Summary of “Tonya Harding Would Like Her Apology Now”

Tonya Harding was the name Barack Obama used as a verb in talking about metaphorically kneecapping the competition during the 2007 presidential primaries.
“Tonya Harding” is the title of a new and quite lovely Sufjan Stevens song And Tonya Harding is the name invoked in a pile of recent feminist think pieces coinciding with the opening of the movie “I, Tonya,” in which she is played by the famous, beautiful actress Margot Robbie, explaining her side of the story.
“You have to say Tonya Harding,” she said.
It’s Tonya Harding who has a few things she would like to clear up.
Ms. Harding skates sometimes, but not as much as she used to.
The story is told in the tone in which Ms. Harding speaks, and there are scenes in it you’ve seen a hundred times before in Lifetime movies: a young girl being hit by her mother, a young wife being hit by her husband – that aren’t portrayed as tragic as much as a particular kind of wide-eyed Oregon gothic.
For the record, Ms. Harding loved the movie.
Her side of the story is not about guilt or innocence – the discussion over guilt and innocence ended right about the time she completed her community service, as far as she’s concerned – but about the finer points of being Tonya Harding: respect, mitigating circumstances, how we treat people and what we expect from them in the first place.

The orginal article.

Summary of “What We’re Excited for in 2018”

The Spider-Man Video Game Victor Luckerson: Though it was Spider-Man who helped kick off this century’s superhero obsession at the megaplex, his presence in video games has been comparatively muted.
For more than a decade I’ve been waiting for a game that could fully realize the potential of Activision’s Spider-Man 2, which captured the thrill of web slinging between the skyscrapers of New York but was weighed down by a repetitive, GTA-lite mission structure back in 2004.
Video Games About Pirates Ben Lindbergh: Next year’s most anticipated video game may be Rockstar’s Western sequel Red Dead Redemption 2, but I still expect to spend more time in 2018 on the virtual open seas than the virtual open range.
In theory, video games about pirates should have been among the biggest beneficiaries of the industry’s ongoing ramp-up in processing power; the limitless environments, pretty waves and water, and persistent online worlds common in today’s big-budget games should suit simulations of the pirate life perfectly.
The most storied pirate games, Monkey Island and Sid Meier’s Pirates!, are decades old.
Sea of Thieves, a cooperative, online-only shared-world game from Rare, adopted a cartoony, light-hearted look and is due out in March.
Ubisoft’s Skull & Bones which will arrive in the third or fourth quarter with both a single-player campaign and online combat, borrows and builds on the ship-combat component of 2013’s Assassin’s Creed IV: Black Flag, the best pirate game in recent memory.
Gaming’s pirate treasure has been buried too long.

The orginal article.

Summary of “The 50 Greatest Moments From a Shockingly Great Year at the Movies”

If you found me after a Tuesday evening screening of Baywatch back in May, you’d have found a dejected, hopeless person incapable of imagining a turkey sandwich, let alone a great movie moment.
The business of movies crumbles around itself with stunning regularity, but the magic of movies still burns hot.
Two movies expertly integrated that feeling of a closed-off life lived on a device.
In the opening moments of Muschietti’s movie, young Georgie follows the paper boat he’s designed with his brother Bill all the way through the rain-strewn streets of Derry and down into a sewer, where we meet Pennywise.
Rooney Mara Devours a Pie-Her First Pie-in A Ghost Story / the Big Breakfast in The Florida Project Great year for fruit, great for pastry at the movies.
Most kids’ movies take their audiences for granted.
Drunken Emma Thompson Crashing Her Car on the Lawn in The Meyerowitz Stories In a movie that delicately and specifically chooses every word, phrase, and look with great care, the funniest moment in Noah Baumbach’s latest is pure slapstick.
It’s one of his gentlest, breeziest movies, and that’s never more clear than when all of the film’s main characters find themselves huddled together on a northbound train to deliver the dead son of one of the men to a proper burial in his hometown.

The orginal article.

Summary of “The Diverging Paths of Jean-Claude Van Damme and Steven Seagal”

As effusive as Van Damme might be in his praise of both Trump and Putin, he’s got nothing on his old action-movie counterpart, Steven Seagal.
In a 1991 interview with Arsenio Hall, Seagal, staring coldly at a stammering Arsenio, said this of Van Damme: “I think that that’s a matter of opinion, that he was a champion anywhere. There are an awful lot of people who say that that’s not true.” Meanwhile, Sylvester Stallone has told a story about Van Damme challenging Seagal to a fight, multiple times, on the night of a 1997 party at Stallone’s house.
Van Damme began to redefine himself with 2008’s JCVD, playing a washed-up movie star named Jean-Claude Van Damme.
Van Damme is the star of a new Amazon show called Jean-Claude Van Johnson, and it might be the most goofily meta Van Damme project in a decade full of them.
As in JCVD, the show features Van Damme as a faded movie star named Jean-Claude Van Damme.
There’s an endless bit where Van Damme plays a dual role, also embodying a whining Bulgarian mob underling who adores Van Damme movies and who looks just like Van Damme.
One thing Seagal has in common with Van Damme: He’s played himself on TV. But in Seagal’s case, it was on Steven Seagal: Lawman, an A&E reality show that followed Seagal in his secondary career as an occasional deputy sheriff in Louisiana and Arizona.
Seagal almost never appears alongside recognizable actors, although 2016’s Sniper: Special Ops does feature Rob Van Dam, the pro wrestler who got his name because of his ability to perform extraordinary splits and a resemblance to Jean-Claude Van Damme.

The orginal article.

Summary of “MoviePass Adds a Million Subscribers, Even if Theaters Aren’t Sold on It”

Under the MoviePass business model, theaters get paid full price for every admission.
The blistering growth has prompted new criticism from theaters and studio owners – namely that MoviePass will never be able to make money by charging $9.95 a month when a single ticket can cost almost twice that amount.
Mr. Lowe, who previously sparred with studios as president of Redbox, the kiosk company that rents DVDs for $1 a day, believes that ticketing can at least be a break-even business for MoviePass.
Mr. Farnsworth said, “When you apply computer science and machine learning to an industry that we believe has lacked significant innovation, useful patterns start to emerge.” If MoviePass gets big enough, it could try to demand that chain theaters sell tickets at a discount or share a slice of their concession revenue.
Helios recently raised $60 million for the expansion of MoviePass, which expects to have more than three million subscribers by the end of next year.
As the popularity of MoviePass demonstrates, theater owners may no longer be able to avoid fundamental change.
One small theater company that has become a MoviePass investor, Studio Movie Grill, which has 30 locations in nine states, credits the service with increasing attendance, especially on weeknights.
“Some people aren’t sure they want to pay $10 to $12 to see a movie like ‘Lady Bird.’ MoviePass takes out that hurdle.”

The orginal article.

Summary of “Kojima: Star Wars in the Era of Disney”

In 1977, George Lucas revolutionized not only film but the entire entertainment industry with Star Wars.
Fueled by the SF craze, Japanese Star Wars-like movies such as The War In Space and Message from Space were rushed into production so that they could be released before Star Wars in Japan.
Lucas’ Star Wars movie revolution gave rise to a creative process mimicked by all films since, and established the current movie business model.
For each new Star Wars movie, the world setting, characters, mechanical creations and other designs must fit within the Star Wars framework, which of course makes it difficult to deliver an experience as all together new and fresh as the original.
The Last JediDespite coming in at a new Star Wars record running time of roughly 152 min.
The film is conscious of gender and minorities in a way that could surely not have been seen in the era of Lucas’ Star Wars.
The Last Jedi may be the first attempt to free Star Wars from its era of mythology, and propel it into the present.
This is what it means for Disney, not George Lucas, to helm the Star Wars franchise.

The orginal article.

Summary of “”A Whole Ocean of Oil Under Our Feet”: ‘There Will Be Blood’ at 10″

The mine shaft, the same one that Daniel Plainview plummets down into a lonely silver deposit in New Mexico in 1898, is the only verifiable truth that There Will Be Blood needs.
Erson’s film, which tracks Plainview’s rise to great wealth and self-imposed isolation, is best remembered for the extraordinary performance of Daniel Day-Lewis, who won his second Oscar for his portrayal of the monomaniacal oilman.
Ross is not Plainview and Oil! is not There Will Be Blood, but the first 150 pages of Sinclair’s novel bear a striking resemblance to Anderson’s film.
Plainview’s performative streak, the introduction of his “Son and partner H.W. Plainview” position him as an insurgent ready to work for the common folk lucky enough to be born upon the proverbial black gold underneath their feet.
Plainview’s primary adversary, the faith healer Eli Sunday, is a fitting stand-in for the obvious theme sitting on the surface of the movie, like the earthquake oil Plainview and H.W. stumble upon on the Sunday ranch.
Everytime Plainview grumbles, “Yes, I do!” and “Give me the blood, Lord!” during Sunday’s slapping fit in church, I lose it.
In There Will Be Blood, he endlessly studied 19th-century drilling technologies while plunging into Plainview’s dark recesses.
Plainview’s “Drainage” speech has become an iconic, much mimicked, oft-memed bit of movie coinage.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Why the A Wrinkle in Time Movie Will Change Hollywood”

Why it took 54 years to turn A Wrinkle in Time into a movie.
A Wrinkle in Time, a Disney movie based on Madeleine L’Engle’s 1962 novel of the same name, will come out on March 9, 2018.
As a novel, A Wrinkle in Time has been a mainstay of middle school English curricula for decades.
As Winfrey sees it, Wrinkle the movie heightens the stakes even more.
A Wrinkle in Time begins with the mother of all literary clich├ęs: “It was a dark and stormy night.” But what follows is wholly original.
Wrinkle will make DuVernay the fourth woman to solo-direct a movie with a budget over $100 million and the first -African-American woman ever to do so.
Despite its mega-budget, its global fan base, its award-winning writer and director, its all-star cast and, yes, even despite the presence of Oprah, there’s no guarantee A Wrinkle in Time will be a hit.
A Wrinkle in Time, the movie, will come out at a time much like the one during which Hand was planning to lobby Mr. Disney.

The orginal article.

Summary of “In “Star Wars: The Last Jedi,” Luke Skywalker Finally Becomes Cool”

The film critic Pauline Kael, in her brief review of “Star Wars,” in 1977, wrote that George Lucas “Has got the tone of bad movies down pat: you never catch the actors deliberately acting badly, they just seem to be bad actors.” Kael didn’t single out any of the young performers, but it’s safe to assume that her assessment included Mark Hamill, who played the hero Luke Skywalker.
Han got the best lines, the crackerjack adventures, and the Millennium Falcon; Luke came across like the first millennial.
We find Luke on a remote island in a hidden corner of the galaxy, living a life of self-flagellating monkhood as the guard of the Jedi temple and foundational texts.
Some fans have sharply criticized the new movie for, among its other faults, turning Luke into a decrepit pacifist, but to my mind he’s, instead, a kind of badass Buddhist and, at long last, the first character with the good sense to point out that, for all their special powers and good intentions, the Jedi have proved to be a pretty disastrous element in the universe-what with their defections to the Dark Side and all the mayhem that’s followed.
It’s refreshing to find that Luke agrees-and fitting to hear it coming from Hamill.
Best of all, time and its bitter disappointments have led Luke to finally develop a sense of humor and a sort of roguish charm-traits that Hamill, back in our galaxy, has always demonstrated offscreen.
In the absence of Harrison Ford’s Han Solo, Luke takes over as the resident gruff, no-nonsense skeptic-and the screenwriters are wise to give Hamill the scene-stealing lines and chances at relatable human interaction that he’s always deserved.
It is, for all his well-chronicled and widely celebrated feats of daring and courage-his one-in-a-million shot on the Death Star and all that followed-the coolest thing that Luke Skywalker has ever done.

The orginal article.

Summary of “How Netflix is trying to rewrite movie marketing with Bright”

The company gobbles up acquisitions at film festivals like Sundance and Toronto, but its insistence on debuting new films on the streaming service and in theaters simultaneously have made theater chains reluctant to screen Netflix films.
“And what we found was, frankly, the enthusiasm that came from Netflix, and their ability to really support us, and make the right version of the movie with resources, far surpassed anywhere else we were looking.”
In Los Angeles, a few billboards for Bright have popped up among the sea of artwork for Star Wars: The Last Jedi, but Jaffe says the service has found that the best venue to promote its new titles is actually Netflix itself.
Netflix creates different sets of visual assets for a title like Bright, with the system algorithmically determining what artwork is best suited for a given user.
Netflix uses trailers the same way, creating different clips themed around a given genre that are then served to users based on their interests – some even automatically playing after watching a different film or show.
It’s the same smart algorithmic process my colleague Ben Popper detailed last year: as people watch Bright, Netflix will get a better sense of what kind of viewers are drawn to the film, and the system will hone the film’s profile appropriately.
New potential audience members will likely be revealed, activating the promotional cycle all over again, but now targeting the people Netflix didn’t know would be interested in the movie in the first place.
Like the intelligent, algorithm-based systems Netflix is using to promote and surface Bright, that strategy represents an entirely new playing field.

The orginal article.