Summary of “Jackie MacMullan on OCD ADHD medication and marijuana in NBA mental health”

The state of mental health in the NBA Mental health in the NBA’s black community To medicate or not? A difficult decision Behind the anxiety and anger of an NBA ref The future of mental health in the NBA. Eight times.
By middle school, Larkin’s symptoms were worsening, so his mother found him a mental health professional, who recommended an antidepressant medication to help him cope.
“I’m not depressed,” Larkin said to his mother.”Am I?”. He tried the pills. They helped alleviate some of his OCD symptoms, but he says they also robbed him of his drive and his energy, qualities that separated him as a budding basketball star.”The medication flat-lined me,” Larkin says.
The stigma of mental health is one thing; that stigma increases tenfold when their peers discover they’re on “Meds.” It’s a gamble that some players don’t believe is worth taking, because it could affect their ability to be employed by a skeptical coach or general manager.”I’ve been on and off medication my whole life,” explains one NBA star, who debated identifying himself for this story but ultimately chose to remain anonymous.
“I’d like to think it doesn’t matter, but I’m not sure that’s true when free agency comes around. I’m choosing to keep my life private because I don’t need the s– on social media. It’s hard enough already.”.”DR. WILLIAM PARHAM, the Los Angeles-based psychologist who was hired by the players’ union to oversee the growing mental health crisis in the NBA, acknowledges some mental health issues may require medication.
“But too often, medication is treating the symptoms, not the real issues,” Parham says. While the population of NBA players with OCD is minuscule, the debate over medication also pertains to anxiety, depression and attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, or ADHD, which, according to John Lucas, the Houston Rockets assistant coach who runs a wellness and aftercare substance-abuse recovery program for athletes, is rampant in the NBA.”I have so many guys from the NBA who were put on ADHD medication, and they didn’t want to be on it,” Lucas says.
Since Sanders’ suspension, the NBA has shored up its mental health policy and sent an internal memo to all of its teams on May 31 with suggested guidelines that include: securing the player’s privacy regarding his mental health; retaining a professional with experience in clinical mental health issues; identifying a psychiatrist who will be readily available to players; and providing mental health awareness materials to the team.
“We need to create a nonjudgmental space where there is no place for the opinion that your way of thinking is better than everyone else’s. If a player is self-medicating because that’s what makes them feel better, or at least that’s what they think, we have to find a way to provide them alternatives that are collaborative and confidential.”. Lucas says it’s imperative for NBA personnel to do a better job of identifying players with mental health issues sooner and to be more proactive in convincing them to seek counseling.”The guy who’s on a road trip and isolates himself is the one suffering from depression,” Lucas says.

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Summary of “Horrific deaths, brutal treatment: Mental illness in America’s jails”

The Pilot and students from Marquette University in Milwaukee tracked 404 deaths since 2010 in what experts say is the most comprehensive effort to examine what happens to people with mental illness in jails throughout the country.
Examining how people with mental illness die in jail is key to understanding how the criminal justice system treats them in the United States, said Elizabeth Sinclair, director of research and public affairs for the Treatment Advocacy Center, a mental health advocacy group based in Arlington.
“It is not at all a coincidence that the only illness discriminated from Medicaid funding is mental illness and that there are so many mentally ill in jails,” said Snook, the Treatment Advocacy Center director.
The mental health system has nothing to offer, social support systems have nothing to offer,” said Laura Usher, a mental health advocate and the former senior manager for criminal justice and advocacy at the National Alliance on Mental Illness.
Texas provided a list of 55 deaths of people with mental illness in state jails.
New management has worked hard to prevent more deaths in the jail and to care for people with mental illness housed there.
Usher, who has worked with many people struggling with mental illness through the National Alliance on Mental Illness, said that families are usually trying to help and are desperate to find services.
The deaths of inmates with mental illness in America’s jails are bound to continue.

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Summary of “‘I Don’t Want To Be Here'”

Known as Laura’s Law, the bill allows courts to order what’s known as assisted outpatient treatment to people with severe mental illness if they meet specific criteria, including previous hospitalizations or arrests, being noncompliant with outpatient treatment, and becoming dangerous to themselves or others.
Misty had run-ins with the police and was taken to hospital, but did not receive the intensive treatment she needed.
For the first time in nearly a decade, Misty was stable, on medication and participating in treatment.
The bill formed the basis of much of the psychiatric legislation for the rest of the USA. What resulted wasn’t just a shift away from long-term psychiatric hospitalization, but also towards giving patients greater control over their own treatment, including the decision whether to receive treatment at all.
In the aftermath of her experience, Cutler started a group called Southern California Against Forced Treatment, which argues against Laura’s Law and any kind of forced psychiatric treatment.
She points to what she calls psychiatry’s double standard: “When I said I didn’t want to be locked up, when I said I didn’t want treatment, it was instantly, ‘Oh, wow, she’s so sick that she doesn’t even have insight into her own need for treatment,'” Cutler says.
“With any other issue that someone might have, if they don’t want a certain type of help for it, or they don’t want to take a certain type of action, we don’t use that, usually, to further justify, ‘Well look, they really need the treatment now, and we can really force it on them.'”.
In North Carolina, Duke University psychiatrist Marvin Swartz randomized individuals who met AOT criteria to receive either AOT or what he termed “Assertive community treatment”, the Cadillac of public outpatient treatment, consisting of social services, including help with housing, food and transportation, as well as psychological and psychiatric services.

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Summary of “YouTube’s top creators are burning out and breaking down en masse”

Six days ago, RubĂ©n “El Rubius” Gundersen, the third most popular YouTuber in the world with just under 30 million subscribers, turned on his camera to talk to his viewers about the fear of an impending breakdown and his decision to take a break from YouTube.
Lately it seems like more of YouTube’s top creators are coming forward with their mental health problems.
“I’ve often talked about the pressures of being a YouTuber and it’s a tricky thing to talk about because to find success on YouTube is to live the dream,” Neistat said.
The pull of the YouTube “Schedule” The backlash to YouTubers and Twitch streamers who publicly take time away from the spotlight shows its face in almost any comments section about mental health and creators.
Their fans are mostly supportive, telling their favorite creators to take time and work on their mental health, but most people who don’t keep up with the day-to-day uploads or aren’t as tuned in to YouTube culture have trouble sympathizing.
What YouTube is doing about burnout YouTubers make almost all of their money from AdSense on YouTube, and projects or merchandise related to YouTube.
“It’s really frustrating to be a creator on YouTube because we don’t really know what’s going on,” PewDiePie said in a video about demonetization and views suppression.
YouTube offers no clear support system for creators, nor is it clear if the company has offered professional help to some of its top creators who’ve made their burnout public.

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Summary of “We are more than our brains: on neuroscience and being human”

The mystique is expressed in multiple forms, ranging from ubiquitous depictions of supernatural, ultra-sophisticated brains in science fiction and the popular media to more sober, scientifically supported conceptions of cognitive function that emphasise inorganic qualities or confine mental processes to neural structures.
Brains are undoubtedly somewhat computer-like – computers, after all, were invented to perform brain-like functions – but brains are also much more than bundles of wiry neurons and the electrical impulses they are famous for propagating.
Another remarkable study showed that transplantation of human glial cells into mouse brains boosted the animals’ performance in learning tests, again demonstrating the importance of glia in shaping brain function.
Some of the most perspicacious animals are the corvids – crows, ravens, and rooks – which have brains less than 1 per cent the size of a human brain, but still perform feats of cognition comparable to chimpanzees and gorillas.
The more we feel that our brains encapsulate our essence, the less sensitive we’ll be to the role of environment.
The most extreme direction in futuristic brain technology is the drive to achieve immortality through the postmortem preservation of human brains.
The more we feel that our brains encapsulate our essence as individuals, and the more we believe that our thoughts and actions simply emanate from the bundle of flesh in our heads, the less sensitive we will be to the role of the society and environment around us, and the less we will do to nurture our shared culture and resources – whether in the context of criminal behaviour, creativity, mental illness or any other aspect of human life.
We must realise that we are much more than our brains.

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Summary of “Why do the temperamentally blessed sail through life’s storms?”

Soon before Schaefer arrived at Duke University in North Carolina, his advisor, the psychologist Terrie Moffitt, published a paper showing that when people are assessed regularly for mental-health problems, their incidence of common mental illnesses was far higher than previous estimates.
The discovery that mental illness was far more the rule than the exception made Schaefer more eager to understand who the remaining 17 per cent of the population were – what was it about their approach to life that preserved their mental health? He presumed, at first, that people who’d been born to wealthy parents or who’d maintained good physical health might end up in the temperamentally blessed group, since poverty and ill health are clear harbingers of mental disorder.
Unsurprisingly, the temperamentally blessed in Schaefer’s study tended to be people whose first-degree relatives were never diagnosed with mental illness, suggesting that their ongoing buoyancy was, at least in part, genetic.
Is complete freedom from mental disorder the unalloyed triumph it first seems? To be sure, severe mental disorders such as schizophrenia and psychosis have very little adaptive value at all.
In a society where mental disturbance is endlessly pathologised, it’s easy to conclude that the pinnacle of mental health is the absence of illness.
Even-keeled they might be, the temperamentally blessed don’t score much higher on life-satisfaction scales than those who are not as blessed.
So while the temperamentally blessed might not have the same access to transformation that arises through emotional trauma, they can still engage full-tilt in the project of building out the self to make it whole.
Schaefer’s research reveals that mental disorders are exceedingly common and often transient, a finding he hopes will reduce the stigma surrounding mental illness.

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Summary of “The unique way the Dutch treat mentally ill prisoners”

About 124 men and 36 women live here, separate from the general prison population.
In countries like the UK and US, prisoners with mental health conditions often end up in the general prison population.
I’m visiting Zwolle prison to understand what effect this segmentation has – and to what extent it helps those who are mentally unwell.
My main focus is on how it affects women, following my in-depth piece last week looking at women with mental health issues in prisons.
Although the Netherlands has seen dramatically declining prison populations year on year, with 19 prisons recently closed, van Koningsveld explains that this is largely because of electronic ankle bracelets and an increase in community sentencing.
For psychiatric patients, particularly women, prison populations are actually increasing.
Still, one weak point that the Dutch system shares with prisons elsewhere is that it was developed largely with men in mind.
In Zwolle, Verbruggen says that isn’t the case – at least not when they enter prison.

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Summary of “The 10 habits of mentally strong people”

When hard times hit, people with mental strength suffer just as much as everyone else.
If you aren’t doing the following things on a regular basis, you should be, for these are the habits that mentally strong people rely on.
People with mental strength know that results only materialize when you put in the time and forego instant gratification.
In a recent study at the College of William and Mary, researchers interviewed over 800 entrepreneurs and found that the most successful among them tend to have two critical things in common: they’re terrible at imagining failure and they tend not to care what other people think of them.
It’s easy to let the looming challenge paralyze you, but the most successful people know that in these moments, the best thing they can do is to get started right away.
People with mental strength believe in themselves no matter what, and they stay the course until they win people over to their ways of thinking.
The more people with mental strength are challenged, the more they dig in and welcome that challenge, and numbers and details are no exception to this.
People with mental strength don’t allow others to walk all over them, but that doesn’t mean they’re rude to them, either.

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Summary of “Parkland students: our manifesto to change America’s gun laws”

We cannot stand idly by as the country continues to be infected by a plague of gun violence that seeps into community after community, and does irreparable damage to the hearts and minds of the American people.
We believe federal and state governments must put these in place to ensure that mass shootings and gun violence cease to be a staple of American culture.
Just as the department of motor vehicles has a database of license plates and car owners, the Department of Defense should have a database of gun serial numbers and gun owners.
This data should be paired with infractions of gun laws, past criminal offenses and the status of the gun owner’s mental health and physical capability.
Thanks to loopholes, people who otherwise wouldn’t be able to buy firearms are able to purchase them at gun shows and secondhand sales.
If we are serious about preventing people from purchasing deadly weapons, we must monitor sales that take place at gun shows and on secondhand markets.
Allow the CDC to make recommendations for gun reform.
The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention should be allowed to conduct research on the dangers of gun violence.

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Summary of “6 Must-Read Books That Will Unlock Your Inner Mental Strength”

What are the best books to read for mental strength? originally appeared on Quora – the place to gain and share knowledge, empowering people to learn from others and better understand the world.
There are no quick fixes or easy hacks for mental strength.
Over the years, I’ve picked up a number of great books about the mental game, the mind-body connection, and the secrets of learning new skills.
I’ve grouped the first three books together because they all reflect on the same aspects of the mental game-the connection between your conscious mind, your subconscious, and your performance.
One of the most interesting points Ericsson makes is about mental representations.
As people increase their skill levels, they begin to see things differently, breaking representations of physical objects into different “Chunks.” They recognize patterns and develop much more sophisticated mental representations.
If you’re interested in the mental game for personal or professional reasons, each of these books is useful in it’s own way.
Your mental effort is meant to change your behaviors, which in turn, helps you reach your goals and build your mental strength.

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