Summary of “‘The Dark Knight,’ ‘Man of Steel,’ and When a Trailer Lies to You”

Zack Snyder makes movies, but he was born for trailers.
Man of Steel, of course, is a movie about aliens punching each other into skyscrapers.
Teasers are unnatural advertisements, meant to ramp up excitement months and sometimes years ahead of a movie’s release.
Sometimes a psychological allegory like Mother! is positioned to look like a horror movie.
The independent houses hired to cut these trailers-for selling a movie he didn’t quite make.
It’s interesting that Snyder’s movie didn’t pick up a cue from the man who produced the film and personally blessed Snyder’s vision: Christopher Nolan.
The Dark Knight is a crime movie, a love triangle, a class commentary, an urban drama, and a true-blue comic book that shows the heroes, the villains, and the razor-wire that separates the two.
For years, we complained about movie trailers giving away too much plot, too many sequences, too much of everything.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Romantic Comedies Are Having a Moment Again-All Thanks to Netflix”

There’s a moment in the upcoming Netflix film Sierra Burgess Is a Loser, about 40 minutes in, that will feel very familiar if you’ve ever seen an early Channing Tatum movie.
Vulture refuted this claim in 2017, arguing that romantic comedies aren’t dead-they’re just changing.
During the past year the streaming giant has released seven original movies that have the glossy sheen of a 2003 romantic comedy, minus the offensive tropes.
The dialogue in Sierra Burgess Is a Loser would’ve easily worked in a Molly Ringwald movie from 1985, as would the plot twist at the end of The Kissing Booth or the dad-on-dad shenanigans from The Week Of. At their core, these movies are capital R-C Romantic Comedies.
“It’s pretty simple: We want to make more of what our members want to watch. And we’ve seen that our members around the world are watching a lot of rom coms,” a representative for Netflix told Glamour in an email.
That’s very true: Netflix’s new slate of romantic films will make viewers quite happy, but they’re not escapist fluff.
The platform will also premiere two more romantic films this summer: Like Father, starring Kristen Bell and Seth Rogen, and The Guernsey Literary and Potato Peel Pie Society with Lily James.
“I think love should be multicultural. I would like to see more romantic comedies-there are several out right now-that are [about] a gay couple or a mixed-race couple. I think all of those stories should come out, and I hope there’s a time where [there] can be romantic comedies about people who are really different-opposites attracting-and it’s not about the fact they’re black and white or lesbian or gay. That it’s just a story about love.”

The orginal article.

Summary of “The Last Days of Blockbuster Video”

Justin Trickel unlocked the door before noon on May 13 and began Sunday with the burden of information that he was asked not to broadcast, something that customers would eventually find out in a Facebook post on the Blockbuster Alaska page later that night - that without ceremony, the store was closing for rental business after 23 years.
At the Blockbuster on Debarr Road, the busiest Blockbuster and the biggest of the three in the state, a store that had peaked years ago at $2 million in annual sales, one of the most popular stores in the country.
“I grew up with these [stores]. It hurts me, when I’m the one who put them together, physically, with the shelves, who moved them and did all this stuff, and then tear them down.” Twenty-seven years and he’d taped a red sign on the front window in the morning that said STORE CLOSING, EVERYTHING ON SALE. Twenty-seven years and he had a story about Blockbuster in the beginning, the lines outside the store, the happy chaos of its arrival, the citywide madness upon its opening in Anchorage in 1990, the year before he started, the store a symbol that the city had arrived; to have a Blockbuster was to feel a little closer to the Lower 48, six years after the first store had opened in Dallas.
He wanted to write a book about it all, about the Blockbuster story from the “Store perspective,” what it had been like, and about what people who said Blockbuster was still better were trying to express.
“We lasted longer because of the way we operated the stores. There was a common theme within Blockbuster corporate that we were doing so well because of the uniqueness of Alaska. I’m not saying that’s not part of why it worked, but it’s only a small part of the story.”To me the most fascinating part of : It went from nothing to an integral part of American culture over the course of five or six years,” he said.
The local owner of a used video game store called Zeroes Trading of Alaska bought all of the shelves in the store.
The store made a little more than $31,000 on that first day of the sale, the biggest number an Alaska Blockbuster had ever made in one day after closing.
She bought energy-efficient overhead lights that cast the store in a softer glow, and she had traveled to candy expos in Chicago, and her store had the highest percentage of confection sales of any of the Blockbuster stores in the entire country, and the whole wall at the far end of the store had an art deco pattern of colorful squares, and she had a huge Pucker Powder kiosk by the checkout, and they recycled their movie cases, and when her staff members cleaned the counters, they did it with microfiber cloths.

The orginal article.

Summary of “The Great Moviegoing Fever of 2018”

Yet: Fallout is fantastic, one of the most thrilling and purely enjoyable movies of the year, imbued with wild set pieces, a chummy acting style, and the kind of Who cares if it makes sense? plotting that feels airlifted in from a time before we had expanded universes and preciously curated intellectual property.
If it isn’t the movie of the summer, it’s the movie that best represents this year, a stunning bounce back at the box office and also a revitalization of moviegoing culture spurred on by dozens of fascinating variables.
Saying MOVIES ARE BACK! is like saying GIRAFFES ARE BACK! Movies and moviegoing were never going anywhere, though their centrality to American culture has been in question for the better part of the past decade, undermined by insurgents-turned-power-brokers like Netflix and threatened by vanishing attention spans.
The movies are a triple-digit financial affair, the domain of the disposable income haver.
The reason for that is clear: they want to see movies.
Black Panther is not just the movie story of 2018 but the cultural phenomenon of the entire year, and the attention it drew is rare.
For many, seeing Black Panther was a badge of honor, an act that indicated a kind of social deed-supporting a movie with a diverse cast made by a black filmmaker on the grandest stage became, somewhat miraculously, a political act.
People just want to see more movies, as cheaply as possible.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Unadulterated Joy: An Oral History of ‘Step Brothers'”

Steenburgen said that her husband, Ted Danson, never joins her on movie sets, but made an exception for Step Brothers.
McKay: Late in the movie, Ferrell and Reilly come up to me and they’re just like, “Look, this movie’s going great, but we are both very tired today.
Part V: “Don’t You Dare Put That in the Movie” Step Brothers is less a film than it is a collection of sublime set pieces.
McKay: Our music supervisor on the movie, the great Hal Willner, from Saturday Night Live, he’s produced dozens of great records.
David Edelstein: One of the things I love about Step Brothers is watching the outtakes on the DVD, which are really hardly outtakes.
Riggle: People always ask, “What’s your favorite movie?” I always say Step Brothers.
When the movie had come out, I said, “I don’t know if you’ve seen this movie Step Brothers.
McKay: The whole nature of the movie is a lot of stories from when we were kids.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Die Hard at 30: how it remains the quintessential American action movie”

The first shot of John McClane in Die Hard is his left hand digging into the armrest as his plane lands at LAX. We can see he’s wearing a wedding band on his ring finger.
It’s also a prime example of why Die Hard remains the greatest American action movie since it was released 30 years ago this week.
Stuart and De Souza’s script is a perfectly worked-out puzzle of a thousand tiny pieces: Die Hard has at least five major villains, unfolds over multiple planes of action, and fully works out Gruber’s elaborate scheme to steal $640m in negotiable bearer bonds and McClane’s improvised efforts to stop it.
In the decade that followed, Die Hard served as the template of the modern action movie, to where “Die Hard on a” would become its own subgenre: Die Hard on a bus, Die Hard on a ship, Die Hard on an airplane, Die Hard on an ice cream truck that must stay under 50 degrees Fahrenheit at all times.
Once Michael Bay made The Rock – Die Hard at Alcatraz – the entire language of action movies started to shift into a more visceral rush of images, sensation without context.
The rise of CGI in The Matrix and onward, with its infinite plasticity, made the physical action in Die Hard even more a thing of the past.
It’s strange to think of Die Hard as a stodgy old classic, but it has been 30 years since it opened midsummer and dominated the back half of 1988.
The lesson of Die Hard is that the small, incidental details are just as consequential – and often exactly what’s missing from the films that tried to emulate it.

The orginal article.

Summary of “The Best Movies of 2018, So Far”

We’re six months into 2018, which means it’s time to take stock of everything we’ve seen so far this year-and determine which films released between January 1 and July 1 stand out most among the crowd.
Positioning an African superhero and his family and countrymen at the center of a big-budget spectacular, with a diverse array of talent behind the camera, Black Panther showed millions of people something they hadn’t seen before, an awfully late-arriving relief in a series that’s now 20-plus movies deep.
In exploring it, his movie offers one of the best recent analyses of what virulent racism, and how we tell the story of that racism, accomplishes.
It’s one of the most surprising films of the year-and, so far, the best.
What sets Let the Sunshine In apart from films of its ilk is the hot streak of intellectualism coursing through it: Denis has made a movie that’s as brutally concerned with how these people talk as it is with what they say, as focused on how desire manifests as on the fact that the desire is there to begin with.
The movie is docu-fiction; Zhao films it all with an airy alertness, combining scenes of the novice Jandreau “Acting” alongside scenes of him interacting with his own family and his own friends, one of whom is a paraplegic said, in the movie, to have been injured on the back of his horse.
So the movie is certainly not some pleasant distraction from the ills of the day-but Soderbergh’s calm, assured style is slick and winding enough to keep us more than engaged.
Claire Foy tosses Queen Elizabeth’s crown in the dumpster and hurls herself into her role, tearing through the movie with thrilling fury.

The orginal article.

Summary of “The Subscription Model Takeover Is Nearly Complete”

On Wednesday, AMC announced it is launching a new subscription movie service called Stubs A-List on June 26.
AMC is throwing its hat in the subscription ring with a service that costs far more than MoviePass does, but it will likely be easier to use and already sounds more sustainable for AMC. $19.95 a month is a difficult number to swallow for customers who are accustomed to something closer to $10 a month for TV or music streaming plans, or who use MoviePass, which is a staggeringly low $7.95 a month.
MoviePass upended what was one of the last content industries that the digital subscription model hadn’t subverted.
The technology industry has long been using subscriptions to deliver content, and it’s a model that consumers are now used to.
The subscription services forced the legacy companies to alter how cable TV was sold to customers, further disrupting their own market.
The results have been mixed; cord-cutters’ dreams have yet to be truly realized, and between streaming platforms, cable companies, and even hardware makers launching subscription products, the options can be dizzying.
Users like subscription models-or at least are used to them by now-and most business sectors have received the message.
If there’s anything to be learned from the tech market that spawned the subscription model, it’s that this moment of affordably priced tickets won’t last.

The orginal article.

Summary of “The Fight for the Future of ‘Star Wars'”

Each of the first three entries in the rebooted tentpole property-The Force Awakens, Rogue One: A Star Wars Story, and The Last Jedi-had made more than $1 billion worldwide, and presales and projections suggested that Solo: A Star Wars Story, the second Star Wars anthology movie, would break the record for a Memorial Day opening and extend Disney’s streak of lucrative Lucasfilms.
On Wednesday, Collider, citing unnamed sources, reported that the production company has “Decided to put plans for more A Star Wars story spinoff movies on hold.” That may mean no Obi-Wan or Boba Fett films for the foreseeable future, and presumably no further Solo installments, although Solo himself, Alden Ehrenreich, signed on for two more films-not an unusual arrangement, even when an actor’s character is killed.
Spinoffs or no, it’s unlikely that Star Wars will experience any extended droughts at the theater after Episode IX. The suits may be easily startled, but Star Wars will soon be back, and in greater numbers.
Unlike the previous Disney Star Wars movies, it came out in May instead of December, which meant a mere five-and-a-half-month gap between Star Wars releases.
To at least some Star Wars fans who lived through the long lean years after Return of the Jedi, the sad spectacle of the prequels, and the decade-plus dry spell between Revenge of the Sith and The Force Awakens-and, evidently, narrowly avoided three movies about midi-chlorians-the fact the fourth Star Wars movie in three and a half years is good but not great probably seems like small beans.
Solo would have been the best Star Wars movie made in the 32 years before Disney rebooted the franchise; that it’s now the cause of a crisis is a sign that Star Wars fans are spoiled in the best possible sense.
Star Wars has always taken trilogy form and fixated on figures at the center of the fight for the galaxy, which gives it greater focus but sometimes ties its hands.
While it’s heartening that the company is clearly concerned about sullying the series’s reputation and extracting too much story from the stone-if only because of what it ultimately might mean for the bottom line-it’s also dismaying that the fallout from Solo is forcing big-screen Star Wars to adhere to a structure established in the ’70s, especially to the extent that Solo’s relatively low turnout can be traced to the most regressive segment of the Star Wars base.

The orginal article.

Summary of “‘Bull Durham’ at 30: The Making of an All-Time Sports Movie Classic”

“If I got one shot to direct,” he remembered thinking, “I’ll make a sports movie I would like to see.” At that point, Shelton already had the idea for Bull Durham.
“You cannot make a movie about a right fielder and a third baseman,” Shelton said, “Because they don’t interact.”
At first, Shelton pitched Bull Durham as Lysistrata in the minors.
The actor’s emergence as a box-office draw, Shelton said, led to Orion Pictures financing the baseball movie.
Shelton called the weathered stadium and the city “The perfect place” to shoot the movie.
Shelton filmed one for Clown Prince of Baseball Max Patkin, who plays himself, but cut it.
“Nuke doesn’t even know what he’s getting and Crash, it’s what he’s always wanted,” Shelton said.
Unlike Crash, who set the minor league home run mark before retiring, Shelton never got a final moment of glory.

The orginal article.