Summary of “NPR Choice page”

By choosing “I agree” below, you agree that NPR’s sites use cookies, similar tracking and storage technologies, and information about the device you use to access our sites to enhance your viewing, listening and user experience, personalize content, personalize messages from NPR’s sponsors, provide social media features, and analyze NPR’s traffic.
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The orginal article.

Summary of “NPR Choice page”

By choosing “I agree” below, you agree that NPR’s sites use cookies, similar tracking and storage technologies, and information about the device you use to access our sites to enhance your viewing, listening and user experience, personalize content, personalize messages from NPR’s sponsors, provide social media features, and analyze NPR’s traffic.
This information is shared with social media services, sponsorship, analytics and other third-party service providers.

The orginal article.

Summary of “NPR Choice page”

By choosing “I agree” below, you agree that NPR’s sites use cookies, similar tracking and storage technologies, and information about the device you use to access our sites to enhance your viewing, listening and user experience, personalize content, personalize messages from NPR’s sponsors, provide social media features, and analyze NPR’s traffic.
This information is shared with social media services, sponsorship, analytics and other third-party service providers.

The orginal article.

Summary of “NPR Choice page”

By choosing “I agree” below, you agree that NPR’s sites use cookies, similar tracking and storage technologies, and information about the device you use to access our sites to enhance your viewing, listening and user experience, personalize content, personalize messages from NPR’s sponsors, provide social media features, and analyze NPR’s traffic.
This information is shared with social media services, sponsorship, analytics and other third-party service providers.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Here’s How to Get Over Social Media Obligation”

Social media has become our go-to connector, helping us stay in touch with long distance family and friends, generating job leads, or rekindling romantic relationships.
Because of this, there is a weird obligation that comes along with actively participating in social networks that can make it feel like a chore.
So how can we make sure social media feeds us instead of sucking us dry? Dallas-based clinical psychologist Lillian Gibson, Ph.D suggests adding more structure to your social media presence and activity.
“For most people, if they’re on social media for a relaxation tool or a connection tool, I would really recommend that they filter what they want to be on social media for,” Gibson says.
Ask yourself: How long am I am going to be on? What is going to be the purpose and intent of being on social media? Knowing why you’re there will lead to more meaningful connections that result in less forced interactions.
Use social media features to do your dirty workIf unfriending an old acquaintance causes anxiety, there’s an easier way out.
“Some people don’t want to be rude, so take advantage of those social media options to snooze pages as well,” Gibson suggests.
While social media can feel overwhelming, I’m not suggesting you become a grouch.

The orginal article.

Summary of “NPR Choice page”

By choosing “I agree” below, you agree that NPR’s sites use cookies, similar tracking and storage technologies, and information about the device you use to access our sites to enhance your viewing, listening and user experience, personalize content, personalize messages from NPR’s sponsors, provide social media features, and analyze NPR’s traffic.
This information is shared with social media services, sponsorship, analytics and other third-party service providers.

The orginal article.

Summary of “NPR Choice page”

By choosing “I agree” below, you agree that NPR’s sites use cookies, similar tracking and storage technologies, and information about the device you use to access our sites to enhance your viewing, listening and user experience, personalize content, personalize messages from NPR’s sponsors, provide social media features, and analyze NPR’s traffic.
This information is shared with social media services, sponsorship, analytics and other third-party service providers.

The orginal article.

Summary of “The Attention Economy Is a Malthusian Trap”

“If the tech sector no longer exists, its premium is no longer justified.” When the Financial Times got its hands on the document, it leaned into the death thesis, declaring: “The tech sector is over.”
Here’s another interpretation of the past 12 months in tech: Perhaps it’s not the end of tech, or even the beginning of the end.
In the first era, tech companies mostly solved media problems.
Look closer at one big sector where tech companies have already started chewing: e-commerce.
In particular, many of today’s largest tech companies, even those that have been mostly media and advertising clearinghouses, want to evolve into digital retailers.
In the past decade of tech, it was scarcely an exaggeration to say that every tech company is a media company.
Perhaps in the next decade, the rule will be: Every tech company is a mall.
So the “Tech is over” crowd and the “End of the beginning” crowd are, perhaps, telling the same story: Tech stocks have fallen, because the media mountain has been scaled.

The orginal article.

Summary of “NPR Choice page”

By choosing “I agree” below, you agree that NPR’s sites use cookies, similar tracking and storage technologies, and information about the device you use to access our sites to enhance your viewing, listening and user experience, personalize content, personalize messages from NPR’s sponsors, provide social media features, and analyze NPR’s traffic.
This information is shared with social media services, sponsorship, analytics and other third-party service providers.

The orginal article.

Summary of “NPR Choice page”

By choosing “I agree” below, you agree that NPR’s sites use cookies, similar tracking and storage technologies, and information about the device you use to access our sites to enhance your viewing, listening and user experience, personalize content, personalize messages from NPR’s sponsors, provide social media features, and analyze NPR’s traffic.
This information is shared with social media services, sponsorship, analytics and other third-party service providers.

The orginal article.