Summary of “Why Living in a Poor Neighborhood Can Change Your Biology”

The people who did move to better neighborhoods didn’t change their diets or daily lifestyles.
The people who moved out of poor neighborhoods were healthier.
The HUD study, and subsequent research, have shown that something more than race, individual behavior, or genetics is taking a toll on the health of people who live in poor neighborhoods: stress.
In its early stages, drugs that increase sensitivity to insulin, along with diet and exercise, can restore some cell function in people with Type 2; later, people with Type 2 diabetes need insulin injections to keep high blood sugar in check.
A recent Pew Charitable Trusts study found that 66 percent of African Americans born between 1985 and 2000 lived in neighborhoods where at least 20 percent of people were poor.
African-Americans and whites living at or near the poverty line had higher rates of diabetes than their wealthier peers.
That’s not the case: Black Africans have lower rates of cardiovascular disease, Type 2 diabetes, and depression than their distant cousins in the U.S. And Hasson says Type 2 diabetes among blacks and Hispanics drops just as fast as among whites in response to changes in exercise or diet-powerful evidence that there’s no inherent physiological difference at play.
“Hasson, of the University of Michigan, praises Obama.”She’s bringing attention to the fact that people need to get out and start moving, and people are starting to ask: “How can we motivate people to start moving again?” Hasson says.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Go Fast and Break Things”

If a decision is reversible, we can make it fast and without perfect information.
Reversible decisions can be made fast and without obsessing over finding complete information.
Reversible decisions are not an excuse to act reckless or be ill-informed, but is rather a belief that we should adapt the frameworks of our decisions to the types of decisions we are making.
Reversible decisions don’t need to be made the same way as irreversible decisions.
The ability to make decisions fast is a competitive advantage.
Decisions provide us with data, which can then make our future decisions better.
Some decisions are consequential and irreversible or nearly irreversible – one-way doors – and these decisions must be made methodically, carefully, slowly, with great deliberation and consultation.
As organizations get larger, there seems to be a tendency to use the heavy-weight Type 1 decision-making process on most decisions, including many Type 2 decisions.

The orginal article.

Summary of “What Parkour Classes Teach Older People About Falling”

As more of America’s 76 million Baby Boomers hit retirement age-with 10,000 turning 65 every day-some parkour groups are introducing a modified version of this trendy urban movement practice to keep older adults active, and to teach them instincts that could save them from death or serious injury during a fall.
According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, the rate of fatal falls among older people rose by 30 percent between 2007 and 2016, jumping from 47 deaths per 100,000 to 61.6 deaths per 100,000.
“Many older adults who have experienced a fall, or know someone who has, develop this fear of falling, which can restrict their activity,” says Kathy Cameron, director of the Falls Prevention Resource Center at the National Council on Aging.
During my visit he’s a student, and he joins five other adults in their 40s and 50s as they take turns jumping over a hip-high horizontal bar-a move called the assisted lazy vault-and learning the “Knee hook” technique that’s supposed to catch their fall.
Teaching older people how to fall better has always been a challenge, Cameron cautions: Falls happen in a split second.
“It’s really a behavior change and empowerment program to help people with practical strategies for fall prevention.”
She adds that people should be thinking about fall prevention as early as their 50s. Evitt believes getting adults to “Fall better” starts with changing how people move, which will later impact their instincts when they find themselves in an unexpected situation.
In a way, both Evitt and Maniktahla are teaching fall prevention by teaching their students to move like they once did as children.

The orginal article.

Summary of “The Next Great Chess Boom Is Here”

Unlike some countries that have made chess a part of every child’s education, or supported chess players the way we support artists or athletes, or even used international chess competitions as a source of national pride, Americans treat chess as a mild curiosity.
How should they present chess to their audience? Should they treat chess like a sport? The St. Louis Chess Club and Chess.com seemed to believe they should, as their streams and commentators closely mimicked those of televised sporting events, with constant chatter, colorful banter, and onscreen graphics.
While chess officials puzzle over how to ignite the game’s next boom, some players say it may already be here.
“It depends on what your content is and who your subscribers are. If you make videos about cats and your audience are people who like funny cat videos, they will be served ads about cat food. Those ads generate less revenue. The people who like chess are doctors or lawyers and they will browse about car insurance or real estate. The ads are customized for the viewer. People think because I have a chess channel it’s harder for me to be self-sustaining. Not really. My 300,000 viewers on a chess channel may equal 3 million on a cat channel.”
There is broad acknowledgement that what is being created in a chess game has some aesthetic value, even if only to the chess faithful who know enough about chess to appreciate it.
“This is what Duchamp said - not all artists are chess players, but all chess players are artists,” he said, referring to an oft-quoted remark from the artist Marcel Duchamp, who at one point considered giving up the visual arts to focus on playing chess full time.
“Everyone who loves chess really loves it. There’s a barrier to entry, but people who get over it are passionate about chess.” Shahade coauthored a book about Duchamp and has lectured on his chess games, and she is an artist herself.
“Until you know a good bit about chess, you don’t even possess the illusion of understanding it. Most other activities are not like this. I know nearly nothing about poker, opera, football, piano, and surrealist art, but this doesn’t stop me from enjoying them occasionally. By contrast, someone who does not play chess will never enjoy looking at a great chess game.”

The orginal article.

Summary of “The Stress Around You Could Cause Obesity or Diabetes”

When they went back and measured the differences between people who got vouchers and people who didn’t, the results were remarkable: The people who got vouchers to move to low-poverty neighborhoods had significantly lower rates of obesity and Type 2 diabetes.
“By dint of the design, the cause of the difference in diabetes and obesity was the voucher and the move to a less-distressed neighborhood,” Whitaker says.
“The amazing thing is that the cause of the difference in obesity and diabetes was the move.”
“Even if you’re not stress-eating, there’s a direct link between cortisol and Type 2 diabetes risk, and cortisol and obesity,” Hasson says.
In its early stages, drugs that increase sensitivity to insulin, along with diet and exercise, can restore some cell function in people with Type 2; later, people with Type 2 diabetes need insulin injections to keep high blood sugar in check.
That’s not the case: Black Africans have lower rates of cardiovascular disease, Type 2 diabetes, and depression than their distant cousins in the U.S. And Hasson says Type 2 diabetes among blacks and Hispanics drops just as fast as among whites in response to changes in exercise or diet-powerful evidence that there’s no inherent physiological difference at play.
He’s spent a decade and a half hunting for genes that contribute to racial differences in obesity and diabetes.
Perhaps no program is as identified with the individual approach to preventing obesity and Type 2 diabetes as Michelle Obama’s “Let’s Move.” With the telegenic First Lady as its figurehead, the program has put a spotlight on encouraging kids and adults to exercise more and eat less.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Here’s How Millennials’ Lives Were Changed By Recession 10 Years Ago”

Many survived the foreclosure of homes, parents losing jobs, and years of fruitless job hunting after graduating school.
I’d say it’s impacted our lives in two ways: One, no matter how many times I took jobs that were outwardly vertical moves or increases in responsibility, my salary stayed pretty stagnant.
“Entry level” around here requires at minimum an associate’s degree and a couple years of experience – and that’s for jobs that literally anyone can do: office jobs, school support staffing, etc.
When the Great Recession hit 10 years ago, my clients were losing their jobs, homes, cars, etc.
My husband had a very difficult time finding a job out of college and worked internships and low-paying seasonal positions for years.
We struggled for three years to find a job that could feed us and lived off unemployment checks.
Once my dad had found a suitable job, it took us four years to get where we are today.
We have spent years working really low-wage jobs, sometimes multiple jobs.

The orginal article.

Summary of “‘We’re moving to higher ground’: America’s era of climate mass migration is here”

The era of climate migration is, virtually unheralded, already upon America.
“Including all climate impacts it isn’t too far-fetched to imagine something twice as large as the Dustbowl,” said Jesse Keenan, a climate adaptation expert at Harvard University, referencing the 1930s upheaval in which 2.5 million people moved from the dusty, drought-ridden plains to California.
The closest analogue could be the Great Migration – a period spanning a large chunk of the 20th century when about 6 million black people departed the Jim Crow south for cities in the north, midwest and west.
There are established migration preferences for some places – south Florida to Georgia, New York to Colorado – but in many cases people would uproot to the closest inland city, if they have the means.
Pilkey’s new book – Sea Level Rise Along Americas Shores: The Slow Tsunami – envisions apocalyptic scenes where millions of people, largely from south Florida, will become “a stream of refugees moving to higher ground”.
Those living near the coasts will face pressures of the gradual as well as dramatic nature but people inland will also be harried to move by climate change.
Further to the south, at the border, there are suggestions that people from Central America are being nudged towards the US because of drought and hurricanes in their homelands, part of a trend that will see as many as 300 million climate refugees worldwide by 2050.
“People can usually cope with being a little less comfortable, but if you see repeated storms or severe damage to crops, that will trigger change,” said Solomon Hsiang, who researches how climate change will affect society at the University of California.

The orginal article.

Summary of “A siege. A bomb. 48 dogs. And the black commune that would not surrender”

In the case of Move members, their politics are a strange fusion of black power and flower power.
Philadelphia police had dropped a bomb from a helicopter onto a Move house on Osage Avenue in the west of Philadelphia in an attempt to force the black radicals to evacuate the premises after long-running battles with the authorities.
The bomb ignited a fire in the Move house that turned into an inferno.
Unlike the Black Panther party which formally dissolved in 1982, Move is still a living entity.
When the 1978 siege happened, there were 12 adults and 11 children in the Move house in Powelton Village – and 48 dogs.
Black liberation, animal liberation – the two are as one with Move.
The unconventional nature of the Move community which drove some neighbors to despair in turn led to demands for their eviction, and ultimately to the fatal siege.
Months before the siege Move members made visible their threat to resist attempts to remove them from the neighborhood – they stood on a platform they had built at the front of the house dressed in fatigues and brandishing rifles.

The orginal article.

Summary of “We Have Always Lived in the House”

The house would be the last place I’d see my mother alive.
The floodgates opened then as I hovered on the brink of adulthood, and in rushed the awareness of just how rocky the terrain of life outside the house could be.
He would return to the house where he grew up, which would have been the last place he had seen his sister alive.
How can we go back into the house without her? With her still in the hospital in a coma? I remember feeling my subway pass in my coat pocket, resting against the folds.
The one I’d had when I was growing up in the house.
In the past year Brandon and I bought a house in Atlanta while my father moved back into his.
As we move into this new house, ours to build our lives in, creating memories unaware of and unsure of the future, I’ve been thinking a lot about the house where I grew up, the last place I called home, and who we were then when we lived there.
My father speaks often of the past, of when we were all together, my mother was alive and we all lived in the house.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Montreal Moving Day: what happens when a whole city moves house at once?”

To call Moving Day mayhem is to prettify the truth of trucks double-parked three deep on narrow two-way streets, amateurs humping fridges up the city’s legendarily winding outdoor staircases, and creative Quebeckers devising all sorts of methods for relocating their stuff.
The mess of Montreal’s Moving Day is enhanced by the fact that it is not primarily a city of homeowners, but one of relatively cheap rents.
Prasun Lala, a technology researcher at McGill University and the École de Technologie Supérieure, argues that Montreal’s well-stocked rental market is to blame for the puzzling persistence of Moving Day.
Like so many aspects of Quebecois culture, including well-loved songs, recipes and turns of phrase long forgotten in France, Moving Day has its roots in the province’s colonial past.
Since 1973 Moving Day has not been law, but rather tradition – a problematic idea that refuses to peter out.
Kristian Gravenor, a local journalist, historian and author of Montreal: 375 Tales of Eating, Drinking, Living and Loving, says Moving Day has a political dimension as well: “It’s impossible not to realise that 1 July is also Canada Day.”.
Gravenor says making Quebec’s Moving Day happen on Canada Day is nothing short of the francophone province – which has held referendums on separating from the rest of Canada not once, but twice – “Punching [English] Canada in the eye”.
He tells a story about trying to parallel-park his moving truck on Moving Day a few years ago.

The orginal article.