move to a cheaper place or because we don’t want to wait forever to save that kind of money.
” Basically, you find someone in Barcelona who wants to move to New York for a year, and swap apartments with them.
“Do people go out all the time? Yeah. Do people like to take little weekend trips and create long weekends by linking a national holiday to a Friday? Yes. People here, especially expats, like to live well.” And this is all possible because when it comes to food and drink, Barcelona is still mercifully cheap.
Another good thing about living in Barcelona? Public transport will get you anywhere you need to go.
Another viable option is to enter Spain with a student visa, which is what Yamet did when he completed courses at the Universitat de Barcelona.

The orginal article.

Summary of “How Living Abroad Helps You Develop a Clearer Sense of Self”

To better understand the psychological effects of living abroad, we set out to examine whether and how international experiences can transform a person’s sense of self.
Of course, one possible explanation for this finding is that people who choose to live abroad have a clearer sense of self to begin with compared to people who never intend to do so.
Once again, we found that people who had lived abroad reported a clearer sense of self than people who had not lived abroad yet, but intended to do so within the next year.
In another study, we used an experimental design to provide causal evidence for the relationship between living abroad and a clear sense of self.
In subsequent studies, we recruited large samples of MBA students who had, on average, spent almost three years living abroad. These samples allowed for a more nuanced investigation of the relationship between living abroad and self-concept clarity.
A study involving 559 MBA students confirmed our prediction and found that the depth-but not the breadth-of living abroad experiences predicted a clearer sense of self.
Surveying a sample of 98 international MBA students, we found once again that the depth rather than the breadth of living abroad experiences predicted a clearer sense of self.
“One interesting direction for future research would be to explore when living abroad does not lead to a clearer sense of self. A fairly common reaction of expatriates is to undergo an initial phase of”culture shock”-the “anxiety that results from losing all of our familiar signs and symbols of social intercourse”.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Why Open-Plan Homes Might Not Be Great For Entertaining”

What is wrong with having just one kitchen? Well, people cook in kitchens, and when they cook in kitchens, they make messes, and then, to make matters worse, if their kitchen is in full view from the rest of the house-as many today are-their mess is out in the open visible as they eat their meals, hang out with their families, entertain their guests, and go about their lives.
The reduced size and more affordable prices of interwar and post-war homes helped justify the fusion of cooking, dining, and living spaces, but the openness of kitchens was further rationalized by an idealized notion of efficiency, thanks to the ability to move seamlessly among different household tasks.
Inside remodeled vernacular homes and ranches, and built into the designs of new subdivisions and urban infill, the open-plan strives for the largest void possible, with the kitchen and living space coming along for the ride.
The formal living room has been abandoned, relegated to the informal great room in the rear, which flows together with a large kitchen and eat-in space.
An open kitchen island faces a large, vaulted great room with second-floor gallery and flanks an open-plan dining area.
High-end estate homes have boasted secondary or hidden catering kitchens for years.
The messy kitchen suggests that design’s pendulum might yet swing back toward defined, divided spaces.
Even if the messy kitchen’s usage proves more equitable along gender lines thanks to intervening cultural changes, the design seems to require a negotiation of the loneliness of prep and cleanup that, despite its downsides, an open design might have helped avoid.

The orginal article.

Summary of “What if everyone in the world lived on the same street?”

I’m obsessed with a website called Dollar Street.
Created by Factfulness co-author Anna Rosling Rönnlund, Dollar Street imagines a world where everyone lives on the same street and the houses are ordered by income.
The significance of income level is brilliantly illustrated by Dollar Street.
Dollar Street really comes alive when you start comparing objects.
The families at the poorest end of the street use their fingers or sticks to clean their teeth.
Once you reach a certain income level, everyone starts using a plastic toothbrush with bristles.
The more time you spend on Dollar Street, the clearer it becomes that all of us have the same basic wants and needs.
People tend to spend money on the same things once they increase their income whether they live in China or Cameroon.

The orginal article.

Summary of “96-Year-Old Secretary Quietly Amasses Fortune, Then Donates $8.2 Million”

Ms. Bloom’s will allowed for some money to be left to relatives and friends, but directed that the bulk of the fortune go toward scholarships of Ms. Lockshin’s choice for needy students.
Like Ms. Bloom, Leonard Gigowski, a shopkeeper from New Berlin, Wis., who died in 2015, left his secret $13 million fortune to fund scholarships.
While her aunt’s wealth was a surprise, Ms. Bloom’s quiet plan to help students was not, Ms. Lockshin said.
Over her 67 years with the firm, Cleary Gottlieb Steen & Hamilton, it grew to its current size, with more than 1,200 lawyers, as well as hundreds of staff members, of which Ms. Bloom was the longest tenured, said Paul Hyams, a human resources executive for the firm who became good friends with Ms. Bloom over his 35 years working there.
Even when she married, Ms. Bloom kept her given name, which was indicative of her independent nature, said a cousin, Flora Mogul Bornstein, 72.Nearly all the money was in Ms. Bloom’s name alone, Ms. Lockshin said, adding that it was “Very possible” that even Mr. Margolies did not know the size of his wife’s fortune.
Ms. Bloom agreed to move to a senior residence mainly because “She wanted to find a good bridge game,” said Ms. Bornstein, a retired social worker.
Ms. Lockshin said an additional $2 million from Ms. Bloom’s bequest would be split between Hunter College and another scholarship fund to be announced.
Ms. Bloom’s view of education was informed by her own public school experience and by working with successful lawyers from highly rated colleges and law schools, he said.

The orginal article.

Summary of “How Living Colour Reignited Rock’s “Cult of Personality””

“The hair,” Reid said, “Was a different texture.” Despite having chops and a loyal following in the biggest city in the country, Living Colour for years couldn’t land a record deal.
“One of the most frustrating things,” Calhoun said, “Is the ignorance of people who will not admit or deal with the fact that black people invented rock ‘n’ roll.” By making songs about the perils of hero worship, racism, and gentrification, Living Colour forced listeners to reckon with uncomfortable truths.
Reid had spent the early part of the decade touring with jazz-funk drummer Ronald Shannon Jackson’s Decoding Society and originally formed Living Colour as a side project.
In 1985, seeking change, Reid, journalist Greg Tate, and producer Konda Mason cofounded the Black Rock Coalition, an organization with the stated mission of “Creating an atmosphere conducive to the maximum development, exposure, and acceptance of Black alternative music.”
In addition to Glover, the new Living Colour lineup was bolstered by fellow New Yorkers Calhoun, an award-winning Berklee College of Music grad, and Muzz Skillings, a bassist with rock and jazz experience.
In October 1989, before Living Colour’s four-night run with Guns N’ Roses and the Stones at the Los Angeles Coliseum, Reid and Calhoun gave a live radio interview.
Keith Richards came to Living Colour’s dressing room and shook Reid’s hand.
These days, Reid looks back on Living Colour’s rise with a mix of pride and incredulity.

The orginal article.