Summary of “The monopoly-busting case against Google, Amazon, Uber, and Facebook”

We need a new standard for monopolies, they argue, one that focuses less on consumer harm and more on the skewed incentives produced by a company the size of Facebook or Google.
On a good day, Google is the most valuable company in the world by market cap, with dozens of different products supported by an all-encompassing ad network.
“If you’re looking for a silver bullet, probably the best thing to do would be to block Google from being able to buy any companies,” says Stoller.
The company’s modular structure is arguably a direct result of that buying spree, and it’s hard to imagine what Google would look like without it.
Of course, Klobuchar’s bill doesn’t focus on Google or even tech giants, but Stoller says that kind of blockade would have a unique effect on how big companies shape the startup world.
“All of these companies, from Amazon to Facebook to Google, they proactively find their competitors and buy them out,” says Stoller.
Amazon makes life hard for its competitors – and by now, the company is competing against nearly everyone.
Anti-monopoly lawyer Lina Khan laid out the case against the retail giant in a 2017 article called “Amazon’s Antitrust Paradox,” in which she argued that the Amazon store had become a utility infrastructure that the company was subverting for its own benefit.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Apps Like mSpy, Teen Safe, and Family Tracker Can Help You Spy on Your Kids-But at What Cost?”

With tracking technologies such as mSpy, Teen Safe, Family Tracker, and others, parents can monitor calls, texts, chats, and social media posts.
A parent’s desire to spy might have less to do with keeping kids safe, and more to do with a burning desire to lower his or her own anxiety.
The researchers asked the kids about whether their parents respected their privacy.
“There’s a lot of research indicating that kids who grow up with overly intrusive parents are more susceptible to those mental health problems, partly because they undermine the child’s confidence in their abilities to function independently,” says Laurence Steinberg, a professor of psychology at Temple University and author of Age of Opportunity: Lessons From the New Science of Adolescence.
According to Darling, kids are more likely to feel their privacy has been invaded when parents intrude on personal issues, like eavesdropping on a conversation or secretly reading their texts.
Most kids realize that parents have legitimate authority over safety issues, such as making rules about drug use and knowing where kids are going after school.
In many communities, a parent’s desire to spy might have less to do with keeping kids safe, and more to do with a burning desire to lower his or her own anxiety.
Still, it’s probably safe to say that most parents who download spy apps aren’t doing it to have quality conversations with their kids.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Fundamental Attribution Error: Why You Make Terrible Life Choices”

The second type of fundamental attribution error occurs when things go well.
The researchers’ believe students who viewed things in a more self-serving way were more motivated and optimistic about their futures.
While the fundamental attribution error has some benefits, it also has a downside when it comes to how we think about others.
Remembering how many things outside of our control had to go just right, can help us feel more grateful and reminds us of how lucky we are that so many things we had nothing to do with went just so.
Research shows we are more likely to fall for the fundamental attribution error when we make quick judgements of others.
Humans seem to be hardwired to make the fundamental attribution error.
There are ways we can fight this tendency and live a happier more empathetic life.
Discover other reasons you make terrible life choices like confirmation bias, hyperbolic discounting and distinction bias.

The orginal article.

Summary of “What Is Your Intent? Reminding Yourself Why You Do What You Do.”

Once you’re clear about your deepest desires, you can start thinking about the ways that you can achieve it.
An intent is who we aspire to be – as individuals, members of our community or citizens of our planet.
An intent represents our deepest desires – those emotional and spiritual yearnings that we ask for when we are honest and authentic.
What desire will that fulfill? Remember to be honest with yourself – this is a personal exercise.
In the morning, before you start work, set an intent just for today.
My intent is to express gratitude to my coworkers today.
Once you’re clear about your deepest desires, you can start thinking about the ways you can achieve them.
Once we know our intents, we get more comfortable expressing our desires to ourselves, to our loved ones and to our community.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Houston is Still Wrestling With How to Prepare for the Next Big Storm”

As a Houston Chronicle editorial noted at the time, “We must not forget this tragedy as we did the one in 1929. Houston has been visited by four serious floods in the last 40 years, each worse than the preceding one. The Chronicle has pointed out repeatedly since 1929 that the … development of widespread Houston residential sections, with storm sewers turning floods of water into the bayou after every rain, has steadily increased the hazard.”
As famed architecture critic Ada Louise Huxtable wrote in the New York Times during the boom years of the seventies, “Houston is all process and no plan. Gertrude Stein said of Oakland that there was no t.here, there. One might say of Houston that one never gets there. It feels as if one is always on the way, always arriving, always looking for the place where everything comes together.”
In the past year, innumerable let’s-do-this studies have been published, with titles like “Build It Forward,” “Houston at the Crossroads: Resilience and Sustainability in the 21st Century,” and the surely compelling “Greater Houston Strategies for Flood Mitigation.” Most consist of similar concepts, ranging from the mundane to the spectacular: buying out homes in irretrievably flood-prone neighborhoods, building higher foundations in areas that can be protected from all but the worst flooding, improving drainage, widening bay.
Thanks to a spate of post-Harvey articles published everywhere from the Houston Chronicle to the Atlantic, many around Houston know that a) the Netherlands floods a lot, and b) because of that, the Dutch have become the world’s leading experts in combating flooding.
Storm surge is by far the biggest flooding concern in the Netherlands, while Houston must also account for the overbuilding problem.
You may recall Governor Greg Abbott’s snide remark in June 2017 that it was “Great to be out of the People’s Republic of Austin.” This prompted a retort from Houston mayor Sylvester Turner in the Houston Chronicle.
Remarkably, no one knows how much federal funding Texas will actually get and, in turn, how much will go to Houston and Harris County.
McCasland, wearing a navy City of Houston polo, moved through a PowerPoint presentation highlighting changes he hoped to make in housing policies so that “Next time it rains here, people don’t die in Houston.”

The orginal article.

Summary of “Will Bernie Sanders or Elizabeth Warren Run in 2020?”

Unlike Sanders, Warren has made a concerted effort to co-sponsor legislation with Republicans.
“I’d be surprised if Senator Sanders has done bills with Senator Cornyn.”
Sanders has famously decried capitalism, describing it in a 2016 primary debate as “a process by which so few have so much and so many have so little.” Despite her fiery anti-corporate rhetoric, Warren remains a capitalist; in a recent MSNBC appearance, she said, “I believe in markets right down to my toes.”
That’s a delicate way of framing Warren as the more salable contender to a national audience: Sanders wants more government in your lives, but Warren just wants it to be more efficient and transparent.
Those in Sanders’s world have an inverse interpretation: Warren is a technocratic academic who revels in arcane regulatory and personnel fights, while Sanders is a folk hero who pounds the pavement and rouses the masses to big-ticket causes.
At a June book party for his campaign manager, the senator cited this as an example of how he “Won” in 2016.”Her message is very similar on Wall Street, financial regulation, inequality, etcetera. But on education, health care, climate change, immigration, foreign policy-Bernie has either developed detailed proposals and policies or outlined a worldview that Warren has not,” Longabaugh says.
Of course, Warren hasn’t run a presidential campaign before.
While she’s never fashioned herself a natural champion of identity politics, Warren likely understands that being a woman would be an asset in a party deeply scarred by its inability to elect the first female president and reinvigorated by woman voters’ vehement opposition to Trump.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Bland on Blonde: why the old rock music canon is finished”

Being based around rock music means the canon is overwhelmingly white, despite black musicians having driven mainstream trends since the Gershwins, Cole Porter, Irving Berlin et al started to pick up and incorporate jazz in their writing.
The website Best Ever Albums has aggregated all the lists it can find – 34,000 of them, from best evers to best of years – to draw up a poll of polls, a canon of canons.
It’s a canon drawn up overwhelmingly by white men, working for magazines or papers that considered themselves to be generalist titles but were, by virtue of their staffing and their readership, really rock titles that occasionally delved into other areas.
You can see it in the fact that online distribution of music has created a generation gap in music again, by creating an audience of teenagers who consume everything online, who listen to music that has bypassed the traditional gatekeepers of press, radio and labels.
You can see it in the fact that music journalists – the people who traditionally define the canon – are no longer overwhelmingly men.
Maybe in five or 10 years’ time a new canon will emerge, once the generation that has dominated music media for the past 30 years or so finally all but disappears, because it’s the composition of the voters that determines the outcome.
It will be a canon that retains some of the old elements: I don’t see Bob Dylan, the Beatles, the Stones or David Bowie going anywhere in a hurry, though perhaps fewer of their albums would fill the lists.
Various forms of African music will enter the lists, not just Fela Kuti; ditto the many offshoots of dance music.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Sleep Better, Lead Better”

Although the ranks of sleep advocates are no doubt growing-led by the likes of Arianna Huffington and Jeff Bezos-a significant percentage of people, and U.S. executives in particular, don’t seem to be getting the sleep they need.
By contrast, insufficient sleep and fatigue lead to poor judgment, lack of self-control, and impaired creativity.
My research shows that sleep deprivation doesn’t just hurt individual performance: When managers lose sleep, their employees’ experiences and output are diminished too.
Lorenzo Lucianetti, Eli Awtrey, Gretchen Spreitzer, and I conducted a series of studies of what we termed “Sleep devaluation”-scenarios in which leaders communicate to subordinates that sleep is unimportant.
Specifically, subordinates of leaders who model and encourage poor sleep habits get about 25 fewer minutes of nightly rest than people whose bosses value sleep, and they report that their slumber is lower in quality.
As a leader, even if you fail to get enough sleep yourself, you should be careful to promote good sleeping behavior.
Avoid bragging about your own lack of sleep, lest you signal to your subordinates that they, too, should deprioritize sleep.
If instead you make sleep a priority, you will be a more successful leader who inspires better work in your employees.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Why Nordic countries might not be as happy as you think”

Nordic countries like Finland and Norway may regularly come out on top of world happiness indexes for wellbeing year-on-year – but new research shows the happiness is far from universal.
A report authored by the Nordic Council of Ministers and the Happiness Research Institute in Copenhagen aims to provide a more nuanced picture of life in the Nordic nations – suggesting their reputations as utopias for happiness are masking significant problems for some parts of the population, especially young people.
The world’s happiest – and least happy – countries in 2018Happiest Least happy 1.
Their data found these problems being reported by young people in particular.
The authors say that in Nordic countries high incomes protected people against feeling they were suffering or struggling.
Ethnic minorities living in Nordic countries were less happy.
Very religious people were more likely to be happier.
So while 3.9% of people in the Nordic region may report scores so low they are classed as “Suffering” – that level is as high as 26.9% in Russia and 17% in France.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Wireless headphones are improving faster than anything else in tech”

Every new pair of wireless headphones or earphones I’ve come across here at IFA has featured a USB-C charging port.
The absence of a USB-C charging port was one of the very few reasons I didn’t award the previous 1000Xs the prize for best wireless headphones.
Beside Sony, Sennheiser added USB-C to its first truly wireless earbuds, the Momentum True Wireless, and Beyerdynamic outfitted its full range of new Byrd earphones and Lagoon headphones with USB-C. I’ll admit, there are few stragglers like Audio-Technica dragging their feet with MicroUSB, but they’re increasingly in the minority.
It’s no accident that I keep returning to these three pairs of headphones: to me, they represent a unified and extremely coherent vision for the immediate future of wireless headphones.
In all cases, whether larger over-ear designs or smaller in-ear ones, each successive generation of wireless headphones is taking major steps forward in increasing battery life.
Looking ahead to 2019, we’ve got a new breed of wireless Bluetooth headphones coming built around Qualcomm’s next generation AptX Adaptive audio codec, designed to handle the trouble spots of wireless connectivity.
The dynamism of the wireless headphones market is driven by an obvious impetus: demand continues to grow at a rapid pace, and so supply – and, importantly, the quality of the goods being supplied – is trying to keep pace.
As cities grow larger, as more people have longer commutes, as podcasting networks turn into self-sustaining businesses, the desire for the best possible wireless headphones is only going to increase.

The orginal article.