Summary of “How former ref Tim Donaghy conspired to fix NBA games”

Jack ConcannonSuburban Philadelphia insurance salesman and friend of Donaghy who, in spring 2003, partnered with Donaghy to bet on NBA games that the referee was working.
The NBA conducted its own investigation and concluded that Donaghy did not fix games.
The research entailed interviews with more than 100 people, including current and former NBA referees, current and former NBA staff, gamblers, bookmakers, lawyers, law enforcement officials and friends and relatives of Donaghy.
Two years of reporting later, the story can now be told: This is the definitive account of how Tim Donaghy conspired to fix NBA games – and how, in so doing, he unwittingly enriched an array of gamblers to the tune of likely hundreds of millions of dollars.
Perhaps the greatest is this: that Donaghy was the ref who colluded with gamblers on NBA games for one disgraceful season.
A decade later, in the break room of the hair salon he worked in, Martino told me how it had gone: Martino had already known that their mutual buddy Tim Donaghy had been betting on his own NBA games with Concannon, and winning those bets.
Martino late at night on the phone with Donaghy, the pair having developed a nightly before-bed ritual: If Donaghy’s pick was a winner, if the spread had been covered, Martino calling the ref and whispering “Good boy,” and Donaghy echoing “Good boy” and then hanging up …. Donaghy calling two fouls 50 seconds apart against the 76ers’ leading scorer, Andre Iguodala, in the third quarter against Boston, with the score’s margin right on the spread. Iguodala heading to the bench; Boston covering the spread … Donaghy in Seattle, the Sonics hosting the Mavericks, calling 11 straight fouls against Seattle as well as the last foul of the night, with 23 seconds to go.
IN A STATEMENT to ESPN at the end of January, the NBA said: “To be clear, the Pedowitz team and the NBA performed substantial statistical and data-based analyses to determine whether Donaghy attempted to manipulate games he officiated. All of our efforts were focused on understanding precisely what he did and how he did it so we would be best equipped to protect the integrity of our games going forward.”

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Summary of “James Harden’s dominance is unprecedented and undeniable”

James Harden is having a moment, smack-dab inside one of the great individual stretches of professional basketball we’ve ever seen.
Harden leads the NBA in isolation plays by a massive margin for a good reason.
James Harden is disrupting the 3-point shooting space by riding the unassisted triple to brand-new heights.
James Harden goes behind the back to break down Jamal Murray and follows up by splashing a 3-pointer.
Harden the rim-attacker is also a ferocious beast, and if defenders dare to overplay the step back, they’ll find out the hard way that Harden is ready and able to blow past them.
The James Harden Experience is a novel motif, but not everyone is smitten with the Rockets’ blend of heroball and moneyball.
If you dislike the Harden aesthetic, your problems aren’t with Morey or Harden himself, they’re with the league office and the rules that don’t just tolerate his quirky life hacks on the court but tacitly encourage this.
James Harden is just the first superstar to cash in.

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Summary of “Bill Simmons’s NBA Trade Value Rankings 2018-19”

The last time I posted an NBA Trade Value piece, the following things were still alive: the Obama presidency, Lob City, Jon Stewart’s Daily Show, Facebook’s likability, Snapchat’s upside, Netflix’s downside, Grantland and The B.S. Report, KD and Russ, Hinkie and the Process, Olympic Melo and Hoodie Melo, Duncan and Pop, Kawhi and Pop, LeBron and Kyrie, Skip and Stephen A., Bill and Jalen, Kanye and common sense, Roy Hibbert and verticality, Charles Barkley’s “Nobody can win an NBA title by shooting jumpers” theory, and, of course, a world where the words “President Trump” provoked reactions like, “Stop it, you’re on drugs,” and, “If that happens I’m moving to Canada.”
We still marvel at the brilliance of Curry and Klay, wonder about AD’s ultimate ceiling, argue about LeBron versus Jordan, play the What-If Game every time someone gets injured.
Franchises treasure cap space more than ever, which – combined with shorter contracts, social media, savvier owners, and the Instant Gratification generation – turned player movement into an NBA 2K yearly redraft.
Every month after that, we’ll keep tweaking the list and adding new commentary for certain players when necessary.
In New York, I realized that Giannis had reached the final level of “If he’s in town, and you love basketball, you kind of HAVE to see him.” When I mentioned that on my podcast with Ryen Russillo three weeks ago, a listener emailed me that I had inadvertently stumbled into a Michelin rating for NBA players.
A perfect way to describe NBA players, right? Westbrook used to be a 3-star experience; now he’s probably a 2.
So I added NBA Michelin Stars to this Trade Value list, along with a slew of other tidbits so you could see everything: numbers, salaries, age, peak year, ceiling, you name it.
20, then players 1 through 19 are all players about whom Utah’s braintrust would either say, “We hate giving up Donovan, but let’s have a meeting ASAP,” or, “Done! Call this deal in!” And Utah wouldn’t trade him straight-up for any player listed between nos.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Bill Simmons’s NBA Trade Value Rankings 2018-19”

The last time I posted an NBA Trade Value piece, the following things were still alive: the Obama presidency, Lob City, Jon Stewart’s Daily Show, Facebook’s likability, Snapchat’s upside, Netflix’s downside, Grantland and The B.S. Report, KD and Russ, Hinkie and the Process, Olympic Melo and Hoodie Melo, Duncan and Pop, Kawhi and Pop, LeBron and Kyrie, Skip and Stephen A., Bill and Jalen, Kanye and common sense, Roy Hibbert and verticality, Charles Barkley’s “Nobody can win an NBA title by shooting jumpers” theory, and, of course, a world where the words “President Trump” provoked reactions like, “Stop it, you’re on drugs,” and, “If that happens I’m moving to Canada.”
We still marvel at the brilliance of Curry and Klay, wonder about AD’s ultimate ceiling, argue about LeBron versus Jordan, play the What-If Game every time someone gets injured.
Franchises treasure cap space more than ever, which – combined with shorter contracts, social media, savvier owners, and the Instant Gratification generation – turned player movement into an NBA 2K yearly redraft.
Every month after that, we’ll keep tweaking the list and adding new commentary for certain players when necessary.
In New York, I realized that Giannis had reached the final level of “If he’s in town, and you love basketball, you kind of HAVE to see him.” When I mentioned that on my podcast with Ryen Russillo three weeks ago, a listener emailed me that I had inadvertently stumbled into a Michelin rating for NBA players.
A perfect way to describe NBA players, right? Westbrook used to be a 3-star experience; now he’s probably a 2.
So I added NBA Michelin Stars to this Trade Value list, along with a slew of other tidbits so you could see everything: numbers, salaries, age, peak year, ceiling, you name it.
20, then players 1 through 19 are all players about whom Utah’s braintrust would either say, “We hate giving up Donovan, but let’s have a meeting ASAP,” or, “Done! Call this deal in!” And Utah wouldn’t trade him straight-up for any player listed between nos.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Carmelo Anthony is the last great American ball hog”

Simply put, Anthony looked like the most-skilled big man in a generational draft class, and he’d just shown his championship credentials on college basketball’s biggest stage.
The problem: Anthony embraces an analytically incorrect style.
Russell Westbrook drained two quick 3s and cut the lead. The Jazz called timeout, and Billy Donovan subbed out Anthony for Jerami Grant.
After the Jazz targeted Anthony on a pick-and-roll that ended with Donovan Mitchell torching Anthony on a basic switch, Donovan had no choice.
In 194 minutes with Anthony on the court, the Jazz outscored the Thunder by 58 points and the Thunder had a net rating of minus-12.6.
In the 94 minutes with Anthony on the bench, the Thunder outscored the Jazz by 32 points and had a net rating of plus-18.1.
It wouldn’t matter if Carmelo Anthony and Kobe Bryant were more gifted shooters than James Harden.
Like MJ and Kobe, Carmelo Anthony loves to shoot from those blue areas.

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Summary of “Kirk Goldsberry on The King’s evolving offensive game”

Since entering the NBA in October 2003, LeBron James has transformed from one of the league’s least effective volume scorers into a hyper-efficient offensive mastermind, dominating opposing defenses with an incredible blend of interior scoring prowess and perimeter shot creation.
James struggled mightily as a scorer in his rookie campaign.
Of the 46 players who attempted at least 1,000 field goals that season, James ranked 41st in effective field goal percentage.
James’ ability to score at the basket would quickly become his calling card.
The story of James transforming from inefficient rookie into NBA scoring champion is one of a player learning how to attack defenses with his ferocious blend of speed and strength to create scoring chances in the paint.
During the 2007-08 season, James was the only player to attempt 600 or more shots in the restricted area.
James became the best in the world at scoring in the little area that NBA defenses work to protect the most.
To defend James over the past decade is to pick a poison: Either you let him blow by one-on-one coverages and score countless buckets at the rim, or you slow down his interior attacks with help defense and allow him to create clean looks for his teammates.

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Summary of “The Art of the Sidle: The Slickest Move in NBA Media”

Sidling has become the great skill on the NBA beat, as fundamental to reporting as the corner 3 is to the sport itself.
Talking about “Casual conversations” and “One-on-ones” can make NBA reporters sound like Bachelorette contestants.
Sidling became a rite of NBA reporting around the time of the Lakers’ back-to-back titles in 2009 and 2010.
To sidle, NBA reporters become geographers, learning the route a player takes to his car.
A national NBA writer told me: “It’s really annoying when you have a sidle-and it’s absolutely your sidle-and some local reporter comes in like that.” The writer pretended to thrust a microphone in my face.
Got a minute to hear why NBA reporters sidle? One reason is that reporters don’t like revealing their hole cards.
Occasionally, reporters will flaunt a sidle in their copy.
The postseason is also when you can see one of NBA reporting’s sneakiest moves.

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Summary of “Joey Crawford and stress of referees Jackie MacMullan”

You cannot blend in, attempt to be inconspicuous, because that’s counterintuitive to the job at hand, which is to resolutely wear the trademark stripes of a referee and maintain order in a hotly contested, highly charged NBA game.
“Before you get hired,” explains NBA referee Marc Davis,”they take a body scan, and right below your heart there’s a little vacuous spot.
The state of mental health in the NBA Mental health in the NBA’s black community To medicate or not? A difficult decision Behind the anxiety and anger of an NBA ref The future of mental health in the NBA. “Dr. Joel Fish, a sports psychologist and director of the Center for Sport Psychology in Philadelphia, has worked with NBA referees and says the unique setting of their workplace leads to a cumulative level of stress that can have both short-term and long-term implications.
“We’re not talking about the kind of stress that goes away after a good night’s sleep,” Fish says. The advance of sophisticated technology, along with two-minute reports released after every game, has only added to the scrutiny of the officials. Fish counsels the referees on how to control their emotions by determining three to five”trigger points” that may set them off.
Dr. William Parham, the newly appointed director of the players’ union mental health and wellness program, has also worked with NBA officials and says the best way to help them is to examine their path to the profession.
On April 18, 2007, commissioner David Stern took the unprecedented step of suspending Crawford for the remainder of the season – and the playoffs – for tossing San Antonio Spurs big man Tim Duncan because Duncan laughed sarcastically on the bench after a call Crawford made against the Spurs.
Back in the early days, when I was first starting out in the NBA, we used to scream and holler at coaches, and the coaches would scream and holler back.
Coming Friday: Part 5 in our series on mental health in the NBA..

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Summary of “Jackie MacMullan on OCD ADHD medication and marijuana in NBA mental health”

The state of mental health in the NBA Mental health in the NBA’s black community To medicate or not? A difficult decision Behind the anxiety and anger of an NBA ref The future of mental health in the NBA. Eight times.
By middle school, Larkin’s symptoms were worsening, so his mother found him a mental health professional, who recommended an antidepressant medication to help him cope.
“I’m not depressed,” Larkin said to his mother.”Am I?”. He tried the pills. They helped alleviate some of his OCD symptoms, but he says they also robbed him of his drive and his energy, qualities that separated him as a budding basketball star.”The medication flat-lined me,” Larkin says.
The stigma of mental health is one thing; that stigma increases tenfold when their peers discover they’re on “Meds.” It’s a gamble that some players don’t believe is worth taking, because it could affect their ability to be employed by a skeptical coach or general manager.”I’ve been on and off medication my whole life,” explains one NBA star, who debated identifying himself for this story but ultimately chose to remain anonymous.
“I’d like to think it doesn’t matter, but I’m not sure that’s true when free agency comes around. I’m choosing to keep my life private because I don’t need the s– on social media. It’s hard enough already.”.”DR. WILLIAM PARHAM, the Los Angeles-based psychologist who was hired by the players’ union to oversee the growing mental health crisis in the NBA, acknowledges some mental health issues may require medication.
“But too often, medication is treating the symptoms, not the real issues,” Parham says. While the population of NBA players with OCD is minuscule, the debate over medication also pertains to anxiety, depression and attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, or ADHD, which, according to John Lucas, the Houston Rockets assistant coach who runs a wellness and aftercare substance-abuse recovery program for athletes, is rampant in the NBA.”I have so many guys from the NBA who were put on ADHD medication, and they didn’t want to be on it,” Lucas says.
Since Sanders’ suspension, the NBA has shored up its mental health policy and sent an internal memo to all of its teams on May 31 with suggested guidelines that include: securing the player’s privacy regarding his mental health; retaining a professional with experience in clinical mental health issues; identifying a psychiatrist who will be readily available to players; and providing mental health awareness materials to the team.
“We need to create a nonjudgmental space where there is no place for the opinion that your way of thinking is better than everyone else’s. If a player is self-medicating because that’s what makes them feel better, or at least that’s what they think, we have to find a way to provide them alternatives that are collaborative and confidential.”. Lucas says it’s imperative for NBA personnel to do a better job of identifying players with mental health issues sooner and to be more proactive in convincing them to seek counseling.”The guy who’s on a road trip and isolates himself is the one suffering from depression,” Lucas says.

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Summary of “LeBron has shows coming on HBO, Showtime, Starz [Video]”

Showtime this week announced a new three-part docu-series produced by LeBron James.
If the Showtime series isn’t enough, or if October is too far away, James is also producing and hosting an HBO show, “The Shop,” that debuts later this month.
If double-dipping with HBO and Showtime isn’t enough, James and his business partner Maverick Carter produced a youth football docu-series debuting on Starz in September called “Warriors of Liberty City.” This comes after his previous Starz show, “Survivor’s Remorse,” ended its four-season run.
More.Of course, James is not the only current or former star athlete who has directed their money into media ventures.
On Aug. 3, Trump tweeted, “LeBron James was just interviewed by the dumbest man on television, Don Lemon. He made LeBron look smart, which isn’t easy to do. I like Mike!”.
The tweet prompted other athletes to react in support of James.
James had already called the president a “Bum” in a 2017 tweet supporting Curry, and added, “Going to White House was a great honor until you showed up!”.
Fellow NBA stars are looking to James now for leadership off the court – both in business and politics.

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