Summary of “A Simple Way to Map Out Your Career Ambitions”

Get the experiences and create a personal experience map.
Create Your Personal Experience Map Since the 70-20-10 ratio says that experiences best accelerate your development, you’ll want to understand which experiences will build your career and the few, most powerful experiences that can close your from/to gap.
A regularly updated personal experience map will help you chart your path.
A personal experience map shows which experiences you want to acquire in the next two to five years to grow your career.
The interviews will provide you with the raw material to create your personal experience map.
Your goal is to sort through this information to find the few experiences that will most accelerate your career.
Select four to seven functional experiences and three to four management experiences you believe will benefit you most and list them on your personal experience map.
The personal experience map is now your guide to continuously grow your high-performing self.

The orginal article.

Summary of “How to Put a Fake Island on the Map”

Zeno called the island Frisland and claimed that two of his ancestors, Antonio and his brother Nicolò, had discovered the island in the 1380s.
Zeno’s map provided additional support for his story.
In his book, Zeno claimed the map dated back to the 1390s, but its sources are clearly from the 16th century.
Bordone’s Isolario of 1528 not only provided images of North Atlantic islands, but it also contained descriptions of Vespucci’s voyage and the island of Hispaniola, which served as a template for Zeno’s picture of the New World inhabitants.
Even the map can’t fully explain the enduring power of Zeno’s story.
To understand why modern scholars might defend Zeno’s story, look at another case of alleged exploration forgery: the Vinland map.
Many scholars argue that the Vinland map is a forgery, perhaps because it lacks a compelling element found in the Zeno tale-a centuries-long track record of evidence.
Zeno’s map gave the appearance of truth to his claims, but the English declaration of ownership over Frisland in 1580 reveals the true power of Zeno’s story.

The orginal article.

Summary of “How Writers Map Their Imaginary Worlds”

A writer’s map hints at a fully imagined world, and at the beginning of a book, it’s a promise.
The 2018 book, The Writer’s Map, contains dozens of the magical maps writers have drawn or that have been made by others to illustrate the places they’ve created.
“For some writers making a map is absolutely central to the craft of shaping and telling their tale.”
The book includes the map from Thomas More’s Utopia, which when published in 1516 contained the first fantasy map in a work of fiction, as far as anyone can tell.
There are more private treasures here, too: J.R.R. Tolkien’s own sketch of Mordor, on graph paper; C.S. Lewis’s sketches; unpublished maps from the notebooks of David Mitchell, who uses them to help imagine the worlds of his books, such as The Thousand Autumns of Jacob de Zoet; Jack Kerouac’s own route in On the Road. Map of Walden Pond from Walden; or Life, in the Woods, by Henry David Thoreau.
In one essay, Cressida Cowell, the author of How to Train Your Dragon, writes of being inspired by maps drawn by the Brontës as children, “In tiny, beautiful books that were in themselves a fascination, for the writing was as small as if created by mice.”
Philip Pullman: “Writing is a matter of sullen toil. Drawing is pure joy. Drawing a map to go with a story is messing around, with the added fun of coloring in.”
A map helps shape a reader’s or a writer’s idea of a fictional place, but ultimately its boundaries are limited only by their joint imaginations.

The orginal article.

Summary of “How to Read a Map”

Being able to read a good old-fashioned paper map is one of the most fundamental outdoor skills.
Topo maps are the only map you should use if you’re trying to navigate outdoors and will be the subject of most of this article.
Photo by USGS.Any good map will tell you how to read itself.
From left to right, it gives you information on where and when the map data was compiled, the area’s magnetic declination, the scale, the location of the shown area in relation to the state it’s in, and a key to the symbols used to represent roads.
The key is another essential, spelling out what the symbols on the map represent.
Take a minute to absorb the legend before trying to read the map itself.
Pick out two distinct terrain features that you can see both in the real world and on the map.
Rotate the map until its orienting lines align with those of the compass bezel.

The orginal article.

Summary of “How 13 Rejected States Would Have Changed The Electoral College”

Our perception of U.S. politics wouldn’t be the same without the Electoral College.
Thanks to most states’ winner-take-all rules, the Electoral College turns states into red and blue Legos.
Elizabeth Warren has called for the abolishment of the Electoral College, and a handful of states have signed on to a plan that would essentially bypass the Electoral College – members of the National Popular Vote initiative have pledged to throw their electoral votes to the national popular vote winner no matter who their state voted for, but the agreement won’t kick in until the states involved have enough electoral votes to guarantee that whoever they vote for will win.
One way to understand just how skewed the Electoral College can be is by rearranging the states inside of it.
What if some of these would-be states were around today? Would moving those state borders, without changing any votes, change our political reality?
These new maps did shift the Electoral College vote margin by as much as 38 votes, but since President Trump won by more than 70 votes, it wasn’t enough to swing the election to Clinton.
The “Current state borders” map above has a slightly different distribution of electoral votes because it apportions the Electoral College based on 2016 population and ignores the fact that Maine split its votes.
Even if the Electoral College isn’t going anywhere, it’s still worth remembering that nothing about our political map is inevitable.

The orginal article.

Summary of “What If Bike Paths Looked Like Subway Maps?”

That may be the case with Michael Graham, who sent CityLab an actual snail-mail letter a few weeks back with a QR code linking us to his Spider Bike Maps page.
His cool idea: Make maps for bike infrastructure as if the lanes, trails, and paths constituted a connected transit system.
Graham became fascinated with London’s bus maps on a family vacation there in 2004.
A simplified spider map of London’s bike trails.
“The map of almost every subway system in the world has converged upon some approximation of Beck’s design,” Graham says.
Graham says the idea for bicycle spider maps came to him later, when he started working at a small financial regulatory agency near Washington, D.C., in 2008.
“Most urban bike maps are extremely detailed,” Graham says.
So Graham attended a Transit Tech workshop in Arlington, Virginia, hosted by Mobility Lab, taught himself to use Adobe Illustrator, and tasked himself with applying these concepts to bike maps for four cities: London, San Francisco, his hometown of Denver, and Washington, D.C.To make these maps, Graham printed a Google Map with bike trails, traced the bike paths with a marker, picked landmarks along the way to use as subway-style stations, photographed it with his cellphone, and used that as the base layer for the digital map.

The orginal article.

Summary of “The Loudest Places You Can’t Hear”

Scientists have tools that can detect these “Silent” waves, and they’ve found a lot of noise happening all over the U.S. Those noises are made by the cracking of rocks deep in the Earth along natural fault lines and the splashing of whitecaps on the ocean.
“Any kind of mechanical process is going to generate energetic waves, said Omar Marcillo, staff scientist at Los Alamos National Laboratory.”Some of that goes through the atmosphere as acoustic waves, and some goes through the ground as seismic waves.
Some kinds of waves produced by earthquakes have even been known to generate sounds that people can hear before the ground starts to shake beneath them.
The result is a map that shows some big regional differences in seismic noise, with the wind-heavy Plains states showing up as “Loudest.”
Infrasound travels through the air, just like the stuff we can hear does, but in this case, the molecular jiggles and vibrations are happening too slowly for our eardrums to convert them into information our brains understand.
Infrasound can travel long distances and is often the unheard ripples set off by an audible sound that happened far, far away.
Back in 2011, Scripps Institution of Oceanography researchers Catherine De Groot-Hedlin and Michael Hedlin, who are married, mapped infrasound across the country by adding infrasound sensors to 400 existing seismic detection stations that are part of the USArray, a continent-wide seismic observatory.
The idea is that other scientists can refer back to their research later, to figure out why they’re getting a weird reading, to better understand atmospheric phenomena that also affect how infrasound travels, or to better understand how infrasound itself might affect things like bird migration.

The orginal article.

Summary of “The Man Behind Most of the Ski Maps in America”

The 72-year-old Coloradan has hand-painted the maps used by more than 200 ski resorts.
Aside from ideal timing, Niehues says he thinks he has an innate ability to see a whole mountain in one shot.
Niehues told us about his book project, the mountains he’s always wanted to draw, why you can’t beat a hand-painted trail map, and how technology has changed his job for the better.
On His Process: “I always fly over the mountain and photograph it. Today I can go in deep on Google, but aerial photography gives me an idea of what it looks like that I can quote from. Then the first step is to go into a small pencil sketch. If it’s a complicated mountain, and I see different ways to illustrate it, I’ll send different thumbnails to clients. Then I’ll go into a comprehensive sketch that will be as big as the map. Once it’s approved, I’ll project the image onto my painting surface, trace every detail, and then airbrush. I start with the sky and work from the top down filling in details.”
On the Details: “It’s a puzzle to put together. I struggled early on getting the back sides of mountains right. I’m constantly trying to get all the flow lines correct and running down the page. Resorts know what they want and need, but sometimes they want to show their mountain bigger than it is. My job is to bring it back to reality. My favorite mountains are the ones where I can paint cliffs or rugged peaks and the mountains beyond. But I really like to do the mountains in New Zealand, because there are no trees there.”
On Skiing: “I learned in ski in Europe when I was in the Army. A couple of us guys took leave and went to down to Switzerland. Mine was the fastest time down, so I thought I was pretty good. When I tried to ski again at Powderhorn, outside Grand Junction, after I came back in 1969, I walked off the mountain because I couldn’t turn. On the job, I became an intermediate skier. It’s important, because I understand what other skiers go through in navigating the mountain.”
On Retirement: “I’ve tried to retire, but then someone will call me and I’ve always wanted to do their mountain, so I end up jumping back in. I’m doing a sketch of Mount Bachelor right now; they have 180 degrees of skiing, and I’ve always wanted to do that. An artist named Rad Smith, who is in Bozeman, Montana, is working as a protégé. He used to make maps with computers but realized he couldn’t do it as well, so he went back to painting. There don’t seem to be any others who are jumping into it. It’s a small market. It was a small market for me.”
On Art: “I think of the paintings as art instead of trail maps. In the early days, it was really about the map, but the values have shifted. Hal and Bill realized it was important to get the beauty and to give people something they could look at and dream about. I think a computer-generated map is a reflection of the office-it’s rigid. A hand-painted map reflects the outdoors. You ski to get into that environment.”

The orginal article.

Summary of “These are all the world’s major religions in one map”

At a glance, this map shows both the size and distribution of world religions.
See how religions mix at both national and regional level.
A picture says more than a thousand words, and that goes for this world map as well.
This map conveys not just the size but also the distribution of world religions, at both a global and national level.
In other words, this is the best, simplest map of world religions ever.
China is the country with the world’s largest ‘atheist/agnostic’ population as well as worshippers of ‘other’ religions.
The map – based on figures from the World Religion Database – also allows for some more detailed observations.
The map of Africa and is dominated by the world’s two largest religions.

The orginal article.

Summary of “How Cartographers for the U.S. Military Inadvertently Created a House of Horrors in South Africa”

John S. and his mother Ann live in the house, which is in Pretoria, the administrative capital of South Africa and next to Johannesburg.
She moved from Ireland to Zambia when she was 22 because, she says, she “Wanted to work in the sun”; there, she met John’s father, who was from South Africa.
Olivier realized quickly that IP address geolocation was to blame, but he wanted to figure out why John and Ann’s house had been selected as a default location so he headed to Google.com.
When Olivier visited the database and did a search for Pretoria, South Africa, he discovered that the designation for “The capital of a political entity” pointed straight at John’s house.
“Welcome to the house of horrors,” John said to me, when an Uber driver dropped me off outside his house in Pretoria.
John and Ann’s backyard is in a suburb north of the city center, and it’s unclear how NGA’s cartographers decided it was a key location.
“Which basically means I’ve just put the crosshairs of the US military on oom Paul’s forehead, surely one of the greatest achievements of my life,” wrote John’s lawyer in an email, referring to a controversial statue in the square that commemorates Paul Kruger, a Afrikaan political leader from the late 1800s who fought the British and was part of a long line of South African leaders who oppressed the country’s black citizens.
A strange side effect of the changes made by NGA and MaxMind was that a search for the coordinates for John and Ann’s house on Google Maps showed a location pin in their back yard but Google Street View photos of Tshwane City Hall.

The orginal article.