Summary of “How to Fly the World’s Best Business Class for Less Than Coach”

If you have airline miles or credit-card points that transfer to frequent-flier programs, they’re bookable for less than the cost of a coach seat.
Why you want to fly it: Back in March 2017, Qatar Airways Co. was the first airline to install suite-style seats with retractable doors in business class, when it introduced its innovative QSuites.
How to book it for less than coach: Redeeming miles through Qatar’s own Privilege Club frequent-flier program isn’t the best way to book a QSuite-not since the carrier raised award prices in May. Instead, pay for your seat with American Airlines Inc. AAdvantage miles, British Airways Avios, Cathay Pacific Asia Miles, or other OneWorld alliance currencies.
American Airlines Inc. might be the best of the bunch: It charges just 70,000 miles each way to fly business between the U.S. and Doha.
How to book it for less than coach: American AAdvantage miles are your best choice here.
How to book it for less than coach: United Airlines Inc.’s MileagePlus program is a transfer partner of Chase Ultimate Rewards; expect to pay 60,000 miles each way from the U.S. to Europe, or 70,000-75,000 miles to Asia, depending on where you are traveling to.
Why you want to fly it: They’re not brand-new-Air France-KLM SA’s Air France unit introduced its latest business class seats in 2014-but the carrier’s lie-flat, blue-white-and-red seats offer a truly French experience from gate to gate.
How to book it for less than coach: Singapore’s own KrisFlyer mileage program is by far the easiest way to book business class awards on the airline-though partners such as United and Air Canada have lately been offering some availability.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Tesla vs Waymo: who’s winning the race for self-driving cars”

Tesla is taking advantage of the hundreds of thousands of cars it has on the road by collecting real-world data about how those vehicles perform with Autopilot, its current semi-autonomous system.
Tesla is developing towards autonomy by using customer-owned cars to gather that all-important data.
As Tesla sells more cars, the amount of data that can be collected increases exponentially.
Tesla cars can log instances where the Autopilot software would have taken an action, and that data eventually gets uploaded back to Tesla.
Tesla has over 300,000 vehicles on the road around the world, and those cars are navigating far more diverse settings than Waymo – which is currently only in Texas, California, Michigan, Arizona, and Georgia.
Tesla has likely passed that mark by now in real-world miles, and yet its cars still aren’t able to fully drive themselves.
“Why has no one put sensors on their customer cars that collect data like Tesla has?”.
How will the company prove that it’s safe? Tesla does have its own small fleet of test cars registered with the California DMV, but they drove zero miles in 2017.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Why Michigan State’s Miles Bridges decided to return to college”

I want to talk to Bridges about how great he is, what wonderful things are ahead for him, but it is not long before he’s telling me about last November’s game against Kentucky at Madison Square Garden, the second game of his college career.
Want to know why Miles Bridges declined the NBA, you have to sit in a room with Tum, Josh and Xavier and ask them to tell you stories.
They have just come from a long practice, but I ask each to share a story that to them is the quintessential Miles Bridges story.
“One day, me, Tum and Miles – nobody in the gym. Coaches were gone and we’re just going to play one-on-one. It was our first time ever playing against each other. Summer. Wasn’t nobody there. And I knew Miles was good, but he won like four games straight. I’m like, ‘I got to step it up.'”.
Just like Miles used to do with his sister when he was a little kid, he keeps pushing them.
Miles is not a big trash-talker, they tell me, but that day he was on fire.
“The last thing I’ll say about Miles,” Tum adds: “Miles tells me he loves me every day. Every day. I’m not exaggerating. Every day.”
“Miles tells me he loves me every day. Every day. I’m not exaggerating.”

The orginal article.

Summary of “Inside Waymo’s Secret World for Training Self-Driving Cars”

They’ve tightly interwoven the millions of miles their cars have traveled on public roads with a “Structured testing” program they conduct at a secret base in the Central Valley they call Castle.
Not only is it fully autonomous, but it cannot be driven by the humans inside it, so they don’t want to get it mixed up with their other cars.
The spatial extent of Carcraft’s capabilities grew to include whole cities, the number of cars grew into a huge virtual fleet.
Cars act like cars, driving in their lanes, turning.
“Our cars see the world. They understand the world. And then for anything that is a dynamic actor in the environment-a car, a pedestrian, a cyclist, a motorcycle-our cars understand intent. It’s not enough to just track a thing through a space. You have to understand what it is doing,” Dmitri Dolgov, Waymo’s vice president of engineering, tells me.
Imagine, for a four-way stop, you might want to test the arrival times of the various cars and pedestrians and bicyclists, how long they stop for, how fast they are moving, and whatever else.
The power is that they mirror the real world in the ways that are significant to the self-driving car and allow it to get billions more miles than physical testing would allow.
Maybe that goes both ways, too: The deeper humans understand the cars, the deeper the cars understand humans.

The orginal article.

Summary of “The Majestic Marble Quarries of Northern Italy”

Over the centuries, the strange geology of the marble mountains has produced an equally strange human community – strange even by the standards of Italy’s fractious regional subcultures.
The people there live in white towns, breathing white dust, speaking their own dialects, nursing their own politics.
Although the tools of extraction have changed over the centuries – oxen and chisels have given way to tractors and diamond-toothed saws – the fact remains: Large pieces of white stone, cut and hauled to distant places, function as a sign of wealth and power.
Like gold, marble is a special form of embedded wealth, visually striking and deeply impractical.
Follow Italy’s marble, and you follow the major movements of global wealth in human history, from ancient Rome to Victorian London to 20th-century New York.Photo.
Today Italy’s marble tends to move farther than it did before – not just 200 miles to Rome or 700 miles to London but 3,000 miles to Abu Dhabi and 4,000 miles to Mumbai and 5,000 miles to Beijing.
The centers of wealth have shifted, as they always will, and the marble follows, as it always has.
The famous white stone is now used not in small batches for art but in bulk for huge building projects: mosques, palaces, malls, hotels.

The orginal article.