Summary of “The Avengers: Infinity War marathon marks the end of a 10-year journey”

After 11 consecutive Marvel movies, they’re ready to cap off a 31-hour marathon with a conclusion they’ve all been waiting for: Avengers: Infinity War.
Though the marathon began just a day before, the start of the kickoff movie, Iron Man, feels like it was a fever dream.
Infinity War unites characters and ties together plotlines from more than a decade of Marvel movies, from Iron Man to this winter’s Thor: Ragnarok and Black Panther.
For the first few movies, the marathon feels easy to sink into.
“It’s not just a trip to the movies.” Walker is new to marathoning, while Hearn is an old hand; he also attended the 29-hour Avengers: Age of Ultron marathon in 2015.
“But each audience is different. When you’re in a marathon like this, you’re with literally a large group of like-minded people. We’re all geeking out about it. We all love the movies so much. We all love Marvel. It’s just fun, the vibe is always good, you meet really great people. We’re all just one big group of people that love these movies. One big nerdy family.”
Black Panther has finished, and in just an hour, Infinity War will begin at 6, an hour earlier than the film’s other screenings.
Infinity War isn’t just another Avengers movie.

The orginal article.

Summary of “He Wanted to Escape His Childhood. Now, It Fuels His Art.”

He used part of his earnings as a child star to take Berlitz classes in English.
He made his first film, “I Killed My Mother,” a Freudian-tinged, semi-autobiographical film about a gay teenager who clashes with his mother, after he dropped out of college at 17.
As one producer after the other rejected it, he scraped together money from his child-acting gigs to make the film himself, at age 20, eventually winning international acclaim.
As we meet, he is the subject of a social media storm over his decision to cut the American star Jessica Chastain from his soon-to-be released film, “The Death and Life of John F. Donovan,” his first English-language film.
In the deeply moving film, shot in London, Montreal, New York and Prague, the boy, now a grown man, tells a hard-bitten journalist about how Donovan, torn between fame and personal fulfillment, had changed his life.
The original cut of the movie, which stars Kathy Bates, Natalie Portman and Susan Sarandon, and has added cultural resonance in the #MeToo era, was more than four hours long.
Born in Montreal, Mr. Dolan was raised by his single mother, Geneviève, a college administrator with Irish roots.
Mr. Dolan’s films, a cri de coeur for tolerance, are invariably populated by outcasts and underdogs, a reflection, he says, of his own feelings of not belonging.

The orginal article.

Summary of “What if superheroes aren’t really the good guys?”

Doctor Strange is also reminding us that Infinity War is the culmination of the most awesomely ambitious, successfully coordinated crossover project that cinema has ever seen, which has unfolded over a decade and nearly 20 movies.
In the predecessor to Infinity War, Captain America: Civil War, the US secretary of state visits the Avengers HQ and points out the elephant in the room.
It’s a question worth asking: what makes superheroes the good guys? It’s taken as a given in these movies, but there’s a nagging sense that for all their tales of heroism and sacrifice and vanquishing alien threats to Earth, the superhero moral compass is no longer pointing in the right direction.
They were still the good guys when Sam Raimi’s 2002 Spider-Man kick-started the current comic-book movie era.
By part three in 2016, Civil War, Captain America refuses the secretary of state’s demand that the Avengers agree to UN oversight and splinters off with a bunch of rebel superheroes.
Either way, the question again needs asking, who are the good guys here?
Michael B Jordan’s antagonist Killmonger was widely regarded as one of the best things about the movie and with good reason: he’s not really bad at all.
Killmonger is defeated, but he wins the argument: Black Panther realises he’s not the good guy! At the close of the movie, Wakanda begins to engage with the rest of the world, albeit on its own limited terms, which are a far cry from the armed uprising Killmonger had in mind.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Summer Movie Preview: 33 Movies to Watch Out For”

It’s decided the summer movie season begins this Friday, April 27, and everyone else can deal with it.
All we can do is to tell you about the other 32 big movies coming out afterward, including heady scifi films, a slew of sequels, different superheroes, and more.
It’s still hard to fathom that mere months ago we had a new Star Wars movie and now we’re already getting another.
Teen Titans Go! To the Movies is almost a PG-rated, animated Deadpool and, come to think of it, that sounds pretty damn excellent.
All the elements are here for a potential franchise and, if the movie does well, author Alexandra Bracken has three more books ready for adaptation.
A.X.L. What happens when a young kid finds a military-enhanced robot dog with a heart of gold? The new movie A.X.L. is here to answer that question.
Even his worst scifi movies are kind of good, but Replicas actually looks like a good one.
Slender Man, the popular Internet meme turned real-life attempted-murder inspiration, will soon be the star of his very own fictional horror movie.

The orginal article.

Summary of “A 31-hour Marvel marathon became a lesson in temporary beauty”

The human machines who can power through all 31 hours with no sleep are rare – almost as rare as the available outlets people flocked to when they entered the theater.
“People are talking about which movies they’re going to sleep through,” Courtney told me while charging her phone, gash still visible.
We became friends while hovering around an outlet at the top of the theater, talking to other people who came by looking for a free plug.
Limited charging options and a room full of heavy cellphone users meant there were ample opportunities to meet the people we were sharing a theater with for 31 hours.
As The Avengers, Guardians of the Galaxy and Avengers: Age of Ultron played, the theater erupted into people coming up with impressive ways to get comfortable, while the rest of us warred over real estate.
Other people, like Jailene, Korina and Joseph, were too young to have done that, citing other films like Captain America: The First Avenger as their first big-screen foray into the Marvel Cinematic Universe.
“It’s so weird to hear people say, ’10 years of Marvel movies.’ It’s been 10 years. It’s a fun way to celebrate a kind of moment that we’ll talk about for the rest of our lives.”
A few minutes before Infinity War started, people counted down until the movie started.

The orginal article.

Summary of “MoviePass is no longer too good to be true”

The company’s business model, which has MoviePass losing money on pretty much every ticket sold, seems too unsustainable.
Two changes the company has begun toying with recently make it appear MoviePass is readying to gut the core value of the service.
We learned earlier this week that for new subscribers, MoviePass is no longer allowing customers to see one movie per day.
To help ease the blow, MoviePass is throwing in a three-month trial of iHeartRadio’s All Access subscription, though it’s not exactly clear why a three-month trial for an audio service is supposed to be a decent stand-in for movie tickets.
The stub verification is ostensibly to test for “Fraudulent activity” and “To ensure that MoviePass is sustainable for the entire community.” An email from MoviePass reads, “Please note that failure to cooperate with the below safeguards could result in irreversible termination of your subscription.”
“We recently made some updates to our Terms of Service, including the policy that MoviePass subscribers are only permitted to see any movie in the theaters once with their MoviePass. This falls within our continued effort to limit fraud on our app and has been effective in doing so in the past,” MoviePass spokersperson said in a statement.
MoviePass is starting to look less and less like a good deal But Lowe’s admission that MoviePass would track user location data to do so kicked up a privacy controversy, and MoviePass has since disabled the mobile app’s location-tracking ability, which it says it never used.
The only thing that matters for potential consumers is whether MoviePass as a service is worth the cost – and all the corner-cutting, tests, and secret changes have undermined the core service to the point where it’s almost not worth the trouble.

The orginal article.

Summary of “How the Marvel Cinematic Universe Left Its TV Side Behind”

Five years after Marvel effectively created its Cinematic Universe, the company’s TV division launched an equally bold venture: a plan to bring the movie’s universe to the small screen.
The connection between Marvel TV and Marvel Movies as a cohesive universe has been stretched thinner and thinner-if not outright ignored-as the production headache of trying to line up different shows with different styles and different audiences on different networks has grown.
Here’s the a brief timeline of how the grand Marvel Cinematic Universe split apart.
Whedon’s comments were followed over the years by similar echoes from both the movie side of things from Marvel Studio head Kevin Feige, to comments from Marvel head of TV Jeph Loeb about the Netflix characters being kept out of the films.
As the growing distance between the events of Marvel TV and the Marvel movies became greater and more public, the message from Marvel changed: “It’s all connected, but you’re never going to get to see any of them.”
Perhaps one of the strangest divergence points between the movie plans and the TV side of Marvel came with the announcement of an Inhumans movie as part of Marvel Studios’ plans for its third phase of movies.
After Kevin Feige wrested control of Marvel Studios out from under Perlmutter to report directly to Disney, Bleeding Cool reported hearing a story that at the time seemed inconceivable: the Inhumans movie was being scrapped, allegedly to avoid giving the Marvel TV Department the “Win” of having set up the Inhumans in a major way before the movie came out.
The Marvel Cinematic Universe still represents a laudable idea that was mostly always too ambitious to work: a shared universe of movie franchises, weaving in and out of each other, a decade of continuity across blockbuster after blockbuster.

The orginal article.

Summary of “The Five Types Of Nicolas Cage Movies”

Cage has made 73 kinds of movies – a few too many categories.
Cage has been in only two direct sequels, “Ghost Rider: Spirit of Vengeance” and “National Treasure: Book of Secrets.” That’s two movies out of 79 appearances as a lead or supporting actor.
Quick, name the protagonist of “National Treasure.” Prior to watching 73 Cage movies, I couldn’t.
Cage has no such defining franchise and no such defining role; his challenge is to make a role unique – and to build a career outside of being Nicolas Cage.
Now we come to the heart of it: Cage has been in many, many enormously bad movies.
For a master class in this, check out “The Runner,” with Cage as a Louisiana politician who’s having a post-Deepwater Horizon personal collapse, or “Rage,” which is a captivating spin on revenge movies like “Taken.”
Looking at the list of box office stars who have made the most money from movies based on an original screenplay – the people who make a living outside of adapted franchises – Cage comes in ninth, with $1.7 billion derived from 45 original screenplay films.
P.S. As a service to both Mr. Cage and society as a whole, I programmed a Twitter bot to take the plot components of his enormous and still-growing filmography to pitch loglines for as-yet-unmade Cage flicks.

The orginal article.

Summary of “‘Avengers: Infinity War’: It’s Marvel’s Universe. We Just Live in It.”

Considered on its own, as a single, nearly 2-hour-40-minute movie, “Avengers: Infinity War” makes very little sense, apart from the near convergence of its title and its running time.
Early on, someone menacingly says, “You may think this is suffering. No: It’s salvation.” That’s a bit overstated either way.
Directed by Joe and Anthony Russo, scrappy fraternal climbers up the 21st-century Hollywood ladder, “Infinity War” is a chunk of matter in the Marvel Cinematic Universe, a vast entity that long ago expanded beyond the usual boundaries of sequelization and brand extension.
You can’t really be for or against Marvel, and you can’t quite opt out of it either.
Those interesting, unusual specimens – what we used to think of, in simpler times, as “Good movies” – aren’t exactly accidents.
Who wants to be a hater? Still, it’s worth noting that the ascendance of Marvel has narrowed the parameters of criticism.
I’m supposed to tell you, in this review, how much fun you’ll have at “Infinity War.” But I’ve probably already gone too far in trying to think about what it means.
The Marvel movies and others of their kind often produce an illusion of profundity, a slick, murky overlay of allegorical suggestiveness.

The orginal article.

Summary of “The Incredible Avengers: Infinity War Lives Up to All the Hype”

Directed by the Russo Brothers, Infinity War is driven by an evil villain named Thanos, glimpsed during several previous films, who decides to traverse the universe hoping to acquire the six Infinity Stones he believes will allow him to rule the galaxy.
If you are, and after 10 years of movies that’s a lot of people, Infinity War gives the audience all we can want and more.
With several dozen Marvel characters to juggle, Infinity War’s main narrative drive comes from Thanos.
All of the Marvel characters are jumbled up and sent on various missions, resulting in roughly five or six narrative threads that weave throughout the movie.
That’s a lot of story to tell and Infinity War does so by structuring itself almost like a book, with sections that start but then don’t continue for sometimes an hour or more.
The result is that the film drags some in the middle, but as those threads slowly come together, so too does the film’s pacing, leading to a jaw-dropping final act that takes up roughly a third of the movie.
By the end of Avengers: Infinity War, it’s almost hard to get your mind around everything you’ve seen-to the point where you may start planning your next screening as you walk out of the theater.
Marvel’s Phase Three isn’t over-it won’t be until Avengers 4 next year-but to say every movie in the Marvel Cinematic Universe has been leading up to Infinity War is absolutely true.

The orginal article.