Summary of “‘These kids are ticking time bombs'”

In 2017-18, the number of NBA games lost to injury or illness surpassed the 5,000 mark for the first time since the league stopped using the injured reserve list prior to the 2005-06 campaign, per certified athletic trainer Jeff Stotts, who has cataloged the careers of more than 1,100 players since that point and is considered the most authoritative public resource for tracking injuries in the NBA. This past season, in 2018-19, the league topped the 5,000 mark again.
Through dozens of interviews over the past two years with NBA team and league officials, current and former players, AAU coaches, parents, youth players, researchers, medical and athletic training officials in and around the NBA, as well as those intimately involved with youth basketball, one possible answer repeatedly emerged: Players, they say, are physically broken down by the time they reach the NBA. “It is grave,” says one NBA general manager, who says his team’s injury databases on players entering the draft, dating back decades, leave “No question” that there are more orthopedic issues among young players in recent years.
Silver, in an interview with ESPN, calls the issue “The highest priority for the league – and I think both in terms of the health and wellness of the players in the NBA, but also the larger category of millions of players, boys and girls, not just in the United States, but globally.”
Still, despite these collective efforts, the NBA continues to receive players who are broken down by the time they get there.
IN 1984, AT the age of 21, Jordan joined the Bulls after spending three years in college, typical of players at that time.
Says Clark, “All the specialization is helping the player become more skillful and more powerful and more athletic, but at the same time they’re not working on the things that prevent injuries and help them recover.”
The lack of a national governing body for youth basketball makes a uniform system of rules all but impossible, says David Krichavsky, the NBA’s vice president of youth basketball development: “Because the youth landscape has been so fragmented, you have other actors coming in and gobbling up the space that exists. A lot of them are profit-driven, and you end up with an ecosystem that has kids playing way too much basketball way too early.”
Seaford, who notes that millions of boys and girls play youth basketball in non-AAU leagues, cautions that the solutions are far from simple: “I don’t think the NBA has the power, nor do I think they should have the power to declare what organization can play basketball or when they can play it. It’s impossible to enforce. USA Basketball has no control. AAU has no control. I don’t know what can be done.”

The orginal article.

Summary of “Why the NBA and the Fashion Industry Are Connected”

Some large-scale sponsorships have even created legitimate powerhouse brands-just look to Air Jordan-but the phenomenon of players bringing quantifiable business value to fashion and accessories brands that started off the court is a new one.
Magic Johnson told Esquire that the new guys shouldn’t be getting all the credit for their fashion sense: “We all wore what was hot in our day, too. The difference [today] is the players get to show people right then and there what they have. Unless you came and took a picture of me, no one would’ve known what I wore.”
“It makes news outside of basketball when a player wears unreleased, $20,000 sneakers.” Tucker wore those sneakers-the Nike Christmastime Stewie Griffin LeBron 6s-in December 2018, which were then available on Grailed for more than $20K, according to ESPN.In fact, sneakers are many players’ gateway into fashion.
These players’ relationships with sneakers not only serve as basketball’s gateway to fashion but also as fashion’s gateway to basketball.
In 2018, the NBA changed its on-court sneaker color policy so that instead of team colors, players could wear any color sneaker during a game.
“The NBA encourages players to have businesses outside of basketball,” says NBA’s Lisa Piken Koper.
Beyond the sponsorships, the collaborations, and the investments, basketball players come to fashion as many do: as a form of self-expression.
Being a basketball player is not a lifelong career, and through external interests like fashion, players can find their next chapter.

The orginal article.

Summary of “How Mapping Shots In The NBA Changed It Forever”

Each season, 30 teams combine to play 1,230 games, and at the end of the regular season, you can bet the sum total of shots taken will be very close to 200,000.
I’d found a way to retrieve five seasons’ worth of shooting data from the web, and I built a database that included over 1 million NBA field-goal attempts, who shot them and where they shot them from.
What did surprise me when I first studied this chart was learning that outside of 6 feet, there is no place on the court where shooters make more than 45 percent of their shots.
I expected to see a marked decrease in field-goal percentage with greater distance: I thought shorter jump shots would go in at higher rates than longer jump shots.
As it turns out, NBA players make only 40 percent of their shots between 8 and 9 feet from the rim, and that number drops to only 35 percent between 25 and 26 feet from the rim.
Points are the ultimate currency in the NBA. When we visualize the average points per shot according to shot location, only then does the true economic landscape of the contemporary NBA reveal itself.
If it’s true that 3-point shots go in 36 percent of the time and 10-foot shots go in just 40 percent of the time, then why are we assigning 50 percent more value to shots from beyond that magical little arc?
The natural landscape depicted in the field-goal percentage map demonstrates that jump shooting in the NBA is essentially a 35 to 45 percent proposition; however, some of those shots are worth 3 and some are worth 2.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Giannis is the best basketball player alive”

At 24 years old, Giannis Antetokounmpo is the best basketball player in the world.
He’s the best defensive player on the No. 1 defense.
The best organizations in the league always have embraced some kind of fitting structure, and the most successful ones put their best players in conducive habitats, just as general manager Jon Horst and Budenholzer have done with Giannis.
Regardless, Giannis is probably not the absolute best offensive player in the league – at least not yet.
Stat No. 3: Of the 206 players who have played at least 50 games and averaged at least 20 minutes per game, Giannis has the third best defensive rating – and the highest such mark on the team with the best defense.
Everybody is a two-way player in this sport, and its best players excel on both ends of the court.
Trying to identify and award the best player in a sport at the end of the season isn’t unusual.
The league’s best team has a superstar who is clearly the best two-way player in the world’s best two-way sport.

The orginal article.

Summary of “This was the season when NBA team culture combusted”

As the postseason gets underway, the undercurrents that exist in Boston, Golden State, Toronto, Philadelphia and San Antonio – all places where a premium has been placed on the construction and maintenance of team culture – will be tested.
Culture triumphed in the NBA for the next couple of years.
In Boston, Stevens delivered as promised: A scrappy, young Celtics team without much star power took shape, and a culture of work and selflessness was laid down.
To the cynic, a quick scan of the NBA could suggest that the primacy of organizational culture looks more like a fleeting fad of the late-Obama era.
In Portland, Damian Lillard, CJ McCollum and coach Terry Stotts are all culture-first personalities, but if the Trail Blazers bow out in the first round of the playoffs this month, what exactly is the added value of that culture? Ditto the Utah Jazz.For San Antonio, Golden State and Boston, the reliance on a well-honed culture came up against the allure of star talent.
Adding a talent of that magnitude to a culture that strong would produce compounding effects that could make the Warriors the greatest team in the sport’s history.
Just as the NBA convinced itself that culture was the silver bullet that could recast the fortunes of a franchise, these organizations believed their elite cultures could absorb any player with a desire to win, no matter how prickly.
The present-day landscape of the empowered NBA superstar generally means that a team’s culture is secondary to that guy’s identity, which is logical because talent drives the value of the NBA product.

The orginal article.

Summary of “How former ref Tim Donaghy conspired to fix NBA games”

Jack ConcannonSuburban Philadelphia insurance salesman and friend of Donaghy who, in spring 2003, partnered with Donaghy to bet on NBA games that the referee was working.
The NBA conducted its own investigation and concluded that Donaghy did not fix games.
The research entailed interviews with more than 100 people, including current and former NBA referees, current and former NBA staff, gamblers, bookmakers, lawyers, law enforcement officials and friends and relatives of Donaghy.
Two years of reporting later, the story can now be told: This is the definitive account of how Tim Donaghy conspired to fix NBA games – and how, in so doing, he unwittingly enriched an array of gamblers to the tune of likely hundreds of millions of dollars.
Perhaps the greatest is this: that Donaghy was the ref who colluded with gamblers on NBA games for one disgraceful season.
A decade later, in the break room of the hair salon he worked in, Martino told me how it had gone: Martino had already known that their mutual buddy Tim Donaghy had been betting on his own NBA games with Concannon, and winning those bets.
Martino late at night on the phone with Donaghy, the pair having developed a nightly before-bed ritual: If Donaghy’s pick was a winner, if the spread had been covered, Martino calling the ref and whispering “Good boy,” and Donaghy echoing “Good boy” and then hanging up …. Donaghy calling two fouls 50 seconds apart against the 76ers’ leading scorer, Andre Iguodala, in the third quarter against Boston, with the score’s margin right on the spread. Iguodala heading to the bench; Boston covering the spread … Donaghy in Seattle, the Sonics hosting the Mavericks, calling 11 straight fouls against Seattle as well as the last foul of the night, with 23 seconds to go.
IN A STATEMENT to ESPN at the end of January, the NBA said: “To be clear, the Pedowitz team and the NBA performed substantial statistical and data-based analyses to determine whether Donaghy attempted to manipulate games he officiated. All of our efforts were focused on understanding precisely what he did and how he did it so we would be best equipped to protect the integrity of our games going forward.”

The orginal article.

Summary of “James Harden’s dominance is unprecedented and undeniable”

James Harden is having a moment, smack-dab inside one of the great individual stretches of professional basketball we’ve ever seen.
Harden leads the NBA in isolation plays by a massive margin for a good reason.
James Harden is disrupting the 3-point shooting space by riding the unassisted triple to brand-new heights.
James Harden goes behind the back to break down Jamal Murray and follows up by splashing a 3-pointer.
Harden the rim-attacker is also a ferocious beast, and if defenders dare to overplay the step back, they’ll find out the hard way that Harden is ready and able to blow past them.
The James Harden Experience is a novel motif, but not everyone is smitten with the Rockets’ blend of heroball and moneyball.
If you dislike the Harden aesthetic, your problems aren’t with Morey or Harden himself, they’re with the league office and the rules that don’t just tolerate his quirky life hacks on the court but tacitly encourage this.
James Harden is just the first superstar to cash in.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Bill Simmons’s NBA Trade Value Rankings 2018-19”

The last time I posted an NBA Trade Value piece, the following things were still alive: the Obama presidency, Lob City, Jon Stewart’s Daily Show, Facebook’s likability, Snapchat’s upside, Netflix’s downside, Grantland and The B.S. Report, KD and Russ, Hinkie and the Process, Olympic Melo and Hoodie Melo, Duncan and Pop, Kawhi and Pop, LeBron and Kyrie, Skip and Stephen A., Bill and Jalen, Kanye and common sense, Roy Hibbert and verticality, Charles Barkley’s “Nobody can win an NBA title by shooting jumpers” theory, and, of course, a world where the words “President Trump” provoked reactions like, “Stop it, you’re on drugs,” and, “If that happens I’m moving to Canada.”
We still marvel at the brilliance of Curry and Klay, wonder about AD’s ultimate ceiling, argue about LeBron versus Jordan, play the What-If Game every time someone gets injured.
Franchises treasure cap space more than ever, which – combined with shorter contracts, social media, savvier owners, and the Instant Gratification generation – turned player movement into an NBA 2K yearly redraft.
Every month after that, we’ll keep tweaking the list and adding new commentary for certain players when necessary.
In New York, I realized that Giannis had reached the final level of “If he’s in town, and you love basketball, you kind of HAVE to see him.” When I mentioned that on my podcast with Ryen Russillo three weeks ago, a listener emailed me that I had inadvertently stumbled into a Michelin rating for NBA players.
A perfect way to describe NBA players, right? Westbrook used to be a 3-star experience; now he’s probably a 2.
So I added NBA Michelin Stars to this Trade Value list, along with a slew of other tidbits so you could see everything: numbers, salaries, age, peak year, ceiling, you name it.
20, then players 1 through 19 are all players about whom Utah’s braintrust would either say, “We hate giving up Donovan, but let’s have a meeting ASAP,” or, “Done! Call this deal in!” And Utah wouldn’t trade him straight-up for any player listed between nos.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Bill Simmons’s NBA Trade Value Rankings 2018-19”

The last time I posted an NBA Trade Value piece, the following things were still alive: the Obama presidency, Lob City, Jon Stewart’s Daily Show, Facebook’s likability, Snapchat’s upside, Netflix’s downside, Grantland and The B.S. Report, KD and Russ, Hinkie and the Process, Olympic Melo and Hoodie Melo, Duncan and Pop, Kawhi and Pop, LeBron and Kyrie, Skip and Stephen A., Bill and Jalen, Kanye and common sense, Roy Hibbert and verticality, Charles Barkley’s “Nobody can win an NBA title by shooting jumpers” theory, and, of course, a world where the words “President Trump” provoked reactions like, “Stop it, you’re on drugs,” and, “If that happens I’m moving to Canada.”
We still marvel at the brilliance of Curry and Klay, wonder about AD’s ultimate ceiling, argue about LeBron versus Jordan, play the What-If Game every time someone gets injured.
Franchises treasure cap space more than ever, which – combined with shorter contracts, social media, savvier owners, and the Instant Gratification generation – turned player movement into an NBA 2K yearly redraft.
Every month after that, we’ll keep tweaking the list and adding new commentary for certain players when necessary.
In New York, I realized that Giannis had reached the final level of “If he’s in town, and you love basketball, you kind of HAVE to see him.” When I mentioned that on my podcast with Ryen Russillo three weeks ago, a listener emailed me that I had inadvertently stumbled into a Michelin rating for NBA players.
A perfect way to describe NBA players, right? Westbrook used to be a 3-star experience; now he’s probably a 2.
So I added NBA Michelin Stars to this Trade Value list, along with a slew of other tidbits so you could see everything: numbers, salaries, age, peak year, ceiling, you name it.
20, then players 1 through 19 are all players about whom Utah’s braintrust would either say, “We hate giving up Donovan, but let’s have a meeting ASAP,” or, “Done! Call this deal in!” And Utah wouldn’t trade him straight-up for any player listed between nos.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Carmelo Anthony is the last great American ball hog”

Simply put, Anthony looked like the most-skilled big man in a generational draft class, and he’d just shown his championship credentials on college basketball’s biggest stage.
The problem: Anthony embraces an analytically incorrect style.
Russell Westbrook drained two quick 3s and cut the lead. The Jazz called timeout, and Billy Donovan subbed out Anthony for Jerami Grant.
After the Jazz targeted Anthony on a pick-and-roll that ended with Donovan Mitchell torching Anthony on a basic switch, Donovan had no choice.
In 194 minutes with Anthony on the court, the Jazz outscored the Thunder by 58 points and the Thunder had a net rating of minus-12.6.
In the 94 minutes with Anthony on the bench, the Thunder outscored the Jazz by 32 points and had a net rating of plus-18.1.
It wouldn’t matter if Carmelo Anthony and Kobe Bryant were more gifted shooters than James Harden.
Like MJ and Kobe, Carmelo Anthony loves to shoot from those blue areas.

The orginal article.