Summary of “Metaphors shape our thoughts in ways we don’t even realize”

The metaphors we choose to use can dramatically impact people’s perceptions in ways that have real-world consequences.
Because of the role they play in our thought processes, the metaphors we choose to use can dramatically impact people’s perceptions in ways that have real-world consequences.
While metaphors make complex concepts easier to digest, they inevitably simplify, shape, and distort our perceptions of these concepts, changing our thoughts in ways that we are not aware of.
Metaphors are physical and visceral, causing us to simulate certain sensations in our mind, which may be a reason why they hold such power over our thoughts.
Metaphors lurk in our language, our thoughts, our assessments of people and situations, and even in the cup of coffee you are holding.
Our brains think using metaphor, and when art gives us new metaphors, it could also be giving us new ways to think.
Outside the realm of art, we can be mindful of the metaphors that exist all around us and the influence they have on our thoughts.
Like poets, we can approach our language with grace and precision, crafting metaphors that are persuasive and give people new ways to think about issues.

The orginal article.

Summary of “5 Public-Speaking Tips From Seasoned Experts”

What are you most afraid of? If you’re like most Americans, public speaking bothers you more than heights, bugs, snakes, enclosed spaces, flying, strangers, clowns and the prospect of drowning.
More than a quarter of the U.S. population has a fear of public speaking.
As an entrepreneur, you likely need to get comfortable with public speaking – at least on some level.
Dale Carnegie, the famed author of How to Win Friends and Influence People and founder of the Dale Carnegie Institute, which teaches a public speaking course, encouraged people to speak about topics they know a lot about.
He’s also a seasoned speaker, and one of his best tips is to speak slowly.
Nicola Sturgeon, first minister of Scotland and leader of the Scottish National Party, is known for her public speaking.
As you get used to public speaking, those nerves might decline but they won’t go away entirely.
Public speaking, like any other skill, can be improved and refined through understanding and practice.

The orginal article.

Summary of “POPSUGAR Smart Living”

Newport shared how he manages to get a seemingly impossible amount of work done – including writing books, publishing academic papers, and teaching courses – all while leaving work by 5:30 p.m. and making time for his family and personal life.
5 Ways to Be More Productive at Work What is deep work?
Deep work boils down to the relatively simple idea that working distraction-free allows you to both improve your professional capabilities and produce higher-quality, more valuable work.
Deep work tackles this by saying you can reevaluate your habits to use your time more productively, create more meaningful work, and get better at what you do so you can accomplish more than you ever thought possible.
You probably spend less time than you realize getting down to work without interruption.
We can facilitate inspiration by setting aside time to work hard.
Stopping what you’re doing to answer every message that comes through makes it a lot more difficult and time-consuming to jump back into the task you were previously working on, even if you don’t realize it.
It’s not easy to make the changes that Newport lays out in Deep Work.

The orginal article.

Summary of “How Europe’s new privacy rule is reshaping the internet”

The rule is called the General Data Protection Regulation, and it’s poised to reshape some of the messiest parts of the internet.
What is the GDPR? The General Data Protection Regulation is a rule passed by the European Union in 2016, setting new rules for how companies manage and share personal data.
In theory, the GDPR only applies to EU citizens’ data, but the global nature of the internet means that nearly every online service is affected, and the regulation has already resulted in significant changes for US users as companies scramble to adapt.
Much of the GDPR builds on rules set by earlier EU privacy measures like the Privacy Shield and Data Protection Directive, but it expands on those measures in two crucial ways.
It’s a lot stronger than existing requirements, and it explicitly extends to companies based outside the EU. For an industry that’s used to collecting and sharing data with little to no restriction, that means rewriting the rules of how ads are targeted online.
That’s a lot more than the fines allowed by the Data Protection Directive, and it signals how serious the EU is taking data privacy.
The GDPR also sets rules for how companies share data after it’s been collected, which means companies have to rethink how they approach analytics, logins, and, above all, advertising.
The GDPR adds complex new requirements for any company that gets user data second-hand, requiring a lot more transparency on what a company is doing with your data.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Can Social Media Be Saved?”

If we’re really serious about changing how social networks operate, far more radical interventions are required.
Here are three possible ways to rescue social media from the market-based pressures that got us here.
Create a Social FederationAnother radical approach would be to make social networks work more like email – so that independent apps could seamlessly work together with one another, across a common protocol.
Mastodon, a decentralized Twitter-like social network, has gotten more than a million registered users since its debut in 2016.
Experimenting with more decentralized models could give social media users a sense that platforms represented their interests, rather than those of a faceless corporation.
In a blog post last year, the venture capitalist Hunter Walk proposed an interesting idea: a legally mandated “Start over” button that, when pressed, would allow users of social networks to delete all their data, clear out their feeds and friend lists, and begin with a fresh account.
I’d go even further, and suggest that social networks give their users an automatic “Self-cleaning” option, which would regularly clear their profiles of apps they no longer used, friendships and followers they no longer interacted with, and data they no longer needed to store.
Making social graphs temporary, rather than preserving them forever by default, would undoubtedly be bad for most social networks’ business models.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Declutter Your Kids Brain By Doing These 6 Things”

With hundreds of toys at their disposal, kids jump from one activity for another, never immersing themselves completely in one activity.
Kids are more likely to use what they have to invent games with their imagination when they have fewer choices for toys and materials.
Kids with fewer toy choices have better social skills.
Kids with fewer toys learn to appreciate what they have.
Kids with fewer toys are less likely to take them for granted.
Kids with fewer toys can be taught to focus on books, art, and experiences.
Kids with fewer toys learn problem solving and perseverance more quickly than children who have tons of toys.
When kids have a ton of toys and can’t figure out how one of them works, they may be more likely to give up and go onto another, easier toy.

The orginal article.

Summary of “This Common Word Makes You Sound More Negative Than You Want To”

Typically, “But” follows a more positive statement and signals a note of disagreement, opposition, or confused thinking that’s just around the corner.
“And” introduces a more collaborative response and positions you as a positive, friendly colleague who’s shifting the conversation in a different direction, not turning it upside down.2.
You might tell your boss, “I can do the creative for this campaign, but I’ll need more time.” You may be right, but using “But” here undercuts the positive message you just delivered: You would be available if not for this one thing.
It’s possible to communicate your caveat much more positively.
Someone at a meeting might say, “We could take that approach with this client, but we could try a different angle, too. What do you all think?” Or a job candidate might tell an interviewer, “I know I have the skills required for this position, but I can see that there will be new challenges, too. I’m confident I can handle them by drawing on my experience, though.” This phrasing makes the speakers sound unnecessarily tentative and confused.
You might tell your coworkers, “Our gross revenues remained solid this quarter, but our profits declined.” Even a straightforward statement like this leaves your listeners to wonder which metric is more important-revenues or profits.
It’s a tiny, completely unavoidable three-letter word that says more about you than you might think.
Pay a little more attention to what you say, and you may find yourself using “But” a lot less-and sounding infinitely more positive as a result.

The orginal article.

Summary of “A Little-Known Hack to Learn a New Skill in a Fraction of the Time”

Deliberate practice refers to the intensely focused practice of a skill, habit, or ability.
To practice deliberately, you have to break down skills into blocks of discrete micro-skills, map out the order in which you need to learn those micro-skills, and closely monitor your progress.
For some skills, it can be easy to find proven curricula to guide your deliberate practice.
Ask yourself, “Where do I anticipate having an opportunity in the course of my actual day-to-day business life, to practice this skill?” Maybe you can practice this new micro-skill during a conversation with an employee, a meeting with your management team, or a phone call with a vendor.
Then consider what it would look like for you to start practicing this new micro-skill.
Namely, what were two, three, or four things that you did well? And what was one specific lesson that you learned from this practice session-something that you’d like to handle differently next time?
If you practice it every day for three or four days a week, you’ll find that you can acquire new skills with incredible rapidity.
These are the five elements that transform “Practice” into “Deliberate practice.” Good luck using them to speed up your development of your staff.

The orginal article.

Summary of “What smartphone photography is doing to our memories”

The seams of our edited memories are silently sealed; we often can’t remember what we can’t remember.
I’ve been wondering what happens to our memories when we start to rely on smartphones more and more to document our lives.
At the same time, new research suggests that cameras can also be used to enhance our memories of certain experiences.
How photo taking may mess with our memories The first step to forming a lasting memory is to pay attention.
How much of my life do I want remembered purely by my brain? Another reason taking photos may diminish our memories is an idea called cognitive offloading.
Alixandra Barasch is a cognitive scientist at NYU. In her work, she finds that, yes, incessant smartphone camera use can lead to lapses in memory.
In 2011, Fairfield University psychologist Linda Henkel found in a experiment that when participants were simply told to take photos in a museum exhibit, their memories for the object and the details about them were diminished.
If we want to hold on to certain memories, it’s going to take some mental effort.

The orginal article.

Summary of “How Shyp Sunk: The Rise And Fall Of An On-Demand Startup”

A half-decade after its founding, San Francisco-based Shyp is ending operations and laying off all its employees.
Gibbon declines to state how many staffers are impacted by the company’s closure.
He is willing to share the hard-earned lessons he’s learned from his experience at Shyp, which started out as a service that let you take a photo of something you wanted to ship with the company’s smartphone app, whereupon a courier would come to you and whisk your stuff away to a warehouse where employees would pack it up and hand it off to a major shipping company for delivery.
More recently, Shyp had bet everything on sustainability rather than expansion.
According to Gibbon, the new, smaller Shyp began turning an operational profit last December; he’s proud of the way the surviving employees hunkered down and kept on getting things done.
Judging from my encounters as a paying customer, Shyp really did nail the customer experience in its consumer-focused days.
To continue in this more corporate direction, Shyp had recently been working on a set of features aimed at even higher-volume shippers.
Shyp has often been described as “The Uber of shipping,” but creating the Uber-of-something is no longer a way to get venture capitalists to write checks.

The orginal article.