Summary of “A 3-Step Process to Break a Cycle of Frustration, Stress, and Fighting at Work”

Bring to mind a conflict at work, and you’ll probably have the perpetrator in mind: your incompetent boss, that passive-aggressive colleague, or the resource-hoarding peer in another department.
Frustration, low-grade fear, irritation, and even rage are familiar companions at work.
We don’t thrive physically, we are disengaged and unhappy at work, and our brains don’t work properly.
If you want to break this cycle and have fewer destructive conflicts at work, the first step is to become more aware of your feelings and reactions to pressure and stress.
Telling yourself you don’t have time or are not inclined to “Work on yourself” will keep you stuck in a bunker mentality at work.
To minimize stress and conflict at work, we need to replace “I, me, mine” with “We, us, ours.” We need to stop seeing each other in terms of what we can get, and replace it with what we can give.
Developing self-awareness, increasing your emotional self-control, and recharging relationships at work takes commitment, but you don’t have to remake yourself to improve how you deal with strife.
As tempting as it is to blame others for our strife-ridden companies, the best way to make work a more enjoyable, productive experience is to lean in to our natural empathy, learn to care for ourselves and others, and take responsibility for our feelings and actions.

The orginal article.

Summary of “The Rise and Fall of Working From Home”

Last year, Richard Laermer decided to let his employees work from home on a regular basis.
Flexible work remains popular at many organizations, but most companies want workers at work at least some-if not most-of the time.
Telecommuting comes in many flavors, and 77 percent of organizations don’t let people work from home on a full-time basis.
Most employers allow ad-hoc remote work for the person who needs to stay home for the plumber or wait for a package.
Technology such as chat programs and collaboration software made remote work feasible for many white collar workers in the last couple of decades.
Some organizations found the most lenient work-from-home policies kept workers too isolated for that kind of work.
Earlier this year the tech giant told 2,000 U.S. workers they could no longer work from home and about the same number of employees that they had to commute into offices more often.
“IBM’s strategy is about adopting the best work method for the work being done,” said an IBM spokesperson.

The orginal article.

Summary of “The Power of Pettiness”

Curiosity is the emotion that motivates exploration for new information, as hunger motivates eating.
Curiosity is seen as a cute and cuddly emotion, pleasant and smelling of old books.
Ignorance is the self-renewing resource that allows curiosity to find expression.
How do we shine a light on our own hidden ignorance – the wellspring of learning? In the second stage of curiosity, hidden ignorance is brought to light through an encounter with weirdness.
In the third stage of curiosity, all kinds of emotions – pleasant and unpleasant – motivate exploration and scrupulosity.
In the early stages of a scene of curiosity, when few people are working in the ignorance mines, the subject matter of the scene is clearly not seen as important by the wider culture; being inappropriately obsessed with the apparently trivial is a filter for working in a true scene.
For curiosity to be realized, pettiness must be suppressed and transformed into energy, gleeful malevolence transformed to honorable ends.
In my model, curiosity is not a specific emotion driving a truth-focused process, but rather the small and fragile truth-focused intersection of four cognitive processes, none of which, on its own, is entirely concerned with truth.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Facebook is getting ready to test paid subscriptions with publications”

These options would seem to accommodate metered publications including Facebook skeptic The New York Times; and The Wall Street Journal and The Economist, which make a certain selection of articles free and put the rest behind a paywall.
One publisher said Facebook is leaning toward letting them be handled through the mobile web, which would eliminate a layer of complexity and the app stores’ cut and would let publishers have more control over pricing and data.
In the end, the question for publishers like the Times and Journal that have been cool on Instant Articles is whether there’s an advantage to Facebook’s proposal of letting them sell subs through Instant Articles instead of posting to Facebook the old-fashioned away and letting people subscribe by traveling to the publisher’s own site.
Facebook aims to test them with a small group of publishers at the end of the year and expand them to others in 2018.
The movement on subscription sales comes as Facebook has been trying harder to win over publishers that are getting increasingly frustrated over their lack of ability to monetize their content on the platform and are also getting in some cases what they feel is better treatment from other platform giants, Google and Apple News.
As part of its charm offensive, Facebook in January launched the Facebook Journalism Project, which has involved working with publishers to understand what they want to get from the app.
Publishers have been seeking ways to sell subscriptions since Facebook rolled out Instant Articles in 2015 and have been been clamoring for more ability to monetize their content on the platform through advertising as Google and Facebook have swallowed up more and more of the digital ad pie.
“We are in early talks with several news publishers about how we might better support subscription business models on Facebook,” Campbell Brown, head of news partnerships, said via a Facebook spokesperson.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Making the Most of Working From Home”

How is it possible to work from home and be productive with so many distractions and temptations? Your mindset and environment are just as important as good old-fashioned self-discipline as a recipe for remote work success.
Offsite workers tend to be productive even when they’re sick, and typically work five to seven more hours per week than their on-site counterparts.
One of the biggest perks of working alone in your home is boundary blurring.
Working in a chaotic house full of teens or kids, or just an elbow’s length away from a sink full of dirty dishes are both distractions you don’t need.
Work in small, intense periods of time, and can get work done in significant chunks.
“I work from home three days a week and am able to keep work and home separate simply because I have a six-year-old that demands my attention once she gets home from school,” says Beth Faris.
Many off-site workers stay glued to their work space all day, even when they can take breaks.
Ultimately, working off-site is best if you’re disciplined.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Why I’m never signing up for Amazon Prime”

It’s open buffet season on consumer goods, and Amazon has that Prime ticket dangling in front of our ravenous faces.
Browse through Amazon even without the hyperactivity of Prime Day and you’ll see that deals are the norm rather than the exception.
Amazon Prime makes it unbelievably easy to shop unthinkingly.
That phenomenon has been so prominent with clothes that Amazon formalized it with the introduction of Amazon Prime Wardrobe last month.
Amazon’s presence in online retail is so influential nowadays that the majority of other major US retailers are throwing their own mini sales to fend off the effects of Prime Day.
As of today, this is a totally consumer-friendly effect of Amazon’s growing domination, but what happens over the long run? What if Walmart and every other retailer never catches up to Amazon and Jeff Bezos’ company ends up in a truly dominant position with no meaningful competition? Bezos himself advocates sternly against complacency, but having a monopolistic retailer of everything is a bad dependency to develop.
Everything about Prime that feels unbelievably cheap is only so because of the unbelievably cheap way that Amazon deals with the people discharging its duties.
You’ve got your own priorities in life and, in all honesty, nobody’s going to fix global injustice by disregarding Prime Day and taking a nice walk outside instead. But it makes me feel good to do exactly that, and so – in the ultimate expression of consumer choice – I’m opting not to consume Amazon’s enchanting deals elixir.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Messy, always late and swear like a sailor? It just means you’re super smart”

You see, my desk is always messy, I swear like a sailor and I tend to sleep late in the morning – normally because I’ve stayed up into the early hours, watching trash on TV. And while all these things may seem like bad habits, you don’t need to look that hard to find evidence that they’re the opposite.
I’ve carefully cherry-picked research studies to create a greatest hits of egocentric evidence designed to prove that all your bad habits are good habits.
Take, for example, a 2009 study by British researchers entitled “Why Night Owls are More Intelligent”, which posits: “More intelligent children are more likely to grow up to be nocturnal adults who go to bed late and wake up late on both weekdays and weekends.” Apparently, this is explained by evolution.
Staying up late is “Evolutionary novel” behaviour that means you’re more likely to win in life.
A 2013 study from the University of Minnesota found mess makes you more creative.
Rather, per psychologist Dr Linda Sapadin, persistent lateness can come from “An obsessive thinking problem”; you are not late because you don’t care, you are late because you care too much and overthink situations.
Last year a study in the journal Poetics found people who like so-bad-it’s-good movies are of above-average education.
The study, entitled “Enjoying Trash Films: Underlying Features, Viewing Stances, and Experiential Response Dimensions” noted: “The majority of trash film fans appear to be well-educated cultural ‘omnivores’, and they conceive of their preference for trash films in terms of an ironic viewing stance.”

The orginal article.

Summary of “The Problem with Being a Top Performer”

The top performers in their fields-from LeBron James to Oprah Winfrey to Bill Gates-seem to have it all.
According to a recent estimate, top performers produce 20 to 30 times more than the average employee in their fields.
New research demonstrates that performing at high levels can also come with some heavy costs: It can make our peers resent us and try to undermine our good work.
There’s more: the “Social penalty” that star performers suffer is actually higher in more collaborative workplaces.
This hypothesis might sound far-fetched, but it’s actually common for peers to punish top performers.
The results showed that peers were more likely to belittle, insult, and damage the reputation of high rather than low performers.
The more collaborative the team was, the more peers mistreated high performers.
If resources were shared, peers benefitted from working with a star and thus socially supported the high performer.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Gordon Hayward Is Exactly What The Celtics Needed”

Gordon Hayward, the All-Star forward who was departing the Utah Jazz as a free agent, confirmed on Tuesday night that he was joining the Celtics, which makes them a bit more formidable at a time when the Cavs have their own organizational challenges in front of them.
Hayward is one of the more organic scorers in the NBA and doesn’t need to dominate the ball to make an impact.
Hayward, like many other NBA guards, has nearly perfected the art of drawing fouls as a jump shooter.
That’s part of the reason that Hayward figures to fit so well with Boston.
Boston currently designs many of their sets around Thomas’s quickness – they use handoffs more than any other team because he excels at them – and there’s nothing about Hayward that suggests that will change.
If there’s a clear downside in all this for Boston, it’s that the club still has to make room under the salary cap for Hayward and his max contract, and that means shedding players.
Hayward is best known for what he does on the offensive side of the ball, but he’s no slouch on defense.
As ESPN’s Kevin Pelton noted, the Hayward signing itself may not yield more regular-season wins right off the bat.

The orginal article.

Summary of “How economics became a religion”

We follow an even more powerful religion, around which we have oriented our lives: economics.
At the end of the 20th century, amid an economic boom that saw the western economies become richer than humanity had ever known, economics seemed to have conquered the globe.
The hubris in economics came not from a moral failing among economists, but from a false conviction: the belief that theirs was a science.
The American Economic Association, to which Robert Lucas gave his address, was created in 1885, just when economics was starting to define itself as a distinct discipline.
Such responses served to remind practitioners of the taboos of economics: a gentle nudge to a young academic that such shibboleths might not sound so good before a tenure committee.
If you think describing economics as a religion debunks it, you’re wrong.
Paradoxically as economics becomes more truly scientific, it will become less of a science.
This is an edited extract from Twilight of the Money Gods: Economics as a Religion and How it all Went Wrong by John Rapley, published by Simon & Schuster on 13 July at £20.

The orginal article.