Summary of “Having Work Friends Can Be Tricky, but It’s Worth It”

What’s more, employees who report having friends at work have higher levels of productivity, retention, and job satisfaction than those who don’t.
Many companies have tried to support office bonds through perks like ping-pong tables, free lunches, or corporate retreats, but the reality is that most of us don’t have close friends at work.
It can be a mixed blessing; people who are friends with coworkers tend to perform better at work but they also report being more emotionally exhausted and having difficulty maintaining their friendships.
When conflict arises among work friends, relationship conflict leads to negative outcomes in teams composed of friends, but positive outcomes among teams without prior friendships.
Maybe that’s why, despite the benefits of having friends at work, some people still choose to avoid it.
Some just aren’t comfortable having real friends at work.
That’s OK. Many of the benefits that come from having friends at work likely emanate from values like vulnerability, authenticity, and compassion.
While some people will always be hesitant to make friends at work, for these or other reasons, social connection is a basic human need.

The orginal article.

Summary of “How to Manage Someone Who Thinks Everything Is Urgent”

The problem is that these employees may have been praised in the past for this very behavior, even when it results in mistakes that they can then heroically “Save.” And when urgency is a part of the organizational culture, it may feel like a requirement to move fast, whether you’re a leader or a frontline employee.
Despite the damage that unaddressed urgency can do, urgent employees are usually some of the most committed and are often very productive.
It’s typical for urgent employees to see only the upside of acting quickly, not the negative effects of acting too quickly.
These decisions led to some unfortunate employee layoffs, despite her having been asked to consult with others and weigh such decisions carefully.
Effective interventions let urgent employees actually experience the success that comes from a more deliberate, thoughtful approach.
During a period of organizational growth, a previously solid team leader made people nuts because he seemed to not take others’ input, needed to manage everything himself, and didn’t share enough information or decision making with his team.
We used mindfulness techniques to help him cope with the feeling and various techniques for engaging his team so that they understood the ramifications, how to anticipate, how to shoulder more responsibility, and how to warn him if anything was going off course.
Employees who are driven by excessive urgency often act like they’re scratching an itch rather than making intentional efforts to accomplish and grow as much as they can, either for themselves or their organizations.

The orginal article.

Summary of “”Leave the crown in the garage”: What I’ve learned from a decade of being PepsiCo’s CEO”

I’ve faced many challenges over the years – as we all do – but with inspiration from family, friends, colleagues and other sources of wisdom, I’ve learned many lessons along the way.
Though it would be impossible to name all the lessons I’ve learned, I’ve come up with seven critical lessons for running a Fortune 50 company in the 21st century.
That’s lesson number one: Come up with a vision that not only reflects the direction of a company, but moves people, inspires people to make it a reality.
My second lesson is to think hard about your time horizon.
He replied, “Because you’re trying to lead when you need to follow.” Then he added, “If you learned to follow, you’d be a better leader. And it would make you a better dancer.” What a profound lesson.
That’s what my seventh lesson is all about.
These are the seven critical lessons I wanted to share with you.
These seven lessons translate into the seven characteristics of a great leader: Vision.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Which Way Out of the Venezuelan Crisis?”

For an article entitled “Being Honest About Venezuela,” Gonzalez begins with a strange conspiracy theory: that a helicopter attack against government targets was really a false flag operation carried out by the government itself.
Gonzalez’s goal is to reveal Maduro’s “Betrayal” of the Revolution, but this betrayal takes the form of a catch-22: the government is ineffective, but if it attempts to act, it is authoritarian; when it defends itself in a far less heavy-handed fashion than most governments would, it is repressive; it is fiscally irresponsible, but criticized for turning out of desperation to extractive projects like the Arco Minero; if it fails to fill the shelves, it is useless, but collaborating with private companies to do so is high treason; and when an admittedly problematic socialist party acts in a partisan way – this being, after all, what revolutionary parties are meant to do – it becomes an “Instrument of political repression.”
For a revolutionary socialist, the author seems to hold liberal democracy in high esteem, misleadingly decrying Chavismo’s “Packed institutions” and deeming the government “Increasingly antidemocratic” without specifying by what measure.
With little more than a nod to imperialism, global capital, or the brutality of the Venezuelan opposition, Gonzalez heaps blame on Maduro’s shoulders.
Like the mainstream media, he doesn’t tell us who is responsible for the deaths in the streets, and like the mainstream media, he offers decontextualized tragedies as proof of the government’s failure.
The government is not the Bolivarian project, which goes far beyond the presidency – this is why they haven’t been able to defeat it and why it is still in the streets today.
The Constituent Assembly is a step toward this, but we also need to cleanse the government and the institutions, where there is too much corruption and bureaucracy.
We must be critical toward the government and build a true alternative capable of governing.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Which Way Out of the Venezuelan Crisis?”

For an article entitled “Being Honest About Venezuela,” Gonzalez begins with a strange conspiracy theory: that a helicopter attack against government targets was really a false flag operation carried out by the government itself.
Gonzalez’s goal is to reveal Maduro’s “Betrayal” of the Revolution, but this betrayal takes the form of a catch-22: the government is ineffective, but if it attempts to act, it is authoritarian; when it defends itself in a far less heavy-handed fashion than most governments would, it is repressive; it is fiscally irresponsible, but criticized for turning out of desperation to extractive projects like the Arco Minero; if it fails to fill the shelves, it is useless, but collaborating with private companies to do so is high treason; and when an admittedly problematic socialist party acts in a partisan way – this being, after all, what revolutionary parties are meant to do – it becomes an “Instrument of political repression.”
For a revolutionary socialist, the author seems to hold liberal democracy in high esteem, misleadingly decrying Chavismo’s “Packed institutions” and deeming the government “Increasingly antidemocratic” without specifying by what measure.
With little more than a nod to imperialism, global capital, or the brutality of the Venezuelan opposition, Gonzalez heaps blame on Maduro’s shoulders.
Like the mainstream media, he doesn’t tell us who is responsible for the deaths in the streets, and like the mainstream media, he offers decontextualized tragedies as proof of the government’s failure.
The government is not the Bolivarian project, which goes far beyond the presidency – this is why they haven’t been able to defeat it and why it is still in the streets today.
The Constituent Assembly is a step toward this, but we also need to cleanse the government and the institutions, where there is too much corruption and bureaucracy.
We must be critical toward the government and build a true alternative capable of governing.

The orginal article.

Summary of “How I Stopped Trying to Please Everyone and Started Prioritizing Myself”

I had convinced myself that they didn’t care, that they were taking me for granted and considered me their personal property.
Whenever I attempted to do something for myself, rest, or say “No,” I was gripped by crippling guilt.
Instead of deriving pleasure from my hobbies, I punished myself for letting others down.
With guilt overpowering me every time I withdrew from my self-invalidation and chose to prioritize myself.
Yes, I could force myself to say “No.” But afterward, I would plummet into a turbulent sea of unhappiness, guilt, and self-punishment.
If I wanted to learn to prioritize myself without suffering I had to treat the root cause.
I affirmed it twenty times a day, told myself when I felt guilty for putting myself first.
I assured myself when I finally told my colleagues, family, and friends that I was stressed and exhausted, that I couldn’t go on like this, that I needed time for myself.

The orginal article.

Summary of “What Spinning Off a GE Business Taught Me About Managing Ultra-Fast Change”

So four years ago, when I was CEO of GE Capital Retail Finance and tapped to lead a mega change initiative – splitting off our unit into a new, publicly traded company, Synchrony Financial – I’ll admit I viewed it as a huge challenge.
Major organizational changes, covering everything from recruiting and branding to regulatory approvals and marketing, happened in rapid succession, with a hard deadline of 12 months to get it all done for the IPO – and 18 months from the IPO until our full separation from GE. While every CEO is forced to work through organizational change, many will tell you that of all their duties, change management scares them the most, because nearly every aspect of a company and its leadership is tested.
We went from being part of a company with over 300,000 employees, at GE, to being a company of 10,000, at Synchrony Financial, seemingly overnight.
We have more than 1,000 employees co-located at a number of different partner sites, so we needed to make sure each employee heard the same message directly from us, not only through email.
Often I received this question from our employees: “How can we preserve our GE heritage while embracing our new future as a stand-alone company?” To get to the answer, I asked them the same questions I had asked our senior leaders.
We transformed those feelings into a simple sentence: “We pioneer the future of financing, improving the success of every business we serve and the quality of each life we touch.” This ended up being the “True north” our employees rallied around.
As we further studied the employee feedback, as well as the composition of our workforce that was very different from GE’s, we made many changes.
We were completely transparent about all of these changes and took employee feedback into account as much as we could.

The orginal article.

Summary of “One Behavior Separates The Successful From The Average”

A certain farmer had become old and ready to pass his farm down to one of his two sons.
The older son was furious! “What are you talking about?!” he fumed.
“Okay,” the father said, “I need you to do something for me. We need more stocks. Will you go to Cibi’s farm and see if he has any cows for sale?”.
The older son shortly returned and reported, “Father, Cibi has 6 cows for sale.”
The father graciously thanked the older son for his work.
A short while later, he returned and reported, “Father, Cibi has 6 cows for sale. Each cow will cost 2,000 rupees. If we are thinking about buying more than 6 cows, Cibi said he would be willing to reduce the price 100 rupees. Cibi also said they are getting special jersey cows next week if we aren’t in a hurry, it may be good to wait. However, if we need the cows urgently, Cibi said he could deliver the cows tomorrow.”
The father graciously thanked the younger son for his work.
For the most part, most people are like the older son in the story.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Why 99 Percent of All Meetings Are a Complete Waste of Money”

Here’s an elephant in the meeting room that no one ever discusses: Meetings are hugely expensive.
If the money came out of your pocket, would you have the meeting?
Any meeting that won’t directly generate revenue or cost savings-either in the form of a key decision or a concrete plan of action-is a complete waste of money.
If the group needs to make a decision during a meeting, shouldn’t they have the information they need to make that decision ahead of time? Send documents, reports, etc.
Holding a meeting to share information wastes the entire group’s time…and the company’s money.
So a meeting that will start at 9 is usually scheduled to run until 9:30 or 10, even if 10 minutes is all that is required to make a decision.
Don’t forget…if you only need 10 minutes, do you really need to hold the meeting?
Great meetings result in decisions, but a decision isn’t really a decision if it’s never carried it out.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Ask Polly: I Moved for My Job, and It Was a Huge Mistake!”

What’s crazy about overachievers who take big risks but who are also neurotic is that we expect ourselves to FIND A SOLUTION using our minds instead of allowing our feelings to tell us what should come next.
Slowing down to feel your feelings doesn’t mean not exercising, which you know manages to keep you afloat moodwise.
You’ll get upset about something, but because you’re feeling it completely instead of pushing it away and bellowing GET BACK TO WORK, YOU FAILURE, you will be able to follow your instincts for a change.
Sensitive women who work their asses off and don’t feel their feelings enough tend to have a lot of trouble standing up for themselves in work situations.
So we’re always paranoid about being “Bitchy.” We ignore our own feelings and we try to ignore other people’s feelings, too, to compensate.
Knowing how you feel and being able to stand up for how you feel instead of defining yourself as a fuck-up and a judgmental bitch is pretty much essential to every woman, and it’s particularly essential if you want to enter middle age without constantly hating yourself for not having “Arrived” in some magical place by now.
No matter what you do next, you have to honor your feelings and give yourself more credit for working so hard to get to this point.
Not in a place or in a job, but in that good feeling inside your heart that says, “I am doing my best. I took a big risk and I floundered but I’m still trying so hard, and that’s a beautiful thing, maybe even more beautiful than sailing across some imaginary finish line.” There is promise in this false start.

The orginal article.