Summary of “Why 99 Percent of All Meetings Are a Complete Waste of Money”

Here’s an elephant in the meeting room that no one ever discusses: Meetings are hugely expensive.
If the money came out of your pocket, would you have the meeting?
Any meeting that won’t directly generate revenue or cost savings-either in the form of a key decision or a concrete plan of action-is a complete waste of money.
If the group needs to make a decision during a meeting, shouldn’t they have the information they need to make that decision ahead of time? Send documents, reports, etc.
Holding a meeting to share information wastes the entire group’s time…and the company’s money.
So a meeting that will start at 9 is usually scheduled to run until 9:30 or 10, even if 10 minutes is all that is required to make a decision.
Don’t forget…if you only need 10 minutes, do you really need to hold the meeting?
Great meetings result in decisions, but a decision isn’t really a decision if it’s never carried it out.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Ask Polly: I Moved for My Job, and It Was a Huge Mistake!”

What’s crazy about overachievers who take big risks but who are also neurotic is that we expect ourselves to FIND A SOLUTION using our minds instead of allowing our feelings to tell us what should come next.
Slowing down to feel your feelings doesn’t mean not exercising, which you know manages to keep you afloat moodwise.
You’ll get upset about something, but because you’re feeling it completely instead of pushing it away and bellowing GET BACK TO WORK, YOU FAILURE, you will be able to follow your instincts for a change.
Sensitive women who work their asses off and don’t feel their feelings enough tend to have a lot of trouble standing up for themselves in work situations.
So we’re always paranoid about being “Bitchy.” We ignore our own feelings and we try to ignore other people’s feelings, too, to compensate.
Knowing how you feel and being able to stand up for how you feel instead of defining yourself as a fuck-up and a judgmental bitch is pretty much essential to every woman, and it’s particularly essential if you want to enter middle age without constantly hating yourself for not having “Arrived” in some magical place by now.
No matter what you do next, you have to honor your feelings and give yourself more credit for working so hard to get to this point.
Not in a place or in a job, but in that good feeling inside your heart that says, “I am doing my best. I took a big risk and I floundered but I’m still trying so hard, and that’s a beautiful thing, maybe even more beautiful than sailing across some imaginary finish line.” There is promise in this false start.

The orginal article.

Summary of “In the knowledge economy, we need a Netflix of education”

Such a solution would adapt to the user’s needs and learn how to make ongoing customized recommendations and suggestions through a truly interactive and impactful learning experience.
In many ways the entertainment model is a good framework for knowledge management and learning development applications.
The solution for the learning and development industry would be a platform that can make education more accessible and relevant – something that allows us to absorb and spread knowledge seamlessly.
Just as Netflix delivers entertainment we want at our fingertips, the knowledge and learning we need should be delivered where and when we need it.
Using artificial intelligence and machine learning, solutions can now aggregate, curate and personalize learning processes and content.
New AI-driven platforms will deliver the content your knowledge workers need at the right time and place.
Curation: Using AI and machine learning will be key to curate relevant and contextual content to your team at the right time and at the point of need.
In the end, let’s use AI and machine learning to help advance our employees’ learning and career paths – and not to replace them.

The orginal article.

Summary of “The Why before the Why”

Every company is interested in why people buy their products, but rewind time a bit further and you’ll find even more fundamental insights.
Across the interviews, it turns out there were four common situations that triggered people to actively shop for Basecamp.
2 “We can’t mess up like that again.” Unlike the first example above which mostly anticipated problems up ahead, this situation gets right to the heart of it: Something bad actually happened.
People may be on different schedules in different locations, so continued real-time meetings or communication isn’t possible.
They need something that not only brings people together, but something that helps them organize, delegate, communicate at different speeds, and make progress together on everyone’s own schedule.
They’ll need to track work that needs to get done, who’s working on what, what they asked people to do, and the overall status of the project.
What’s most interesting is feeling the moments, the situations people find themselves in before they’re our customers.
Basecamp is often second - they’ve tried something else before, or cobbled together a series of tools they stumbled into but fumbled around with.

The orginal article.

Summary of “10 Habits That Change Boys Into Men”

Much has been said and written in recent years about the challenges of men and boys.
A common theme is that men and boys have become increasingly confused about their identity and role in society.
Girls outperform boys now at every level - from elementary school through graduate school.
According to the National Center for Education Statistics, boys are 30 percent more likely than girls to drop out of both high school and college.
Naturally, boys have a strong need for accomplishment and challenge.
Boys on the other hand, are often motivated by tangible experiences that relate to real life.
Get Intensive Physical StimulationShort and intensive learning spurts, followed by rigorous physical stimulation is a powerful and positive way for boys and men to learn.
The Need For Physical PainInterestingly, boys and girls experience pain differently.

The orginal article.

Summary of “There’s a better way to build your startup”

Under the leadership of Kalanick, Uber appears to have chosen ‘The Lord of The Flies’ as its cultural roadmap, and it’s a cautionary tale that startup founders everywhere need to contemplate as they build their companies.
“Companies set business goals all the time. They use these goals to check their progress and hold themselves accountable to the metrics. If a company is not taking the same approach to culture then they’re showing you that they aren’t taking it as seriously as they take other business goals,” Kapor Klein explained.
Danny Crichton, a NYC investor in early stage companies, agrees it’s something that needs to be foundational for the company.
While Salesforce is a long established company, Clef, an identity startup launched in 2013, that became part of Twilio in March, put culture at the center of its hiring process, and went so far as to create a handbook, which it then “Open sourced” for others to use.
“Building a company is hard. Building a company that prioritizes inclusion in an industry that doesn’t is even harder. Both this handbook and our company are a long way from perfect, but this is a start. One of our values is to be better today than yesterday, and we’re excited to have help making this core part of our company better,” he wrote.
Another company trying to do it differently is Trivago, the German hotel search site, which claims to be building the company to be a meritocracy where no single person has total power over another person’s career.
It’s worth noting that Glass Ceiling reviews of the company don’t paint quite as rosy a picture of the company’s culture as the company’s executives, especially when it comes to advancement opportunities and salary.
Surely, Uber’s case should be a lesson for every startup that it’s better to start that process of building a positive culture from day one – and not have to go back and fix it or retrofit it down the road. Featured Image: Rawpixel/Shutterstock.

The orginal article.

Summary of “How to Integrate Data and Analytics into Every Part of Your Organization”

The stakes are high, with International Data Corporation estimating that global business investments in D&A will surpass $200 billion a year by 2020.
D&A should be the pulse of the organization, incorporated into all key decisions across sales, marketing, supply chain, customer experience, and other core functions.
What’s the best way to build effective D&A capabilities? Start by developing a strategy across the entire enterprise that includes a clear understanding of what you hope to accomplish and how success will be measured.
One of the major American sports leagues is a good example of an organization that is making the most of its D&A function, applying it in scheduling to reduce expenses, for example, reducing the need for teams to fly from city to city for games on back-to-back nights.
Some organizations have D&A capabilities spread across functions, or rely on a few data scientists to provide insights.
In our experience, companies that build a D&A capability meeting their business needs have teams of data and software engineers who are skilled in the use of big data and data scientists who are wholly focused on a D&A initiative.
While structures vary, the team should be seamlessly integrated with the company’s existing providers and consumers of D&A, operating in cohesion with non-D&A colleagues – people who really understand both the business challenges and how the business works – to set and work toward realistic and relevant strategic goals.
In an age where data is created on a scale far beyond the human mind’s ability to process it, business leaders need D&A they can trust to inform their most important decisions – not just to reduce costs but also to achieve growth.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Engineering a culture of psychological safety”

The biggest finding was that the number-one indicator of a successful team wasn’t tenure, seniority or salary levels, but psychological safety.
Our team has a strong sense of culture that can be hard for new people to join.
“Our team has a strong sense of culture, and it’s hard for new people to join”.
A team – proud that every engineer is on-call for their service – may need to professionalize around a smaller team of operations-focused engineers as the potential production impact of an outage grows.
Good managers are proactive about moving on an engineer who is a poor fit for their team’s workload. Great managers expand their team’s remit to make better use of the engineers they have, so they feel their skills and talents are valued.
Imagine how grateful Karen would have been, had a senior engineer at the Engineering Review offered to work on her design with her, so it was more acceptable to the team.
Rather than yelling at an engineering team each time they have an outage, help them build tools to measure what an outage is, a Service Level Objective that shows how they are doing, and a culture that means they use the space between their objective, and reality, to choose the work that will have the most impact.
Discuss what “Safety” means to your team; see if they’ll share when they felt “Unsafe”Build a culture of respect & clear communication, starting with your actions.

The orginal article.

Summary of “The 4 Types of Innovation and the Problems They Solve”

In researching my book, Mapping Innovation, I found that every innovation strategy fails eventually, because innovation is, at its core, about solving problems – and there are as many ways to innovate as there are types of problems to solve.
They find themselves locked into a set of solutions that don’t fit the problems they need to solve.
It was with this in mind that I created the Innovation Matrix to help leaders identify the right type of strategy to solve a problem, by asking two questions: How well can we define the problem? and How well can we define the skill domain(s) needed to solve it?
We want to improve existing capabilities in existing markets, and we have a pretty clear idea of what problems need to be solved and what skill domains are required to solve them.
For these types of problems, conventional strategies like strategic roadmapping, traditional R&D labs, and using acquisitions to bring new resources and skill sets into the organization are usually effective.
As Thomas Kuhn explained in the The Structure of Scientific Revolutions, we advance in specific fields by creating paradigms, which sometimes can make it very difficult to solve a problem within the domain in which it arose – but the problem may be resolved fairly easily within the paradigm of an adjacent domain.
Clearly, being able to reach out to scientists on the cutting edge can help a business plan for the future, just as the other approaches, such as design thinking, open innovation, business model innovation, and others, can help propel a business forward if applied in the right context.
There are always new problems to solve; learn to apply the solution that best fits your current problem.

The orginal article.

Summary of “and Ask These Questions from Stripe’s COO”

According to COO Claire Hughes Johnson, the biggest challenge the company faces isn’t bringing enough new people on board.
“You don’t want to get attached to thinking that a certain process is the only way to do something, or that you need a certain combination of people to get something done – I can pretty much guarantee that neither the process or the people will still be right a year from now.”
“Take the time to ask: Okay, what kind of people have we hired? Are they a diverse enough group to bring different perspectives and experience to the company? Who’s doing really well? Who’s scaling at the same pace as the company? What are those people’s characteristics?” says Johnson.
“You want to hire more people who fit the mold of the people who not only have the right skills, but who are having a good time too. Happiness is critical to high performance – happy people get curious and want to learn.”
“When making product decisions, you want people to reference the plan – ‘Is this new idea or feature serving our overarching objectives?’ Or ‘should we launch this thing even if it doesn’t serve any of our 5-year objectives?’ Your constitutional document empowers people to ask and answer these questions so your company doesn’t get distracted from the things you absolutely believe you must do to succeed.”
“There are many companies out there that get really into decision rights – like who’s allowed to decide what based on seniority or role. In my experience, this doesn’t work when you need to move and grow fast. I’ve been at companies where people will say, ‘Talk to these three people and then you can go ahead and decide.’ Those three people inevitably become a bottleneck, and a bunch of other people feel like they don’t truly have ownership of their work.”
Nearly all of the questions you should ask before you scale are about making trust central to your company’s operations.
As a founder, can you trust hundreds of people – including many new people every month – to do their work the way you would do it? You’ll only be able to answer yes if you trust their judgment, and the only way to trust their judgment is to – above all – hire well.

The orginal article.