Summary of “From rust belt to robot belt: Turning AI into jobs in the US heartland”

There is no sillier-or more disingenuous-debate in the tech community than the one over whether robots and AI will destroy jobs or, conversely, create a great abundance of new ones.
In one of the first attempts to quantify the impact of industrial robots, research by Daron Acemoglu at MIT and his colleagues, based on data from 1990 to 2007, found that for every robot on the factory floor, some six jobs are lost.
That means as many as 670,000 jobs for the years that they looked at, and as many as 1.5 million jobs at 2016 levels of robot usage in the US. Automation is changing work.
Gauging the net gain or loss of jobs due to robotics and AI is a tricky business.
“The alarmists’ is that this time is different and it will destroy jobs. The truth is it’s capable of doing both.” Though in the past the economic benefits from new technologies have always been enough to create more jobs than were lost, he says, “Lately, for a variety of reasons, there has been a much more job-destroying face to technology.”
Part of what he’s describing is the so-called productivity paradox: while big data, automation, and AI should in theory be making businesses more productive, boosting the economy and creating more jobs to offset the ones being lost, this hasn’t happened.
On tech unemployment: “I’m of the view that we’re not headed for sustained technological unemployment. In a market economy, wages adjust over time and people will find jobs. The question is not the number of jobs but the quality of jobs. Will they provide livelihood levels and opportunities comparable to livelihoods and opportunities of the jobs lost through automation? This worries me.”
As a country, we’re struggling to imagine how to build an economy with plenty of good jobs around AI and automation.

The orginal article.

Summary of “How Peppa Pig became a video nightmare for children”

In November of last year, I read an article in the New York Times about disturbing videos targeted at children that were being distributed via YouTube.
YouTube’s initial proposal was to restrict advertising on disturbing content aimed at children – but its proposals failed to engage honestly with its own platform.
In March, Wired catalogued a slew of violent accounts and demonstrated that it was possible to go from a popular children’s alphabet video to a Minnie Mouse snuff film in 14 steps, just by following YouTube’s own recommendations.
Take YouTube’s recommendation system for starters, which doesn’t differentiate between Disney movies and a grainy animation cooked up by a bot farm in China.
In the months since first writing about YouTube’s weird video problem, I’ve met a few people from the company, as well as from other platforms that have been caught up in similar vortices.
If YouTube is bridging a gap in childcare, the answer is more funding for childcare and education in general, not fixing YouTube.
YouTube provides another salutary lesson here: only last week it was reported that YouTube’s most successful young stars – the “YouTubers” followed and admired by millions of their peers – are burning out and breaking down en masse.
Polygon magazine cited, among many others, the examples of Rubén “El Rubius” Gundersen, the third most popular YouTuber in the world with just under 30 million subscribers, who recently went live to talk to his viewers about fears of an impending breakdown and his decision to take a break from YouTube, and Elle Mills, a popular YouTuber with 1.2 million followers, who posted footage of herself mid-anxiety attack in a video entitled Burn Out at 19.

The orginal article.

Summary of “The most important skill nobody taught you”

While the book is mostly a mathematician’s case for choosing a life of faith and belief, the more curious thing about it is its clear and lucid ruminations on what it means to be human.
Today, more than ever, Pascal’s message rings true.
Beyond the current talk about privacy and data collection, there is perhaps an even more detrimental side-effect here.
The less comfortable you are with solitude, the more likely it is that you won’t know yourself.
You’ll spend even more time avoiding it to focus elsewhere.
The more the world advances, the more stimulation it will provide as an incentive for us to get outside of our own mind to engage with it.
We are so busy being distracted that we are forgetting to tend to ourselves, which is consequently making us feel more and more alone.
That’s ironic because it’s more important than most of the ones they do.

The orginal article.

Summary of “In a world of digital nomads, we will all be made homeless”

The basic deal is simple enough: you can either pay to put your laptop wherever there is space, or stump up a little more for a more dependable desk or entire office – and, in either case, take advantage of the fact that, with operations in 20 countries, WeWork offers the chance to traverse the planet and temporarily set up shop in no end of locations.
As the working day winds on and such distractions – along with the necessity of meeting other footloose hotshots, and comparing “Projects” – take up more of your time, a couple of questions might spring to mind: what is work, and what is leisure? And does the distinction even count for much any more?
If accommodation is proving hard to find, you need company, and your life as a freelance means you have no permanent workplace where you can meet like-minded people, here is a solution: a range of tiny studio flats and slightly bigger dwellings, built around communal areas, kitchens and laundrettes – in the same building as WeWork office space.
Miguel McKelvey, one of the company’s two founders, has said that the idea is partly aimed at people who are “Always working or always semi-working”.
For upwards of $500 a week, such people can now wander around the world, mixing life and work – “Two activities that quickly become indistinguishable within Roam’s confines”, as the New York Times put it.
More generally, the need for a distinction between work and downtime should enter the political vocabulary as a fundamental right, and the organisations dedicated to trying to enforce it – most notably, the network of small freelance unions that are dotted across Europe and the US – need to be encouraged and assisted.
We all know the modern rules: millions of people have to leave where they grew up to find even halfway dependable work; and they find that creating any kind of substitute home somewhere new is impossible.
The idea is apparently to put WeGrow schools in WeWork properties across the world, so digital nomads can carry their disorientated offspring from place to place, and ensure they have just as flimsy an idea of home as their parents do.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Best Workouts for 40 Year Old Men”

Periodize your regimen The importance of periodizing and the risks of not doing so have been drilled into my head by the likes of soccer coach Raymond Verheijen and exercise scientist Trent Stellingwerff, Ph.D.For an elite athlete, periodizing can mean creating a structured program of buildup and tapering that yields peak fitness at a precise time.
Emphasize recovery Elite lifters end their workouts differently than the rest of us do.
A percentage of your workouts should be high intensity, and the balance – say, 80 percent – should be performed at very low intensity.
Elite older athletes stay competitive by being more deliberate in their training, focusing their limited time honing specific skills, and correcting their fitness weaknesses.
If you’re looking for a new challenge to get in the best shape of your life after 40, check out Muscle After 40, the latest 12-week workout program from Men’s Health.
I’ve increased the protein in my diet as well as the number of times I consume it during the day, following the advice of triathlete and nutrition scientist Asker Jeukendrup, Ph.D. A side benefit: Adding protein to anything you eat effectively lowers its glycemic index, says Chris Jordan, M.S., C.S.C.S., director of exercise physiology for the Johnson & Johnson Human Performance Institute.
Challenging your body in the same ways day after day for decades is an efficient way to chew up your body.
There’s nothing like trying something new and sucking at it, and then sucking a little less every day.

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Summary of “I Stopped Eating Carbs After 2:30 P.M. And It Changed My Body”

We wanted to give my body a chance to burn off any of the carbs I consumed earlier in the day to help me debloat overnight.
“Because carbs retain water in your body, you start looking fuller. Cutting your carb intake off at a certain point, such as 2:30, gives your body a chance to absorb and drain all of that excess water. It also gives you time to burn them off throughout the rest of the day.”
“Serotonin is a neurotransmitter that is most optimal to have increased levels of at night as it promotes healthy sleep.” So eating carbs at night could theoretically help you sleep more soundly.
“Eating carbs at night can boost serotonin, which will convert into melatonin and help support a healthy night sleep. We know from studies on lack of sleep that one bad night can lead to eating hundreds of calories more the next day, which would lead to increase cortisol, fat gain, and ultimately an unhealthy state.”
“Others get slow and bogged down by this and do better with sips of carbs intra workout. Still, there is another group who do better with carbs post-workout to help replenish glycogen stores and to recover.”
Dr. Berkowitz is a fan of eating carbs before you workout-even if it’s at night.
For my experiment, I focused on mainly eating gluten-free carbs and whole grains, which are easier to digest than complex carbs.
“There is no set amount of carbs a person should have throughout the day. If you are a male athlete training for an upcoming game or marathon, your carb intake is going to be different than a young woman who works at a corporate job all day.”

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Summary of “Smarter, Not Harder: How to Succeed at Work”

We each have 96 energy blocks each day to spend however we’d like.
Using this energy blocking system will ensure you’re spending each block wisely to make the most progress on your most important goals.
Think of your day as having 96 blocks of energy, with each block being a 15-minute chunk of time.
Not all of those blocks are direct productivity blocks – they can’t be unless we’re androids.
Sleeping for eight hours uses 32 blocks of your 96-block day.
That leaves 32 blocks for you to apply your energy toward keeping your job and doing something amazing.
If you get enough sleep, the other 64 blocks are amplified.
When it comes to the 32 blocks of work time you have to allocate, everything that’s not on your top-three list should be dropped.

The orginal article.

Summary of “The Savory Tomato Pound Cake You Never Knew You Needed”

There are few good reasons to fire up one’s oven during the summer months, but one of the surest, for me, is cake with fruit in it-not fruitcake, but just plain cake studded with hunks of juicy, fresh, seasonal fruit.
Despite the fanciness of the name “Torte,” Burros’s recipe is essentially a variant on a pound cake, which might be the key to its popularity.
In the finicky, ultra-precise world of cake-making, where a baker can be entirely undone by a misstep as minor as introducing her eggs to a batter at the wrong temperature, pound cake is virtually foolproof.
There’s the very French, very posh-home-cook cake salé a dry cake made with cubed ham, cheese, and olives and baked in a loaf pan.
My first experiments with the tomato cake came out flat and dense, tasting oily and undercooked, even though the top was nearly scorched-an insipid waste of good ingredients.
It’s undeniably a pound cake, with a fine crumb and a sunny yellow hue, but instead of sweetness it hums on a bass line of Parmesan cheese, olive oil, and black pepper, with bright bursts of tangy tomato.
As in a traditional pound cake, the ratio of ingredients is clean: one part each of cheese, butter, and olive oil, with two parts each of flour and eggs.
Let the cake cool for 20 minutes before removing from the pan.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Photos: Soccer Fields Around the World”

One of the most appealing aspects of soccer is its simplicity-a ball, some open space, goal markers, and you can play.
As the 2018 World Cup kicks off in Russia, with matches held in massive modern arenas, here is a look at the beautiful game in action in some smaller and more unusual venues around the world, including pitches built on a glacier, on a beach, floating in a river, made of straw, on a rooftop, and more.
Skip to the next and previous photo by typing j/k or ←/→..

The orginal article.

Summary of “Understanding Maslow’s Theory of Self-Actualization”

Self-actualization is typically discussed in conjunction with Maslow’s hierarchy of needs, which posits that self-actualization sits at the top of a hierarchy above four “Lower” needs.
Humanistic psychologists claimed that people are driven by higher needs, particularly the need to actualize the self.
Maslow contextualized his theory of self-actualization within a hierarchy of needs.
Esteem needs: The need to feel both self-esteem based on one’s achievements and abilities and recognition and respect from others.
Self-actualization needs: The need to pursue and fulfill one’s unique potentials.
When Maslow originally explained the hierarchy in 1943, he stated that higher needs generally won’t be pursued until lower needs are met.
Maslow included caveats in order to explain why certain individuals might pursue higher needs before lower ones.
The theory of self-actualization has been criticized for its lack of empirical support and for its suggestion that lower needs must be met before self-actualization is possible.

The orginal article.