Summary of “‘Bull Durham’ at 30: The Making of an All-Time Sports Movie Classic”

“If I got one shot to direct,” he remembered thinking, “I’ll make a sports movie I would like to see.” At that point, Shelton already had the idea for Bull Durham.
“You cannot make a movie about a right fielder and a third baseman,” Shelton said, “Because they don’t interact.”
At first, Shelton pitched Bull Durham as Lysistrata in the minors.
The actor’s emergence as a box-office draw, Shelton said, led to Orion Pictures financing the baseball movie.
Shelton called the weathered stadium and the city “The perfect place” to shoot the movie.
Shelton filmed one for Clown Prince of Baseball Max Patkin, who plays himself, but cut it.
“Nuke doesn’t even know what he’s getting and Crash, it’s what he’s always wanted,” Shelton said.
Unlike Crash, who set the minor league home run mark before retiring, Shelton never got a final moment of glory.

The orginal article.

Summary of “”Coco” Is the Definitive Movie for This Moment”

One weekend last fall, my boyfriend, Andrew, whose favorite movies include “Deliverance” and the original “Texas Chain Saw Massacre,” went off to go see the Pixar movie “Coco,” by himself, and came back in a delirium of happy, wistful tears.
“It’s the best movie of all time.”
Eventually, Miguel realizes that H├ęctor is his real ancestor, and the movie sprints to a conclusion that’s as skillfully engineered to produce waterworks as the montage at the beginning of “Up.” But until the end, “Coco” is mostly, wonderfully, a mess of conflict and disappointment and sadness.
Before “Coco” hit theaters, it was easy to doubt that the movie would present Mexican culture as expansively and gorgeously as it does, with such natural familiarity and respect.
“Coco” is the first movie to have both an all-Latino cast and a nine-figure budget.
“Coco” is also a definitive movie for this moment: an image of all the things that we aren’t, an exploration of values that feel increasingly difficult to practice in the actual world.
“Coco” is a movie about borders more than anything-the beauty in their porousness, the absolute pain produced when a border locks you away from your family.
The thesis of the movie is that families belong together.

The orginal article.

Summary of “And the Pixie Award Goes To …”

Because it’s the Pixies, which is a thing that we made up as a way to talk about a bunch of stuff that’s happened in different Pixar movies.
The Pixie for the Character Who Wasn’t Actually the Best Pixar Character but I’m Going to Say He’s the Best Anyway Because, Whatever, It’s Time We Won a Thing This goes to Miguel from Coco, who technically is not actually the best Pixar character but I’m going to give him the award anyway because, I mean, sometimes cheating is OK. It’s just that we finally got some Mexicans into the lead roles in a Pixar movie, and so I’m going to lift that up whenever I can.
First: This goes to the Love Over Time montage scene from Up, which very well might be the most masterful four-minute stretch of any movie in the Pixar universe, a statement that should carry a mammoth of gravity with it given that the Pixar universe is stuffed fat with brilliant moments.
The Pixie for the Movie That Wasn’t a Pixar Movie but Should’ve Been a Pixar Movie This one goes to Shark Tale, which was not a Pixar movie but should’ve been a Pixar movie.
The Pixie for the Pixar Movie That, If You Only Know the Mechanics of Its Entry Point, You’d Think it Was a Revenge Movie Starring Liam Neeson A husband and wife are enjoying a nice afternoon out while their children nap nearby.
The Pixie for the Most “Nice Try, but No Thanks” Idea in a Pixar Movie I understand the sentiment behind Ratatouille’s “Anyone can cook” life lesson.
The Pixie for the Character Who Seems the Worst but Turns Out to Be the Best This one goes to Sadness from Inside Out, who, at the beginning of the movie feels like little more than a gigantic bummer but then by the end of the movie has worked herself into the most interesting, most complex, most thought-provoking character of all.
The Pixie for the Movie That Already, Even Just a Handful of Years After It’s Come Out, Already Looks Very Prophetic This one goes to Wall-E, a movie that peeks forward at what human life will be like after we wreck the planet and become machine-dependent.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Every Pixar Movie, Ranked”

What follows is the result of that process-The Ringer’s official ranking of every Pixar movie.
Finding Dory Ben Lindbergh: Thirteen years elapsed between the releases of Finding Nemo in 2003 and Finding Dory in 2016, which seems like a dangerous span of time between an animated movie and its sequel/spinoff: long enough that the kids who watched the former have aged out of the audience, but not long enough that they’ve created tiny Pixar consumers of their own.
Which reunited Nemo director Andrew Stanton and stars Ellen DeGeneres and Albert Brooks, did billion-dollar business, becoming the highest-grossing animated movie ever in the domestic market and ranking second behind Nemo in inflation-adjusted dollars on the all-time Pixar earnings leaderboard.
Monsters, Inc. Alison Herman: If your favorite SNL cast is inevitably the one that was on the air while you were in high school, your favorite Pixar movie is undoubtedly one released when you were between the ages of 8 and 12.
You’re young enough to have the intensity of feeling that can imprint a movie in your brain for decades to come, but just old enough to understand the emotional sophistication that comes with all the best Pixar projects.
To my mind, Monsters, Inc. is the movie that best exemplifies that Pixar blend, even if you remove the nostalgia factor.
In a profile of Inside Out director Pete Docter around the time of its release, the writer Lisa Miller noted that, “In my house, the movie has given us a new way to talk about how we feel.” While riding bikes, she asks her young daughter, “Who’s driving now?” Her answer is inspired by the movie: “Joy, and a little bit of Fear.” Talk about a mind-altering children’s movie.
I judge a Pixar movie by its ability to destroy me emotionally, and thus Up is, by my estimation, the best Pixar movie ever, a tale of sad widower Carl learning to live after losing his love, with the help of a child and a flying house.

The orginal article.

Summary of “‘Jurassic Park,’ ‘Last Action Hero,’ and the Meta-Blockbuster”

Last Action Hero would show that an actor who was already skirting self-parody on- and offscreen-a walking Simpsons character-could take a joke while laughing all the way to the bank.
Having committed a then-massive $60 million budget to a conceptually promising but unpolished script, Columbia sent Last Action Hero through multiple revisions, dismissing Penn and Leff and bringing on Shane Black and then William Goldman.
Last Action Hero limped into theaters with the worst pre-release buzz since Ishtar.
In his excellent 2004 book Blockbuster: How Hollywood Learned to Stop Worrying and Love the Summer, author Tom Shone suggested that the showdown between Last Action Hero and Jurassic Park was more than a game of chicken between Sony and Universal.
It’s still very much Spielberg’s world, while Last Action Hero remains a relic of a fallen kingdom.
You can almost imagine Ready Player One’s Wizard of Oz figure, James Halliday, insisting that Last Action Hero was a misunderstood masterpiece.
T2’s script plunged a not-so-innocent teenager into an R-rated world of gore, gunplay, and four-letter words, while Last Action Hero stranded Danny in a PG-13 purgatory.
In between these two movies Last Action Hero gives us an Arnold who doubts his own abilities.

The orginal article.

Summary of “How ‘Can’t Hardly Wait’ Became a Teen Cult Classic”

Can’t Hardly Wait is, true to Elfont and Kaplan’s initial idea, a party scene stretched out into an entire movie.
Released on June 12, 1998, the movie is one of the forefathers of the late ’90s teen movie craze.
Can’t Hardly Wait was originally titled The Party, and Elfont and Kaplan had structured it so that all of the movie’s main characters-Preston, Mike, William, and Kenny-were friends, and Preston was meant to fall for his best girl friend, Denise.
“Every actor at the time was literally begging to be in this movie,” says Joel Michaely, who played X-Phile #1 in Can’t Hardly Wait and who Elfont and Kaplan refer to as “The guy who runs the reunion.” “It was like, I have to be in this movie. This is gonna be a teen classic.”
All told, Can’t Hardly Wait made $25.6 million domestically and stayed in theaters for only three weeks-a disappointment, given the movie’s promising testing and the studio’s excitement on that first Friday.
Asked if he felt any anger when movies like American Pie and Superbad kicked off a wave of successful raunchy teen comedies in the decade after Can’t Hardly Wait, Embry replies, “Absolutely. Like, you fuckers.”
A year after Can’t Hardly Wait’s release, American Pie came out, not only tossing a gallon of tainted beer on the teen movie sheen, but making over $100 million domestically in the process.
In the wake of those films, teen movies stopped being made for the adolescent crowd who couldn’t wait to grow up, and started being made for the adult crowd who just wanted to go back to high school.

The orginal article.

Summary of “5 Reasons The Marvel Cinematic Universe Should Have Failed”

The X-Men series made it to three films before rebooting itself and spinning off Wolverine into a hit-and-miss series of his own.
Let’s be real, that series has made a pact with some sort of elder god, and we’re gonna be enjoying.
Maybe your infinite money can pry the Star Wars franchise from Disney? Who cares? They produce great animated shows like The Clone Wars and Rebels, but they can’t seem to escape the black hole of “Famous character, but younger” when it comes to spinoff movies.
The reviews for Solo are … fine, but who from the Star Wars universe bench could give you the equivalent of Black Panther?
Amazon is making a Lord Of The Rings series which I guess will stand independently of the films, since we don’t know if Peter Jackson will be involved, but after viewing The Hobbit trilogy took up about a month of my life, I’m pretty good with not seeing any Middle-earth stuff until the Age of Man ends.
The failed Mummy movie that was supposed to launch the “Dark Universe” was actually one of the more promising candidates.
Sure, there’ll continue to be ongoing series’ and shared universes.
A series of standalone blockbusters that all play off of the same central storyline and culminate in a number of ensemble blockbusters that somehow never get stale?

The orginal article.

Summary of “What if Star Wars never happened?”

Despite the decades that have passed since its release, it would be hard to argue that any film is as relevant to the way movies are made today than George Lucas’ 1977 space opera, Star Wars: Episode IV – A New Hope.
Kevin Feige, the Marvel head honcho who presides over what is the most lucrative and successful film franchise currently operating – including Star Wars – talks openly about how much of an impact the original trilogy had on him.
The subsidiary industries that Star Wars has spawned, from toys to novels to video games, has changed how the entertainment business works.
The release of Solo: A Star Wars Story just five months after that of The Last Jedi makes it clear that Star Wars has never been more ubiquitous than it is now; in fact, if Solo’s box office is any indication, audiences might actually be going a little sour on Disney’s attempts to turn the property from a touchstone of childhood and nostalgia into a never-ending modern-day cinematic universe like Marvel and its imitators.
Lucas brings the film in on time and just barely over budget, delivering a well-reviewed movie shot in cinema-verite style that draws comparisons to The Battle of Algiers and Z. But audiences are tired of the Vietnam War, which had finally ended in 1975, and when the movie comes out in 1976, it’s a modest success rather than a breakout hit like Graffiti.
Without Star Wars dominating screens, both William Friedkin’s Sorcerer and Martin Scorsese’s New York, New York gain enough of a foothold to become respectable hits.
Scorsese never hits rock bottom, which means he never deigns to adapt a book he has no interest in, Raging Bull; instead, with Marlon Brando available, he finally attempts to make a film based on the 1890 Wounded Knee massacre.
He never visits Hawaii on the weekend of the release of Star Wars with Lucas, which is when the pair would have come up with the idea for Raiders of the Lost Ark. Bereft after the failure of 1941 and without Raiders to distract him, Spielberg tries to make an adaptation of Blackhawk.

The orginal article.

Summary of “What Does It Take to Build a Successful Cinematic Universe?”

There is another successful shared cinematic universe out there: Fox’s X-Men films.
Both look like coherent artistic statements next to the nearly avant-garde incoherence of David Ayer’s Suicide Squad. These films were designed to usher in a cinematic universe to rival the MCU, with the optimistically titled, Snyder-directed Justice League Part One set to introduce a slew of new characters who would then appear in films of their own.
Not Everything Should Be a Cinematic Universe I can remember the long, seemingly permanent hiatus between Return of the Jedi in 1983 and the special edition rereleases in 1997.
“It was very much a classic prequel that explained stuff people didn’t want to know in the first place. It didn’t build off past movies; it drafted off past movies.” In other words, a cinematic universe is only as strong as its weakest entry, and without a strong connection to an ongoing story, Solo looked optional.
The Plans Take Precedence Over the Movies On May 22, 2017, Universal announced the name for its long-gestating series of films featuring classic monsters: The Dark Universe.
Universal essentially invented the idea of a cinematic universe in the 1940s when it discovered that teaming up its iconic monsters created new interest in the characters.
The only problem: The first and, to date, only Dark Universe entry, The Mummy, suggested that more energy had been expended planning the Dark Universe than filling it.
Maybe asking whether or not we’ll ever see another successful shared cinematic universe again isn’t the right question anyway.

The orginal article.

Summary of “‘Solo’ Flopped at the Box Office Now What?”

What Went Wrong for Solo The Shaky Production Period: The issues for Solo began once the production drama and the exit of Lord and Miller came to the fore.
When Solo was released also majorly contributed to those feelings …. The Glut of Star Wars: Solo arrived less than six months after The Last Jedi, the shortest window between Star Wars movies we’ve ever had. Seeing Solo stumble so shortly after The Last Jedi earned more than $1 billion at the box office highlights how important it is that Star Wars movies still feel like an event.
The Lack of Stakes: Though Solo isn’t the first Star Wars movie to undergo extensive reshoots since Disney acquired Lucasfilm in 2012-Rogue One had similar reshoots after the studio replaced Gareth Edwards with Tony Gilroy-it’s the first Star Wars movie that doesn’t have the built-in cosmic stakes that define the rest of the franchise.
Aside from a shocking cameo, the biggest reveals in Solo are how the smuggler met Chewbacca and Lando Calrissian-hardly “Stealing the Death Star plans” or “Training under enigmatic Jedi Master Luke Skywalker” levels of importance in the Star Wars universe.
Solo’s Alden Ehrenreich has implied that he’s signed on for at least two more Star Wars movies, and Solo ends in such a way that the story could be continued.
After dropping Solo a scant five months after The Last Jedi, Lucasfilm may conclude that it’s better off releasing only one Star Wars film a year.
Han Solo is dead, Luke Skywalker is a Force Ghost, and with the death of Carrie Fisher, Princess Leia won’t reappear in Episode IX. Instead of mining the past for stories, as Lucasfilm did with Young Han Solo, the future of the franchise could be entrusted to Rey, Poe Dameron, and other characters yet to be introduced in future films.
Otherwise, Han Solo won’t be the only one who has a bad feeling in the Star Wars universe.

The orginal article.