Summary of “Why You Should Have Two Careers”

By committing to two careers, you will produce benefits for both.
In my case, I have four vocations: I’m a corporate strategist at a Fortune 500 company, US Navy Reserve officer, author of several books, and record producer.
My corporate job paycheck subsidizes my record producing career.
With no track record as a producer, nobody was going to pay me to produce his or her music, and it wasn’t money that motivated me to become a producer in the first place – it was my passion for jazz and classical music.
My day job not only afforded me the capital to make albums, but it taught me the skills to succeed as a producer.
A good producer should be someone who knows how to create a vision, recruit personnel, establish a timeline, raise money, and deliver products.
After producing over a dozen albums and winning a few Grammys, record labels and musicians have started to reach out to see if they can hire me as a producer.
While I was in Cuba making an album, one of my clients observed about the dancing musicians, “I’ve never been around people who have so much fun at work.” That my clients have a phenomenal experience only helps me drive revenue at work, so my corporate and recording careers are mutually beneficial.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Jazz’s Sisterhood: Regina Carter, Renee Rosnes, and More Women Transforming the Genre”

“It’s so hard being a jazz musician anyway. Why wouldn’t it be harder being a female jazz musician? It’s one more strike.”
The musicians pictured here offer proof of the innovation and leadership coming from an unprecedented number of women in the field, a snapshot of the freshest faces of 21st-century jazz: women instrumentalists who have sizzle right now.
“I’m honored! But why the hell is it called Trumpet Kings? ‘Cause that’s what jazz is: It’s kings. If you look at all these jazz books, you’d never see a cool picture of a woman sweating with a scrunched-up face like mine when I’m playing.”
“Discontent at the way women have been treated in jazz has been bubbling up for so long that it’s reached a boiling point and the lid’s popped off,” says music critic David Hajdu.
“Some fearless women plowed through with machetes so that another generation can say, ‘This is possible. Maybe there’s a place for me.’ Women as performers, composers, and innovators is the story in jazz today.”
These days women are headlining at concerts and clubs, at New York’s Jazz at Lincoln Center, and at festivals from Newport to New Orleans to Chicago, from San Diego to Monterey to Portland.
Last year, women nabbed a record 12 Jazz Journalist Association Jazz Awards, and for the first time ever, the Lifetime Achievement in Jazz Journalism award went to a woman, Patricia Willard.
At the same time, important contemporary jazz artists-by embracing the avant-garde movement and borrowing from hip-hop and other genres-have given their peers a safe space, less tethered to the macho roots that have characterized traditional jazz.

The orginal article.

Summary of “How Indie Artists Actually Make Money in 2019”

“I don’t really understand how any musician can afford to stay in one place,” indie veteran singer-songwriter Cass McCombs told me during an interview for Vulture earlier this year.
“We don’t make enough money to afford an apartment. I know pretty much half of the musicians in existence have a side job of some sort.” One of the most common misconceptions in the social media age – a time in which you can log on and see your favorite indie musicians partnering with brands, playing festivals, and posting selfies on tour as if they were on some endless vacation – is that the foot soldiers in the industry itself are awash in capital.
The truth is that most indie artists – from some of the nebulously defined genre’s biggest stars to its buzz-making heat seekers – rely on multiple sources of income outside of their music career to pay the bills and put food on the table: “Wavves Is a Landlord Now and Everyone Is Freaking Out,” a headline read on Exclaim earlier this year after the pop-punk act’s front man Nathan Williams posted an Instagram listing advertising vacant rented space on a property he owned.
What follows are 17 testimonials from working indie and indie-adjacent musicians about what they do when they’re not making music, how they perceive their financial future in the industry, and how much money they make – or, much more often, lose – in the process.
Cass McCombsSide hustles: truck driving; worked in bookstores, record stores, movie theaters, delicatessens; painter on the Trump Tower; demolition work; stable hand; projectionist; folded and licked invitation envelopes.
Brian Profilio, the Budos BandSide hustle: art teacher.
“I’m an art teacher in a New York City high school, and I’ve been doing it for 17 years. The biggest downside is that I can’t tour for more than a weekend. Some of my friends who are professional musicians are on the road for months at a clip, and life on the road is not easy. I don’t think of myself as a professional musician at all; I look at it as a hobby. I don’t make nearly enough money off of it to sustain myself and my family. My biggest paydays are from when people sample our music or use it commercially. On the road, maybe we make $150 a night each. We’ve never made a ton of money touring.”
Ryan Mahan, AlgiersSide hustle: refugee project work.

The orginal article.

Summary of “The New Business of Hip-Hop Beats: How One Company Gets Musicians Paid For Creating Samples”

Two artists Heron manages, multi-instrumentalist Leon Michels and composer Beat Butcha, had landed placements on a top-secret project that the producers described only as “Life-changing.”
They just needed stems of the recordings that Heron had sent them months before, including a four-bar instrumental loop Michels had created in his spare time, and a few tweaks: a new bassline and strings on top.
The success of Heron’s new music outfit is a window into how the ¬≠business’ top stars are ¬≠churning out music faster than ever, increasingly soliciting pieces of ideas from a wide range of creators in order to make as many beats as they can in real time.
“We’re in a climate where people are just trying to get records out really quickly,” says Heron.
In the late 1990s, Heron was part of a community of record-collecting fanatics who would spend hundreds of hours and thousands of dollars digging through record stores for obscure samples, re-recording them onto LPs and selling the breakbeats to producers like No I.D. and Dr. Dre.
Diddy, says Heron, would give one of Heron’s record-collecting friends $10,000 to $15,000 just to go shop for records, many of which wound up on Bad Boy albums like The LOX’s Money, Power, Respect.
Heron began working with Shady Records in 2013, where he remains vp A&R. But he also started managing ¬≠musicians on the side, beginning with Robert “G Koop” Mandell and AntMan Wonder three years ago, helping them place original music with hip-hop producers.
“The musicians and producers, they’re like a community,” says Heron.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Cecil Taylor, Pianist Who Defied Jazz Orthodoxy, Is Dead at 89”

“There is only one musician who has, by general agreement even among those who have disliked his music, been able to incorporate all that he wants to take from classical and modern Western composition into his own distinctly individual kind of blues without in the least compromising those blues, and that is Cecil Taylor, a kind of Bartok in reverse.”
Because his fully formed work was not folkish or pop-oriented, did not swing consistently and never entered the consensual jazz repertoire, Mr. Taylor could be understood to occupy an isolated place.
Mr. Taylor’s music at that time was steadily swinging and fit recognizably within the modern jazz idiom – its spiky phrases had a clear connection to Monk’s – but it was also already moving beyond it.
In 1959, Gunther Schuller devoted a long essay in The Jazz Review to the question of whether Mr. Taylor’s music was atonal.
Whitney Balliett of The New Yorker described a crowd reacting to Mr. Taylor’s performance at the Great South Bay Jazz Festival on Long Island in 1958: A few were mesmerized, he wrote, while others “Fidgeted, whispered and wandered nervously in and out of the tent, as if the ground beneath had suddenly become unbearably hot.”
It wasn’t the technique and feeling of jazz that Mr. Taylor was rejecting, only its form: the 32-bar song, the theme-solos-theme progression.
Not until the mid-1970s, Mr. Lyons told the writer John Litweiler, did the Cecil Taylor Unit have enough work that the musicians could make a living from it – mostly in Europe.
In the summer of 1988, Mr. Taylor played a series of concerts in East and West Berlin – solo, in duos and with groups of various sizes – which were released on the FMP label as an 11-CD set, “Cecil Taylor in Berlin ’88.”.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Charlie Parker and the Meaning of Freedom”

There is a famous story of Parker himself at age 16 at a jam session in Kansas City, Mo., with older, well-known musicians.
When Parker lost track of the chords during a solo, Jo Jones threw a cymbal at him and kicked him out.
Freedom in Parker’s music was the freedom to work within the melody and chords to make beautiful, life-affirming music.
The lesson: To be truly free to enjoy the best things in life, set proper moral standards for yourself and live within them as undeviatingly as Charlie Parker did in his music.
By his early 30s, Parker suffered from cirrhosis of the liver and heart disease.
Some may see Parker’s demise as an excess of freedom, but his own work teaches us that this interpretation is a misunderstanding of the term.
As a lover of music, I focus on Parker’s preternatural artistry won through the freedom that comes only from self-mastery.
In the tragedy of his life, the lessons of true freedom are sadly reinforced.

The orginal article.

Summary of “The final bar? How gentrification threatens America’s music cities”

Its success has helped Austin establish music as a fundamental part of its development, but at the same time, as many as 20% of musicians in this self-appointed “Live music capital of the world” survive below the federal poverty line.
According to a recent study by the Urban Land Institute, the city is “In the effective ’11th hour’ of the endangerment of the live music scene”, brought on by Austin’s rapid growth – it is now the fastest growing city in the US in terms of population, jobs and economy.
Hayes Carll, a 41-year-old Grammy-nominated artist who recently won Austin’s Musician of the Year, says that for most Texans, Austin is “The mecca of music cities”.
Music lives throughout Austin’s 200 or so venues, the annual music awards and festivals, and the many brilliant artists including Townes Van Zandt and Janis Joplin who have called it home.
As soon as I mention the phrase “Music cities”, Barry interrupts jovially: “Well, I think there’s only one!” Music has been part of Nashville’s foundations since the 1800s when it established itself as a centre for music publishing.
Music Row, the 200-acre area near downtown at its peak housed 270 music publishers, 120 record production agencies, 80 record manufacturing companies, 80 booking agencies and more.
Music is firmly intertwined with the city’s municipal plans for how it will develop in the future.
“The city provides affordable housing for musicians, and music programmes for school children, as”we know our graduation rates go up when kids are involved in music,” says Barry.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Why You Should Have Two Careers”

By committing to two careers, you will produce benefits for both.
In my case, I have four vocations: I’m a corporate strategist at a Fortune 500 company, US Navy Reserve officer, author of several books, and record producer.
The two questions that people ask me most frequently are “How much do you sleep?” and “How do you find time to do it all?”.
My corporate job paycheck subsidizes my record producing career.
With no track record as a producer, nobody was going to pay me to produce his or her music, and it wasn’t money that motivated me to become a producer in the first place – it was my passion for jazz and classical music.
My day job not only afforded me the capital to make albums, but it taught me the skills to succeed as a producer.
A good producer should be someone who knows how to create a vision, recruit personnel, establish a timeline, raise money, and deliver products.
After producing over a dozen albums and winning a few Grammys, record labels and musicians have started to reach out to see if they can hire me as a producer.
While I was in Cuba making an album, one of my clients observed about the dancing musicians, “I’ve never been around people who have so much fun at work.” That my clients have a phenomenal experience only helps me drive revenue at work, so my corporate and recording careers are mutually beneficial.
People wanting to book a musician for a party in New York could find a band on my organization’s website, which would then ask the booker to add a “Tip” which would be allocated to a New Orleans-based charity.

The orginal article.