Summary of “Pythagoras on the Purpose of Life and the Meaning of Wisdom – Brain Pickings”

The Greek polymath Pythagoras ignited the golden age of mathematics with the development of numerical logic and the discovery of his namesake theorem of geometry, which furnished the world’s first foothold toward the notion of scientific proof and has been etched into the mind of every schoolchild in the millennia since.
Alongside his revolutionary science, Pythagoras coined the word philosopher to describe himself as a “Lover of wisdom” – a love the subject of which he encapsulated in a short, insightful meditation on the uses of philosophy in human life.
According to the anecdote, recounted by Cicero four centuries later, Pythagoras attended the Olympic Games of 518 BC with Prince Leon, the esteemed ruler of Phlius.
The Prince, impressed with his guest’s wide and cross-disciplinary range of knowledge, asked Pythagoras why he lived as a “Philosopher” rather than an expert in any one of the classical arts.
Life may well be compared with these public Games for in the vast crowd assembled here some are attracted by the acquisition of gain, others are led on by the hopes and ambitions of fame and glory.
Some are influenced by the love of wealth while others are blindly led on by the mad fever for power and domination, but the finest type of man gives himself up to discovering the meaning and purpose of life itself.
This is the man I call a philosopher for although no man is completely wise in all respects, he can love wisdom as the key to nature’s secrets.
Complement with Alain de Botton on how philosophy undoes our unwisdom, then revisit other abiding mediations on the meaning and purpose of life from Epictetus, Toni Morrison, Walt Whitman, Richard Feynman, Rosa Parks, Fyodor Dostoyevsky, and Martha Nussbaum.

The orginal article.

Summary of “The Book of LifeThe Book of Life”

The work of two University of Denver psychologists, Cindy Hazan and Phillip Shaver, the questionnaire asked readers to identify which of three statements most closely reflected who they were in love.
I often worry that my partner doesn’t really love me or won’t want to stay with me.
Behind the scenes, the options refer to the three main styles of relating to others first identified by the English psychologist John Bowlby, the inventor of Attachment Theory, in the 1950s and 60s. Option A signals what is known as a secure pattern of attachment, whereby love and trust come easily.
Attachment, where one longs to be intimate with others but is continuously scared of letdown and often precipitates crises in relationships through counter-productively aggressive behaviour.
If there is one thing we should do to improve our relationships, it is to know which of the three categories we predominantly belong to – and to deploy the knowledge in love, so as to warn ourselves and others of the traps we might fall into.
We then need a little training because half of us at least are not secure in love; we belong in the camps of either the avoidant or the anxious, and we have – to complicate matters – an above average propensity to fall in love with someone from the other damaged side, thereby aggravating our insecurities and defences in the process.
Their quiet might just be quiet, not a lack of love.
Knowing whether we can be classed as secure, avoidant or anxious in love should be a basic fact we grasp about ourselves.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Why The Wi-Fi ‘Beating Heart’ Emoji Means True Love”

There’s no more universal sign of love than a heart.
According to Apple, the red heart emoji was the second-most popular emoji in 2017, bested only by the crying-laugh face.
The yellow heart emoji on iPhone used to translate into a hairy monstrosity on Android, though it was fixed in a later update to the OS. Even if your heart is not lost in translation, certain hearts are rife for misinterpretation.
There is one heart emoji that communicates love so deeply and effectively that it’s shocking it isn’t more frequently used.
Since it was introduced, those who interpret the emoji as a beating heart have used it to represent life or love.
According to data Burge pulled for me from Emojipedia, the Wi-Fi heart is neither most nor least used of all the emoji hearts.
The Wi-Fi heart communicates that you love a person or thing so profoundly that you couldn’t live without it.
While the classic red emoji heart communicates a bland and generic love, the Wi-Fi heart stands for something deeper and more essential.

The orginal article.

Summary of “The Challenges of Anxious-Avoidant Relationships”

There are so many ways to be unhappy in love, but one kind which modern psychology has given particular attention to are relationships, very high in number, in which one of the parties is defined as avoidant in their attachment patterns – and the other as anxious.
What makes things even more complicated and very combustible is that Avoidant and Anxious people are frequently drawn to forming couples where their varied emotional quirks contribute to an especially fraught combination.
Tragically, this avoidant party triggers every insecurity known to their anxious lover.
Under pressure to be warmer and more connected, the avoidant partner instinctively withdraws and feels overwhelmed and hounded.
Underneath their silence, the avoidant one resents feeling, as they put it, ‘controlled’; they have the impression of being got at, unfairly persecuted and disturbed by the other’s ‘neediness’.
There is an immense difference between acting out on one’s avoidant or anxious impulses – and, as would be preferable, understanding that one has them, grasping where they came from and explaining to ourselves and others why they make us do what we do.
There are few things more romantic, in the true sense, than a couple who have learnt to tell one another with wit and composure that they have been triggered in an avoidant or an anxious direction, but are doing everything they can to get on top of things – and hope to be normal again in a little while.
To help dispel the slight taboo which sometimes surrounds it, we have created a welcoming home for psychotherapy for when you feel stuck in a rut, anxious about your relationships or simply unsure about what’s going on in your life.

The orginal article.

Summary of “A True Love”

I dived into casual sex, learned for the first time in my life what casual racism feels like, what a not-quite-consensual sexual experience feels like.
It’s an unusual feeling for me to be the new person in this equation.
“Respect Erica’s agency. If she wants you to know something, she’ll either find a way to tell you or she will talk to Cory. You’re not responsible for Erica, Cory is.”
Making the feelings more potent, it’s my first real love.
How does it feel like to be in love with someone who at that any given moment might be with his girlfriend at the veterinarian’s, caring for the sick kittens they’ve adopted? Might be spending time doing anything with this woman he also loves, whom he met and loved way before he met me.
To ensure no one feels left out, we plan everything.
How does it feel to be in love with this beautiful, beautiful boy who makes me feel so beautiful and safe and loved and cared for, like no boy ever has before? Who makes me feel like he’s gently cracked me open and laid me out in the sun?
It’s a personal milestone when I realise that my affection for him doesn’t take away anything from what I feel for Cory.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Zach Lowe on Kyle Korver, Kevin Love and the Cleveland Cavaliers”

Kyle Korver had almost reached his starting position in the left corner as James whispered to Love.
Cleveland piled up 125 points per 100 possessions against Toronto in 99 minutes with LeBron, Love and Korver on the floor, and outscored the Raptors by 41 points over that time, per NBA.com.
If the cut gets Korver open, Love’s defender will often sag back to snuff the direct pass from LeBron to Korver.
Love will rush down and screen for Korver in the corner instead of waiting for him.
For the season, the Cavs have scored almost 1.1 points per possession when a Love screen for Korver leads directly to a shot, and almost 1.3 points per possession – a gigantic number near the top of the overall leaderboard – when Korver screens for Love, per Second Spectrum tracking data.
Another favorite: Love and Smith set a monster double pick for Korver, only Korver slithers in between the two screens and beelines for the rim.
Korver has imported a lot of the quirks he developed with Paul Millsap and Al Horford in Atlanta, though Love is a more willing 3-point shooter than those guys, with a quicker release.
“I asked Kevin how he’d feel if I threw him the ball and did that,” Korver recalls, “And he was like, ‘I did that with Kevin Martin all the time!'”.

The orginal article.

Summary of “This 75-Year Harvard study shows how to have lifetime joy”

“The clearest message that we get from this 75-year study is this: Good relationships keep us happier and healthier. Period.” – Robert Waldinger, director of the Harvard Study of Adult Development.
Although the Harvard study lays the foundation, there is other compelling research on the importance of human relationships.
Put simply, if you have healthy relationships, your chances of survival increase by 50%. Nearly everything in life is impacted by WHO is around you, and how those people support you.
Healthy relationships could help you avoid addiction.
“You can give without loving, but you can’t love without giving.” – John Wooden.
The most loving and deep relationships are built on a very simple foundation: giving and gratitude.
Only in such relationships can you be fully present to the moment and fully un-inhibited in the expression of your love.
You’ve got to stick to these incredible practices of giving and gratitude or the relationships will stop being transformational.

The orginal article.

Summary of “What happens to your brain on sex?”

What happens to your brain on love? Is there such a thing as “Casual sex”? What do we get wrong about male and female sexuality?
She’s written six books about human sexuality, gender differences in the brain, and how cultural trends shape our views of sex, love, and attachment.
Which is why romantic love is a far more powerful brain system than the sex drive.
So casual sex is not casual: It can trigger these brain systems for romantic love and feelings of attachment.
Sean Illing I’m sure you get pushback from people who worry about reducing something as rich and complex as love to brain systems.
You asked me about the brain circuitry associated with romantic love, so that’s what I told you about.
People pine for love, live for love, kill for love and die for love.
There are three brain regions that become active when you are in a longterm, loving relationship.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Good love is “boring””

If we approach love with healthy hearts, we don’t complain of “Boredom” with our partners, because we understand that they are not here to amuse, distract, or otherwise entertain us.
Emotionally healthy people can lap at the edge of excess; they are satiated on healthy displays of love alone.
Romantic hedonism - new restaurants, gifts, travel, grandiose displays or constant reassurance or lofty, poetic declarations of love.
Love built on frenzied pursuits leaves us fatigued and washed up, looking at each other at the end of our ropes, frustrated that we “Can’t come up with anything else to do.”
In good love, there’s nothing “To do” except love one another.
It doesn’t depend on how we feel, because good, healthy love doesn’t hinge on our feelings; it’s a choice.
Good love looks and feels “Boring”Real, healthy love is quiet, not loud.
“Real love it’s not a game you don’t understand the rules of, or a test you never got the materials to study for. It never leaves you wondering what you could possibly do to make it come home and stay there. It’s fucking boring, dude. I don’t walk around mired in uneasiness, waiting for the other shoe to drop This feels safe and steadfast and predictable and secure. It’s boring as shit. And it’s easily the best thing I’ve ever felt.”Good love is just the everyday - every day.

The orginal article.

Summary of “21 books you should read this spring”

With so many great books coming out in 2018, it can be hard to figure out just which ones you should pick up.
This week on the MashReads Podcast, we are joined by Cristina Arreola, books editor at Bustle, to chat about spring reading.
Join us in the episode below as we talk about the books we’ve read recently, the books that’ve been on our spring reading wishlist, the classic books we’ve been revisiting, and the upcoming books you need to know about.
Here’s the podcast – read on for our list of 21 books you should check out this spring further down the page.
Be sure to check out more of Cristina’s work by checking out Bustle’s books coverage.
If you’re looking to revisit a book this spring, check out James Baldwin’s portrait of New Yorkers in the ’50s Another Country.
If you’re looking for a deep dive into love this spring, make sure to revisit Maggie Nelson’s 2015 book, The Argonauts.
Recommended by: MJ. “He has an essay called ‘After Peter,’ and it is easily one of the most affecting essays I’ve ever read in my life. I read this book a little while ago and I’ve just been waiting for it to come out so I can talk to people about it. It’s so good.”

The orginal article.