Summary of “How One Tiny-Home Designer Makes a Small Space Feel 10 Times Bigger”

Matt Impola was already living in a small space when he decided he would take on a new weekend project: his first-ever tiny home.
The most striking thing about Impola’s tiny homes is that they don’t immediately look.
Clearly Impola has picked up on plenty of ways to make even the smallest spaces feel much larger, and his advice can be applied to cramped apartments or even not-so-tiny homes.
“Motor homes and travel trailers can feel so temporary, especially when they use cheaper materials like vinyl and plastic, funky wallpapers, and all that,” says Impola.
Opt for High-Quality MaterialsThose aren’t the only elevated pieces Impola swears by.
“Everything’s got to be a bit scaled down, especially sofas,” says Impola.
Kondo Your Belongings”Especially in a kitchen, you’re not going to have room for a ton of extra stuff. It’s about choosing your favorite 10 to 20 dishes,” Impola says.
Impola advocates for more unexpected choices: “I do a lot of behind-the-scenes tricks with my loft floors,” he says.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Who Owns a Home in America, in 12 Charts”

Though more than 100 million Americans rent, they’re outnumbered two-to-one by Americans who own their own home, according to data from the U.S. Census.
The populations of homeowners and renters aren’t flat across the U.S. There’s one major group of Americans who are more likely to rent than own: people in their 20s. Adults older than 30 are more likely to live in homes they own rather than rent, a likelihood that increases as they get older.
In 1980, for example, young-adult Baby Boomers were much more likely to own a home than today’s young-adult Millennials.
The trend of Americans renting in their 20s also holds steady when controlling for other factors that affect homeownership.
Residents of cities are much more likely than rural Americans to rent, regardless of their age.
Lower-income Americans are much more likely to rent than wealthier Americans.
The median household income for black Americans is less than $40,000 per year, compared to more than $60,000 for white Americans.
Americans who marry in their early 20s-well below the country’s median age at first marriage of around 28 for men and 26 for women-are actually more likely to rent than their single brethren.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Why You Should Manage Your Energy, Not Your Time”

A workplace study found an average working professional experiences 87 interruptions per day, making it difficult to remain productive and focused for a full day.
Knowing something had to give, Congdon began to adjust her approach to work and restructured her day to achieve the same amount of output, without working around the clock.
The key to maintaining focus and energy in shorter bursts was to apply flexibility to those segments – she could use some for exercise, some for meditation, some for work.
Getting rest within her workday helped lower stress levels and therefore achieve better results within the allotted time for working, Congdon found.
While our culture may be pushing us towards working 24/7, Alex Soojung-Kim Pang, a Silcon Valley consultant and author of Rest: Why You Get More Done When You Work Less, believes this is not helping us to be more productive or to come up with creative solutions.
There are a number of approaches to mastering the art of deep work – be it lengthy retreats dedicated to a specific task; developing a daily ritual; or taking a ‘journalistic’ approach to seizing moments of deep work when you can throughout the day.
In the past, Justin Gignac, co-founder of freelance network Working Not Working, left little room in his routine to be lazy.
Now, he believes it is important to build time to kick back and let his brain think by itself, and is one of many successful people debunking the myth that working more equals working best.

The orginal article.

Summary of “The Surprising Reason People Change Their Minds”

Researchers at the Hebrew University of Jerusalem recently gave people statements like “I believe the internet makes people more sociable” or “I believe the internet makes people more isolated”.
There hadn’t been time for people to change their behaviour to adjust to the practicalities of the ban.
Today, general consensus is that it makes sense not to allow smoking inside hospitals – but before that ban became commonplace, some people felt otherwise.
Laurin’s team found that just a couple of days after his inauguration, those same people felt more positively about him.
Even people who disliked Trump’s performance at the inauguration approved of him more after he was made president than they did before.
We do have to bear in mind that it wasn’t that people who couldn’t stand Trump decided they loved him when he took office – but they did start to dislike him a little less.
So it’s not that people simply become accustomed to a new situation.
We might rationalise the things that are hard to change, but once a critical mass gets behind a cause, people stop rationalising the status quo, feel they can make a difference because others are with them and begin campaigning for change.

The orginal article.

Summary of “The key to productivity is tapping into your flow state. Here’s how |”

Yes, you can experience the benefits that come with it more often, including being self-motivated, more productive, and more empowered, according to violinist and keynote speaker Diane Allen, who’s become an expert at helping people find their flow state.
Here’s how to gain awareness of your flow state and what you can do to tap into it more often.
One of the key indicators of being in flow state is losing a sense of time.
You may feel like you’re in the flow state during activities – like reading a book, binge-watching TV, or playing video games – because you lose all sense of time but they’re not the flow state, says Allen.
“The actual flow state is when you’re somehow active,” says Allen, pointing to activities like playing the violin, writing, playing tennis, or leading a meeting.
Allen recommends recreating the memories of when you were in flow state and examining them.
Allen worked with one client who found his flow state whenever he was racing bicycles.
As Allen says, “Being in the flow state brings out the best in all of us.”

The orginal article.

Summary of “Why the Covid-19 economy is devastating to millennials, in 14 charts”

A poll from the Pew Research Center conducted from April 7 to 12 found American millennials to be the most pessimistic of any age group about the future of the economy.
Given the high – and growing – cost of college education, younger millennials found themselves needing to wait longer than older millennials to see those benefits.
This is true for millennials broadly, but even more true for millennials of color.
All of this adds to the economic stress millennials – particularly millennials of color – were already facing.
Millennials delayed home buying, which means they don’t have stable equity With fewer resources, millennials have delayed buying homes – again, assets that for older Americans provide some measure of economic security amid sudden downturns like those created by the pandemic.
A 2019 report by the National Association of Real Estate Brokers found that 16 percent of black millennials owned homes in 2017, compared to 46 percent of white millennials, 34 percent of Asian American millennials, and 29 percent of Latinx millennials.
Millennials never really recovered from the Great Recession – and this time is looking worse The Great Recession hit millennials really hard.
A 2018 study by the St. Louis Federal Reserve found that while older Americans recovered in the years following the recession, millennials continued to sustain economic losses, so much so that by 2016, the median wealth of a household headed by a millennial was 34 percent lower than historical models suggested it should have been.

The orginal article.

Summary of “If You Love Staying Up Late and Sleeping In, Doing Otherwise Might Actually Hurt Your Health”

Night owls might get a rap for staying up too late watching Netflix or getting lost in meme spirals on the web, but it’s not all fun and games.
Study after study shows the later you sleep and rise, the more likely you are to develop some serious health complications.
“We think,” says Knutson, “It is at least partly due to our biological clocks. We think the problem is that the night owls are forced to live in a more ‘lark’ world, where you have to get up early for work and start the day than their internal clocks want to. So it’s a mismatch between the internal clock and the external world, and it’s a problem in the long run.”
Messing with your preferred sleep schedule can drastically disrupt your circadian rhythms, which in turn can have severe, negative effects on your health.
We’re all feeling the effects of this, to some extent, no matter when we like to go to sleep; research indicates that modern humans are sleeping poorly thanks to artificial light, warmer temperatures, and stress, and scientists are working to understand what kind of impact this has on our health.
“We know what their preferred time to sleep is, but we have no idea what they were actually doing on a day-to-day basis,” says Knutson.
Genes play a significant role in governing your internal clock, so if you’re naturally attuned to sleeping at 3:00 a.m. and waking up at 11:00 a.m., your best bet would be to find a career and lifestyle where this is okay.
Of course, being a creature of the night isn’t all bad. Other studies have shown that the whole morning versus night person debate is really more of a proxy battle between organized and meticulous, or being expressive and imaginative: day-dwellers might be more focused on achieving goals and paying attention to details, but all-nighters tend to be more creative and open to new experiences.

The orginal article.

Summary of “I Read 50-Plus Books Every Year: Here’s How I Do It”

Over the past three years, I’ve read 174 books, and I’ve done it all while balancing a full-time job, extra hobbies, and what I consider to be just the right amount of a social life.
By the time a new year rolled around, I made it a goal to finish 50 books.
Are you hoping to finish more books in 2020? Follow these five tips I’ve picked up along the way.
Narrative style, structure, and your own taste all come into play to determine how long you’ll take to finish a book.
Though other voracious readers may keep up their pace by switching from book to book, I’ve found that sticking with one title at a time helps me to retain my focus and get through books faster.
Let’s face it-not every book is going to grip you in its first page or even its first chapter.
By publicly logging how many books I finished in a year, I found myself getting competitive with myself from month to month.
This is what I most often say to people when they ask me how I finish a considerable number of books per year: It’s something that I set out initially as a goal, which later became a habit.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Pay Attention: Practice Can Make Your Brain Better at Focusing”

Practicing paying attention can boost performance on a new task, and change the way the brain processes information, a 2017 study says.
The question is: which part of this attention equation is more important for learning, and how is it affected by practice? To find out, researchers led by Sirawaj Itthipuripat at the University of California, San Diego, subjected 12 research participants to the least entertaining computer game in the world, while measuring their brain activity.
The researchers suspect that this more automatic phase is the result of the brain fine-tuning what exactly it needs to pay attention to, basically switching over to a process that’s more like muting the volume on the rest of the orchestra.
For some of the sessions, the students were told where the contrast-boosted circle might appear, and to pay attention to that spot.
Turns out, the students got much better at picking out the correct, contrast-boosted circle after two or three days of training when they knew which part of the screen to pay attention to.
Itthipuripat suspects that this initial spike in activity accounts for the early gains in performance, when the brain is learning what to pay attention to.
Then as the task becomes more natural, another mechanism takes over that refines the pattern of brain activity that drives the task, cutting down on the neural background noise.
“The brain is still figuring out ways to make itself better.”

The orginal article.

Summary of “Baby Boomers’ retirement savings are running dry”

West Allis, just outside Milwaukee, was once the headquarters of the Allis-Chalmers Co., which manufactured industrial machinery, employed 31,000 unionized workers in Wisconsin and elsewhere, supported a solid standard of living for its workers for nearly eight decades, and paid them pensions when they retired.
Only about one-quarter of employed Americans work continuously through their 50s and their early 60s in jobs with benefits, according to a study by the Center for Retirement Research at Boston College.
“If older workers can’t work in high-contact areas,” said Teresa Ghilarducci, who studies aging and employment issues at the New School University in New York, “Employers will have to make accommodations for them.” That’s an expense.
That’s what befell Gregory Bates – and he’s only 61.Bates went to work for the local utility company in Milwaukee – now called WE Energies – when he was 18, as a file clerk, and, after four years in the Air Force, eventually worked his way up to budget analyst.
Just 40 percent of working Americans aged 55-64 participate in a job-related retirement plan, according to a Stanford University study.
With 401(k)s and other individual savings accounts, which collectively are more expensive to manage than a pension plan, each worker has to provide for an unknowable number of years in retirement.
Her son, who works for a company that makes environmentally friendly doors, works from home now and has had his hours cut back.
“The hardest part,” said his wife Tammy, 57, who is unable to work full-time because of a back injury she sustained while working in a dry cleaner’s, “Has been when you’re fighting the big medical bills, even though you have insurance – okay? – and it’s hard to find money for anything else. And now that he’s retired it’s going to be even harder.”

The orginal article.