Summary of “What Happens to Your Body After Giving Birth?”

Watch: What they won’t tell you about being a new mom.
“You have Instagram, you have Facebook, you have this idealized version” getting publicized and shared on social media, Karp says.
“I bet if you searched a million images of new babies and new mothers, you’d get only one image that focuses on swollen ankles.” Which can lead, he says, to unrealistic expectations and discomfort with sharing the less adorable realities of new parenthood.
Mayer credits social media with having the opposite effect.
As the Millennial generation, known for its propensity to post status updates and frequent broadcasts to social media, has grown up, all facets and stages of people’s lives have become fodder for sharing, including new motherhood.
“They can share anything they want to share, and that’s really powerful.” And perhaps, she adds, the same culture of radical public honesty about the unglamorous, unpleasant aspects of new motherhood has given rise to the graphic, unfiltered mothering humor that Wong, Teigen, and Schumer have helped popularize.
New motherhood and its medical challenges have come into the public spotlight in other ways, too, Mayer notes.
A few notable books aimed at enlightening new mothers on how to care for their own bodies after birth have been released in the past couple of years-such as 2016’s The First Forty Days and 2017’s The Fourth Trimester.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Motherhood Isn’t Sacrifice, It’s Selfishness”

One male character declares that the woman must “Learn in silence with all subjection” and that “She shall be saved by childbearing.” In this scenario, the act of motherhood is subverted for the benefit of those in power, and they get away with it because of the concept of motherhood as sacrifice.
Motherhood is not a sacrifice, but a privilege – one that many of us choose selfishly.
By reframing motherhood as a privilege, we redirect agency back to the mother, empowering her, celebrating her autonomy instead of her sacrifice.
There are many mothers who would not have chosen motherhood, for financial or personal reasons.
Calling motherhood “The hardest job in the world” misses the point completely because having and raising children is not a “Job.” No one will deny that there is exhaustion, fear and tedium.
Calling motherhood a woman’s “Job” only serves to keep a woman in her place.
If we start referring to motherhood as the beautiful, messy privilege that it is, and to tending to our children as the most loving yet selfish thing we do, perhaps we can change the biased language my mother used.
Only when we stop talking about motherhood as sacrifice can we start talking about mothers the way that we deserve.

The orginal article.