Summary of “YouTube’s top creators are burning out and breaking down en masse”

Six days ago, Rubén “El Rubius” Gundersen, the third most popular YouTuber in the world with just under 30 million subscribers, turned on his camera to talk to his viewers about the fear of an impending breakdown and his decision to take a break from YouTube.
Lately it seems like more of YouTube’s top creators are coming forward with their mental health problems.
“I’ve often talked about the pressures of being a YouTuber and it’s a tricky thing to talk about because to find success on YouTube is to live the dream,” Neistat said.
The pull of the YouTube “Schedule” The backlash to YouTubers and Twitch streamers who publicly take time away from the spotlight shows its face in almost any comments section about mental health and creators.
Their fans are mostly supportive, telling their favorite creators to take time and work on their mental health, but most people who don’t keep up with the day-to-day uploads or aren’t as tuned in to YouTube culture have trouble sympathizing.
What YouTube is doing about burnout YouTubers make almost all of their money from AdSense on YouTube, and projects or merchandise related to YouTube.
“It’s really frustrating to be a creator on YouTube because we don’t really know what’s going on,” PewDiePie said in a video about demonetization and views suppression.
YouTube offers no clear support system for creators, nor is it clear if the company has offered professional help to some of its top creators who’ve made their burnout public.

The orginal article.

Summary of “We are more than our brains: on neuroscience and being human”

The mystique is expressed in multiple forms, ranging from ubiquitous depictions of supernatural, ultra-sophisticated brains in science fiction and the popular media to more sober, scientifically supported conceptions of cognitive function that emphasise inorganic qualities or confine mental processes to neural structures.
Brains are undoubtedly somewhat computer-like – computers, after all, were invented to perform brain-like functions – but brains are also much more than bundles of wiry neurons and the electrical impulses they are famous for propagating.
Another remarkable study showed that transplantation of human glial cells into mouse brains boosted the animals’ performance in learning tests, again demonstrating the importance of glia in shaping brain function.
Some of the most perspicacious animals are the corvids – crows, ravens, and rooks – which have brains less than 1 per cent the size of a human brain, but still perform feats of cognition comparable to chimpanzees and gorillas.
The more we feel that our brains encapsulate our essence, the less sensitive we’ll be to the role of environment.
The most extreme direction in futuristic brain technology is the drive to achieve immortality through the postmortem preservation of human brains.
The more we feel that our brains encapsulate our essence as individuals, and the more we believe that our thoughts and actions simply emanate from the bundle of flesh in our heads, the less sensitive we will be to the role of the society and environment around us, and the less we will do to nurture our shared culture and resources – whether in the context of criminal behaviour, creativity, mental illness or any other aspect of human life.
We must realise that we are much more than our brains.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Why do the temperamentally blessed sail through life’s storms?”

Soon before Schaefer arrived at Duke University in North Carolina, his advisor, the psychologist Terrie Moffitt, published a paper showing that when people are assessed regularly for mental-health problems, their incidence of common mental illnesses was far higher than previous estimates.
The discovery that mental illness was far more the rule than the exception made Schaefer more eager to understand who the remaining 17 per cent of the population were – what was it about their approach to life that preserved their mental health? He presumed, at first, that people who’d been born to wealthy parents or who’d maintained good physical health might end up in the temperamentally blessed group, since poverty and ill health are clear harbingers of mental disorder.
Unsurprisingly, the temperamentally blessed in Schaefer’s study tended to be people whose first-degree relatives were never diagnosed with mental illness, suggesting that their ongoing buoyancy was, at least in part, genetic.
Is complete freedom from mental disorder the unalloyed triumph it first seems? To be sure, severe mental disorders such as schizophrenia and psychosis have very little adaptive value at all.
In a society where mental disturbance is endlessly pathologised, it’s easy to conclude that the pinnacle of mental health is the absence of illness.
Even-keeled they might be, the temperamentally blessed don’t score much higher on life-satisfaction scales than those who are not as blessed.
So while the temperamentally blessed might not have the same access to transformation that arises through emotional trauma, they can still engage full-tilt in the project of building out the self to make it whole.
Schaefer’s research reveals that mental disorders are exceedingly common and often transient, a finding he hopes will reduce the stigma surrounding mental illness.

The orginal article.

Summary of “The unique way the Dutch treat mentally ill prisoners”

About 124 men and 36 women live here, separate from the general prison population.
In countries like the UK and US, prisoners with mental health conditions often end up in the general prison population.
I’m visiting Zwolle prison to understand what effect this segmentation has – and to what extent it helps those who are mentally unwell.
My main focus is on how it affects women, following my in-depth piece last week looking at women with mental health issues in prisons.
Although the Netherlands has seen dramatically declining prison populations year on year, with 19 prisons recently closed, van Koningsveld explains that this is largely because of electronic ankle bracelets and an increase in community sentencing.
For psychiatric patients, particularly women, prison populations are actually increasing.
Still, one weak point that the Dutch system shares with prisons elsewhere is that it was developed largely with men in mind.
In Zwolle, Verbruggen says that isn’t the case – at least not when they enter prison.

The orginal article.

Summary of “The 10 habits of mentally strong people”

When hard times hit, people with mental strength suffer just as much as everyone else.
If you aren’t doing the following things on a regular basis, you should be, for these are the habits that mentally strong people rely on.
People with mental strength know that results only materialize when you put in the time and forego instant gratification.
In a recent study at the College of William and Mary, researchers interviewed over 800 entrepreneurs and found that the most successful among them tend to have two critical things in common: they’re terrible at imagining failure and they tend not to care what other people think of them.
It’s easy to let the looming challenge paralyze you, but the most successful people know that in these moments, the best thing they can do is to get started right away.
People with mental strength believe in themselves no matter what, and they stay the course until they win people over to their ways of thinking.
The more people with mental strength are challenged, the more they dig in and welcome that challenge, and numbers and details are no exception to this.
People with mental strength don’t allow others to walk all over them, but that doesn’t mean they’re rude to them, either.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Parkland students: our manifesto to change America’s gun laws”

We cannot stand idly by as the country continues to be infected by a plague of gun violence that seeps into community after community, and does irreparable damage to the hearts and minds of the American people.
We believe federal and state governments must put these in place to ensure that mass shootings and gun violence cease to be a staple of American culture.
Just as the department of motor vehicles has a database of license plates and car owners, the Department of Defense should have a database of gun serial numbers and gun owners.
This data should be paired with infractions of gun laws, past criminal offenses and the status of the gun owner’s mental health and physical capability.
Thanks to loopholes, people who otherwise wouldn’t be able to buy firearms are able to purchase them at gun shows and secondhand sales.
If we are serious about preventing people from purchasing deadly weapons, we must monitor sales that take place at gun shows and on secondhand markets.
Allow the CDC to make recommendations for gun reform.
The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention should be allowed to conduct research on the dangers of gun violence.

The orginal article.

Summary of “6 Must-Read Books That Will Unlock Your Inner Mental Strength”

What are the best books to read for mental strength? originally appeared on Quora – the place to gain and share knowledge, empowering people to learn from others and better understand the world.
There are no quick fixes or easy hacks for mental strength.
Over the years, I’ve picked up a number of great books about the mental game, the mind-body connection, and the secrets of learning new skills.
I’ve grouped the first three books together because they all reflect on the same aspects of the mental game-the connection between your conscious mind, your subconscious, and your performance.
One of the most interesting points Ericsson makes is about mental representations.
As people increase their skill levels, they begin to see things differently, breaking representations of physical objects into different “Chunks.” They recognize patterns and develop much more sophisticated mental representations.
If you’re interested in the mental game for personal or professional reasons, each of these books is useful in it’s own way.
Your mental effort is meant to change your behaviors, which in turn, helps you reach your goals and build your mental strength.

The orginal article.

Summary of “How Your Phone Can Keep You from Getting Depressed”

Now Picard, who heads a program on affective computing at the Media Lab, is at the forefront of a radical new idea: that your emotional state can be objectively measured using wearable devices or by tracking patterns in the way you type and talk on your mobile phone.
Picard is working on a system that will send people alerts about moods that are on the way, like a gathering storm - along with suggestions for ways to intervene.
“I’ll glance at my phone and it says: ’40 percent chance your stress is going to be higher, 20 percent chance you’re going to be sick, 40 percent chance your mood is going to drop,'” Picard says.
Picard makes a bold claim about the potential of the technology: she thinks most of the depression that people experience can eventually be prevented.
Mobile phones may be part of the problem, Picard says, but they also can be part of the solution.
The app will allow researchers to use the phone’s microphones, keyboards, and location functionality to measure how quickly people respond to text messages, how fast or slow they type, the force with which they hit the keys, and their patterns of late-night texting and browsing.
Detecting extrovertsIn addition to smart phones, Picard’s group at the Media Lab adds another tool: wristbands with built-in sensors that can measure temperature, physical activity, and skin conductance - the strength of electrical signals in the skin.
In 2013, Picard’s group began the Snapshot study, which tracks MIT undergraduates using smartphone apps and the wristbands to gather a variety of data and correlate it with other measures of mental and emotional status.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Rethinking Discipline”

What is self-discipline? I think everyone has at least a hazy picture of what it means to be self-disciplined.
The idea is still very speculative, but here it is: at any moment, there are mental habit patterns that are compelling you to engage in some kind of action.
In addition to these mental habit patterns, there’s a broader quality of attention.
The third is that knowledge of time is itself a feedback signal that influences our habits.
The only thing modulating behavior is the relative strength of different mental habits, and feedback from either the outside world or internal sensations, can trigger those habits with different intensities.
The third reason for willpower seeming like a resource is that one of the regulators of habits is itself a kind of knowledge of time.
The mental habit of taking mildly unpleasant conditions and making them seem excruciatingly unbearable if they are imagined to persist for a long period of time is quite a strong one.
To “Use” a mental habit is to engage in it in any way.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Are you sleepwalking now? What we know about mind-wandering”

If we are only ever partly aware of what is happening in our own minds, surely we can’t be in absolute command of our thoughts, let alone causing them? Is it ever possible to distinguish mental actions, which we can direct and select, from the more general category of mental events, which simply happen to us? In what sense are we ever genuinely mental agents, capable of acting freely, as opposed to being buffeted by forces beyond our control?
The self might not be a Cartesian agent that causes thought or action, but perhaps there are other ways for the organism as a whole to shape what happens in its mental life.
Perhaps mental autonomy plays no real causal role in our thought processes.
Even high-level cognitive control might be just another form of mental sleepwalking.
Mindfulness practice can sometimes lead to a crystal-clear and silent mind that is not clouded by thoughts at all, the pure conscious experience of mental autonomy as such that arises without actually exerting control.
Every spontaneously occurring ‘task-unrelated’ mental event is a potential task in itself, a cognitive affordance, a dynamic state that has the potential to be selected and transformed from unintentional mental behaviour into something subjectively experienced as full-blown mental action.
What we need is an evidence-based, differentiated picture that is open for future discoveries, perhaps leading us to the insight that even the highest degree of mental autonomy is still a form of unintentional mental behaviour – without ultimate origination, but adding in veto-control, flexibility and context-sensitivity.
Given what we know to date, should we eliminate the concept of ‘mental action’ altogether, and become selflessly observing Radical Neuro-Buddhists? An alternative philosophical role model would be the ‘Romantic Revisionist’.

The orginal article.