Summary of “London’s Long Housing Boom Is Over. Is a Bust Coming?”

Lance Paul put his home in West London on the market last May with a 1.5 million-pound price tag.
Similar deliberations are playing out across London as sellers weigh whether to take what they can get in a falling market or sit tight in the hope the slump will be short-lived.
“The party is over for the London housing market and the hangover is just beginning,” said Neal Hudson, founder of research firm Residential Analysts.
Since 1973, the year Britain joined the European Union, the average London home price climbed from just under 13,000 pounds to about 474,000 pounds-a 36-fold increase, according to Nationwide, the U.K.’s largest building society.
Time to Sell London homes are taking longer to find buyers.
International buyers made more than half of home purchases in prime central London and almost a third in greater London in the second half of 2017, according to broker Hamptons International.
Global City Proportion of London homes bought by international buyers.
The pound’s slump after Britons voted to leave in June 2016 cushioned the blow by making London homes more affordable to buyers from abroad. The prospect of a weaker currency remains an insurance policy against a disorderly Brexit, said Savvas Savouri, the chief economist at Toscafund Asset Management LP. He’s optimistic about the housing market and supports leaving the EU. He does see one big political risk beyond Brexit, however: the potential ascension of Labour party leader and self-proclaimed socialist Jeremy Corbyn to the premiership.

The orginal article.

Summary of “How Britain let Russia hide its dirty money”

The embarrassing truth is that, although I have written about Russia and its neighbours for two decades, during which I have increasingly specialised in analysing corruption, it had never really occurred to me to ascertain precisely how much stolen Russian money had found a home in the UK, or to chart exactly where it had ended up.
One way to begin investigating exactly how much Russian money there is in Britain – and how much of it is dirty – is to look at the official data.
Russian money that moves through another jurisdiction before arriving in Britain isn’t counted as Russian and, since the overwhelming majority of money that enters and leaves Russia does so via tax havens such as Cyprus and the Bahamas, this means the official figures reflect only a small portion of the money the MPs were interested in.
“Guselnikov believes that politicians’ sudden panic about Russian money in Britain is misplaced. When we met in his office in a grand terraced house on Grosvenor Square, he began by pointing out that Russian money had less influence over British business than people think.”I can’t recall any big enterprise controlled by Russians, or any big company.
Guselnikov said banks had become more stringent in their checks on the provenance of money in the last few years, so it was unlikely that significant flows of dirty money were entering the UK from Russia any more.
Why was Britain the only country that declined to act on the information Browder provided? His conclusion was that too many influential people – lawyers, bankers, accountants, property developers – were dependent on dirty Russian money for their livelihoods.
This is one of the problems with trying to ascertain the volume of dirty Russian money in London: how far back do we go? Do the fees Midland Bank received for banking Soviet money in the 1950s still count as Russian cash, and if so, are they dirty? Does the commission the estate agent earned by selling those flats in Kensington in the early 1990s count as dirty money? And what about the £800m that Russians paid for government bonds in return for golden visas? Or the $41,000 of Magnitsky money that was spent on a wedding dress in London? How many times does money have to circulate in the economy before we decide it’s not dirty any more?
We don’t know how much dirty money there is in the UK, nor do we know exactly where it is, and there’s nothing we can do about it.

The orginal article.

Summary of “The British jazz explosion: meet the musicians rewriting the rulebook”

In London especially there is the sense that today’s jazz musicians have come up together over the past few years.
These include Tomorrow’s Warriors, at London’s Southbank Centre, whose ethos is to support the development of jazz newbies, especially women and musicians of colour.
It’s an ethos shared by Jazz re:freshed, Justin McKenzie and Adam Moses’s promotions company turned label, which has played a huge part in supporting new jazz, whether giving musicians a stage in the UK or overseas.
These days Boyd is surrounded by jazz musicians with a similarly open-minded approach to genre and process, but 10 years ago, when he started playing around London, things felt very different.
He says of these musicians that, much like him, “The differences in the generation now and generations past is that it feels like young musicians aren’t trying to satisfy the standards that were set by jazz in the past. They’re just going, ‘What is the music that represents me today?'”.
Like punk, “It’s an attitude of, ‘Fuck it, we’re doing something that’s probably not going to be popular anyway’. Jazz is that music that no one’s expecting to go anywhere, and the musicians are just getting on with it.”
A second EP, 90 Degrees, is out on 19 May. Though her music blurs genres, including R&B, soul, reggae and even garage, the 29-year-old feels especially connected to the resurgent British jazz scene – she cites Ezra Collective, Nubya Garcia and Shabaka Hutchings as inspirations.
“The hip-hop scene in Manchester has brought in a lot of jazz recently, and when I go out on weekends it’s amazing now how many DJs will be playing jazz records.” Being a hometown hero, even an unassuming one in a flat cap and cardigan, does he get stopped on the street? “Yeah, yeah I do,” he says.

The orginal article.

Summary of “In London, The American Food Aisle Is Filled With Nostalgia And Preservatives”

To Americans abroad, comfort food so often looks like junk food.
Plenty of food shops in the U.K.’s capital have sections catering to American immigrants, as well as to the large population of Brits who have spent time in the U.S. and developed some American tastes.
In the U.K., certain garden centers – and even Urban Outfitters – stock packaged American food.
Pop-Tarts are the one mainstay of every American food section in London, whether the shop is a small convenience store or a large branch of supermarket behemoth Tesco.
Unsurprisingly, there are plenty of varieties of Pop-Tarts for sale at the American Food Store, the only all-U.S. food shop in London.
The American Food Store used to be a post office branch.
A.S.M. Mustafiz has been working as a clerk for the American Food Store for over two years now.
What about American versions of internationally available products? Some people insist that the differences in recipes make it worthwhile to opt for American formulations, such as the American version of Cheerios that contains less sugar than the British one.

The orginal article.

Summary of “how they changed Britain’s dining habits”

The rise of the burger from a scapegoat for the obesity crisis to the symbol of a dining revolution was fuelled by a combination of social media and recession-era economics, and it established a whole new class of restaurant: inspired by simple street food, led by untrained chefs and advertised via Twitter.
“GBK messed about with ‘global influences’; that’s not what I want from a burger,” says food writer and burger connoisseur Helen Graves.
In the months and years after MEATliquor’s launch, a string of premium burger joints opened across London and the UK. Some, like Patty & Bun and Honest Burger, have grown into thriving chains.
Within 10 minutes’ walk of the King’s Cross headquarters of the Guardian, for example, there are branches of Five Guys, Honest Burger, MEATliquor and Burger King – and two McDonald’s.
While the burger boom has “Forced the likes of McDonald’s to look at what they offer and ask how they can change their quality,” he says, what it has really disrupted is home dining: “The sheer level of people who eat out now is so much higher than it was 20 years ago. We’ve simply given people the option, rather than having an average quality hamburger from a supermarket, of having a better-quality hamburger from a restaurant.”
Deliveroo faces potential action from several local authorities in London for bypassing planning rules by setting up temporary kitchens in carparks and on industrial estates, where food is made exclusively for delivery by chefs from restaurants reportedly including MEATliquor and GBK. Maybe the pertinent question is not how much the market can grow, but how much better the burgers can be.
Gavin Lucas, who spent two years running his own burger pop-up at a Marylebone pub, says the perfect burger is an elusive dream, and a burger chain is not the place to go looking for it: “As soon as you have more than about 10 branches, you can’t work with a butcher, you have to work with wholesalers. And as soon as you start imagining the tonnage of cow that’s going into those businesses, it’s harder to remain in love with their burger,” he says.
“The best burger in terms of absolute quality won’t be from a burger chain. It’s probably in a restaurant or a pub, conjured up by a chef who wants to do something special. To make a great burger, you have to have really good suppliers – and you have to have love in your heart.”

The orginal article.

Summary of “Uber’s New CEO Just Sent an Amazing Email to Employees-and Taught a Major Lesson in Emotional Intelligence”

Uber’s new CEO, Dara Khosrowshahi, has been on the job only a matter of weeks, but a recent email to employees is proof positive that he’s the right man for the job.
Uber’s chief executive responded to the news with a remarkable email to employees.
In just a few short sentences, Uber’s new leader teaches some major lessons in emotional intelligence.
Uber’s new CEO follows what I refer to in my forthcoming book as one of the 10 commandments of emotional intelligence: the ability to learn from other perspectives.
Most important, the new CEO implied that to succeed, Uber has to change its de facto motto of “Disrupt first, ask questions later.” More than simply following the rules, Uber must go a step further: Essentially, it must convince regulators that it is willing to play nice with others.
After a series of mishaps and scandals kept Uber in the news for months-for many reasons-the company’s board of directors decided that former chief Travis Kalanick was no longer the right man for the job.
Looking to bring a sense of maturity and wisdom to Uber, the board unanimously voted Khosrowshahi, who was serving as the chief executive at travel company Expedia, to replace Kalanick as the new CEO. And from the beginning, Uber’s new leader made it clear that major adjustments were coming.
Thanks for everything you’re doing to make Uber the best company it can be, and particularly to our teammates in London and across the UK. -Dara.

The orginal article.

Summary of “The Least-Known Most Influential Man in Fashion”

Generally speaking the man behind glam rock is largely shrouded in obscurity, while Bowie is hailed as its poster boy.
Born Mark Feld into a Jewish family in London, Mr. Bolan always knew he wanted to be famous.
Widely credited with pioneering the glam rock movement, Mr. Bolan, with his corkscrew hair, sparkly makeup and flamboyant outfits, defined an era of glitter and gobbledygook, though he never broke through in America.
“A lot of fashion designers reference him today,” said Oriole Cullen, senior fashion and textiles curator at the Victoria & Albert Museum.
The most overt example of Mr. Bolan’s continued influence in fashion can be seen in the designs of John Varvatos.
A self-described “Big fan” of the rocker, Mr. Varvatos’s T-shirts often have displayed Mr. Bolan’s image, and the designer has “Definitely” hung posters of the rocker in his studio.
It’s easy to imagine that, had he lived, Mr. Bolan would have had a permanent place in the front row of every fashion week show.
As Zowie Broach, head of fashion at the Royal College of Art and a co-founder and designer of the brand Boudicca, said, he “Would have been deeply adored today and would have adored fashion today.”

The orginal article.

Summary of “On London’s Streets, Black Cabs and Uber Fight for a Future”

Their signs and slogans blamed Uber for an array of wrongs, including pollution and rape – and the government for siding with Uber.Rachel Whetstone, who was a senior executive at Uber until April, is married to Steve Hilton, a close friend of, and once an adviser to, former Prime Minister David Cameron.
When Boris Johnson, as mayor of London, considered clamping down on Uber in 2015, for example by imposing a minimum waiting time of five minutes on riders, some 200,000 Londoners signed a petition in protest and he was reportedly told to back off.
The protesters slowly marched toward Victoria Street and the headquarters of Transport for London, or T.F.L. Cabbies say that T.F.L. stands for Totally Failing London.
A popular bagel shop on Brick Lane in East London had signed up with Uber Eats, the company’s delivery service.
“I don’t need Uber poison.”
Uber says it receives hundreds of complaints a month from its drivers about abuse from cabbies.
In her photograph on the Uber app, she wears a head scarf discreetly tied at the back of her neck.
Some of them met at a party Uber held for them on International Women’s Day.

The orginal article.