Summary of “The 200 Best Songs of the 2010s”

“Cranes” is a soft-power anthem for frightening times, noncoercive yet still inspiring.
It’s the product of Solange working through the trauma, sadness, and disappointment of being a black woman in this society.
There’s so much space around Solange’s calm, and the song’s jazzy, soulful rhythms are carefully selected to evoke a whole history of black musicians, black culture, and black spirituality.
At a time when power is something loud and dangerous and brash, “Cranes in the Sky” is an atypical song of revolution.
It’s a New Yorker’s goodbye to New York, an overdue star’s coming-out party, and a warning to herself.
Celebrated French-Canadian producers Lunice and Jacques Greene make cameos in the unforgettable black-and-white video, but only cameos: “212” felt like pure Banks, the unfiltered arrival of a fiery new voice.
“If I listen closely. I can hear the sky falling, too.” What an unprecedented act of bravery in the history of black music, of queer music, of all music; he opened the door so that we could at once pour ourselves into his light.
It was the lens through which we listened to Channel Orange, and no song echoes the love, the glow, the tectonic impact of Frank Ocean more than “Thinkin Bout You.”.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Frank Ocean Makes Moves Like Nobody Else”

In 2012, the year he released his major label debut album, Channel Orange, and was nominated for six Grammys, he revealed in a Tumblr letter that his first love had been a man, an unusually open admission for a black male artist at the time.
To book studio time, he worked various odd jobs before heading to Los Angeles, where he began writing songs for Justin Bieber, John Legend, and Brandy.
As to whether he had any release dates in mind, he simply answered, “No.” One thing he made certain: He’s on Frank Ocean time, and so are we.
My cousins would be at the house with me for that time.
I’m working with a string arranger right now in Rio, and every time we go back and forth, because I don’t put things on the Internet, I have to send a drive with someone to Rio, or I have to go myself.
Because technology for a long time has dictated what the format is, and as punk as we want to be, we’re all kind of existing as recording artists inside of a technology, whether it’s the software we record and edit our music on, or whether it’s the medium that we press our music to distribute it.
I’ve never been in a band or had a songwriting partner or been with a group, so it’s always been a lot of time on my own writing and doing the work.
I’ve been trying to make time to do more of that sort of thing, and be in spaces where I’m not the expert.

The orginal article.

Summary of “The Chords of the Universe”

Anyone who has ever played a musical instrument is aware of the presence of mathematics on every page of the score – from the time signature that sets a piece’s rhythm, to the metronome number that determines the speed at which the piece should be played; and, of course, the very act of playing music requires us to count 1, 2, 3 and arrange these numbers into groups, called bars or measures.
Pythagoreans regarded the music component of the quadrivium as referring to music theory – the study of harmony – rather than the practice of playing music.
As my musical interests expanded, I gradually ventured beyond the Baroque-Classical-Romantic period, and turned to modern music.
In serial music, complete democracy ruled: no single note held any preferred status over the others.
At its heart it was a mathematical system, and Schoenberg was determined to impose it on music.
As a mathematician, I see a striking similarity between Schoenberg’s serial music and Albert Einstein’s general theory of relativity, as though a parallel dismantling of the canonical structures of music and physics were happening simultaneously.
One cannot fail to note the similarity to Schoenberg’s atonal music, in which each note is related only to its immediate predecessor in the series.
Whether these developments had any effect on Einstein’s and Schoenberg’s work is difficult to say, but it is revealing that several of the actors in this new world were actively involved with music: Einstein’s violin immediately comes to mind; Planck was an accomplished pianist; and the Nobel Prize-winning physicist Werner Heisenberg seriously considered pursuing a career in music before turning to quantum mechanics.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Disco Mike’s Surfer Stomp”

In retrospect, Park remembers, it was a very simple dance, not too different from how people dance nowadays.
Park has always had a turbulent relationship with dance, and for seventeen years-a period marked by a “Loss of confidence”-he didn’t dance at all.
In middle school and high school, Park began to follow his dance obsession in earnest.
In a moment of frustration and anger, Park walked out of the dance party he had organized.
“Mike-Park-Dick-Clark.” In 2011, he started a dance promotion company that promotes music that you can dance to.
The former is a dance style that became popular in the ’70s and garnered national attention on the show So You Think You Can Dance.
The first time I saw Park dance was at a small surf rock show at Otto’s Shrunken Head in Manhattan.
Years ago, before he quit dancing, Park wondered if dance was just a fad for him.

The orginal article.

Summary of “An NYC Rap Icon’s Latest Hustle: Hip-Hop Coordinator At the Library”

Over the years, McDaniels has hosted several events, like a talk with Run-D.M.C.’s Darryl McDaniels.
Recently, the library moved to carve out a part-time job dedicated to hip-hop programming, and McDaniels’ application appeared in the crop.
“Ralph has been a mentor to the whole industry,” says Beast, a filmmaker, who became an apprentice under McDaniels in the early days of “Video Music Box.” “A lot of us feed our families because of Ralph, have careers because of Ralph and are empowered because of Ralph.”
Now, 34 years later, McDaniels views his role in the library as similarly providing that opportunity for young people.
McDaniels working in his office at the Queens Library.
McDaniels grew up in Hollis, Queens, but likes to note that, counter to stereotypes, he came from an intact, two-parent family and lived in a nice house, not the projects.
Though his wife and daughter urged him to accept the coordinator position for its change of pace from Video Music Box, this cultural hub in Queens suits McDaniels.
Dennis Walcott, the president and CEO of the Queens Library, whistles and says, “Woo, look at you!” in response to the jacket and tie that McDaniels doesn’t typically wear.

The orginal article.

Summary of “The Unsolved Case of the Most Mysterious Song on the Internet – Rolling Stone”

“Everything about this song is mysterious, from the creation to the lyrics to where it played on the radio,” says amateur song detective “Mkll,” who prefers to be identified only by his internet handle.
“It’s not often that songs of this age are dug up, and the fact that a search has been happening for over a decade on the Internet really made this case unique.” Even if the case is never solved, it has briefly returned the pre-Google mystique to music, set to a Sprockets-appropriate beat.
The full song had apparently leaked out when Lydia says she received an email from someone asking for the full track; after uploading it using Lycos, she was still concerned about the legalities and quickly removed the link after the fan of the song downloaded it.
Based on the singer’s accent, is the band from Germany or, perhaps, Poland or Austria? Is it even a band, or a one-man-group operation? Is the unknown singer intoning, “Hear the young and restless dreaming” or “Here you’re under arrest for screaming”? Is the song a comment on the Cold War? Is the song called “Like the Wind,” after its not entirely decipherable opening line? Or is that voice singing “Locked Away”?
The names of these potential sources all appear on a detailed spreadsheet set up to keep track of leads: Deine Lakaien has been “Ruled out” but someone claims to recognize it as “The B-side of a demo tape.” Another song detective lamented they’d been unable to reach out to a particular company that “Managed in-store music for Whole Foods in 2003, where one YouTuber said they were ‘100 percent sure’ the song was played.” Phonebook-thick guides to Eighties New Wave records have been scrutinized.
“If I thought it was the best thing since sliced bread, I probably would be more interested, but I don’t think it’s a particular interesting song.” For his part, “Mkll” insists it’s about acknowlegement, that “The people behind the song get proper credits for their work.” A mysterious poster claimed credit for the song and put it on Spotify, but others determined he wasn’t even born when it was released.
“I think the fact that I’m so interested in this isn’t even because of the song itself – it’s understanding why this song is so mysterious and why nobody can find anything about it,” Vieira admits.
Would the singer and/or musicians involved be dragged out of obscurity and thrust in the limelight – only for fans of the song to realize they’re retired, out of practice and only had one decent song? What if the song was actually released on a small label in the Eighties? Would it then become an overpriced collector’s item out of reach of anyone who’d want to own it? “How many hundreds of people will have more money to spend than me and will ban me from purchasing an original?” Zúñiga asks.

The orginal article.

Summary of “The Man Who Recorded, Tamed, and Then Sold Nature Sounds to America”

If you flip on a waterfall to fall asleep, if you keep rainymood.com in your bookmarks, if you associate well-being with the sound of streams and crickets or wonder why the beach never quite sounds as tranquil as you imagine, it’s because of Teibel.
Though the human ear is used to filling in gaps left by a choppy radio or telephone, Teibel found it to be much less forgiving when taking in natural sounds.
As Teibel later told the New York Times, early test pressings displayed at the Harvard Coop outsold the Beatles at exam time, as students used recorded surf to drown out noisy neighbors.
“Today, we sell to everybody from precociously intelligent 13-year-olds to grandmothers who use our records for knitting,” Teibel told the Times in 1975, just after the release of environments 8: “Wood-Masted Sailboat”/”A Country Stream.”
Between 1969 and 1979, Teibel released 11 environments LPs. Most sold well, though none approached the success of “The Psychologically Ultimate Seashore,” which moved enough units that he never had to work again.
Een Newton, like most new fans, first encountered environments by accident: While nurturing an interest in environmental folk recordings, he happened upon a brief mention of Teibel in a magazine sidebar.
Part of this is revealing the man behind Syntonic Research, an endeavor Teibel kept purposefully faceless.
“The Music of the Future” How do Teibel’s records sound now, fifty years past their commercial prime? Environments 1: “The Psychologically Ultimate Seashore” is available on Discogs for a few bucks.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Ken Burns on His Eight-Year Dive into Country Music”

Best known for his epics, including his Civil War documentary, which aired on PBS over five nights in 1990 to an audience of 40 million people, the filmmaker is now readying for the premiere his latest deep-dive, Country Music.
Even the Carter Family and Jimmie Rodgers, the two acts recorded at the big bang of country music in 1927, don’t sound anything alike.
So I assumed we would be exploding the presumption that country music is this white, Southern, rural, conservative music.
In the film, you note that controversy surrounding what is or isn’t country music actually sparked one of its most vibrant eras-the 1970s.
There were a lot of purists saying, “Hey, that isn’t right.” But I would submit Patsy Cline’s version of Willie Nelson’s great classic “Crazy” as an example that the Nashville sound works-and it’s still country music.
The history of country music is a history of super strong women, and we rejoice in being able to tell that tale.
Our last episode is titled “Don’t Get Above Your Raising.” It’s an old Southern thing that means “Don’t get too big for your britches. Don’t forget where you came from.” And country music stars don’t.
As much as we want to dump on country music and say, “Oh, it’s just good ol’ boys and pickup trucks and hound dogs and six-packs of beer,” what it is really about are these poets who have crossed the last century, decade after decade after decade, writing about, talking about, singing about love and loss-and particularly loss.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Why Is American Classical Music So White?”

Why Is American Classical Music So White? : Deceptive Cadence Early American composers could have shaken off their European sound and mined the rich trove of African American music.
More difficult to decode is the relationship African American music has had – or should have had – with America’s classical music tradition.
In his article “New World Prophecy,” published last week in the autumn edition of The American Scholar, the cultural historian argues that the seeds of a truly American sound were sown but never watered, as American composers in the late 19th century largely resisted the influence of African American music.
Horowitz, who has written numerous books about the history of music in America, pays special attention to George Gershwin – one white composer who did embrace black music – and a handful of African American composers who found genuine success in the 1930s, only to see it quickly fade.
That trove of melody-rich, expressive black music could have taken root in America’s classical music, Horowitz maintains, but it didn’t – and as a result, our classical music has remained overwhelmingly white and increasingly marginalized.
He was consumed by these new methodologies: using Indian music, using African American music, to help foster an American classical music style.
I would say Porgy and Bess, with all of its problems, is the highest creative achievement in American classical music, and it is exactly the kind of American classical music that Dvořák predicted.
Near the end of your essay, you write: “Might American classical music have canonized, in parallel with jazz, an ‘American school’ privileging the black vernacular?”.

The orginal article.

Summary of “The rise of Palestinian pop”

I’d always imagined doing the things I am doing now, but I didn’t think it was possible because there were no resources – Bashar Murad. The landscape for Palestinian music, and Arabic music as a whole, is richer than it’s ever been.
The only three music venues in the Palestinian territories are in the West Bank, but their large size makes them unsuitable for emerging pop acts.
The only other venue that is a key hub for Palestinian musicians is Kabareet in the Israeli city of Haifa, run by locals and Jazar Crew, a Palestinian underground DJ collective.
The Palestinian Authority is forbidden from conducting any activities in East Jerusalem under the Oslo Accords, and Israel often prohibits cultural or political activities by Palestinian organisations on the grounds that they’re connected to the PA and erode Israeli sovereignty in the city.
Earlier this year, Israeli forces were reported to have shut down a Palestinian football tournament, and, in August, they prevented a memorial service for the Palestinian writer Subhi Ghosheh from taking place at the Yabous Cultural Center.
Palestinians have long had no access to airports in the Palestinian territories: those in Jerusalem and Gaza ceased operations around the turn of the millennium, so most Palestinians must travel to Jordan in order to fly anywhere, which costs around US$500 one-way.
The streaming giant’s new presence there is helping Palestinian musicians in two important ways: providing those who live in the Palestinian territories with a platform on which to listen to them; and, through the ‘Arab hub’, presenting them to global audiences by adding their music to playlists, an important means of music discovery.
“As a Palestinian artist, you always have people impose on you your genre; people always think we are going to play traditional Palestinian music, but we’re like every other place in the world with lots of artists doing different things.”

The orginal article.