Summary of “You’ll Never Be as Radical as This 18th-Century Quaker Dwarf”

Lay’s methods made people talk about him, his ideas, the nature of Quakerism and Christianity, and, most of all, slavery.
According to Benjamin Rush, a Philadelphia physician and signer of the Declaration of Independence, the name of this “Celebrated Christian philosopher” became “Familiar to every man, woman and to nearly every child, in Pennsylvania.” For or against, everyone told stories about Benjamin Lay.
Lay, a hunchback as well as a dwarf, was the world’s first revolutionary abolitionist.
Against the common sense of the day, when slavery seemed to most people as immutable as the stars in the heavens, Lay imagined a new world in which people would live simply, make their own food and clothes, and respect nature.
Today Benjamin Lay is largely forgotten, for essentially two reasons.
His greatest power, indeed his genius, lay in his gift as an agitator.
Lay fell silent for a few reverential moments, then rose from his chair, praised God and announced, “I can now die in peace.” He died a year later, an outsider to the Quaker community he loved, but a moral giant of a man.
In his time Lay may have been the most radical person on the planet.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Google Doesn’t Want What’s Best for Us”

Last week, Google fired a software engineer for writing a memo that questioned the company’s gender diversity policies and made statements about women’s biological suitability for technical jobs.
The company said that releasing that information would cause “Competitive harm.” It was not until 2014 that Google began to disclose statistics showing that only 17 percent of its technical work force was female.
The rise of Google and the other giant businesses of Silicon Valley have been driven by a libertarian culture that paid only lip service to notions of diversity.
Google had to fire the offending engineer, James Damore, but anyone who spends time on the message boards frequented by Valley engineers will know that the “Bro” culture that gave us Gamergate – an online movement that targeted women in the video game industry – is much more prevalent than Mr. Pichai wants to acknowledge.
Google employees who opposed Mr. Damore found their internal company profile pictures posted on Breitbart, the Verge reported.
Companies like Google, Amazon and Facebook are coming under the same cultural microscope that questioned the “Greed is good” culture of the 1980s.
We have an obligation to care about the values of the people who run Google, because we’ve given Google enormous control over our lives and the lives of our children.
As the former Google design ethicist Tristan Harris points out, “Without realizing the implications, a handful of tech leaders at Google and Facebook have built the most pervasive, centralized systems for steering human attention that has ever existed, while enabling skilled actors to hijack our attention for manipulative ends.”

The orginal article.

Summary of “She’s 98. He’s 94. They Met at the Gym.”

“So I’m 99, 98, it’s just a number,” Ms. Mokotoff said.
Mr. Mann, who is 94 and received a bachelor’s degree in history last year from Mount St. Mary College in Newburgh, N.Y., agreed that when it comes to being old as opposed to feeling old, the numbers don’t always add up the same.
The son of Mae Mann and Hyman Mann, an insurance executive, he joined the war effort in 1943 as a 19-year-old, eventually serving as a second engineer aboard cargo ships, tankers and troop ships during World War II.”It was a scary time,” he said.
In 1960, Mr. Mann, who said he “Could never stand living in the city,” purchased his country home in Cuddebackville, in the foothills of the Catskill Mountains, which he calls “a little piece of heaven.”
Mr. Mann’s first marriage, which lasted 20 years before ending in divorce, produced his only biological child, Mark Mann, now 71, who served as best man.
Last year, Mr. Mann became the oldest person to graduate from Mount St. Mary College.
Keith Schuler, who has been Mr. Mann’s neighbor for the past 20 years, called him “An inspiration, and an incredible human being.”
Mr. Mann managed to slip out a back door and, moments later, reappeared in front of City Hall, behind the wheel of his red Toyota Corolla.

The orginal article.

Summary of “‘There Have Always Existed People Who’ve Simply Wanted to be Alone’: An Interview with Michael Finkel”

In The Stranger in the Woods: The Extraordinary Story of the Last True Hermit, Michael Finkel tackles the story of the famed North Pond hermit.
If you read about hermits throughout history-people who wanted to separate themselves from all other people-an extremely high percentage of those people have been bright.
Your book opens with a vivid description of the woods where Knight lived for twenty-seven years.
People in Maine seem to have had strong reactions toward Knight.
There were a significant number of people in Maine, victims of his crimes, who intuitively realized there was someone living in the woods who just didn’t want to be part of society, and they were very sweet about it.
The way people reacted to Chris Knight spoke less to who Chris was, and more to who they were.
Strangely, across all of human history and going back thousands of years, there have existed a tiny handful of people who’ve simply wanted to be alone.
Despite the fact that it was radically different from the way anybody else lived, he ignored all the pressure of society and went to live exactly as he wanted.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Passing Over: How Reading Lets Us Live a Thousand Lives”

Someone once asked the great short story writer Jorge Luis Borges “Don’t you regret spending more of your life reading than living?”.
“There are many ways of living, and reading is one of them When you are reading, you are living, and when you are dreaming, you are living also.”What does Borges mean? Isn’t living, well, living?
“Looking back into your own past, among the landmarks of your life, you will find that great readings occupy a place no less significant than actual happenings - for instance, a long and adventurous journey through strange lands, which you undertook in a certain year, may in retrospect appear no less memorable than your first exploration of A la recherche du temps perdu; or again, you might realize that your encounter with Anna Karenina, or with Julien Sorel proved more momentous than meeting most of your past acquaintances. Who is to assess the relative significance, the specific weight that should be ascribed to these diverse experiences in the shaping of your personality?”Our memories are not so different from the stories we find in books.
One time, an older girl I did not know came up to me and said, “Why are you reading books? It’s a beautiful day. Go out live a little!”.
Even as an adult, someone will occasionally tell me to put my books away and go live.
Reading is not living, and every moment spent in a book is a life less well-lived.
Here’s something else to think about - what if reading makes you live more?
“Those of us who have been true readers all our life seldom realize the enormous extension of our being that we owe to authors. We realize it best when we talk with an unliterary friend. He may be full of goodness and good sense, but he inhabits a tiny world. In it, we should be suffocated. My own eyes are not enough for me. in reading great literature I become a thousand men and yet remain myself. Like the night sky in the Greek poem, I see with a myriad of eyes, but it is still I who see. Here, as in worship, in love, in moral action, and in knowing, I transcend myself; and am never more myself than when I do.”The cat has nine lives as a boy who read, I guess I had a thousand.

The orginal article.

Summary of “The Top 5 Regrets of the Dying”

How you choose to spend your time, or your life, is up to you.
At the end of your life, what do you want to be remembered for? There are many popular, introspective self-help books right now on what the dying are thinking, and what they regret most.
She stared longingly out the window admiring the small tree and squirrels playing, as if thinking back on her life.
Take the time to enjoy what’s good about your life, whether it’s a loving family, a great circle of friends, a safe roof over your head, a stable job, and food on the dining room table.
Don’t spend your whole life looking ahead. Appreciate what you have now, in the moment.
I wish I’d had the courage to live a life true to myself, not the life others expected of me.
If you’re looking for love, or a certain lifestyle, get the rest of your life in order to make room for these things.
Do you have any tips on living your life to the fullest? Let me know on Twitter.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Tell Me What You Did Today, And I’ll Tell You Who You Are”

How close to your values and goals are your living?
If you are to really accomplish your goals and dreams, how much differently would your regular day need to be than today was?
What activities must happen daily for you to live exactly how you want to be living? You may have several things in the way of your ideal day right now, but are you getting closer?
If you were to consistently live your ideal day, where would you be in one year from now? Where would you be in five years?
Self-evaluation: determines how well we are performing comparative to our goals.
Self-reaction: determines how we think and feel comparative to our goals.
Loads of research has sought to determine: How do you keep people striving for a goal when they’re struggling to stay motivated?
How you spend each day is a clear indicator of who you are and who you will become.

The orginal article.

Summary of “What to Do When You’ve Picked the Wrong Suburb”

The couple gravitated north to Westchester County, where they had lived in their 20s and where Mr. Curry, an ordained minister and the director of connectional ministries for the United Methodist Church in New York, had served as a pastor.
Even if a possibility looks great on paper, one person’s idea of a great place to live can be another person’s nightmare.
“Just like someone living on the Upper East Side won’t fit into Williamsburg, someone who likes Maplewood may not fit into Short Hills. You can end up in a place that really doesn’t suit you.”
Moving to a new suburb may be the way to recapturing your identity, whether it’s somewhere where you can walk to dinner or a place with more like-minded people.
You should give serious thought to who lives in the town and what types of things go on there.
“Choosing a place to live is the single most expensive decision many of us ever make, and many of us make it mostly on intuition,” said Richard Florida, an urban theorist at the University of Toronto who studies demographic shifts, and is the author of “The Rise of the Creative Class”.
Julie LaChapelle, 41, had been living in the Riverdale section of the Bronx when she moved in 2003 to Verona, N.J., about an hour by car outside of Manhattan.
Ms. LaChapelle knows she’s taking a risk, and she doesn’t want to disrupt her daughters’ lives and move again.

The orginal article.

Summary of “The Glory of a Summer Sleep”

For him, sleep is mainly about marking the time between days.
Crusoe’s sleep is part of the order of the world; Gulliver’s is a doorway to another world.
There is a central cultural contrast here: Do you take sleep, or do you let sleep take you?
The senior counselor at our school says that poor sleep is his No. 1 predictor of poor mental health.
His great book “The Sign of Jonas” ends with a piece written in the heat of summer of 1952 called “Fire Watch,” a meditation on sleep, silence, prayer and community.
Sleep is the most generative part of our day because it is when our ego gets out of the way.
I am fascinated by sleep perhaps because I have so often struggled to achieve it – both as a sufferer of severe sleep apnea and, more happily, as the father of twins.
I have learned that when you cannot sleep, the discipline of silence can serve as a substitute, a kind of waking sleep allowing us to let go and live in the present.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Self-Driving People, Enabled by Airbnb”

Answer: Only if we let them – and Airbnb is creating a platform to not let them.
To see what’s growing, go to Airbnb’s site and click not on “Homes” but on “Experiences.” You’ll find an endless smorgasbord of people turning their passion into profit and their inner artisan into second careers.
For $152 a person, they will take seven people visiting Florence, Italy, on a trip to “Make pasta from scratch in the woods outside the city” in an “Old house surrounded by a garden with aromatic plants. We are between the hills where is produced the famous Chianti wine.”
For $35 a person, Lee Marvin will take five people in Havana on a tour of three-on-three neighborhood basketball games.
Tourists visiting a foreign country try to understand the culture by going to a museum and viewing “Art by dead people,” noted Chesky.
“The biggest asset in people’s lives is not their home, but their time and potential – and we can unlock that,” he explained.
Because the world is full of artisans and people with passions waiting to be unlocked.
So much of what companies did in the past, concluded Chesky, “Was unlocking natural resources to build the stuff we wanted.” Today’s new platforms are unlocking human potential to “Be the people we wanted.”

The orginal article.