Summary of “If Social Media Makes You Feel Bad, Quit Using It”

Of course, I’m exaggerating, and social media is not the source of all our problems.
Don’t expect to that your life will be awesome when you get rid of social media.
It’s the opposite of the scientific approach to quitting social media that Cal Newport took.
He makes some good points about why social media is bad for you.
What’s it going to be? Do you use social media or not? Does it make you happy? Does it improve your life or business?
People who have stakes in social media will never tell you to stop using it.
Many successful entrepreneurs I know have never used social media.
One thing is sure: You can do well in life with and without social media.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Why can’t we agree on what’s true any more?”

Any utterance by a public figure can be unpicked in search of its ulterior motive.
Over-reliant on analogies to 20th century totalitarianism, it paints the present moment as a moral conflict between truth and lies, with an unthinking public passively consuming the results.
What has changed? The key thing is that the elites of government and the media have lost their monopoly over the provision of information, but retain their prominence in the public eye.
The problem we face is not that certain people are oblivious to the “Mainstream media”, or are victims of fake news, but that we are all seeking to see through the veneer of facts and information provided to us by public institutions.
One way in which seemingly frameless media has transformed public life over recent years is in the elevation of photography and video as arbiters of truth, as opposed to written testimony or numbers.
The difficulty of completely squaring any narrative with a photographic image is a philosophical one as much as anything, and the Zapruder film gave a glimpse of the sorts of media disputes that have become endemic now cameras are ubiquitous parts of our social lives and built environments.
Attacks on the mainstream media follow an identical script: the individuals professionally tasked with informing the public, in this case journalists, are biased and fake.
What if we accepted that journalists, editors and public figures will inevitably let cultural and personal biases slip from time to time? A shrug is often the more appropriate response than a howl.

The orginal article.

Summary of “NPR Choice page”

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Summary of “Today’s teens are anxious, and social media can play a role”

The cause of your teen’s anxiety may be completely unknown.
The following is an excerpt from the new book “Understanding Teenage Anxiety: A Parent’s Guide to Improving Your Teen’s Mental Health.” This book is a product of a combination of three very different perspectives: those of the anxious teen, the parent, and the therapist.
Experts say teens are growing up with more anxiety and less self-esteem than ever before.
The anxiety your teen is experiencing now has origins in events that probably occurred years earlier and has made an appearance due to one or more fac­tors.
Anxiety can also be induced by life’s common stressors and the inabil­ity to effectively deal with them-and then you factor in things like social media.
A 2017 New York Times Magazine article cites physical and intellectual insecurities, academic pressures, peer judgement on social sites, and cyberbullying as factors contributing to the skyrocketing rates of chronic juvenile anxiety.
For years, I was one of the skeptics who responded to claims of social media being responsible for anxiety and depression.
Higher emotional investment in social media was strongly correlated with higher levels of anxiety.

The orginal article.

Summary of “NPR Choice page”

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The orginal article.

Summary of “NPR Choice page”

By choosing “I agree” below, you agree that NPR’s sites use cookies, similar tracking and storage technologies, and information about the device you use to access our sites to enhance your viewing, listening and user experience, personalize content, personalize messages from NPR’s sponsors, provide social media features, and analyze NPR’s traffic.
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The orginal article.

Summary of “NPR Choice page”

By choosing “I agree” below, you agree that NPR’s sites use cookies, similar tracking and storage technologies, and information about the device you use to access our sites to enhance your viewing, listening and user experience, personalize content, personalize messages from NPR’s sponsors, provide social media features, and analyze NPR’s traffic.
This information is shared with social media services, sponsorship, analytics and other third-party service providers.

The orginal article.

Summary of “NPR Choice page”

By choosing “I agree” below, you agree that NPR’s sites use cookies, similar tracking and storage technologies, and information about the device you use to access our sites to enhance your viewing, listening and user experience, personalize content, personalize messages from NPR’s sponsors, provide social media features, and analyze NPR’s traffic.
This information is shared with social media services, sponsorship, analytics and other third-party service providers.

The orginal article.

Summary of “NPR Choice page”

By choosing “I agree” below, you agree that NPR’s sites use cookies, similar tracking and storage technologies, and information about the device you use to access our sites to enhance your viewing, listening and user experience, personalize content, personalize messages from NPR’s sponsors, provide social media features, and analyze NPR’s traffic.
This information is shared with social media services, sponsorship, analytics and other third-party service providers.

The orginal article.

Summary of “NPR Choice page”

By choosing “I agree” below, you agree that NPR’s sites use cookies, similar tracking and storage technologies, and information about the device you use to access our sites to enhance your viewing, listening and user experience, personalize content, personalize messages from NPR’s sponsors, provide social media features, and analyze NPR’s traffic.
This information is shared with social media services, sponsorship, analytics and other third-party service providers.

The orginal article.