Summary of “Netflix Co-Founder’s Crazy Plan: Pay $10 a Month, Go to the Movies All You Want”

MoviePass wants to subsidize your film habit, letting you go to the theater once a day for about the price of a single ticket.
By. As movie theaters struggle with tepid sales, Mitch Lowe has an extreme proposal for how to get more people into seats: Let them come to all the showings they want for about the price of a single ticket each month.
Lowe, an early Netflix Inc. executive who now runs a startup called MoviePass, plans to drop the price of the company’s movie ticket subscriptions on Tuesday to $9.95.
MoviePass will pay theaters the full price of each ticket used by subscribers, excluding 3D or Imax screens.
If MoviePass can drive more people to theaters that would benefit the exhibitors, although the overall impact is “More negligible than anything,” Wold wrote.
With the new strategy, MoviePass hopes to resolve what Lowe sees as the biggest factor to blame for the theater industry’s decline.
He said the high price of tickets, not competition from Netflix or Amazon.com Inc.’s Prime Video service, is a big part of what’s keeping people away.
“People really do want to go more often,” Lowe said.

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Summary of “Stop Treating 70- and 90-Year-Olds the Same”

Older adults are thus more susceptible to infections – more likely to get sick, more likely to require hospitalization and more likely to die.
Older adults who receive tetanus and diphtheria vaccines produce less-effective antibodies, and the vaccines’ protective effect fades faster than it does for younger patients.
Older people may need different dosing or even biologically different vaccines.
Changes in the kidneys, heart, skin and other organs steadily decrease older people’s ability to tolerate chemotherapy and radiation.
Treatments rarely target older adults’ particular physiology, and the old are typically excluded from clinical studies.
Equally troublesome is the failure of studies to measure outcomes that reflect older people’s priorities.
Some may believe that focusing more research and treatment on the old will take resources away from younger populations.
Insurance companies continue to pay top dollar for questionable, useless and even harmful care for older people, money that could be spent on more effective care.

The orginal article.

Summary of “How to Reshape Your Brain and Learn Anything, Based on the Most Popular Coursera Class Ever”

What’s the best way to make sure you learn and don’t forget? After all, you can fish all day, but you won’t eat if your fish all jump out and wriggle back out of the boat.
In partnership with the University of California and neuroscientist Terrence Sejnowski, Oakley’s compiled the best of the best scientifically supported learning strategies into “Learning How to Learn,” the most popular class ever on Coursera.
Repeating and practicing what you want to learn essentially builds a stronger bridge, so that it’s easier for the electrical impulses to move from cell to cell.
Spaced repetition is the most efficient way to build the synaptic connections and learn fast.
How far you need to chunk and drill down will depend on what you’re trying to learn and how complex it is, but the general process is always the same.
Most people who want to learn from a text just reread it over and over without taking time to test what they remember.
If you know what kind of learner you are, you can pick learning strategies that feel natural to you and you don’t have to feel embarrassed or incompetent next to anyone else.
How people learn best might be somewhat predictable, but what you learn compared to someone else is not.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Not even remotely possible”

I’m talking about remote work, of course, a subject that provokes surprising vituperation whenever I write about it.
Consider: “We found massive, massive improvement in performance – a 13% improvement in performance from people working at home.” Consider companies like Automattic, Gitlab, InVision, and Zapier, all of which thrive as fully remote companies.
Over the same period, the proportion who only work remotely went to 20% from 15%. The biggest transition from office to remote work isn’t the geography; that’s incidental.
The biggest transition is the mode of communication, which goes from default-synchronous to default-asynchronous I certainly concede that certain forms of work, and certain people, benefit more from synchronous communications; but I put it to you that “Most kinds of software development” is not among them1, and that an ever-increasing fraction of the world’s work can be described as “Most kinds of software development.”
Remote work is not without its flaws and challenges.
Some people prefer a tight-knit work community to the broader but more loose-knit ones that remote work fosters, which is fair enough.
There are exceptions, the kinds of people who learn better from textbooks than from classes; but as a general rule, in my experience, remote work is for people who are already fairly capable and experienced.
Looking at the increasing numbers it seems awfully apparent that remote work is the future for a substantial fraction of the modern work force.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Live Like You Could Lose Everything, But Know There’s Nothing To Lose”

Most people don’t want to assume greater responsibility, and thus, greater freedom.
The more responsibility and security you choose to have, the more you are enabled to be then do and then have.
When you chose greater responsibility over your life and the welfare of others, you can’t help but be compelled to live at a higher standard.
You have a reason, no, a responsibility to be and do your very best in everything you do.
Such a sense of responsibility provides more than enough motivation and urgency to push through exhaustion and sometimes despair.
Here’s the paradox, you have absolutely nothing to lose.
There is No Downside “When I had nothing to lose, I had everything. When I stopped being who I am, I found myself.” - Paulo Coelho.
There’s nothing more beautiful than improving the lives of other people.

The orginal article.

Summary of “What We Learned About Bureaucracy from 7,000 HBR Readers”

We recently asked members of the HBR community to gauge the extent of “Bureaucratic sclerosis” within their organization using our Bureaucracy Mass Index tool.
Interestingly, individuals working in customer service, sales, production, logistics and R&D were more likely to feel that bureaucracy was growing than those working in functions like HR, finance, planning, purchasing, and administration.
Two-thirds of respondents believe that bureaucracy is a significant drag on the pace of decision-making in their organization-a number that rises to nearly 80% in large companies.
Taken as a whole, the BMI survey provides yet more evidence of the toll bureaucracy takes on productivity and resilience.
Morning Star, Spotify, Haier, and others have demonstrated that it’s possible to run large, complex organizations with a minimum of bureaucracy, and that doing so yields substantial performance advantages.
When we asked survey participants to identify the most significant barriers to down-sizing bureaucracy, 57% of them pointed to the reluctance of senior executives to share power, and 50% cited the widely-held belief that bureaucracy is essential for control.
So who’s right here? Frontline employees who believe that bureaucracy is vigorously defended and deeply embedded, or senior executives who see bureaucracy as a less fearsome foe?
Where do you start? How do you overcome pockets of resistance? How do you build the right sort of culture and values? How do you prepare individuals to take on more responsibility? What supporting changes in information systems, incentives and organizational structure are necessary? Sadly, when it comes to bureaucracy, there’s no uninstall button.

The orginal article.

Summary of “5 Traits of People With High Emotional Intelligence”

One of the biggest realizations I’ve had in my career is also one of the purest: the simple fact that people are drawn to likable people.
When you look around, you’ll notice that many people don’t make it a priority to learn the habits of likable people.
Whether interacting with customers, vendors, partners or employees, we can all make great strides in our personal relationships and career by raising our emotional intelligence.
Here are five traits shared by people with high emotional intelligence.
When you build better relationships and come across as likable, people tend to share more information with you, make introductions on your behalf and invite you into new opportunities.
They receive the benefit of the doubt If you treat people well, you’ll get the benefit of the doubt.
They possess long-term vision People with high emotional intelligence understand that entrepreneurship is a journey, and that success is a process.
They can read people better People with high EQ foster their natural curiosity, asking questions – and then listening – to get to know people and situations better.

The orginal article.

Summary of “The Definitive Guide to Eggs”

What would our food be like if the humble egg didn’t exist? Not only would we lose all the basic egg preparations, like scrambled, poached, and fried eggs, we’d also miss out on some of our most important emulsified sauces, like mayonnaise and hollandaise.
Let’s not forget that without eggs, we most certainly wouldn’t have chickens-because the egg inarguably came first.
Eggs sold directly from farms and outside the US may not have their protective cuticles washed off; dirt or feathers may cling to the shells.
Keep in mind that well-written recipes require large eggs unless otherwise specified.
Once you’ve brought your eggs home, make sure they’re packed away properly.
The USDA recommends refrigerating eggs as soon as you bring them home, as most eggs sold in cartons in the US have been washed of their protective cuticles.
Washed eggs shouldn’t sit out for more than two hours, as contaminants and harmful bacteria may start to be absorbed through the porous shell.
If an egg is never scrubbed of its cuticle, then refrigeration is not necessary before sale or use-that’s why you’ll sometimes see unrefrigerated eggs sold direct from farms or outside of the US.The USDA recommends storing fresh, uncooked, shell-on eggs in the refrigerator for no more than three to five weeks.

The orginal article.

Summary of “How Claude Shannon Rebooted Information”

Though the building’s live-in super and housekeeper, Freddy, thought Shannon morose and a bit of a loner, Shannon did befriend and date his neighbor Maria.
As he proudly recalled later, “We became friends and so I was the mid-wife for a lot of his theories. He would bounce them off me, you know, and so I understood information theory before it was ever published.” That might have been a mild boast on Oliver’s part, but given the few people Shannon let into even the periphery of his thinking, it was notable that Shannon talked with him about work at all.
Robert Fano, a later collaborator of Shannon, said, “He was not someone who would listen to other people about what to work on.” One mark of this, some observed, was how few of Shannon’s papers were coauthored.
Reading the work of Ralph Hartley, Shannon said, was “An important influence on my life.” Not simply on his research or his studies: Shannon spent much of his life working with the conceptual tools that Hartley built, and for the better part of his life, much of his public identity-“Claude Shannon, Father of Information Theory”-was bound up in having been the one who extended Hartley’s ideas far beyond what Hartley, or anyone, could have imagined.
In the 1939 letter in which Shannon first laid out the study of communications that he would complete nine years later, he used Nyquist’s “Intelligence.” By the time the work was finished, he used Hartley’s crisper term: “Information.” While an engineer like Shannon would not have needed the reminder, it was Hartley who made meaning’s irrelevance to information clearer than ever.
First Shannon saw that information science had still failed to pin down something crucial about information: its probabilistic nature.
In his theory of communication, Shannon guessed that the world’s wealth of English text could be cut in half with no loss of information: “When we write English, half of what we write is determined by the structure of the language and half is chosen freely.” Later on, his estimate of redundancy rose as high as 80 percent: Only one in five characters actually bear information.
To begin with, how fast can we send a message? It depends, Shannon showed, on how much redundancy we can wring out of it.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Why Successful People Spend 10 Hours A Week On “Compound Time””

Each morning, Benjamin Franklin asked himself, “What good shall I do this day?” and each evening, “What good have I done today?” Steve Jobs stood at the mirror each day and asked, “If today were the last day of my life, would I want to do what I am about to do?” Both billionaire Jean Paul DeJoria and media maven Arianna Huffington takes a few minutes each morning to count their blessings.
Pulling from the results of more than a decade of experiments, nap researcher Sara Mednick of the University of California, San Diego, boldly states: “With naps of an hour to an hour and a half you get close to the same benefits in learning consolidation that you would from a full eight hour night’s sleep.” People who study in the morning do about 30% better on an evening test if they’ve had an hour-long nap than if they haven’t.
Winston Churchill spent several hours a day reading biographies, history, philosophy, and economics.
Theodore Roosevelt read one book a day when busy, and two to three a day when he had a free evening.
Hack #6: Success is a direct result of the number of experiments you performThere’s a reason that Jeff Bezos says, “Our success at Amazon is a function of how many experiments we do per year, per month, per week, per day.”
“Given a ten percent chance of a 100 times payoff, you should take that bet every time. But you’re still going to be wrong nine times out of ten. We all know that if you swing for the fences, you’re going to strike out a lot, but you’re also going to hit some home runs. The difference between baseball and business is that baseball has a truncated outcome distribution. When you swing, no matter how well you connect with the ball, the most runs you can get is four. In business, every once in awhile, when you step up to the plate, you can score 1,000 runs.”No matter how much you read and discuss, you’re still going to have to spend some time making your own mistakes.
Spend almost all of his time on compound time, things that create the most long-term value.
To get started, follow the 5-hour rule: for an hour a day, invest in compound time: take that nap, enjoy that walk, read that book, have that conversation.

The orginal article.