Summary of “Break Bad Habits With a Simple Checklist”

No matter how sophisticated your strategies to rid yourself of bad habits and create good ones, you’re less likely to succeed if you don’t track and review your progress frequently.
After receiving some particularly stinging feedback from a colleague that confirmed what his boss had shared, Yi-Min vowed to be a better leader.
Together, we crafted a plan to help Yi-Min achieve his goals.
In order to listen better, Yi-Min could have left all devices behind for every meeting, but that would be a hard shift to make.
Reviewing his patterns also allowed Yi-Min to recognize when he was ready to introduce another habit aimed at achieving his goal.
After practicing with one meeting a day, Yi-Min slowly increased the number of device-free meetings he attended until, four months later, he no longer used devices in meetings at all.
Yi-Min replaced the old one on the chart with the next one in his goal of being a better listener: paraphrasing what he heard at least once a day.
You can set goals to achieve your dreams or improve your behavior, but without actionable ways to move forward and a way to measure progress, you’ll fall back into your old bad habits once again.

The orginal article.

Summary of “How to Get Your To-Do List Done When You’re Always in Meetings”

At the end of the day, your resolve has turned to dismay: yet again, you spent most of your time in meetings.
Here are some tips on how to get project work done even when you need to start and stop for meetings.
Some others have two, two-hour blocks of time in the afternoons each week marked as “Busy.” Inserting in project time to give you at least an hour to get things done each day, preferably more, allows you to build some momentum day-by-day and week-by-week.
It’s likely people will try to schedule meetings during those times, but when you can, hold firm to those boundaries.
Guarding time for projects as a recurring event starts to open up some room between meetings.
You can approach making decisions about how to fill the project time in a few different ways.
You can write any updates on your task list such as “Left voicemail for building project manager, follow up if haven’t heard back by Friday.” And, of course, check off or delete items when you successfully complete them.
Although you may long for the perfection of a meeting-free day, you can still get project work done when you’re interrupted by meetings.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Two Things to Do After Every Meeting”

Steve Jobs insisted that every item on a meeting agenda have a designated person responsible for that task and any follow-up work that happened.
Attendees are often immediately running to another meeting where their attention shifts to a new set of issues.
To make sure productivity doesn’t slow after you walk out of the room, do two things after and in between meetings: Quickly send out clear and concise meeting notes and follow up on the commitments made.
Sharing a summary of the meeting is an important part of working on engagement.
Here’s what works: Distribute concise, clear notes about the meeting.
Historically, minutes were like court transcriptions, capturing everything that was said during the meeting.
Two years later, nothing had happened and the president was convinced it was because the people in that meeting didn’t have the right skills.
If he’d checked in with the group two weeks after the meeting, then followed up every few weeks until the project was up and running, it likely would’ve been a different story.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Why Your Meetings Stink-and What to Do About It”

Multiple employees described his meetings as “a time suck.” They complained that he asked them to meet too often, allowed a few people to dominate conversations, and failed to create an environment where attendees really wrestled with ideas and engaged in critical thinking.
A telephone survey of more than 1,300 managers found that while 79% of them said that meetings they initiated were extremely or very productive, only 56% said the same about meetings initiated by others-clear evidence of an “I’m not the problem” attitude.
Additional research provides insight into why: In a study with Jiajin Tong of Peking University, I found that the attendees who are the most active are the ones who feel that meetings are the most effective and satisfying.
Meetings can efficiently bring together ideas and opinions and allow people to do their jobs in a more coordinated and cooperative manner.
What seemed to energize people? What could you do in future meetings to encourage that kind of engagement?
In addition to these routine scans, check in periodically with people who attend your meetings.
Because people often experience meetings as interruptions-taking them away from their “Real work”-the leader’s first task is to promote a sense of presence among attendees.
Some attendees felt that meetings were still longer than justified by their agendas; discussions sometimes rambled.

The orginal article.

Summary of “The Leader’s Calendar”

On top of that, the CEO must be the internal and external face of the organization through good times and bad. CEOs, of course, have a great deal of help and resources at their disposal.
A CEO’s schedule is a manifestation of how the leader leads and sends powerful messages to the rest of the organization.
In the study each CEO’s executive assistant was trained to code the CEO’s time in 15-minute increments, 24 hours a day and seven days a week, and to regularly verify that coding with the CEO. The resulting data set reveals where, how, and with whom the CEO spent his or her time and on what activities, topics, and tasks.
On the basis of these discussions and those with the hundreds of other CEOs in our workshops, we are convinced that every leader can improve his or her time management.
Finally, we will reflect on what our rich data reveals about the overall role of the CEO. A CEO has to simultaneously manage multiple dimensions of influence, which all contain dualities, or seeming contradictions, that effective CEOs must integrate.
Keeping time allocation aligned with CEOs’ top priorities is so crucial that we suggest that every quarter CEOs make a point of looking back at whether their schedule for the previous period adequately matched up with their personal agenda.
Should the CEO follow up with that person right away to make sure everything is OK? Should the CEO just wait and let the team member cool off? Sometimes emerging problems seem small at first but balloon into larger distractions if the CEO doesn’t attend to them.
Though the CEO’s presence can be important, overseeing and managing such work does not require the CEO and can be delegated to direct reports, for whom it is motivational and provides professional development opportunities.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Go Ahead, Skip that Networking Event”

We’ve probably all been to at least one networking event, those initially promising but inevitably awkward meet-ups where most people arrive hoping to meet new contacts that can further their career – but end up stirring their drink in the corner of the room chatting with someone they already knew.
In a notable study of networking events, Columbia Business School professors Paul Ingram and Michael Morris organized a networking mixer as part of the school’s executive MBA program.
Prior to the event, Ingram and Morris surveyed the executives to learn who among the invited guests they already knew and what their intentions and objectives were for the event.
Despite 95% of executives expressing a desire to meet new people, the average participant spent half of their time with the one-third of the people they already knew.
In terms of both new conversations and diverse connections, the most successful networker at the event turned out to be the bartender.
According to Brian Uzzi, sociologist, network scientist, and Richard L. Thomas Professor of Leadership and Organizational Change at the Kellogg School of Management, “Potent networks are not forged through casual interactions but through relatively high-stakes activities that connect you with diverse others.” In other words, schmoozing at a mixer is far less likely to lead you to a powerful network than jumping into projects, teams, or activities that draw a diverse set of people together.
The problem with networking events is that there’s no bigger purpose other than just having conversations with people, and without that bigger purpose – without that high-stakes activity – there’s little incentive to move beyond conversations that make us comfortable.
The return on investment of time in these types of activities is far higher than just attending a social event.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Reaching Peak Meeting Efficiency”

Peak Meeting FunctionThe thing is that most people say they don’t want to have meetings.
Most say “Oh that meeting could have been handled with an email or slack message”.
First, everything you are meeting about is relative to these factors and you’re not revisiting them every time you talk.
The first step in having any meeting is deciding who participates.
For the vast majority of meetings this will be either manager meeting with reports or peers across disciplines.
No matter what functional area of a company is represented, the role of process and values play a critical role in the meeting process.
I skipped a lot of meetings and at the same time was given a lot of grief for spending too much time meeting with the team.
Described earlier is the “Without” meeting, which I think on any project the most important execution-oriented meeting.

The orginal article.

Summary of “How These 4 Different Personality Types Find Motivation”

Through research for her previous books, Rubin realized people fall into one of four distinct tendencies: obliger, questioner, rebel, and upholder.
Are you inner driven, outer driven or neither? You can take Rubin’s online quiz to learn your tendency, but you might recognize yourself based on their traits.
“Obligers need outer accountability to meet inner expectations,” says Rubin.
If you’re an obliger who is in a work environment that promotes autonomy or if you work for yourself you’ll have to create that accountability, says Rubin.
“Questioners have a hard time making decisions because they want more information,” says Rubin.
“Identity is so important to the rebel,” says Rubin.
Rubin is an upholder, which is why she had an easy time completing her Happiness Project.
You can do what you want to do once you decide, says Rubin.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Inside the Confidential N.F.L. Meeting to Discuss National Anthem Protests”

The owners were intent on finding a way to avoid Trump’s continued criticism.
The Buffalo Bills owner Terry Pegula sounded anguished over the uncertainty of when Trump would take another shot at the league.
The owners kept returning to one bottom-line issue: Large numbers of fans and sponsors had become angry about the protests.
After the Miami Dolphins owner Stephen Ross raised the idea of a “March on Washington” by N.F.L. players and owners, Eric Reid, Kaepernick’s former teammate and the first player to kneel alongside him, brought the discussion back to Kaepernick.
Anquan Boldin, a former N.F.L. wide receiver who was at the meeting, said that owners needed to be spokesmen, too.
“Letting people know it’s not just the players that care about these issues, but the owners, too,” Boldin said.
Before the meeting ended, owners had quoted Thomas Paine, invoked Martin Luther King Jr.’s Selma march and expressed great hope for what they all could accomplish together.
“Today owners and players had a productive meeting focused on how we can work together to promote positive social change and address inequality in our communities. NFL executives and owners joined NFLPA executives and player leaders to review and discuss plans to utilize our platform to promote equality and effectuate positive change. We agreed that these are common issues and pledged to meet again to continue this work together.”

The orginal article.

Summary of “When You Start a New Job, Pay Attention to These 5 Aspects of Company Culture”

Companies differ in how they cultivate relationships, in how much they value collaboration, and in how much face time is required to get work done and make important decisions.
When you arrive in your new organization, ask insiders how you should approach relationships.
When you start a new job, look at how people tend to communicate with one another.
Pay attention to how information is typically packaged for meetings, the extent to which issues are debated versus “Checked off,” and how deferential people are to those in positions of power.
How companies make decisions also varies in important ways.
The question you want to ask is, what is your own bias for action, and how does it fit your new culture?
One cue is to listen for how people discuss their work in meetings.
Most organizations will hire you for past experiences, but your future success there will be determined by your impact in your new environment – and depending on how well you understand and work within your new culture, your impact can be amplified or derailed.

The orginal article.