Summary of “People in open-concept homes are realizing the walls were there for a reason”

Wait, what?!? For decades, Open Concept, and the togetherness-loving, friend-filled lifestyle it was supposed to bring, has been a home buyers’ religion, the one true way to live.
There may be few real estate trends as enduring or as aspirational as open concept – the name realtors and home designers gave to vast living spaces that are all about happy-together time.
“Overall, the open concept was a reaction against years of small, low-ceilinged living, which felt restricting and stuffy to a new generation of home buyers.”
Oh, open concept, how you seduced us, made us believe that the fault is not in ourselves, but in our walls.
As real estate agent Kathy McSweeney, of Collins & Demac Real Estate in Shrewsbury, put it: “Whether [buyers] entertain or not, when they’re looking for a new home, they picture themselves entertaining. They want that big open space.”
Others get seduced by the fantasy of living in a pristine minimalist space – per every photo ever taken of an open concept home – only to forget that when your first floor is one room, there’s no place for clutter to hide.
Researchers have looked at what open space means in the workplace, and home buyers might want to take note.
Better hope you don’t have an open floor plan there, too.

The orginal article.

Summary of “What to Eat to Live to 100”

I aspire to live an incredibly long, happy, and healthy life.
The book is fantastic and I highly recommend it for anyone who is looking to live a longer, happier life.
Food Guidelines to Live By:.95% of your food should be plant-based.
Knowing your sense of purpose, or reason for living, has been shown to add up to 7 years of life expectancy.
Attending faith-based services 4 times per month has been shown to add 4-14 years to your life.
Committing to a life partner can add up to 3 years of life expectancy.
Here’s to a long, happy, healthy, and fulfilling life!
Rew Merle writes about living well, including good habits for happiness, health, productivity, and success.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Why I Hope to Die at 75”

So I am not talking about bargaining with God to live to 75 because I have a terminal illness.
I am talking about how long I want to live and the kind and amount of health care I will consent to after 75.
The claim is that with longer life, an ever smaller proportion of our lives will be spent in a state of decline.
It tells us exactly what we want to believe: that we will live longer lives and then abruptly die with hardly any aches, pains, or physical deterioration-the morbidity traditionally associated with growing old.
Although he didn’t die from the heart attack, no one would say he is living a vibrant life.
At age 75 we reach that unique, albeit somewhat arbitrarily chosen, moment when we have lived a rich and complete life, and have hopefully imparted the right memories to our children.
Certainly if there were to be a flu pandemic, a younger person who has yet to live a complete life ought to get the vaccine or any antiviral drugs.
Is making money, chasing the dream, all worth it? Indeed, most of us have found a way to live our lives comfortably without acknowledging, much less answering, these big questions on a regular basis.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Burned out and overwhelmed: should you embrace the joy of no?”

It is on the cover of two new books, The Joy of No by Debbie Chapman, published at the end of last year, and The Joy of Missing Out, by the philosopher and psychologist Svend Brinkmann, published earlier this month.
As Brinkmann writes in The Joy of Missing Out – his reversal of the Twitter phenomenon #Fomo, the fear of missing out – there is intense and growing pressure to go out more, acquire more, and just be more.
The wish to say no instead of saying yes, to stay in instead of going out, to discard instead of to accumulate – these are all logical responses to our feelings of being overstretched, overtired and overwhelmed.
He says: “I think that once a tendency or a counter-tendency starts to trend in this way, it becomes part of the culture it wants to critique or resist. It enters the circuit of anxiety.” Inevitably we begin asking ourselves, are we saying no enough? Are we missing out enough? Are we not working enough? As we strive to embrace the virtues of restraint, of doing less, of leaving space, we risk destroying that which we seek.
You are missing out on absolutely everything and feeling very smug about it, too.
Such big questions can be addressed by psychoanalysis, says Cohen, since, “Uniquely to itself, it encourages us to ask questions about how we live that we are allowed to sit with, and turn over, and not feel under pressure to resolve. It asks us to be with the question rather than leap to the answer.” He also suggests taking a long walk with no destination in mind, or meeting a friend without a time limit or agenda – in other words, trying to create an expanse in your life that is not hemmed in by time, space, or purpose.
As for #Jono and #Jomo – well, for me, saying no and missing out are not where I find my joy.
Cohen says: “If you read the great poets of joy, like Rilke, they think of joy as something fleeting. There is something sad about it, because one feels its passing as one experiences it – it is not some kind of permanent aspiration, a solid state.” It is a word that loses all meaning when it is part of a hashtagged acronym.

The orginal article.

Summary of “The Shortness of Life: Seneca on Busyness and the Art of Living Wide Rather Than Living Long”

It is unsurprising that the best treatment of the subject is also among the oldest: Roman philosopher Seneca’s spectacular 2,000-year-old treatise On the Shortness of Life – a poignant reminder of what we so deeply intuit yet so easily forget and so chronically fail to put into practice.
Life is long enough, and a sufficiently generous amount has been given to us for the highest achievements if it were all well invested.
So it is: we are not given a short life but we make it short, and we are not ill-supplied but wasteful of it Life is long if you know how to use it.
You act like mortals in all that you fear, and like immortals in all that you desire How late it is to begin really to live just when life must end! How stupid to forget our mortality, and put off sensible plans to our fiftieth and sixtieth years, aiming to begin life from a point at which few have arrived!
Living is the least important activity of the preoccupied man; yet there is nothing which is harder to learn Learning how to live takes a whole life, and, which may surprise you more, it takes a whole life to learn how to die.
So you must not think a man has lived long because he has white hair and wrinkles: he has not lived long, just existed long.
Perhaps unsurprisingly, given his own occupation, Seneca points to the study of philosophy as the only worthwhile occupation of the mind and spirit – an invaluable teacher that helps us learn how to inhabit our own selves fully in this “Brief and transient spell” of existence and expands our short lives sideways, so that we may live wide rather than long.
On the Shortness of Life is a sublime read in its pithy totality.

The orginal article.

Summary of “3 Women on Being the Caregiver of a Disabled Sibling”

More American women than you think are currently waiting for their parents to die – knowing when that happens, they will end up caring for their disabled siblings.
Their childhoods are a dress rehearsal for this inevitability: Research shows that in these families, starting in early childhood, sisters are much more likely than their brothers to help parents care for developmentally disabled children – for example, helping to dress or feed their siblings.
Once disabled children graduate from high school and age out of federally mandated special-education services, which expire at age 22 – a milestone that has been called “The services cliff” – families must ask not just what happens next, but what will happen after the parents are gone.
Below, three women share what it’s like to be ambitious in their careers, date, and communicate with their families while caring for a disabled sibling.
I distinctly remember being like 12, and all of a sudden my parents started going to the gym every day – they had kind of let go of their health but then they were like, if we don’t change, Rekha is going to keep getting bigger, and we have to be able to physically care for her.
My parents were very upfront, like, this is your little sister, she needs your help, don’t ever let her down.
My parents were very up-front, like, this is your little sister, she needs your help, don’t ever let her down.
If my parents pass away, my sister will be my responsibility.

The orginal article.

Summary of “7 Strange Questions That Help You Find Your Life Purpose”

After some research, I have put together a series of questions to help you figure out for yourself what is important to you and what can add more meaning to your life.
I made them that way because discovering purpose in our lives should be something that’s fun and interesting, not a chore.
Before you are able to be good at something and do something important, you must first suck at something and have no clue what you’re doing.
In order to suck at something and have no clue what you’re doing, you must embarrass yourself in some shape or form, often repeatedly.
Ergo, due to the transitive property of awesomeness, if you avoid anything that could potentially embarrass you, then you will never end up doing something that feels important.
There’s something you want to do, something you think about doing, something you fantasize about doing, yet you don’t do it.
If your reasons are something like, “I can’t start a business because spending time with my kids is more important to me,” or “Playing Starcraft all day would probably interfere with my music, and music is more important to me,” then OK. Sounds good.
Feeling foolish is part of the path to achieving something important, something meaningful.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Why Most People Will Never Be Successful”

Many people with lots of money have horribly unhappy and radically imbalanced lives.
The more evolved you become, the more focused you must be on those few things which matter most.
As Jim Rohn has said, “A lot of people don’t do well simply because they major in minor things.”
The more successful you become - which is balancing the few essential things in your life and removing everything else - the less you can justify low quality.
The more successful you become, the less you can justify low quality.
Because the only things in your life are the things you highly value.
As you come closer to living on a daily basis with your values and ideals, amazing things start to happen.
To repeat Jim Rohn, “A lot of people don’t do well simply because they major in minor things.” Said another way, most people are caught in the thick of thin things.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Anxiety and burnout: I work with kids. Here’s why they’re consumed with worry.”

I’d heard from parents, teachers, and friends with children that kids today live increasingly busy and stressful lives compared to previous generations.
The kids often used workplace lingo to describe their lives.
Kids today live with the baggage of their parents’ economic anxiety I’ve talked about these observations with friends who work with kids, parents, and other students when our church goes to summer camp.
Kids today have to constantly consider the perils of work and career with enough specificity to worry about it.
At the same time that they stress about the future that’s so very far off, they live with technology that keeps that anxiety consistently in the front of their minds.
While many of us who work with kids don’t want to name the likelihood that the generation behind us will do even worse than us, it’s hard not to see that we communicate it to them regardless.
These kids aren’t even being told that the point of all the work and the stress is a better life – they’re being told it’s necessary just to survive.
These kids live with what philosopher Pascal Bruckner calls “Tension without intention.” They’re constantly stressed, and they’re growing aware that there’s no payoff for it all.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Stop Wasting Your Hard-Earned Free Time”

Please answer me this: Why do we work 8-9 hours a day so that we can earn free time, while we endlessly waste that hard-earned free time?
I thought about how I invested my time: About two and a half hours on the train each day, working a job I wasn’t passionate about and spending my free time drinking in the pub with co-workers, watching TV shows or gossiping at work.
We all work hard to earn two things: Money and free time that we can spend on leisure activities.
Right? But shitty part is that we end up wasting that time on bullshit activities.
Anyway, if you keep wasting your time for 35 years, it’s no good.
We work hard to earn free time – but we can’t do anything with it because we’re too tired.
You know that you can’t party all the time and at the same time learn new skills.
Remember how Seneca said that “Life is long if you know how to use it”? Well, when you do things that are worth it, you’re using time – not wasting it.

The orginal article.