Summary of “Players who could change teams in offseason and why”

The 2018 offseason is shaping up to be a fascinating game of quarterback musical chairs.
During a typical offseason, we usually see about seven teams either replace their current passer or draft a player who they expect to eventually take over as their long-term quarterback.
Excluding the injuries that forced the Colts and Dolphins to make moves before the 2017 season, there were six teams – the 49ers, Bears, Browns, Chiefs, Jets and Texans – that dramatically changed their quarterback calculus this past offseason.
By the time this offseason is over, we could see as many as 11 teams change either their current or long-term QB1. And that’s assuming we don’t get any veteran retirements or teams like Kansas City trading up to grab a quarterback a year or two before anyone expected.
Teams will have to prepare to pursue multiple quarterbacks on several fronts and be willing to settle for their second or third choice.
Now, with Jimmy Garoppolo and Jared Goff both playing like stars, those teams are out of the quarterback market.
The Dolphins are in awful cap shape after making a series of terrible decisions this past offseason, but as a team that routinely offers players an additional year of guarantees, they might very well offer Cousins four or even five years of guaranteed upper-echelon quarterback money.
The departure of general manager John Dorsey shortly thereafter doesn’t change things, given that coach Andy Reid doesn’t have any qualms about trading away a quarterback.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Long Island Iced Tea Soars After Changing Its Name to Long Blockchain”

Long Island Iced Tea Corp. shares rose as much as 289 percent after the unprofitable Hicksville, New York-based company rebranded itself Long Blockchain Corp. It’s the latest in a near-daily phenomenon sweeping the stock market, where obscure microcap companies reorient to focus on some aspect of the mania sparked by bitcoin’s 1,500 percent rally this year.
Long Blockchain, whose business has been selling non-alcoholic beverages, says it will now seek to partner with or invest in companies that develop the decentralized ledgers known as blockchain, the technology that underpins bitcoin.
Long Blockchain’s shares may be benefiting from the announcement, but so far the company has little to show for its aspirations.
Eric J. Watson is the largest shareholder of Long Island Iced Tea Corp. with more than 13 percent of outstanding shares, according to U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission filings.
In conjunction with the change in focus, the company canceled a planned share sale.
Long Island Iced Tea, the product of a 2015 merger with Cullen Agricultural Holding Corp., has been funding operations through a combination of equity and debt sales.
Long Island Iced Tea had a net loss of $3.9 million on sales of $1.6 million in the three months ended Sept. 30.
These “Sorts of companies that go up the course of five or 10 times in one day just because they say that they’re a blockchain company now,” Nations said.

The orginal article.

Summary of “The Miami Marlins’ Giancarlo Stanton Trade Is a Baseball Disgrace”

On Saturday morning, the Marlins reached an agreement to trade Giancarlo Stanton – or more accurately, trade a reported $265 million of his contract – to the New York Yankees for second baseman Starlin Castro and prospects Jorge Guzman and Jose Devers.
At a time when good relief pitchers can net teams multiple top-100 prospects, the Marlins have ripped their team up by the roots to trade Stanton, and received only two underwhelming prospects in return, along with Castro, an OK big league second baseman, who will no doubt soon be traded himself, because he’s due almost $24 million over the next two years, and the Marlins brass has promised investors that the team’s payroll will shrink from about $115 million last Opening Day-already in the bottom third of the MLB payroll rankings-to somewhere in the neighborhood of $55 million, which is about a third of the MLB median.
Miami is now without not only Stanton but Dee Gordon, sold to Seattle along with $1 million in international bonus money-the cheapest way for savvy teams to acquire talent-for a bag of magic beans.
Where’s the path back to the playoffs for Miami, particularly when they’re committed to running a payroll that wouldn’t keep the lights on in the NHL? There are situations in which the best thing a team can do for its own medium- and long-term competitive interest is rebuild.
Not only is that contrary to what we know about the Bruce Sherman-led investment group that bought the team in September-where should they spend that money if not on the NL MVP? Nor should we take at face value-or worse, repeat-claims that the Marlins can’t afford to keep Stanton.
Sherman has broken faith with the city that supports his franchise-and for all the jokes about Marlins Park being empty all the time, the team sold 1.65 million tickets last year, which was 27th in baseball but still actual millions-for the purpose of paying down some $400 million in debt resulting from the purchase of the team, and presumably selling the club for a profit when that’s done.
The baseball world should have known better than to greet Sherman’s purchase of the team as a relief.
Sherman, for all the immense consequence of his investments over the years, maintains a low public profile-his public persona is mostly his lack of a public persona-and is described as “Shy” and “Publicity-averse.” What a savvy strategy: If you’re making billions torching newspapers and baseball teams, why would you want publicity?

The orginal article.

Summary of “The NBA Trades That Need to Happen”

On December 15, NBA teams can officially trade almost anyone signed from last summer.
Why not add a Trade Machine wrinkle that allows us to turn off every “Recently signed” restriction and create fake trades for 365 days a year? Because ESPN hates us! I thought you knew!
Without further ado, a handful of NBA Trades That Need To Happen.
The Inevitable DeAndre Jordan Trade In case you missed it, the Clippers need to trade DeAndre Jordan because he’s opting out of his deal next summer, the Clippers are the Clippers again, Doc Rivers is like The Thing That Wouldn’t Leave.
VERDICT: Don’t you love when NBA teams trade salary-cap VD for salary cap anal warts? Bonus points because the numbers add up to $24.4 million exactly, Noah might actually retire over having to live in Memphis, and I like the thought of Page Six chipping in knowing it would make the money back on Parsons gossip.
This fake trade can’t happen until right before February’s deadline because Stauskas just got traded.
We learned from Chicago and OKC in 2012, Indiana in 2013 and the Clippers in 2014 that your NBA title window can end in one play, one trade, one strategy shift or one stupefying collapse that’s fueled by an insane barrage of Corey Brewer/Josh Smith 3s. YOU NEVER KNOW. 4.
It’s a sports column based on fake trades that will almost definitely never happen.

The orginal article.

Summary of “As Silicon Valley Gets ‘Crazy,’ Midwest Beckons Tech Investors”

More than 50 percent of all venture capital money spent in the United States goes to companies in California alone, according to the National Venture Capital Association.
Focusing on the Midwest is no longer considered a nutty idea, as it was by skeptical West Coast venture capitalists when Mr. Kvamme and Chris Olsen, another Silicon Valley transplant from Sequoia Capital and co-founder of Drive Capital, made the move in 2013.Every major Midwestern city now has clusters of start-up accelerators and incubators, typically housed in renovated red-brick industrial buildings.
Local entrepreneurs and big investors are scouting the Midwest for start-up investments that range up to tens of millions of dollars, far more than local angel and venture investors.
They are beginning to attract venture capital from Silicon Valley for follow-on rounds of funding.
Today, three-quarters of all venture capital invested in America goes to California, New York and Massachusetts, the National Venture Capital Association estimated.
“One with an abundance of capital and opportunity – in Silicon Valley and pockets around the nation. But not in the other America, and that other America is most of the country.”
Drive Capital spotted the company, led the early financing and has since been joined by Bay Area investors including Khosla Ventures and Silicon Valley Bank.In Ohio, that $35 million is the equivalent of $70 million in the Valley in terms of being able to hire talent and sustain operating costs, said Sean Lane, CrossChx’s co-founder and chief executive.
“And if two guys from Silicon Valley and Sequoia can’t do it,” Mr. Olsen said, “Capital isn’t going to come here.”

The orginal article.

Summary of “Fashion Startups Aspire To Be The Anti-Bonobos”

Remember when Nasty Gal and Bonobos were the darlings of the e-commerce universe and the envy of fashion startups everywhere? After everything that has happened to them over the last year, those days seem very far away.
Consumers loved these brands, as did the investors who lined up to fund the companies’ growth.
A new flock of fashion brands like Mizzen + Main, Allbirds, Ministry of Supply, and many others-Dunn created a whole encyclopedia of them-followed this approach very closely.
“We watched these brands explode and we wanted to be just like them,” says Sasha Koehn, who cofounded menswear brand Buck Mason in 2014.
The enormous valuations mean that the brands suddenly had to scale very quickly, which generally means no longer serving the needs of the customer originally drawn to the brand, but creating a blander product and brand experience that will appeal to a much wider segment of the market.
“The reason the brand was a hit was that it had such a distinct point of view,” says Kaitlyn Nagy, who joined Nasty Gal in 2012 as the head of PR and witnessed the company’s unraveling firsthand.
They’re ditching the Nasty Gal and Bonobos playbook, and looking to brands like Patagonia and Eileen Fisher as examples.
After a stellar first year, the brand grew 150% a year for three years straight, until they hit $5 million in annual revenue.

The orginal article.

Summary of “The Case Of Wilbur Ross’ Phantom $2 Billion”

Fresh off a tour through Thailand, Laos and China, United States Secretary of Commerce Wilbur Ross Jr. picked up the phone on a Sunday afternoon in October to discuss something deeply personal: how much money he has.
A year earlier, Forbes had listed his net worth at $2.9 billion on The Forbes 400, a number Ross claimed was far too low: He maintained he was closer to $3.7 billion.
So began the mystery of Wilbur Ross’ missing $2 billion.
Three years later, Storper alleged in a lawsuit that the firm sent him inaccurate financial information after his departure and that Wilbur Ross stole his interests outright.
A few years earlier, a vice chairman of WL Ross sued Wilbur Ross for more than $20 million, alleging that Ross tried to cut him out of interest and fees he had been promised.
Last year, Ross’ assistant claimed $3.7 billion; we stuck with $2.9 billion.
If Ross had owned $2 billion of additional assets before the election, wouldn’t they have produced income that he was required to disclose, even if he no longer owned the assets? And why would someone apparently transfer $2 billion to his family, thereby triggering more than $800 million in gift taxes, especially with a president in the White House who was prepared to eliminate the estate tax and therefore much of the cost of transferring fortunes to later generations?
The only problem with that statement: The person who told Forbes that the transfer had taken place, that it had happened after the election and that it had meant more than $2 billion of family assets weren’t on the disclosure was none other than the sitting secretary of commerce, Wilbur Ross..

The orginal article.

Summary of “Got $1 million to retire? Here’s how long it will last, by U.S. state”

If your vision for retirement was basking in a tropical paradise, let’s hope your vision of tropical paradise resembles something more like Mississippi and less like Hawaii.
Data analysis site HowMuch analyzed how far $1 million goes in retirement in every U.S. state.
HowMuch crunched the numbers based on the Cost of Living Index for Q2 of 2017 as well as average annual expenditure of persons with 65 years and above.
1 million would allow the average retired person in Missouri to live for 25 years and 6 months.
1 million only gets you 13 years and 1 month of retirement in Hawaii.
State How long $1 million lasts in retirement Mississippi 25 years, 6 months Arkansas 25 years Tennessee 24 years, 5 months Kansas 24 years, 5 months Oklahoma 24 years, 4 months.
State How long $1 million lasts in retirement Hawaii 13 years, 1 month District of Columbia 14 years, 2 months California 15 years Oregon 16 years, 7 months New York 16 years, 7 months.
Seniors who are currently collecting Social Security checks are getting a boost in their payments, and it’s the biggest increase in six years.

The orginal article.

Summary of “What Sophia Amoruso Learned From Nasty Gal’s Bankruptcy”

In 2006, Sophia Amoruso started Nasty Gal and was met with huge success.
Amoruso had an estimated net worth of $280 million, enough to earn her a spot on Forbes’ list of the Richest Self-Made Women, where she was one of the youngest members.
“It was the day Trump was elected,” recalls Amoruso, now 32, speaking at the Forbes 30 Under 30 Summit in Boston Tuesday.
Amoruso hosts conferences she calls Girlboss Rallys and there was even a Netflix series based on her life.
“We are exploring the concept of what success means,” says Amoruso.
The pains of the last year still fresh, Amoruso is already thinking hard about what future success will look like for herself and others.
“You don’t get what you don’t ask for.” Amoruso recommends tools like Boomerang, a G-mail app the resurfaces e-mails when recipients haven’t responded.
“Asking and asking again and asking again goes really far.” “Being naive is a really really beautiful thing. You can accomplish so much.” “Focus on less things and be great at those things.” Focus can be hard, especially when you are a creative person with lots of ideas.

The orginal article.

Summary of “TV Series Budgets Hit the Breaking Point as Costs Skyrocket in Peak TV Era – Variety”

Now $20 million seems the logical extension of where Netflix and its many competitors are headed; HBO isn’t that far away with its budget-busting hit “Game of Thrones,” which will see the price of its final episodes run $15 million apiece.
At a moment when the television industry is grappling with a massive increase in the number of shows being produced, the ripple effects of Peak TV are surfacing in virtually every line item in a typical TV series budget.
The estimates on the cost of content that emerged from these interviews peg the typical range of the production budget for high-end cable and streaming dramas at $5 million-$7 million an hour, while single-camera half hours on broadcast and cable run from $1.5 million to more than $3 million.
With the exception of HBO, which made its mark with lavish productions, that’s a significant increase, during just the past five years, over what had been $3 million-$4 million for cable dramas and around $1 million-$1.5 million for single-camera half hours.
Amazon is laying out $8 million on action drama “Jack Ryan” and $5 million per half hour for “The Tick,” the superhero comedy with lots of visual-effects shots that also films largely on location in pricey New York.
Apple is paying $2 million an episode for the CBS-produced “Carpool Karaoke” series, even for episodes that run far less than 30 minutes.
“On Netflix, [it costs] $5 million an episode. I made shows like that for years at the WB [Network] for $2 million an episode. It’s ‘interior high school,’ ‘interior home.’ There’s no rhyme or reason to what they’re paying.”
“We used to say, in TV, if you go $10,000 or $20,000 over budget, you get noticed. On the film side, you’ve got to go $10 million [over] to get noticed.”

The orginal article.