Summary of “Baby Boomers’ retirement savings are running dry”

West Allis, just outside Milwaukee, was once the headquarters of the Allis-Chalmers Co., which manufactured industrial machinery, employed 31,000 unionized workers in Wisconsin and elsewhere, supported a solid standard of living for its workers for nearly eight decades, and paid them pensions when they retired.
Only about one-quarter of employed Americans work continuously through their 50s and their early 60s in jobs with benefits, according to a study by the Center for Retirement Research at Boston College.
“If older workers can’t work in high-contact areas,” said Teresa Ghilarducci, who studies aging and employment issues at the New School University in New York, “Employers will have to make accommodations for them.” That’s an expense.
That’s what befell Gregory Bates – and he’s only 61.Bates went to work for the local utility company in Milwaukee – now called WE Energies – when he was 18, as a file clerk, and, after four years in the Air Force, eventually worked his way up to budget analyst.
Just 40 percent of working Americans aged 55-64 participate in a job-related retirement plan, according to a Stanford University study.
With 401(k)s and other individual savings accounts, which collectively are more expensive to manage than a pension plan, each worker has to provide for an unknowable number of years in retirement.
Her son, who works for a company that makes environmentally friendly doors, works from home now and has had his hours cut back.
“The hardest part,” said his wife Tammy, 57, who is unable to work full-time because of a back injury she sustained while working in a dry cleaner’s, “Has been when you’re fighting the big medical bills, even though you have insurance – okay? – and it’s hard to find money for anything else. And now that he’s retired it’s going to be even harder.”

The orginal article.

Summary of “Who Was Blaze Foley: Inside the Life of Enigmatic Texas Songwriter”

The new biopic ‘Blaze,’ directed by Ethan Hawke, is based on the love story of Blaze Foley and Sybil Rosen.
These are the facts: Blaze Foley was born Michael David Fuller in December 1949.
Thirty-nine years and two months later, he was shot dead. The life and legend of Blaze Foley was resurrected with Blaze, a biopic directed by actor and filmmaker Ethan Hawke, who, true to Foley’s confounding legend, once believed the singer had died taking a bullet for a homeless man at the unemployment office.
Hawke co-wrote Blaze with the singer-songwriter’s muse, Sybil Rosen, and based it on her memoir, Living in the Woods in a Tree: Remembering Blaze Foley.
The love affair that blossomed between Foley and Rosen would span “Two years and 10 states,” she wrote in the book, first published in 2008 by the University of North Texas Press.
To the entirely uninitiated, Blaze Foley was the man responsible for “If I Could Only Fly,” a devastating piece of songwriting that Merle Haggard clearly recognized as such, cutting it as both a duet with Willie Nelson in 1987, and then later as the title track of his remarkable 2000 comeback album.
Rosen waited tables while Foley wrote songs, but his time in the Texas capital was short-lived and he soon returned to Georgia and Rosen stayed in Austin.
While forging his own serpentine path to stardom, such as it was during his lifetime, Foley also came to champion and befriend fellow artists including prolific Texas songwriter Kimmie Rhodes, and Pat MacDonald and Barbara K – the couple who performed as Timbuk3 and earned a Top 20 pop hit in 1986 with “The Future’s So Bright, I Gotta Wear Shades.” Although 1987 would bring the release of the Willie and Merle duet version of “If I Could Only Fly,” the release of the song as a single was hampered by a label shakeup.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Tiny Houses Look Marvellous but Have a Dark Side”

While there is no census for these homes, they have seen a surge in popularity in the decade since the Great Recession – witness the prolific growth of tiny house manufacturers, for instance.
Originating in the US, tiny homes have also been popping up across Canada, Australia and the UK. Tiny houses are promoted as an answer to the affordable housing crisis; a desirable alternative to traditional homes and mortgages.
I have toured homes, attended tiny house festivals, stayed in a tiny house community and interviewed several dozen people who live inside them.
Photo from Luke Stackpoole/Unsplash, CC BY-SA. All the tiny-houser millenials that I interviewed wanted to own bigger houses in future; they saw tiny living as a means of owning something now and being able to save at the same time.
More broadly the legalities around tiny homes remain complicated.
In southwest England, Bristol City Council recently overruled such rules to allow several tiny homes to be built in the back garden of a terraced house in the suburbs, reckoning that it was necessary to help alleviate a local housing crisis.
Tiny Homes Tiny Consumption Tiny houses are often put forward as a more sustainable housing option.
Referred to as a “Dirty secret” by one interviewee, another explained her desire to keep items from her previous home in case she changed her mind about tiny living.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Designing a home for living alone”

The living room is her least-used space; the couch is a hand-me-down from the frat house of a local college, and the TV is mostly for watching sports or noteworthy series, usually on the rare occasion she invites someone over.
They “Named it and framed it” in 1981, Popcorn says, and in her 1991 book, The Popcorn Report, she broke down the trend into three initial sections: armored cocooning, or living in gated communities and having substantial home security; wandering cocooning, or seeking alone time in individual vehicles and solo transportation, just as Lindsey did; and socialized cocooning, or retreating to a private sphere while still interacting with family and friends.
In 2017, Pew Research Center analysis of the census found that 42 percent of Americans lived alone and 61 percent of Americans under the age of 35 lived alone.
If you’re living alone in 2019, it’s almost instinctive to find yourself in some type of socialized cocoon, and that’s changing how solo dwellers use their living spaces.
One-bedroom apartments are increasingly pricey everywhere in the U.S. But those who live alone often prize doing so despite the cost, and see their homes as spaces for the individual first, and guests second.
“When I’m designing for someone living alone, it’s almost always focused on the living space and the bedroom,” she says.
“There’s not a lot of focus on the kitchen and the dining room. It can go both ways, and a lot of people do want to be set up to entertain, but the main focus is on a living space for themselves.”
Popcorn, who has made her career by predicting future trends, pointed out that the living room will become more like a “Life space” designed to fit its dweller.

The orginal article.

Summary of “I could never understand my grandmother’s sadness”

My grandmother always looked as if she was on her way to a fashion show, even when she was going to the supermarket.
My grandmother would sit alone – under an umbrella, separate from us, reading the French fashion magazines her brothers still sent her from Paris.
Sala died in 1994 and although she had made a life for herself in America, she never stopped seeming sad to me, and her sadness never stopped unnerving me.
I’d have lunch with him in his flat, surrounded by his collection of paintings by Monet and Matisse and Picasso, and I’d never question why his supremely glamorous life in Paris was so different from my grandmother’s in Miami.
To Sala’s horror, Henri agreed, and so, in what must have been a state of shock, in June 1937, Sala sailed to New York, to marry a man she didn’t know, leaving behind everything she loved.
The story of my grandmother confused people, especially Jewish Americans, who understandably assume that any story about escaping the war to the US is a happy one.
Sala never saw her former fiance again; he almost certainly died in the war.
Even before I knew the details of Sala’s story, I’ve always known that I would not exist if the Holocaust hadn’t happened – because then Sala would never have come to America.

The orginal article.

Summary of “How to Be Mediocre and Be Happy With Yourself”

In the novel Catch-22, the author Joseph Heller famously wrote: “Some men are born mediocre, some men achieve mediocrity, and some men have mediocrity thrust upon them.”
Most of us go on to live what by most measures are pretty ordinary lives.
The Art of Kakonomics It all started over a decade ago when they met up and got chatting about their experience of working and studying overseas, comparing it to how things were done in Italy.
People did not show up for meetings or showed up unannounced.
Take the case of Italian olive oil manufacturer Leornardo Marseglia, who was charged with fraud in the 1990s for selling adulterated oil under the label “Extra virgin”, something that should denote it is of superior quality, say Origgi and Gambetta.
Even in Italy, extra virgin olive oil is expensive, and when Mr Marseglia was later acquitted he justified himself by arguing that thanks to his adulterated oil many people could afford to buy it with the label “Extra virgin” at a reasonable price.
The problem, Mr Manson argues, is that social media ensures we’re constantly exposed to the highlight reel of people’s lives and that’s leaving some feeling like they’re not quite making the most of their time in this mortal coil.
She lives in a small town of about 10,000 people in the Canadian province of Alberta, just outside the city of Edmonton.

The orginal article.

Summary of “The halfway underground homes of ‘Parasite’ are real spaces of desperation and dreams”

This article misstated the number of South Koreans living in semi-basement homes as “More than 36,000.” The correct statistic is: More than 360,000 households lived in semi-basement homes as of 2015, the year from which the most recent figures are available.
The halfway underground banjiha home figures prominently in South Korean director Bong Joon Ho’s dark comedy “Parasite,” a stark depiction of the rock-bottom existence the movie’s Kim family tries to claw out of and then descends back into.
Director Bong Joon Ho and actor Song Kang Ho on the “Parasite” set depicting the Kims’ home, a semi-basement banjiha apartment.
Like Hong Kong’s cage homes and Brazil’s favelas, the banjiha in many ways has come to symbolize a segment of South Koreans squeezed by increasing density and diminishing affordability, crammed into unseen corners of a city where the rich keep getting richer and occupy more and more of the space.
‘Parasite’ director Bong Joon Ho. More than 36,000 South Koreans live in semi-basement homes, according to the most recent survey conducted in 2015, the vast majority of them in the greater Seoul metropolitan area.
As in the climax of the movie, when the Kims wade through rising waters in their home during a downpour, many banjiha homes are vulnerable to flooding and have been submerged during monsoons.
During a particularly severe flood in 2010, authorities in Seoul said that most of the more than 9,000 homes damaged by the rains were semi-basement units.
They pledged to gradually eliminate banjiha homes and provide other forms of affordable housing instead. Shin, the poet, moved into one with her then-5-year-old daughter around 2007.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Couples living apart together and why it works”

As I looked for other Boston-area couples living close enough to share everyday routines, while still maintaining separate spaces, I found an entire world of people voluntarily “Living apart together.” Yet the more I read about the phenomenon, the more I realized how inadequately the term makes space for the vast diversity within and around it.
There are many couples who live apart involuntarily, separated by borders, jobs, or other circumstances, and others who might wish to live apart but can’t afford to do so.
My friends saw living apart together not as a permanent situation but as an added transitional step between dating and the heteronormative ideal of sharing one bedroom in one home.
Living apart together has its tangled roots in both the aristocracy and queer culture, and its contemporary branch comprises couples looking to prioritize individualism and moments of intentional solitude as features of longterm relationships, not roadblocks to togetherness.
What Harry knew to be foundational features in the latter couples’ relationships didn’t seem to translate to same-sex couples in such full force: While “The vast majority” of married heterosexual couples in his study lived together, he found that only three-quarters of the gay couples participating did.
It’s hard to say how far back the practice of living apart together goes, since LGBTQ people have existed forever, yet have historically been erased from formal studies.
In many ways, their situation is a descendant of the aristocratic mode of living apart together.
It’s her theory about why I found so many articles questioning the validity of living apart together, even though so many people are out here doing it successfully-whether you’re dividing a house, occupying separate units altogether, or living apart only temporarily, to ease the transition to someday fully living together.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Was Jeanne Calment the Oldest Person Who Ever Lived-or a Fraud?”

People in France remember the summer of 1997 for the deaths of Princess Diana, Mother Teresa, and Jeanne Calment.
Jeanne Calment was an accidental icon, her celebrity the result of a form of passivity.
Another time Calment recalled, “My husband said to him, ‘I present to you my wife.'” This recollection was also blurred: Calment, an adolescent in 1888, didn’t marry for another eight years.
On a recent winter morning, the current owner showed me around the third floor, above where Calment lived.
On the roof, a faded sign glowed in the sunshine: MAISON CALMENT. When Calment was ninety-four, in 1969, her notary bought her apartment.
At a hundred and ten, Calment was still living alone, in the Rue Gambetta apartment, where she had never bothered to install a modern heating system.
After the woman died, at a hundred and sixteen, in 1991, Calment became the oldest person ever known to have lived.
Calment lived through twenty French Presidents and survived periods of terrorism that no one even recalled.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Homelessness in Koreatown: a parallel neighborhood of unhoused people has grown up around the existing community.”

Advocates who work with the homeless estimate there are at least 2 million unhoused people in the United States.
Even as some outlets have disputed this specific claim and I regularly see homeless people sleeping in tents on the sidewalks where I was once homeless, Salt Lake has been held up as a national symbol of a city that has “All but ended chronic homelessness.”
Despite the widespread myth that homeless people flock to Los Angeles to bask in the sunshine, most of the unhoused are people who have been living in the area for many years, according to a 2018 report from the Los Angeles Homeless Services Authority.
Sixty-five percent of the homeless people in Los Angeles County have lived there for at least two decades, and three-quarters have lived in the county for at least 10 years.
In November, I talked with Johnny Lee, who owns a pizza restaurant in Koreatown: “Yesterday, I was riding my bike to work and I saw a man take his last breath and die. He was homeless.” Lee, 36, is also the co-founder of Koreatown for All, a small group of Los Angeles residents who have banded together to watch over their unhoused neighbors.
In L.A., the death of the unhoused is becoming commonplace: An average of three homeless people die every day in Los Angeles County, according to a 2019 report from the Los Angeles County Department of Public Health.
More than 100 people showed up to oppose the homeless shelter proposal, Lee says.
Some of them shouted stereotypes about homeless people, according to Lee-how they were dangerous and drug addicts-and said they didn’t want “People like that” around their children, he recalls.

The orginal article.