Summary of “Don’t Underestimate the Power of Women Supporting Each Other at Work”

Don’t underestimate the power of women connecting and supporting each other at work.
Senior-level women who champion younger women even today are more likely to get negative performance reviews, according to a 2016 study in The Academy of Management Journal.
According to a 2016 McKinsey report, Women in the Workplace, white men make up 36% of entry-level corporate jobs, and white women make up 31%. But at the very first rung above that, those numbers change to 47% for white men and 26% for white women – a 16% drop.
For women of color, the drop from 17% to 11% is a plunge of 35%. People tend to think that whatever conditions exist now are “Normal.” Maybe this explains men’s blind spots: at companies where only one in ten senior leaders are women, says McKinsey, nearly 50% of men felt women were “Well represented” in leadership.
I hope it lowered the attrition rate of women working at my company – rates that are, across all corporate jobs, stubbornly higher for women than men, especially women of color.
What are women in the workplace to do, when research shows that we’re penalized for trying to lift each other up? The antidote to being penalized for sponsoring women may just be to do it more – and to do it vocally, loudly, and proudly – until we’re able to change perceptions.
There are massive benefits for the individual and the organization when women support each other.
I’m thrilled by the rise of women’s organizations like Sallie Krawchek’s Ellevate Network, a professional network of women supporting each other across companies to change the culture of business at large.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Elon Musk’s New York Times Interview Reveals Double Standards for Male and Female CEOs”

For women, the risks of being open are far greater, and they can manifest in tangible ways.
“Women incur social and economic penalties for expressing masculine-typed emotions because they violate proscriptions against dominance for women. At the same time, when women express female-typed emotions, they are judged as overly emotional and lacking emotional control, which ultimately undermines women’s competence and professional legitimacy,” according to the Handbook on Well-Being of Working Women, a collection of research and literature on the topic.
The guidebook for being a female CEO is, at its core, the same as the one for being a female anything: No matter your title, the double bind remains.
Women in the workplace are constantly walking a tightrope.
A 2008 series of studies from the Harvard Kennedy School’s Women and Public Policy Program found that displays of anger from men in professional contexts are often viewed as responses to external circumstances, while the same from women are seen as representations of their personality.
In other words, men are provoked, while women are naturally prone to anger.
The research also found that women who expressed anger in work contexts were perceived as less competent and received lower wages, while the opposite was true for men.
According to It’s Always Personal: Navigating Emotion in the New Workplace by Anne Kreamer, women who cry at work “Feel rotten afterward, as if they’ve failed a feminism test.” Men tend to feel better after crying: Kreamer’s research showed that “Their minds felt sharper, the future seemed brighter, and they felt more physically relaxed and in control.” When HuffPost interviewed 15 high-profile female leaders about crying in the office, the majority considered it taboo and bound to produce negative results.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Film Crit Hulk: Hannah Gadsby Rejects the Premise”

Gadsby ends up rejecting the premise of comedy both through demonstration and through analysis, doing so in a way that organically brings you to the same conclusion as her.
It’s again another moment of terrifying tension, but Gadsby makes us laugh when she instantly chimes in about him not hitting women, “What a guy!” She then tells us how the man apologized with another stunningly ignorant statement of, “Sorry, I thought you were a fucking faggot trying to crack onto my girlfriend.” The irony that Gadsby is 1) gay and 2) somewhat cracking on his girlfriend is just too delicious.
In hearing the words Gadsby most need to hear from her mother, she then says, “I looked at my mom in that moment and thought, how did that happen? How did my mom get to be the hero of my story?” A simple joke to helps us along with the relief, but Gadsby instead digs deeper, “She evolved. I didn’t. I think part of my problem is that comedy has suspended me in a perpetual state of adolescence.”
Gadsby presses even further on our inherent culpability, “Because it was a man who sexually abused me as a child. It was a man who beat the shit out of me when I was 17, my prime. It was two men who raped me when I was barely in my twenties. Tell me why that was O.K. Why was it O.K. to pick me off the pack like that and do that to me?”.
Because as Gadsby so clearly tells us, “I am not a man hater, but I am afraid of men.” And it’s not just because of the horrific experiences that those specific men put her through.
As Gadsby says, men “Do not have a monopoly on the human condition.” Heck, we don’t even see ourselves as a group or community.
Gadsby relents, “These men control of our stories and yet they have a diminishing connection to their own humanity.” Pulling our socks up means we have to connect to our humanity.
As Gadsby states while talking about growing up in Tasmania, Australia, “Seventy percent of the people who raised me, who loved me, who I trusted, believed that homosexuality was a sin, that homosexuals were heinous, subhuman, pedophiles. 70 percent! And by the time I identified as being gay, it was too late, I was already homophobic. And you do not get to just flip a switch on thatthe only thing I knew how to do was be invisible and hate myself.”

The orginal article.

Summary of “Men Don’t Take Their Wife’s Last Name at Marriage”

The prospect of a married man adopting his wife’s last name hasn’t always been so startling in Western cultures.
In medieval England, men who married women from wealthier, more prestigious families would sometimes take their wife’s last name, says Stephanie Coontz, a professor of marriage and family history at Evergreen State College.
From the 12th to the 15th century, Coontz told me, in many “Highly hierarchical societies” in England and France, “Class outweighed gender.” It was common during this period for upper-class English families to take the name of their estates.
In America today, many men tend to have the same hang-up about surrendering their last names, says Brian Powell, a professor of family and gender at Indiana University Bloomington who has studied attitudes toward marital name changes: They worry they’ll be seen as less of a man.
“With any nontraditional name choice, the man’s status went down.” The social stigma a man would experience for changing his own last name at marriage, Powell told me, would likely be even greater.
It comes with other challenges too: Because so few men opt to change their name, couples who make the unconventional choice are well aware they’ll stick out, eliciting questions for as long as anyone can remember their names before marriage.
Lamb told me that there was no way for her husband to “Casually” take her name.
Men don’t take their wife’s last name, Becca’s husband, Avery, told me, because they lack examples of other men doing the same thing.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Gaming’s toxic men, explained”

How did we get here? Gaming has attracted many angry young men who are comfortable with harassing and abusing women.
There’s an often promoted belief amongst certain people within the worlds of gaming and tech that technology is naturally, even biologically, the domain of men.
Why are objectionable opinions so common in gaming spaces? Gaming’s toxic men are often keen to display offensive opinions about women and people of color.
Why is online gaming chat rife with overt and casual racism? People of color who venture into gaming spaces are often assaulted with vile insults or tired cliches.
If you look at gaming circles and the gaming industry, it is a fairly white industry – both in development and publishing, and press.
Why are gaming’s toxic men so enraged? Women and people of color are beginning to appear in games as powerful characters with their own agency.
“For these people, white male is the default mode for humanity” Why do so many men in gaming exhibit a persecution complex? White male gamers often defend their own toxic behavior by claiming to be marginalized.
How can real change be effected? Gaming’s toxic men are often hostile to progressive change and inclusion.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Transgender men talk about life on the other side of the gender divide”

“But the transgender men will go get jobs and the new boss doesn’t even know they’re trans.”
We spoke with four men who transitioned as adults to the bodies in which they feel more comfortable.
Their experiences reveal that the gulf between how society treats women and men is in many ways as wide now as it was when Barres transitioned.
I did an ethnographic study of trans men and found that 96 percent of African American and Latino men want to have surgery, while only 45 percent of white respondents do.
There are also ways in which men deal with sexism and gender oppression that I was not aware of when I was walking around in a female body.
Prior to my transition, I rarely considered how men experienced life or what they thought, wanted or liked about their lives.
I have learned so much about the lives of men through my friendships with men, reading books and articles by and for men and through the men I serve as a licensed clinical social worker.
Plenty of research shows that life events, medical conditions and family circumstances impact men and women differently.

The orginal article.

Summary of “What happens to your brain on sex?”

What happens to your brain on love? Is there such a thing as “Casual sex”? What do we get wrong about male and female sexuality?
She’s written six books about human sexuality, gender differences in the brain, and how cultural trends shape our views of sex, love, and attachment.
Which is why romantic love is a far more powerful brain system than the sex drive.
So casual sex is not casual: It can trigger these brain systems for romantic love and feelings of attachment.
Sean Illing I’m sure you get pushback from people who worry about reducing something as rich and complex as love to brain systems.
You asked me about the brain circuitry associated with romantic love, so that’s what I told you about.
People pine for love, live for love, kill for love and die for love.
There are three brain regions that become active when you are in a longterm, loving relationship.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Life on the Oil Frontier”

My housemates have been all men – more out of necessity than preference – until I decide to go on Craigslist and sign a proper lease.
Masculinity is embedded in the very language of the oil industry: oil men, land men, man camps.
The dirty, difficult nature of the jobs here is better suited for men, he believes: let men civilize the frontier and women follow.
At Champs Place, a squat bar near my new house advertising casino liquor, a man overhears me speaking ill of men abandoning their families and becomes enraged because, like plenty of men here, he claims that his ex-wife won’t let him see his children anymore.
One of the women upstairs, Kate, dropped out of college in Michigan and is out here to pay off $20,000 in student loans.
J. is irritated that men at Walmart ask her out after mentioning their wife and children.
As the price of oil rebounds well into the sixties this year, I hear by all accounts that the North Dakota oilfield has straightened out.
Rao is the author of Great American Outpost: Dreamers, Mavericks and the Making of an Oil Frontier.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Why you’ve never heard of the six Chinese men who survived the Titanic”

That man would be one of six Chinese passengers who survived the Titanic, a little-known fact about the historic disaster that has largely remained untold or distorted, owing to a racially hostile environment toward Chinese people in the West at the turn of the 20th century.
For six Chinese passengers who survived the sinking, their ties to the Titanic have all but vanished.
The New Jersey native, who has lived in China for 22 years, had recently researched the Titanic and come across a brief mention of six Chinese survivors.
The invisibility of the six Chinese survivors is such that, even in China, Jones and Schwankert find themselves telling people: Yes, there were Chinese passengers on the Titanic.
A still from “The Six,” an upcoming documentary about the little-known Chinese survivors of the Titanic.
How the eight men responded as the Titanic began taking on water may never be known.
Even after the Carpathia arrived in New York on April 18, 1912, the troubles for the six Chinese men were not over.
“The one dark spot is the fact that in the bottom of one lifeboat which left the Titanic were found, wedged beneath the seats, the bodies of two dead Chinese coolies and eight living ones,” the article stated.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Fresh Air: ‘Doing Harm’ By Maya Dusenbery”

Fresh Air: ‘Doing Harm’ By Maya Dusenbery : Shots – Health News Journalist Maya Dusenbery argues that medicine has a “Systemic and unconscious bias” against women that is rooted in “What doctors, regardless of their own gender, are learning in medical schools.”
We still don’t know that women are necessarily adequately represented in all areas of research, because the NIH looks at the aggregate numbers, and the outside analyses that have been done show that women are still a little bit underrepresented.
Even though women are usually included in most studies today, it’s still not the norm to really analyze results by gender to actually see if there are differences between men and women.
Women are included, but we’re still not getting the knowledge we need about ways that their symptoms or responses to treatment might differ from men.
On why some medicine affects men and women differently – and how that results in women receiving excessive doses of most drugs.
So there’s been a concerted effort to go back and compare women’s experiences to men’s, which has led to the knowledge that women are more likely to have what are considered to be atypical symptoms.
One study found it was younger women – so women under 55 – were seven times more likely than the average patient to be sent home mid-heart attack.
So conditions like autoimmune diseases that really are marked by these subjective symptoms of pain and fatigue, I think, are very easy to dismiss in women.

The orginal article.