Summary of “The 50 Best Sports Movies of All Time”

The best sports movies are independent of the sport they’re depicting, with universal stories that should appeal to anyone whether they love the sport or not.
This is to say: Our favorite sports movies tend to avoid the traditional “Meet hero, see hero overcome adversity, see hero win big game” sports movie structure, or at least deconstruct it enough to justify themselves.
For some reason, many sports movies insist on being predictable, adhering to the formula.
Those are not the sort of sports movies you will find on our list of the 50 best sports movies of all time.
The best sports surprise us: These great sports movies do the same.
At the same time Rush isn’t a sports movie where we’re meant to admire both men equally – these competitive, closed-off men both seem to be striving for something bigger than victory, and both seem incapable of finding it.
Tin Cup suggested that Shelton would make various versions of wonderfully grown-up, sexy sports movies for years to come.
Many sports movies are sad or touching, but few are as profoundly pathetic as Foxcatcher, which finds director Bennett Miller further exploring the role that sports has in people’s lives.

The orginal article.

Summary of “The California Sunday Magazine”

During the Bush years, this rhetorical tic greased our path into the Iraq quagmire, of course, but it also helped shoehorn the country into its massive mortgage crisis: Bush’s “Ownership society” nudged millions of citizens into bad loans on the premise of “More freedom and more control over your own life.” Before that, he launched the USA Freedom Corps in 2002, followed by the so-called Freedom Agenda, his tectonic foreign-policy shift away from “[s]ixty years of Western nations excusing and accommodating the lack of freedom in the Middle East.”.
Eager to shed its establishment vibe, corporate America long ago co-opted the personal-freedom language of the ’60s. The CEO of Dreyer’s has equated ice cream with freedom, and skin-care professionals have linked freedom with the removal of unsightly neck bands.
The Scientologists put out the magazine Freedom, and the Valley Forge Freedom played hockey.
You may “Learn to beat the IRS” at Freedom Law School or live in any of more than a dozen places in the U.S. called Freedom.
Hum “Full Tank of Freedom” enough and you start wondering if commercials like these sell us a desire for freedom as much as anything.
Freedom is what’s been taken, and freedom is what they have left.
Arranged near her was a collection of hats doing just that, ostensibly focused on the Second Amendment but with broader overtones: Don’t tread on my freedom and Freedom isn’t free and Free men don’t need permission.
There is external freedom and there is internal freedom.

The orginal article.

Summary of “12 Natural Ways to Lower Blood Pressure, According to Research”

When you get a high blood pressure reading at the doctor’s office, it might be tough for you to understand exactly what impact those numbers can make on your overall health, since high blood pressure has no unusual day-to-day symptoms.
Then try these natural ways to lower your blood pressure without having to take a single pill.
These hormones can raise your heart rate and constrict blood vessels, causing your blood pressure to spike.
Cut your sodium intakeCertain groups of people-the elderly, African Americans, and those with a family history of high blood pressure-are more likely than others to have blood pressure that’s particularly salt-sensitive.
Indulge in dark chocolate The sweet serves up flavanols that help lower blood pressure by relaxing blood vessels and boosting blood flow.
On average, regular dark chocolate consumption could help lower your systolic blood pressure by 5 points and your diastolic blood pressure by almost 3 points, suggests an Australian analysis.
On average, consuming 200 to 300 mg caffeine raises systolic blood pressure by 8 mmHg and diastolic blood pressure by 6 mmHg.
Take up teaLowering high blood pressure is as easy as one, two, tea: Adults with mildly high blood pressure who sipped three cups of hibiscus tea daily lowered their systolic BP by seven points in six weeks, found Tufts University researchers.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Why P.E. Fails at Solving Problems Such as Obesity”

The results of Packham’s paper on the Fitness Now program support the basic takeaway that the design of P.E. courses is what’s most consequential, and they hint at two interconnected factors that experts suggest tend to undermine the impact of such curricula.
For one, P.E. programs often rely on a superficial notion of gym class-conceiving of physical activity as little more than a timed run around the track, for example, or a game of kickball-and this results in worse offerings.
Despite greater recognition of the academic benefits of physical activities-including guidelines from agencies such as the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention stressing that kids should get at least an hour of such activities a day-schools began to deprioritize P.E. about two decades ago, and the cuts have persisted in many cases, suggests Kohl.
An immense body of research demonstrates the positive benefits of increased recess time, which schools started to cut after No Child Left Behind was signed into law, because of the policy’s emphasis on academic subjects such as reading and math.
Justin Cahill, a veteran P.E. educator who’s taught at an Atlanta-area private school for the past decade or so, stresses that it’s the typical application of physical education rather than the fundamental concept that results in bad outcomes.
Until the past few years, P.E. classes tended to focus on kids’ acquisition of skills, such as dribbling a ball, and the fulfillment of universal benchmarks, such as the ability to run around a track three times within some specific amount of time.
Echoing the findings outlined in Kohl’s book, he says that positive results are contingent on a multifaceted and holistic design-what he defines as programs that inspire children to exercise without realizing they’re exercising, that simply ensure they’re constantly moving, during recess, frequent “Brain breaks” to get out “The sillies,” morning jogs, and, yes, regular P.E. class.
Positive results are also contingent on experienced, empathetic P.E. teachers-those who know to modify a curriculum to meet a certain student’s needs, and to give kudos to that child who can’t run around the track.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Spotify data shows how music preferences change with latitude”

Around that winter solstice, Spotify listeners in the most northerly latitudes of the world dial down the intensity of their music choices, choosing calmer and more relaxing music.
The researchers suggest that the results point to a universal human habit that probably sounds familiar: choosing your music to both match and change your mood.
Cornell PhD student Minsu Park and her colleagues were interested in how mass trends in music choices could illustrate the rhythms of music’s role in people’s emotional lives.
Although Spotify does recommend music to listeners, it reported that in 2016-the year used in the study-more than 80 percent of tracks were users’ personal choices.
Using Spotify-provided data on the music, they tracked a variable they called musical intensity, “Ranging from highly relaxing to highly energetic.”
These results matched up neatly with a previous study tracking emotions in Twitter users’ speech, but it differed on one point: language showed an afternoon slump, but there was no such slump in the music choices.
The data also showed some cultural differences-more energetic music, on average, in Latin America, more relaxing music in Asia-and a gender difference that depended on hemisphere: women listen to less intense music in the Northern Hemisphere and more intense in the Southern Hemisphere.
Near the equator, changes in intensity were much flatter across the whole year, while more northerly and southerly places had larger changes in music preferences.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Are These Bad Habits Creeping Into Your Writing?”

Many writers rely more heavily on pronouns than I’d suggest is useful.
For me this sort of thing comes under the heading Remember that Writing Is Not Speaking.
I’ve always cherished it, and I like to haul it out whenever I can, as it celebrates the skill of a writer who’s not often complimented on his writing.
Writers’ brains, I’ve noted, have a tendency to play tricks when the writer isn’t paying attention, and in copyediting I’ve occasionally run across weird little puns, echoes, and other bits of unconscious wordplay.
For fiction written in the past tense, here’s a technique for tackling flashbacks that I stumbled upon years ago, and writers I’ve shared it with have tended to get highly excited: Start off your flashback with, let’s say, two or three standard-issue had’s, then clip one or two more had’s to a discreet “‘d”, then drop the past-perfecting altogether when no one’s apt to be paying attention and slip into the simple past.
Much of the unpublished material had been presented to us in photocopies of Jackson’s characteristic all-lowercase first drafts-I imagine her clattering away at her typewriter in bursts of determined creativity, not bothering to reach for the shift key-and no writer dead or alive deserves to have their material sent to press without at least some review.
I assured the book’s editors, who happened to be two of Jackson’s grown children and literary executors, that being a lifelong devotee of their mother’s work and having read and reread her writing for decades, I knew Jackson’s voice as well as any copy editor could hope to know it.
B: The more specific a writer gets in providing details down to the nuclear level, the more likely it is that at least some of those details are going to be incorrect.

The orginal article.

Summary of “The Play Deficit”

In a book called The Play of Animals, Groos argued that play came about by natural selection as a means to ensure that animals would practise the skills they need in order to survive and reproduce.
It explains why young animals play more than older ones and why those animals that depend least on rigid instincts for survival, and most on learning, play the most.
Lion cubs and other young predators play at stalking and pouncing or chasing, while zebra colts and other prey species play at fleeing and dodging.
Groos followed The Play of Animals with a second book, The Play of Man, in which he extended his insights about animal play to humans.
In hunter-gatherer bands, at Sudbury Valley School, and everywhere that children have regular access to other children, most play is social play.
Preschoolers playing a game of ‘house’ spend more time figuring out how to play than actually playing.
Social play is by far the most effective venue for learning such lessons, and I suspect that children’s strong drive for such play came about, in evolution, primarily for that purpose.
We think of play as childish, but to the child, play is the experience of being like an adult: being self-controlled and responsible.

The orginal article.

Summary of “White gold: the unstoppable rise of alternative milks”

The entire US was suffering from a shortage of Oatly, a Swedish plant milk whose rapid rise from obscure digestive health brand to the dairy alternative of choice had caught even Oatly by surprise.
Just over one in 10 of Pret a Manger’s hot drinks in the UK are ordered with dairy alternative milks.
Rude Health got into plant milks in 2013, selling three flavours: oat, brown rice and almond.
Most plant milks split in hot drinks – one reason that so many manufacturers use acidity regulators and other additives – and don’t foam like cow’s milk.
In June 2017, a Belgian couple were convicted of unintentionally causing the death of their seven-month-old baby, after feeding him oat and quinoa milks instead of infant formula.
Much of the debate revolves around whether or not plant milks should be fortified with additional vitamins to better imitate cow’s milk.
Califia Farms’ unsweetened almond milk boasts “50% more calcium than milk” on its bottle – but it doesn’t contain Vitamin D, B12, Riboflavin or any of the other nutrients found in milk or other fortified plant milks.
What most plant milks are desperate to tell you is what they don’t have in them.

The orginal article.

Summary of “‘The cars just disappeared’: What happened to the 90,000 cars a day the viaduct carried before it closed?”

The Alaskan Way Viaduct carried 90,000 cars a day before it was shut down.
“Where do the cars go?” said Mark Burfeind, spokesman for INRIX, the Kirkland-based traffic analytics company.
Through the first 11 days of the viaduct closure, car traffic on the route between Seattle and Bainbridge Island was down 15 percent from the same period last year.
A small portion of that disappeared ferry traffic may have gone to the Kingston-to-Edmonds route, which has seen slightly increased traffic.
The only place on Seattle-area highways where traffic volumes were higher than normal every day last week was on I-5, just north of the intersection with I-90.
I-5, at Yesler Way, carried around 279,000 cars a day on an average weekday last fall, according to WSDOT traffic counters.
Far more typical of regional highways is I-405, in Kirkland, which normally carries about 182,000 cars a day past the Kingsgate Park and Ride.
“These cars – or some cars – disappeared into thin air,” Jacobs wrote.

The orginal article.

Summary of “A Study on Driverless-Car Ethics Offers a Troubling Look Into Our Values”

The first time Azim Shariff met Iyad Rahwan-the first real time, after communicating with him by phone and e-mail-was in a driverless car.
A car at level four would be highly autonomous in basic situations, like highways, but would need a human operator.
“We would kind of geek out.” One of their most frequent topics of conversation was the ethics of self-driving cars.
In the game, players are presented with a version of the trolley problem: a driverless car can either stay its course and hit what is in its path, or swerve and hit something else.
The U.S. government has clear guidelines for autonomous weapons-they can’t be programmed to make “Kill decisions” on their own-but no formal opinion on the ethics of driverless cars.
What should a company do if another country wants its vehicles to reflect different moral calculations? Should a Western car de-prioritize the young in an Eastern country? Shariff leans toward adjusting each model for the country where it’s meant to operate.
In twenty to fifty years, the majority of cars on the road will likely be driverless.
In a future dominated by driverless cars, moral texture will erode away in favor of a rigid ethical framework.

The orginal article.