Summary of “”The World According To Fannie Davis” Is BuzzFeed Book Club’s October Pick”

I’ve already learned that the best time to tell Mama difficult news, something that could get you in trouble, is during that brief, expectant pause in the day.
Mama throws on her soft blue leather coat, the color of the Periwinkle crayon in my Crayola box, and together we slide into her new Buick Riviera; are we headed back to school to confront Miss Miller? Thank God no, as Mama heads south, away from Winterhalter Elementary; she soon turns onto Second Avenue, drives to the corner of Lothrop, and parks in front of the New Center building.
Mama takes my hand and leads me to the children’s shoe department, where an array of options spreads before us.
We lived well thanks to Mama and her Numbers, which inured us from judgment.
After Mama died in 1992, my sister Rita briefly took over running the business; but she eventually closed it down and our family’s life in Numbers ended, and with it, the threat of exposure disappeared.
To maintain our comfort, Mama fought steadily against the threats of fierce competition and wipeouts, but also against exposure and police busts-and thanks to the cash business she was in, armed robberies and break-ins.
Yes, Mama could get busted, but I didn’t process what that meant: that our good life would end.
Scariest of all is this: the only way for me to tell Mama’s story is to defy her, by running my mouth.

The orginal article.

Summary of “The Chinese Farmer Who Live-Streamed Her Life and Made a Fortune”

Then she started presenting her life on the social-media platform Kuaishou.
A few years after this humble start, Liu Mama has fourteen million followers on the Kuaishou platform and reportedly earns a million yuan per month through her Kuaishou account.
The broadcast jockeys on Kuaishou are mostly poor, uneducated, and live in rural areas.
Eighty-eight per cent of Kuaishou users have not attended university, seventy per cent earn less than three thousand yuan per month, and a majority live in the nation’s smaller, less economically-developed cities.
Kuaishou has effectively rendered the life of the otherwise overlooked Average Zhou not only visible but potentially profitable, providing an alternative source of income to the population that is most vulnerable to being left behind in China’s technological rise.
The Kuaishou platform is relatively free of promoted content and celebrity influencers, which leaves its jockeys room to create content that reflects their own life styles, warts and all.
The chaotic and freewheeling Kuaishou platform lives inside the Chinese online ecosystem, within the Great Firewall.
A few months agos, Kuaishou introduced a new section called the Kuaishou Positive Spirit, which boosts the accounts of streamers who demonstrate the “Everyday citizen’s Chinese dream.” In the Kuaishou Positive Spirit feed, you will find a master painter inking a delicate bird on a work of calligraphy, a policeman helping a mother and her newborn cross the road, and a panda nuzzling its baby cub.

The orginal article.

Summary of “In Los Angeles, Hotel Hipness Makes a Grand Return”

He told me that he visits hotel rooftops at least twice a week, rotating between Mama Shelter, the glitzy W, and the rooftop Highlight Room bar at the brand new Hollywood Dream Hotel, where celebrities like Jessica Alba and Alessandra Ambrosio can often be seen lounging in the private pool cabanas.
Because the roof features free Wi-Fi and is open to nonguests, many Angelenos come to the hotel during the day to write or take meetings en plein-air.
Mr. Trigano said that attracting a steady stream of working locals like Ms. Latow to Mama Shelter was his goal for the space, which opened in 2015 in building that once housed the Hotel Wilcox in the 1920s and later became a satellite Scientology Center.
Like the Garden of Allah, he hopes that his hotel will feel as attractive for neighborhood denizens as it does for travelers just passing through.
“We didn’t anticipate it to be so crazy popular that we have people coming in all day long. They work, they do yoga on the roof, they transition into a small dinner. A hotel is successful when locals make it their own place. We’ve hit that vibe now.”
Opened in up-and-coming Koreatown in 2014 by the Sydell Group, who run the NoMad hotel in New York and the Ned in London, the Line has since attracted a steady stream of locals, who drink cold brew and eat sticky pastries in the spacious lobby, which takes up half a city block.
Mr. Zobler says he has already seen the communal culture of the Line start to replicate at his new hotel, The Freehand, which opened this summer inside the historical Commercial Exchange building in Downtown Los Angeles.
“If you are at a restaurant or bar, people have an expectation of privacy, but at a hotel, some of that comes down.”

The orginal article.