Summary of “The Secret Life of Live Mascots”

See what life is like off the field for these living symbols of school pride.
Bevo XV took over the job in 2016, the centennial celebration of a live longhorn’s first game appearance, at the 1916 Texas A&M contest, replacing the previous mascot, a pit bull terrier named Pig.
That’s good for only the second-heaviest live mascot.
“We never make her do anything she doesn’t want to,” explains John Graves, CU’s live mascot program manager.
His new home is an obvious improvement over the living quarters of his predecessors, who have lived adjacent to Tiger Stadium since 1936.
In 1924, head cheerleader Vic Huggins decided his school needed a live mascot to compete with rivals such as NC State, which at the time would trot out a live wolf for games.
“You’d be doing well to be living this ol’ boy’s life right here,” says Don Basnight, Hogan’s grandson, as he pets Rameses XXII with one hand and slips him a handful of sheep feed with the other.
Unlike some live mascots, Rameses’ location is no secret.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Why we must listen to the ticking of our body clock”

Their discovery enabled other scientists to discover the thousands of circadian times that control our health, our genes and even when we should have treatments: it can make the difference between life and death.
The time of surgery made a significant difference: 54 patients who had surgery in the morning experienced complications compared to 28 patients who had surgery in the afternoon.
The heart has an exceptionally strong circadian timing system, as is well-known to those in elite sports.
The heart’s circadian strength in the late afternoon may help explain better heart surgery outcomes at that time of day, and suggests the times that Atkinson’s sons should avoid intense exercise.
Living to our circadian times boosts health; when we do not live to these times we have increased health risks.
What prevents us from living our lives to circadian times? There are many answers: working hours, social commitments, using technologies late into the night, 24/7 lifestyles.
Using our bodies’ clocks to improve our lives starts by making sure we know our own body’s circadian times: when we should wake, how long we sleep and when we’re at your best.
Then decide what is preventing you from living to these circadian times.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Is There Something Odd About Being Single?”

“I’m single and I like long bike rides,” I finally declared, wondering if these strangers pitied me or if they saw my singlehood as the sign of something unpleasant and uncooperative.
I had considered “Happily single” but knew the emphasis would ring false – no reason to emphasize unless you had something to defend.
There was something queer about being single: queer in the sense of “Strange,” yes, but also in the sense that connotes a threat to the conventions around which most people arrange their lives.
The shame of having “Failed” at marriage isn’t unlike the “Failure” of being single, if you consider the congratulations offered newlyweds the sign of a universal goal achieved.
As a result, and especially if you’re a childless white woman in her 30s, like me, singlehood is a state people assume you are trying to flee.
The pathos typically associated with singlehood is that severe.
Thriving as a single person doesn’t challenge conventions of gender or sexuality, but it does contest the notion that romantic partnerships must take precedence over other relationships.
Another friend reminds me that to reclaim singlehood the way queer people once reclaimed “Queer” is a means of seizing power.

The orginal article.

Summary of “The Digital Nomad’s Guide To Working From Anywhere On E”

Ten years later, the digital nomad idea resurfaced in Tim Ferriss’s 2007 best-selling book The 4-Hour Workweek: Escape 9-5, Live Anywhere, and Join the New Rich.
The authors also couldn’t have predicted the rise of the digital nomad industrial complex, an entire industry created by and for digital nomads.
Github, Working Nomads, The Remote Working Company, Remote OK, DigitalNomad JobFinder, We Work Remotely, and RemoteBase all curate lists of remote jobs that can be done from anywhere in the world.
Speaking of boats, the Nomad Cruise is a two-week “Floating conference for digital nomads,” according to founder Johannes Voelkner.
Digital nomads give up the community, camaraderie, and social interaction that comes with working in an office.
Launched in 2015, the company caters to digital nomads because the work habits of nomads is, well, different, according to cofounder Thom Wensink.
Some 46% of digital nomads are not currently married or otherwise in a committed relationship, the Digital Nomad Survey.
Another approach to plug-and-play digital nomad living are companies that enable you and their other customers to travel from one place to the next as a group together, including Remote Year, Embark, Nomad Train, Nomad Convoy, Hacker Paradise, We Roam, The Remote Way, B-Digital Nomad, and WiFi Tribe.

The orginal article.

Summary of “10 Life-Changing Questions to Ask Yourself Today”

Happiness, life satisfaction and the daily habits of the most successful people are topics which researchers love to study.
Think about what’s not perfect in your world, whether it’s a self-destructive habit, burdensome debt, loneliness or anything else.
Plus, researchers have found that performing acts of kindness make people feel happier.
You can’t be present and your best self if you’re constantly asking yourself questions such as: Did they think that I was smart? Did they think that I was successful? Did they think what I said was stupid? In truth, you can never really know what someone else thinks of you.
Instead of worrying about it, be your most confident self and concentrate on what you want to communicate, ask good questions and look people in the eyes.
Her friend-who had a fantastic day in spite of her one hairy leg-proved that the people who have the most fun are comfortable in their own skin.
Take some inspiration from J.K. Rowling, who said “It is impossible to live without failing at something, unless you live so cautiously that you might as well not have lived at all – in which case, you fail by default.”
Think about the people you miss the most on this planet.

The orginal article.

Summary of “John Green Tells a Story of Emotional Pain and Crippling Anxiety. His Own.”

“Turtles All the Way Down” is an emotionally fraught project for Mr. Green, whose young adult novels are beloved for their quirky humor and sharp, sensitive teenage protagonists.
Mr. Green, 40, who lives in Indianapolis with his wife, Sarah Urist Green, and their two children, Henry, 7, and Alice, 4, is one of the publishing industry’s biggest stars, and over the past decade, he and his brother Hank have built an online video business with 16 educational shows that have collectively drawn more than two billion views on YouTube.
With “Turtles All the Way Down,” Mr. Green tried to bridge the language barrier by bringing readers inside Aza’s consciousness, subjecting them to her anguished obsessions.
On Monday, Mr. Green started his book tour with an event in Manhattan, where more than 100 fans gathered to see him and his brother put on a variety show of sorts.
Mr. Green apologized for the slapdash quality of the performance – it was a rehearsal – then read passages from his novel that describe Aza’s debilitating fear about the wound on her finger.
Mr. Green started and abandoned several novels.
Hank Green said that when he first read the novel, he felt like he understood for the first time what it must feel like to live with obsessive compulsive disorder: “Even having a brother who deals with OCD, I never really got it until I read the book.”
In the book’s acknowledgments, Mr. Green thanks his doctors and notes how fortunate he is to have a supportive family and mental health care that many don’t have access to.

The orginal article.

Summary of “The Five Invitations: Zen Hospice Project Co-founder Frank Ostaseski on Love, Death, and the Essential Habits of Mind for a Meaningful Life – Brain Pickings”

“Death is our friend precisely because it brings us into absolute and passionate presence with all that is here, that is natural, that is love,” Rilke wrote a generation later from the height of life.
This notion that death grants us a most singular and intimate perspective on life, much as love does, is what Zen Hospice Project co-founder Frank Ostaseski explores in The Five Invitations: Discovering What Death Can Teach Us About Living Fully – a celebration of how the recognition that death comes to each of us, a recognition at once consolatory and conciliatory, brings us closer to one another and closer still to the innermost truth of our own being.
Such palpable awareness of death, he observes, vitalizes and clarifies life with tremendous power.
His most impassioned insistence is that we need not wait until we ourselves hover on the precipice of death in order to apply its clarifying force to how we live our lives.
In Japanese Zen, the term shoji translates as “Birth-death.” There is no separation between life and death other than a small hyphen, a thin line that connects the two.
Death is not waiting for us at the end of a long road. Death is always with us, in the marrow of every passing moment.
The habits of our lives have a powerful momentum that propels us toward the moment of our death.
Complement it with Oliver Sacks on death and the redemptive radiance of a life fully lived, psychoanalyst Adam Phillips on how Darwin and Freud shaped our relationship with death, these seven unusual children’s books about mortality, and Seneca on the key to resilience in the face of loss.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Why octopuses are building small “cities” off the coast of Australia”

The first time that divers discovered a “City” of octopuses off the coast of Australia, it seemed like a fluke.
In 2016, divers found another community of octopuses living in dens built from discarded shells.
Researchers now suspect octopuses have been building group habitats for a long time.
These octopuses only live for about three years, so each generation is relatively short.
Over the years, octopuses pushed these mounds against the rocks, burrowed inside, and created dens next to each other.
Using video footage from divers and camera traps, the scientists were able to observe the social behavior of city slicker octopuses.
Building Octlantis might also put the octopuses in danger, since they have to come out of hiding to pile up shells and create burrows.
According to the researchers, Octlantis residents also regularly engage in social behavior that humans have never witnessed between octopuses before.

The orginal article.

Summary of “A History of My Mexico City Home, in Earthquakes”

Our massive pink building, with ten floors, a penthouse, and a deep, two-story garage-one of the few ugly buildings on the block-nearly collapsed in the earthquake of 1985, in which ten thousand or more are thought to have died, mostly as a result of shoddy construction and the lax enforcement of building codes.
On August 24th, I injured my left knee lugging heavy boxes while vacating my apartment in Brooklyn; the owner was selling the building.
Mexico City was given the democratic vote in 1998-before that, the ruling party, the PRI, appointed the city’s mayors-and since then has been governed by a series of center-left mayors who have enforced stricter building regulations.
Recent Chilean quakes have been stronger than those that have hit Mexico, but far fewer buildings have collapsed in Santiago, a newer city.
It’s being reported that perhaps at least three thousand buildings in the city have been heavily damaged; it’s not yet known how many are left uninhabitable.
Some of these buildings are new, their residents victims of the same old corruption that allows builders to cut corners.
El Doctor, our landlord, was moving out; he told Jovi that if the building was saved, he’d sell his apartments.
Outside, a city official was trying to reassure a crowd of neighbors, who were worried that the building was going to fall over onto the school next door.

The orginal article.

Summary of “I live a healthier life now I’m free of the trappings of modernity”

It’s easy to live by your values when times are good, much harder when you’re having a stroke or dying of cancer.
One thing I can say with more confidence is this: if we continue pursuing this political ideology of mass industrialism – which has given us ambulances, dialysis machines, wheelchairs and antidepressants – not only will we continue to harm our physical, emotional and mental health we’ll also wipe out much of life on Earth.
Deconstruct a single ambulance – with its plastics, oils, fluids, copper, acids, glass, rubber, PVC, minerals and steel – and I’ll show you how to lay waste to the very thing all our lives depend upon: the planet.
We create stressful, toxic, unhealthy lifestyles fuelled by sugar, caffeine, tobacco, antidepressants, adrenaline, discontent, energy drinks and fast food, and then defend the political ideology that got us hooked on these things in the first place.
My own approach to healthcare won’t satisfy the critics, the advocates of this strange thing called progress that seems to have us all more stressed and less content.
Your body is always aiming for balance and health, and listening to it is one of the best things you can do.
I made the tough decision to live in the natural world so that I could breathe clean air, drink pure water and create life that allows others the same.
I only managed to do it by stripping away modernity’s bullshit, learning to live with the land, and reducing my bills down to zero.

The orginal article.