Summary of “Exclusive: ‘Dead Sea Scrolls’ at the Museum of the Bible are all forgeries”

A warmly lit sanctum at the exhibit’s heart reveals some of the museum’s most prized possessions: fragments of the Dead Sea Scrolls, ancient texts that include the oldest known surviving copies of the Hebrew Bible.
On Friday, independent researchers funded by the Museum of the Bible announced that all 16 of the museum’s Dead Sea Scroll fragments are modern forgeries that duped outside collectors, the museum’s founder, and some of the world’s leading biblical scholars.
What of the other 11 fragments? And how had the forgers managed to fool the world’s leading Dead Sea Scroll scholars and the Museum of the Bible?
Nearly all the authentic Dead Sea Scrolls fragments are made of tanned or lightly tanned parchment, but at least 15 of the Museum of the Bible’s fragments were made of leather, which is thicker, bumpier, and more fibrous.
In 2016, leading biblical scholars published a book on the Museum of the Bible’s fragments, dating them to the time of the Dead Sea Scrolls.
Davis then published evidence in 2017 that cast doubt on two Museum of the Bible fragments, including one that was on display when the museum opened in 2017.
Despite being purchased at four different times from four different people, the report finds that all 16 of the Museum of the Bible’s Dead Sea Scroll fragments were forged the same way-which strongly suggests that the forged fragments share a common source.
The report may also lead to a reevaluation of Dead Sea Scrolls Fragments in the Museum Collection, the 2016 book that introduced the museum’s fragments to the scholarly community.

The orginal article.

Summary of “The Best Places to Visit for Dinosaur Lovers of Any Age”

With so many fossil sites for dinosaurs and other prehistoric creatures located around the globe, it can be hard to narrow down which ones to visit.
Heaviest Dinosaur: Argentinosaurus in Patagonia, ArgentinaAlthough no complete skeleton has been found, scientists estimate that Argentinosaurus is likely the heaviest dinosaur discovered to date.
Armored Dinosaur: Borealopelta markmitchelli in Alberta, CanadaIn 2011, an impressively preserved armored dinosaur.
See the dinosaur on display at the Royal Tyrrell Museum.
The jawbone of the Megalosaurus was the first dinosaur fossil to be recognized by science; it’s on view at the Oxford University Museum of Natural History.
First Discovered Dinosaur: Megalosaurus in Oxford, EnglandTo see the first dinosaur fossil ever scientifically described, you need to travel to the Oxford University Museum of Natural History.
Antarctic Dinosaur: Glacialisaurus in Los AngelesThe first Antarctic dinosaur was unearthed in 1986., and additional fossils have been uncovered since then, despite the icy climate that makes excavation difficult.
Visitors can view fossils and models and learn about the difficulties of dinosaur digs in Antarctica.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Caring For Holocaust Survivors Whose Trauma Grows Worse Every Day”

Olga Horak, a 91-year-old Holocaust survivor, knows the Sydney Jewish Museum intimately.
Survivors like Horak have been the lifeblood of the Sydney Jewish Museum since it opened in 1992, providing living history lessons to almost 50,000 visitors every year.
The museum has also tasked survivors like Horak with providing a unique educational role: They teach nursing home caregivers to attend to elderly patients experiencing symptoms of post-traumatic stress disorder, creating a unique situation in which those who care for patients with trauma are being led by the traumatized.
In a narrow, windowless room at the museum, Horak gives an account of her harrowing World War II experience to a dozen staff from Sir Moses Montefiore Jewish Home.
Horak’s role today is to acquaint the staff – most of whom are caregivers – with the unique horrors of the Holocaust.
Horak spoke during an event marking UN International Holocaust Remembrance Day and the Liberation of Auschwitz at the Sydney Jewish Museum in January 2018.
As concentration camp survivors age, nursing homes are getting an influx of survivors who were children during the Holocaust.
“The adult survivors came from intact families, so they had stable backgrounds. But the child survivors come from fragmented families,” Symonds says.

The orginal article.

Summary of “The Curious Case of the Bog Bodies”

Who will say ‘corpse’ One Saturday in the spring of 1950, brothers Viggo and Emil Højgaard from the small village of Tollund, in Denmark, were cutting peat in a local bog when they uncovered a dead man.
Since the 18th century, the peat bogs of Northern Europe have yielded hundreds of human corpses dating from as far back as 8,000 B.C. Like Tollund Man, many of these so-called bog bodies are exquisitely preserved-their skin, intestines, internal organs, nails, hair, and even the contents of their stomachs and some of their clothes left in remarkable condition.
Even the best-preserved bog bodies emerge looking like golems, rudely crafted from leather and mud.
More recent archaeological finds, including the exhumation of Tollund Man, seem to support his theory that the bog was an intentional grave.
In his popular book The Bog People, Glob proposes that many bodies were brutally sacrificed in ritual killings to appease a fertility goddess.
Eamonn Kelly, an expert in Irish bog bodies formerly with the National Museum of Ireland, posits that Oldcroghan Man was a failed king, contender to the throne, or royal hostage sacrificed to a fertility goddess.
Kelly, E.P. An archaeological interpretation of Irish Iron Age bog bodies.
Kelly, E.P. Kingship and sacrifice: Iron age bog bodies and boundaries.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Pharrell on Evolving Masculinity, “Blurred Lines,” and “Spiritual Warfare””

The instant I join Pharrell Williams and his wife, Helen, in the lobby of the Hotel Georges V in Paris, my day becomes suddenly frictionless.
We slide out at the Guimet National Museum of Asian Arts, pausing briefly at the top of the museum stairs for Pharrell to bow to a young girl, maybe four or five years old.
Pharrell has come to Paris to launch an anime-inspired collaborative installation with Mr., a Japanese artist associated with Takashi Murakami’s Kaikai Kiki Co. The museum people greet us at the door; the exhibition space has been cleared so we can hang out and talk.
In 2015, Pharrell starred in a campaign for the vaunted French fashion house-never mind that it isn’t in the menswear business.
Pharrell has been an agent of change his whole career.
That might not sound earth-shattering now, but a whole generation of young African American misfits will tell you that Pharrell Williams was the first time they saw themselves in pop culture.
Pharrell’s wardrobe inspired subtle shifts in the culture around him-and reflected shifts going on inside him too.
Pharrell, now 46 years old, has a brain that seems to run algorithms that project and simulate the future.

The orginal article.

Summary of “‘Ripper’-the Inside Story of the Egregiously Bad Videogame”

Yet the game endures: Last year the 25th anniversary edition of Night Trap was made available on Steam, PS4, and the Nintendo Switch.
Last year at the Library of Congress’ Rulemaking Public Roundtable, James Clarendon, who used to work at 2K Games, a Take Two Company, gave testimony that when the company was seeking to reissue its megahit BioShock after a period of about five years, they realized that no archive of the game existed.
While Ripper is not part of MADE’s vast collection, if I brought in my CD-ROMs-and yes, I held onto them-to the Oakland, California museum, I could play the game on one of its old Windows PC systems.
As Handy sees it, “A videogame museum without playable games is like an art museum with the lights off.”
“Adventure games weren’t a great genre, but the Silliwood games are like the sci-fi films from the ’50s. There’s joy in watching them.”
Abandoned games on CD-ROM, floppy disk, or console cartridges can be purchased online at auction sites, or in person at one of the many retro gaming conferences, but the physical media the games are stored on are in constant danger of degradation.
The emulation community has been making old game files run on new hardware for decades, thus helping to preserve these old titles and save them from total extinction.
Using some free software downloads, I could set up my MacBook Air with the tools necessary to play Ripper all the way through to all four endings-and if I didn’t happen to own the original discs, I could download a copy of the actual game.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Exploring a Hidden Archive of New York City’s Historic Trash”

The museum is known for having preserved or restored a handful of cramped living spaces and businesses in two tenement buildings-the kind that typified the neighborhood throughout the 19th and 20th centuries, when it was a dense immigrant enclave.
As the museum combed through these cramped, dilapidated apartments and storefronts, they exhumed plenty of debris that generations of residents had left behind.
The museum’s archive of antique garbage and cast-offs is off-limits to visitors.
The Tenement Museum’s trash collection has it a little different.
Most of the trash in the archive turned up when the museum worked to stabilize the floors, ceilings, or staircases of 97 Orchard Street, one of the two tenements it owns.
Between then and the end of the 1930s, tens of millions of immigrants landed in New York City, and the museum estimates that roughly 7,000 of them passed through 97 Orchard.
“We talk about it as bringing a floor online at a time,” says Dave Favaloro, the museum’s director of curatorial affairs.
The museum hasn’t quite decided what to do with this unusual archive.

The orginal article.

Summary of “A Prescription for Awe”

In 1832, Buckland rounded off the annual meeting of the British Association for the Advancement of Science in Oxford by entertaining his audience with another novel interpretation of an extinct monster: the Megatherium, or giant sloth.
In his 1836 “Bridgewater Treatise,” Geology and Mineralogy Considered with Reference to Natural Theology, Buckland expounded at length on the ways in which divine oversight had prepared the earth as a suitable environment for humankind-right down to the geographical disposition of coal, iron ore, and limestone in the British Isles in ways suited to the needs of English capitalists.
Buckland’s efforts to advance science at Oxford proved to be no match for the conservative opposition.
In 1847, Buckland turned down an invitation to add his name to a list of supporters for a new Museum of Natural History at Oxford-a project he had once lobbied for enthusiastically, seeing the museum as a natural home for his ever-growing collections.
“Some years ago,” he replied to the invitation, “I was sanguine, as you are now, as to the possibility of Natural History making some progress at Oxford, but I have long come to the conclusion that it is utterly hopeless.”9 Buckland died in Islip in 1856, having taken no further part in his colleagues’ efforts to create the new museum.
Buckland’s once-longed-for Museum of Natural History was eventually built-the cornerstone was laid in 1855-and was nearing completion in the summer of 1860, when the British Association for the Advancement of Science was due, once again, to visit Oxford.
The advocates who took up the museum’s cause after Buckland stepped away prevailed only by doggedly reiterating his original argument-that the scientific study of nature was not merely compatible with, but genuinely supportive of, true religion.
Buckland would have been appalled by the pretensions of contemporary young “Earth Creationists” like Kentucky Creation Museum Founder Ken Ham, who claim that the history of life on earth can simply be read out of scripture with no regard for the findings of science.

The orginal article.

Summary of “A Prescription for Awe”

In 1832, Buckland rounded off the annual meeting of the British Association for the Advancement of Science in Oxford by entertaining his audience with another novel interpretation of an extinct monster: the Megatherium, or giant sloth.
In his 1836 “Bridgewater Treatise,” Geology and Mineralogy Considered with Reference to Natural Theology, Buckland expounded at length on the ways in which divine oversight had prepared the earth as a suitable environment for humankind-right down to the geographical disposition of coal, iron ore, and limestone in the British Isles in ways suited to the needs of English capitalists.
Buckland’s efforts to advance science at Oxford proved to be no match for the conservative opposition.
In 1847, Buckland turned down an invitation to add his name to a list of supporters for a new Museum of Natural History at Oxford-a project he had once lobbied for enthusiastically, seeing the museum as a natural home for his ever-growing collections.
“Some years ago,” he replied to the invitation, “I was sanguine, as you are now, as to the possibility of Natural History making some progress at Oxford, but I have long come to the conclusion that it is utterly hopeless.”9 Buckland died in Islip in 1856, having taken no further part in his colleagues’ efforts to create the new museum.
Buckland’s once-longed-for Museum of Natural History was eventually built-the cornerstone was laid in 1855-and was nearing completion in the summer of 1860, when the British Association for the Advancement of Science was due, once again, to visit Oxford.
The advocates who took up the museum’s cause after Buckland stepped away prevailed only by doggedly reiterating his original argument-that the scientific study of nature was not merely compatible with, but genuinely supportive of, true religion.
Buckland would have been appalled by the pretensions of contemporary young “Earth Creationists” like Kentucky Creation Museum Founder Ken Ham, who claim that the history of life on earth can simply be read out of scripture with no regard for the findings of science.

The orginal article.

Summary of “The Artist, the Conman and the $15 Million Fraud”

Together, Shaun and George Greenhalgh Sr. peddled at least 120 fakes to museums, galleries and auction houses around the world with a potential face value of nearly fifteen million dollars.
Shaun, the solitary family artist, created the piece, basing it on a missing Anglo-Saxon relic known as the Eadred Reliquary.
Despite the bags of material collected from the Greenhalgh’s house, an “Aladdin’s cave of evidence” as Rapley put it, Shaun may well have known that to build a criminal case against his family the police needed to prove both he and his parents knew the objects they were selling were fakes.
Police conducted over thirty hours of questioning in six interviews, most of which found Shaun steadfastly sticking to the family storyline that the art had been inherited.
Art Squad detectives remembered the frustration of letting Shaun go home to the Greenhalghs at night, knowing he’d be back again, swearing the family knew nothing of the forgeries – his father likely having coached him.
In police interviews, Shaun remained vague about his artistic ambitions, revealing only hints of bitterness that he was never able to study art or sell his own work.
The family lawyer, commenting in a brief interview, echoes that view: “Shaun has no interest in speaking to the press or revealing his thoughts for general dissemination.
His father’s death may grant Shaun some sense of freedom and a chance to create original art, but after years of keeping secrets, obeying orders and diverting his own artistic journey, he may prefer to live his life quietly, hidden in the shadows.

The orginal article.