Summary of “Gateway Episodes: Living Single’s “Love Thy Neighbor” and “Mystery Date.””

The few exceptions include Amazon Prime, home to A Different World, and Hulu, where you can binge Family Matters or, my personal favorite, Living Single.
The all-white simulacrum, which began airing a year after Living Single’s debut, eventually became a megahit, with the core cast members raking in $1 million per episode by the end of the show’s 10-season run.
Despite its own success, Living Single ended after just five seasons, all of which are now streaming for those looking to be initiated into what the theme song calls “a ’90s kind of world.” And those initiates should start with the 18th and 19th episodes of the first season, “Love Thy Neighbor” and “Mystery Date.”.
The first part of “Love Thy Neighbor” revolves around a fairly standard sitcom trope: A new couple has moved in upstairs and is having loud, frequent sex.
Just as the first episode ends, a handsome new neighbor takes their place and ends up stirring up even more of a fuss than the previous ones did.
The episode ends with a party at Kyle and Overton’s apartment, where Hamilton finally chooses between the three ladies-the victor was chosen by viewers calling in to Fox-and Synclaire and Overton, who finally share a kiss at the end of “Love Thy Neighbor,” making a decision about their relationship.
I won’t give away any more than that, but it’s fair to say that “Love Thy Neighbor” and “Mystery Date” combine all the elements that make Living Single one of my favorite shows.
These episodes and Living Single writ large so convincingly capture, through the chemistry of the cast, true-blue friendship.

The orginal article.

Summary of “The Meaning of Life Is a Ham Sandwich”

First off, before we can even appropriately ask “What is the meaning of life?” we must first settle something more subtle and something more important.
What does it mean for something to mean something? As humans, we have a constant need to attach meaning to everything that happens in our lives.
That’s why your friends are sometimes the biggest assholes – because that meaning you just shared, to them, meant something completely different.
Meaning is not something that exists outside of ourselves.
Meaning is something that we must continually find and nurture.
How to Find Meaning in Your Life In a very real sense, the meaning of life is therefore to create meaning.
Goals are dangerous because the meaning they provide when you’re working towards them is the meaning that is taken away once you achieve them.
So what’s the meaning of life? Well, for me, right now, it’s a ham sandwich.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Secrets of Happiness from the Oldest of the Old”

After spending a year following six people ages 85 and older, The New York Times reporter John Leland came to some surprising conclusions about old age and contentment later in life.
His work inspired his book, Happiness Is a Choice You Make: Lessons From a Year Among the Oldest Old, which comes out in paperback in January.
In this lightly edited conversation with Associate Editor Mary Kane, Leland talks about applying the wisdom of the oldest old to our lives at any age.
We know from a lot of research that older people are more content with their lives than younger people are.
We are so detached from the oldest old, in a way previous generations were not.
We think of old age as some sort of place to visit-and not a pleasant place.
Just spending time with the old is sometimes all we can do, and the most important thing we can do.
They are being told what they need by people who have never been old.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Secrets of Happiness from the Oldest of the Old”

After spending a year following six people ages 85 and older, The New York Times reporter John Leland came to some surprising conclusions about old age and contentment later in life.
His work inspired his book, Happiness Is a Choice You Make: Lessons From a Year Among the Oldest Old, which comes out in paperback in January.
In this lightly edited conversation with Associate Editor Mary Kane, Leland talks about applying the wisdom of the oldest old to our lives at any age.
We know from a lot of research that older people are more content with their lives than younger people are.
We are so detached from the oldest old, in a way previous generations were not.
We think of old age as some sort of place to visit-and not a pleasant place.
Just spending time with the old is sometimes all we can do, and the most important thing we can do.
They are being told what they need by people who have never been old.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Top 10 books about self-reinvention”

In my novel The Possible World, three characters each find themselves abruptly spilled into unfamiliar lives: six-year-old Ben, the only survivor of a brutal crime; his doctor Lucy, facing the dissolution of her marriage; centenarian Clare, harbouring her own story of cataclysm, carrying secrets that will affect the destiny of the other two.
All of them struggle with memory, identity and meaning while seeking a way forward into their new lives.
Life After Life by Kate Atkinson The riveting saga of Ursula Todd, who is born and dies in 1910 and is then reborn again and again into the same life, things going a little bit differently each time.
Eleanor Oliphant Is Completely Fine by Gail HoneymanAt first we might pity Eleanor, the 30-year-old odd-bird outcast who lives in a rut of lonely vodka weekends and supermarket pizza.
Her voyage brings her to a crisis: she must decide which of her many selves is the authentic one, and which life can claim to be her destiny.
The Unlikely Pilgrimage of Harold Fry by Rachel Joyce When a mysterious rose-pink envelope arrives for Harold, a 65-year-old man who “Doesn’t know anyone anywhere”, it ruptures his stagnant life.
His Illegal Self by Peter Carey Che Selkirk never knew his parents, outlaw hippie terrorists who abandoned him to a life of sanitised privilege with his wealthy grandmother.
There, memory clouds Joan’s new life in a way she didn’t anticipate, and she realises that there may be a limit to one person’s capacity to self-reinvent.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Why ‘Bushman banter’ was crucial to hunter-gatherers’ evolutionary success”

In the 1960s, the Ju/’hoansi “Bushmen” of the Kalahari desert became famous for turning established views of social evolution on their head. But their contribution to our understanding of the human story is far more important than simply making us rethink our past.
The speed of the Ju/’hoansi’s transformation from an isolated group of hunter-gatherers to a marginalised minority in a rapidly developing nation state is without parallel in modern history.
Among the most important is the realisation that apparently selfish traits such as envy – through which we express our discontent with inequality – was a useful evolutionary characteristic for building the social cohesion that enabled hunter-gatherers such as the Ju/’haonsi to thrive for as long as they did.
Ju/’hoansi still make use of well over 150 different plant species, and have the knowledge to hunt and trap pretty much any animal they choose to.
For the Ju/’hoansi, that fundamental axiom of modern economics, “The problem of scarcity”, simply did not apply.
How did a society like the Ju/’hoansi with no formalised leaders maintain this egalitarianism? Their answer is unequivocal: it was not born of the ideological dogmatism we associate with 20th-century Marxism, or the starry-eyed idealism of New Age “Communalism”.
As much as the Ju/’hoansi’s fierce egalitarianism served them well for so long, it poses a challenge now.
Many Ju/’hoansi are reluctant to take management roles or assume responsibilities that require making and imposing their decisions or authority on others.

The orginal article.

Summary of “You Don’t Find Your Purpose”

Ever since Daniel Gulati, Oliver Segovia, and I published Passion & Purpose six years ago, I’ve received hundreds of questions – from younger and older people alike – about purpose.
In the midst of all this angst, I think we’re also suffering from what I see as fundamental misconceptions about purpose – neatly encapsulated by the question I receive most frequently: “How do I find my purpose?” Challenging these misconceptions could help us all develop a more rounded vision of purpose.
On social media, I often see an inspiring quotation attributed to Mark Twain: “The two most important days in your life are the day you are born and the day you find out why.” It neatly articulates what I’ll call the “Hollywood version” of purpose.
Put differently, purpose is a thing you build, not a thing you find.
For me, I find purpose in my children, my marriage, my faith, my writing, my work, and my community.
It’s not purpose but purposes we are looking for – the multiple sources of meaning that help us find value in our work and lives.
Acknowledging these multiple sources of purpose takes the pressure off of finding a single thing to give our lives meaning.
How do you find your purpose? That’s the wrong question to ask.

The orginal article.

Summary of “LISTEN: 12 podcasts that explore the human side of tech”

As technology pervades every part of our lives, someone talking us through what it means can be a comfort.
Ben Thompson and James Allworth explore the effect of technology on society as a whole.
Two guys, 40 years of online experience, and a no-holds-barred discussion of how the internet is affecting our lives for good or bad. 3.
Practical advice and tips for being a happier and more productive human with help from technology from the team at Lifehacker.
Bloomberg Tech reporters uncover what’s happening behind the innovation that’s driving the economy.
A show for a better future: interviews with great minds in tech, philosophy and art.
Join Team Motherboard’s fast-paced look at new technology, culture and discoveries.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Is it moral to respect the wishes of the dead, above the living?”

Imagine that a legal structure were erected to execute the wishes of the dead, and that the law would side with the dead even when their wishes conflicted with the needs of the living, or with the wellbeing of future generations.
In the US, the wealthy continue to own and grow wealth after their death, and the state can enforce the spending wishes of the dead in many ways.
Non-profit institutions such as hospitals, museums and universities can have large amounts of their spending constrained by the wishes of dead donors, such as that there be an endowed professorship for the study of parapsychology, or that a certain wing must be set aside for housing individuals of Confederate ancestry.
When it comes to the wishes of the dead with respect to their personal wealth, we grant them many rights.
The current state of wealth inequality together with the ongoing practice of honouring the wishes of the dead, could result in a future economy that will reflect the preferences of a past aristocracy, rather than the majority of those living.
Respecting the wishes of the dead can lead to serious intergenerational economic injustice.
So why do we continue to give the dead such eternal rights? I believe we honour the wishes of the dead out of a misplaced sense of moral duty, as we would feel if we made a deathbed promise to a loved one.
This existential fear we overcome by permitting institutions to honour the wishes of the dead in order to guarantee a place for our wishes in the future.

The orginal article.

Summary of “A Look at the Benefits of a Systematic Approach to Life”

Habits, not goals, make otherwise difficult things easy.
The purpose of a well-crafted set of habits is to ensure we reach our goals with incremental steps.
All our life, so far as it has definite form, is but a mass of habits – practical, emotional, and intellectual – systematically organized for our weal or woe, and bearing us irresistibly toward our destiny, whatever the latter may be.
Once a habit becomes ingrained, it can last for life.
Reap an action; sow an action, reap a habit; sow a habit, reap a character; sow a character, reap a destiny.
“First we make our habits, then our habits make us.”- Charles C. Nobel.
By switching our focus from specific goals to creating positive long-term habits, continuous improvement can become a way of life.
For further reading on this topic, look to Drive: The Surprising Secret of What Motivates Us, How to Fail at Almost Everything and Still Win Big, and The Power of Habit.

The orginal article.