Summary of “What happened after Fantastic Four broke Josh Trank”

On Aug. 7, 2015, hours before his $150 million comic book reboot Fantastic Four opened on 3,995 North American screens, director Josh Trank smashed the self-destruct button.
Fox didn’t want to make another Fantastic Four movie – it wanted to make Josh Trank’s Fantastic Four movie.
On top of critical pans and a worldwide gross of $167 million, just a third of what the first Fantastic Four made 10 years earlier, the lead-up and fallout of the film saw Trank caught in behind-the-scenes drama.
“If Josh Trank is not in Movie Jail,” one critic tweeted after the announcement of Capone, “Does Movie Jail even exist anymore?” Trank doesn’t believe it does.
I spoke to Trank off and on for four years as he reeled from Fantastic Four and set out to make Capone.
Again, Trank came to Slater with a skeleton idea: His Fantastic Four would be the opposite of every other franchise kickoff.
“The trials of developing Fantastic Four had everything to do with tone,” Trank said.
The first cut of Fantastic Four caught studio executives off-guard, Trank said.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Oliver Stone’s ‘Natural Born Killers’ Is, More than Ever, the Spectacle of Our Time”

“Natural Born Killers,” a brazenly radical movie when it was first released, on August 26, 1994, has never lost its sting of audacity.
I’ve met a number of people who feel the way I do about “Natural Born Killers,” but I’ve also run across a great many people who don’t.
The reaction has always been split between those I would call “Natural Born Killers” believers and those who thumb their noses at what they consider to be an over-the-top spectacle of Oliver Stone “Indulgence.” At the time of its release, it was said that the film was bombastic, gonzo for its own sake, pretentious as hell, and – of course ­- too violent.
If you go back and watch “Natural Born Killers” today, long after all the ’90s-version-of-film-Twitter chatter about it has faded, what you’ll see is that the movie summons a unique power that descends from the grandeur of its theme.
Far more than, say, “The Matrix,” “Natural Born Killers” was the movie that glimpsed the looking glass we were passing through, the new psycho-metaphysical space we were living inside – the roller-coaster of images and advertisements, of entertainment and illusion, of demons that come up through fantasy and morph into daydreams, of vicarious violence that bleeds into real violence.
I’ve always found “Natural Born Killers” a nearly impossible movie to nail down in writing.
His vision is suffused with irony, whereas Oliver Stone directs “Natural Born Killers” as if he were making a documentary about a homicidal acid trip.
In 1967, the tagline for “Bonnie and Clyde” was “They’re young. They’re in love. And they kill people.” The tagline for “Natural Born Killers” should have been: “They kill people. So they’ll have something to watch.”

The orginal article.

Summary of “What to Stream: Classics for Comfort While Quarantined Against the Coronavirus”

“Happiness isn’t cheerful,” goes the last line of one of the greatest of movies, Max Ophüls’s “Le Plaisir,” and so it is with comfort movies.
Rather, I’m picking up on a search for substance, for movies that have the settled and solid quality of classics-movies serious enough for the mood, compelling enough to provide ready distraction, and confident enough to look beyond the troubles that they evoke.
Here are some of the movies that I’ve been grateful to watch in the past few stressful days.
Freed is surrounded by musicians who fill the movie with onscreen performance, as well as by composers and producers who shape it in real time, hustlers looking to exploit the music, and people in the city whose lives the music is changing.
The movie is directed by Floyd Mutrux, one of the hidden heroes of the American cinema of the seventies; his connection to rock music is at the very core of his work.
The movie whirls ahead with a wild panoply of twists and wily intrigue; even as Hollywood coincidences and Hollywood sentiment put the recklessly unstable tale on solid ground, the enduring impression is of a sham society that dispenses its rewards to the unworthy.
A thought for Italy: Pier Paolo Pasolini, a poet who, in the early sixties, nearing forty, had just begun his movie career, made a documentary that premièred in 1964, “Love Meetings,” in which he travels through Italy and-appearing on camera, microphone in hand, interviews his compatriots about sex.
In 1920, less than two years after the first wave of the influenza pandemic wrought havoc, John Ford made his first movie for the producer William Fox, “Just Pals,” a comedic drama of love for American society’s despised outsiders and of contempt for its snooty moralists.

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Summary of “Why Jonathan Demme Was One of the Greatest Concert Movie Directors Ever”

Why Jonathan Demme was the greatest concert movie director of all time – and not just because he made ‘Stop Making Sense.
It’s not hyperbole to say that Demme was arguably the greatest concert filmmaker ever – look at the number of them that he made, the range of artists he chronicled and the sheer brilliance with which he shot musicians playing.
Many great directors have tried their hand at concert films, but few could match Demme’s skill at capturing their joy and their celebration of communal creation.
Demme’s best concert movie is his first – and also a strong contender for the greatest ever made.
It wasn’t until 1998’s Storefront Hitchcock that Jonathan Demme returned to making a full-on concert film.
Three years later, Demme shifted direction as wildly as his subject, delivering the ramshackle, lo-fi concert movie Neil Young Trunk Show, in which Young put away the pedal steel and cranked up the electric guitars to 11 for loud, stomping garage rock.
Demme had been impressed by Justin Timberlake after seeing him in The Social Network, and when the two met, Timberlake proposed making a concert film from his 20/20 Experience Tour.
Talking to Rolling Stone in 2016, Demme was asked what the secret was to making a great concert film.

The orginal article.

Summary of “7 Things You Don’t Know About ‘Reservoir Dogs'”

Cast members Harvey Keitel, Tim Roth, Michael Madsen, Steve Buscemi and writer-director-actor Quentin Tarantino all got together to reminisce after the 1992 movie screened to a packed house at the Beacon Theater.
Tarantino wanted to stage “Reservoir Dogs” as a play.
The most iconic moment in “Reservoir Dogs” is unquestionably the scene in which Madsen’s character, Mr. Blonde, tortures a captured cop, cutting off his ear after doing a little dance to the jaunty tune of Stealers Wheel’s “Stuck in the Middle With You.” That dance was entirely spontaneous, it turns out.
“You never made me do it in rehearsal, because I was so intimidated by it,” Madsen reminded Tarantino at the panel.
The director said he had always intended for “Reservoir Dogs” to be more than a genre film.
“33 was the largest walkout.” He added that he had thought that at least everyone would be able to sit through it when it screened at the Sitges Horror Film Festival, where they had just shown Peter Jackson’s gore-soaked early film, “Dead Alive.” “I thought, ‘Finally, I’ve got an audience that won’t walk out.’ Five people walk out of that audience – including Wes Craven! The f-kin’ guy who did ‘Last House on the Left’! My movie was too tough for him?”.7.
One of Tarantino’s favorite memories from the film didn’t happen on set.
During the panel, Tarantino reminisced about one of his favorite moments making the film, which happened at a cast dinner at Keitel’s house after the cast had spent two weeks rehearsing the material.

The orginal article.

Summary of “‘Office Space’: How Mike Judge Brought Flair and Red Staplers to the World”

Mike Judge’s workplace satire “Office Space” was a bona fide box office flop when it grossed a measly $10.8 million in 1999.
“Office Space” was based on the “Milton” animated shorts Judge created and voiced in the early 1990s, as well as his own experiences working as an engineer – which years later, also made Judge’s “Silicon Valley” feel painfully real.
Herman, who now works primarily as a voice actor, believes that Judge is a visionary.
“I breakdance in that scene and that just happened because Mike said, ‘Guys, you have the space.’ And I did it. It stayed in the movie.”I really get Mike’s tone,” said Herman, who knew Judge from doing voicework for “King of the Hill.”.
“You can go on the internet and you can find him doing ‘Office Space.
In another “Office Space” effect, office workers and fans can now buy red Swingline staplers, which didn’t exist before the movie was made.
In the film, the weird bespectacled office worker Milton guards his red stapler as if it was his treasured security blanket.
Judge believes “Office Space” bombed because “it was a hard movie to make a trailer for – hard to market in general,” he said.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Remembering ‘Singles’: Cameron Crowe on Making the Definitive Grunge Movie”

Crowe wanted his audience to grow up with him, so for his follow-up movie, he turned his attention to twentysomethings.
Crowe spoke to Rolling Stone about the making of Singles on the movie’s 25th anniversary, how he cast the actors and musicians and why his love letter to Seattle still holds a special place in his heart.
The story allows you to know enough about them that you would say, “Hmmm, I think I would spend more time with Colin, but I really love Emma” And if you’re a lonely person, which I think most writers are, this is a wonderful place to disappear into when you’re writing or making a movie.
I never wanted to tamper with the scene in the course of making the movie.
Nora Ephron came in with Sleepless in Seattle and within 18 months, there were plaques in town that said, “Sleepless in Seattle was filmed here!” I was like, damn, what do you have to do get a plaque around here?!? But sure enough, over time, the Singles apartment house became kind of its own little tour stop for anybody who remembered the movie.
The Seattle explosion happened after we finished the movie.
Warner Brothers hadn’t wanted to put the movie out.
Then Nirvana hit, and they said, “Oh, OK, we can call the movie Come As You Are.” And we said, “No, it’s not called Come As You Are.” And then they said, “We tested a title that we really love:”One Hot Summer.

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Summary of “How Turner Classic Movies Built a Marquee Brand by Catering to Film Fans”

Photo courtesy of TCM.Turner Classic Movies, the last cable channel launched by Ted Turner as an independent media mogul, hit its silver on-air anniversary in early 2019.
TCM has spent 25 years building up a community of film fanatics who love the channel itself, not just the movies it screens.
The Turner Classic Movies seal of approval draws thousands of attendees annually to the TCM Classic Film Festival, which kicks off its 10th edition in Los Angeles this week, and to TCM-branded screenings in theaters around the country.
TCM has a gold-plated brand because it was designed to appeal to movie devotees rather than a mass audience.
“Context and curation is what we’re known for,” says Charlie Tabesh, senior VP of programming for Turner Classic Movies.
“We wanted to lay claim to offering the best mix of classic movies – with a definition of ‘classic’ as something that was really good, not by a chronological time period,” Siegel says.
As a mirror of the times in which they were made, movies offer a kind of road map to how attitudes evolve.
TCM runs “The Birth of a Nation” and movies with similar backgrounds, but only with appropriate introduction, context and, when necessary, warnings to viewers.

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Summary of “‘Home Alone’ Star Macaulay Culkin on Life Now, Dating Brenda Song & His Sister’s Death”

When his lids are low, he looks either bored or hyperfocused-you can’t always tell with Mack, and that’s part of what made him a joy to watch in the dozen movies he did before age fourteen, and especially in Home Alone, the movie that ultimately left him very much alone in the world.
The man embraces Mack like he’s family come home for Sunday supper.
We’re talking about this at Carlitos, where dinner rolls along the way he is used to: a plate of grilled blood sausage, a Mack favorite; plump green gnocchi, the leftovers of which he will take home to the woman he calls “My lady.”
“That scene where I’m looking through the mail slot? Hughes saw that and he got the idea: Kid defends house! And he wrote Home Alone for me,” Mack says.
Last night after the photo shoot, at 3:00 a.m., Mack ordered eggs and bacon on Postmates, plus banana pancakes for his girlfriend, Brenda Song, for when she woke up and he was still sleeping.
Mack’s sister Dakota, the second of the seven Culkin kids, a year older than Mack, was hit by a car in Los Angeles and died the next day, on December 10, 2008.”She passed away eleven years ago tomorrow.”
If Hughes sometimes played the father Mack’s father couldn’t be, Jackson was often the schoolmate he never had. Jackson got in touch with Mack after Home Alone, and suddenly they were hanging out.
The first chapter is about a monkey boy in the circus, which is essentially Mack being a child star.

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Summary of “Why Is Everyone So Scared of Disney?”

Disney owns Marvel, it owns “Star Wars,” it owns “Avatar,” it owns the fabled animated features that it has been using to mint live-action-remake megahits as if it were printing money.
That power has long been implicit in the word “Disney.” Walt Disney started off as a hand-drawn rebel visionary, rooting his rise in the scrappy image of Steamboat Willie, and starting in 1937, the animated films that became the foundation of the Disney empire were, one after another, astonishing works of art.
If it suddenly seems like the new Disney might own the future, maybe that’s because Walt Disney was so instrumental in creating the future.
In a highly thoughtful piece about the new Disney empire, entitled “For the Sake of Cinema, Disney Needs to Be Broken Up,” my colleague Guy Lodge, writing in The Guardian, argues that the company’s dominating might now poses an existential threat to the art and innovation of motion pictures.
None of this is the real reason that I think we don’t have to be scared of the new Disney.
The company itself surely thinks so; I’m certain, once the merger happened, that there was a feeling among Disney executives of “We’ve got it all!” But the reason they’ve “Got it all” isn’t that Disney owns the future.
I’m sure Disney is already planning out their reboots, but the magic of the MCU, rooted in multiple overlapping generations of collective comic-book memory, has gone on for a quite a while, and it’s my feeling that it will be a challenge for Disney to sustain it on that level.
To be scared of the new Disney is really to fear a future that’s probably less than accurate, because it’s a 20-20 reflection of the rearview mirror.

The orginal article.