Summary of “Staying Productive While on a Business Trip Takes Planning”

You can’t just wake-up in the morning of and decide that you’re going to go on a business trip.
Put your business in good hands: Appoint an emergency contact in case a fire needs to be put out while you’re away.
Take advantage of your commute: While you’re en route, create a list of your priorities and review your schedule so that you know how you’re going to productively spend your time.
While you can purchase WIFI on the plane, I think it’s a waste of time and money because the spotty quality.
Business trips are an opportunity to spark creativity while you’re outside your comfort zone.
If you were at home a family member or employee just might interrupt you while you’re focused on deep work.
How can I possibly maintain my current workload while on the road? The fact is, you can’t put in a full workday while away.
This way you aren’t freaking-out about everything that needs to get done either while on the trip or when you return.

The orginal article.

Summary of “I Was 35 When I Discovered I’m on the Autism Spectrum”

A Danish study published in January 2015 suggests that diagnoses of autism are more frequent because of a broadening of diagnostic criteria over the years, meaning there could be generations of people with autism spectrum disorder who were never diagnosed.
I’d pulled myself out of those spirals before they became too serious.
If a doctor told me I’d never be “Normal,” that my strangeness was something pathological, would that be the excuse I needed to turn into a complete lump?
There were all the times I’d walk away from an encounter with someone new with the overwhelming feeling I’d done something wrong and had no idea what it was.
If someone did get mad at me, I’d obsess over it, frozen in a moment of shame and self-hatred long after the other person had let it go.
Worst of all was that I couldn’t feel excited on almost any level – I’d sit through TV shows and movies like a stone.
For most of my life, I’d been afraid discovering I was on the spectrum meant I was cut off from being able to maintain friendships, professional contacts, a romantic connection.
In August 2015, Dr. P explained, slowly and with caution, that she was moving out of state to join a new practice and to be closer to family, so I’d need to change therapists, and that she’d help with the transition.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Brexit: what happens the next day if there is no deal?”

Currently, a driver of a UK-registered car is allowed to drive anywhere in the EU, the EEA, Switzerland and Serbia, and not have to carry a green card that proves you have insurance cover.
If the UK leaves without a deal, all changes and drivers will be expected to carry a green card when in mainland Europe and Ireland.
The official advice from the UK government is: “From 29 March 2019, in the event that there is no EU exit deal drivers of UK-registered vehicles will need to carry a motor insurance green card when driving in the EU and EEA.”.
Direct Line insurance says: “In the event of a no-deal Brexit, we have plans to ensure customers are provided with a green card if they drive in Europe on or after 29 March. Customers will need to contact us at least two weeks in advance of when they are due to travel.”
From 29 March, if the UK leaves without a deal, the government says: “You may need a GB sticker even if your vehicle has a europlate. You will not need a GB sticker to drive outside the UK if you replace a europlate with a numberplate that features the GB sign without the EU flag.” PC. Driving with a UK licence when abroad. In a sentence You will have to buy an International Driving Permit to drive in Europe, at a price of £5.50, with different ones required for France and Spain.
If there is no deal with the EU then recognition of UK driving licences in the EU ends.
So British drivers will have to go to the Post Office and obtain an International Driving Permit, which you will need to carry with you in conjunction with your UK driving licence.
It was also revealed this week that British citizens resident in Ireland – estimated to number about 300,000 – will be required to swap their UK driving licence for an Irish one at a fee of €55 if there is no deal on Brexit.

The orginal article.

Summary of “How to stop being a people pleaser”

3 minute Read. Do you regularly ignore your own work in response to others’ need for your assistance? Do you say “Yes” to meetings that do more to fulfill someone else’s agenda instead of your own? While being a people pleaser may endear you to others in the short term, this behavior can be harmful to your career in the long run.
People pleasers often struggle to say the word “No.” The fear of not being liked, of losing friends or of disappointing others paralyzes them, making the word “No” seem like a swear word.
To practice saying “No,” Martinez suggests starting with small no’s, ones that don’t have any significant ramifications.
Then start to say medium no’s, such as saying no to a friend who invites you out to coffee when you’re feeling overwhelmed with work or other responsibilities.
Make a list of situations that you struggle saying “No” to and work your way through the list, checking off each situation when you do say “No.”
Often saying “No” comes with feeling the need to offer a long explanation for disappointing the asker.
Jonathan Alpert, Manhattan psychotherapist, performance coach, and author of Be Fearless: Change Your Life in 28 Days, suggests providing only a short explanation or none at all, adding that a polite “No” can help people pleasers to be assertive with their decision.
Will you saying “No” to your sister mean that she’ll disown you and never come over for dinner again? Will saying “No” to a coworker who wants to pick your brain about something really mean that you won’t be able to have lunch together again? “When you understand the dynamic and your role, you won’t feel as worried about the consequences of saying no. You’ll realize that your relationships can withstand your saying no,” says Alpert.

The orginal article.

Summary of “The political case for more free time”

Real wages are still stagnant, as they have been for decades, and what gains there are stay with the best paid workers – in large part because most job growth is in low-paid service work.
Add burnout on top of that, and the old fault lines within the working class are obscured by the giant veil of shit we’ve all come to mistake for working life in the twenty-first century.
It’s not the much more populous, much more diverse group of service workers and truck drivers and manual laborers and office assistants getting the spotlight: it’s those of us who were led to believe we were promised something better.
Their growing militancy may yet boost other unions, but for now public service workers are just happy to be holding steady after Janus, the recent Supreme Court decision undercutting public-sector unions’ ability to charge collective bargaining fees, and factory workers are still trying to stanch the bleeding from NAFTA and Trump’s farces.
A high-paid tech worker and a precariously employed service worker both suffer under our absolutely bonkers healthcare system.
It doesn’t just provide health care for those who don’t have it, it also gives well-insured workers the freedom to take a sabbatical between jobs, or stay home with kids, or start a creative project, or whatever it is that humans do when not required to spend their daytime hours in a job they hate – not to mention the good health to enjoy that time.
For Medicare for All to succeed, it can’t occupy what little free time workers have.
The more free time it saves – by directly confronting care work, racialized health disparities, queer health needs, long-term care for the disabled – the more successful it will be.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Don’t Know What You Want? Improve These 7 Universal Skills”

What does success look like? What do you want from life? What career do you want?
We think it’s the worst thing in the world if you don’t know what you want to do in life.
One of the biggest thinking errors that I’ve made was that I thought I needed to know what I exactly wanted to do with my life.
The truth is that no one knows what they truly want.
So it’s not important to know exactly what you want to do with your life.
It’s not even realistic to boldly claim “I know what I want!”.
If you can’t decide what direction you want to go in life, that’s automatically your #1 goal in life – to figure out where you want to go.
Persuasion: Learn how to get what you want in an ethical way.

The orginal article.

Summary of “3 Women on Being the Caregiver of a Disabled Sibling”

More American women than you think are currently waiting for their parents to die – knowing when that happens, they will end up caring for their disabled siblings.
Their childhoods are a dress rehearsal for this inevitability: Research shows that in these families, starting in early childhood, sisters are much more likely than their brothers to help parents care for developmentally disabled children – for example, helping to dress or feed their siblings.
Once disabled children graduate from high school and age out of federally mandated special-education services, which expire at age 22 – a milestone that has been called “The services cliff” – families must ask not just what happens next, but what will happen after the parents are gone.
Below, three women share what it’s like to be ambitious in their careers, date, and communicate with their families while caring for a disabled sibling.
I distinctly remember being like 12, and all of a sudden my parents started going to the gym every day – they had kind of let go of their health but then they were like, if we don’t change, Rekha is going to keep getting bigger, and we have to be able to physically care for her.
My parents were very upfront, like, this is your little sister, she needs your help, don’t ever let her down.
My parents were very up-front, like, this is your little sister, she needs your help, don’t ever let her down.
If my parents pass away, my sister will be my responsibility.

The orginal article.

Summary of “A Simple Formula for Changing Our Behavior”

I’m always inclined to ask: Why do I react the way I do? The answer is a complicated fusion of reasons including my love for my daughter, my desire to teach her, my low tolerance for messiness, my need to be in control, my longing for her success, and the list goes on.
Because knowing why I act a certain way does not change my behavior.
Practicing a new behavior, showing up in a new way, or acting differently, feels inauthentic.
Changing a dance that’s been danced many times before will never feel natural.
If we want to learn, we need to tolerate the feeling of inauthenticity long enough to integrate the new way of being.
Long enough for the new way of being to feel natural.
Yesterday, my daughter was doing homework late at night and I had to ask her to work in the dining room instead of her bedroom because her younger sister needed to go to bed.
“Sweetie,” I said, “Your sister needs to go to sleep and we need to move you into the dining room. How can I help?” Identify the problem, state what needs to happen, and offer to help.

The orginal article.

Summary of “The Power of Imperfect Starts”

What is optimal for them right now isn’t necessarily needed for you to get started.
If you set your bar at “Amazing,” it’s awfully difficult to start.
Comparing your current situation to someone who is already successful can often make you feel like you lack the required resources to get started at all.
You don’t need new cooking bowls to start eating healthy.
You don’t need a new backpack to start traveling.
You can point out how your business mentor is successful because they use XYZ software, but they probably got started without it.
Don’t let visions of what is optimal prevent you from getting started in the first place.
An imperfect start can always be improved, but obsessing over a perfect plan will never take you anywhere on its own.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Alain de Botton on Love, Vulnerability, and the Psychological Paradox of the Sulk”

“Why is love rich beyond all other possible human experiences and a sweet burden to those seized in its grasp?” philosopher Martin Heidegger asked in his electrifying love letters to Hannah Arendt.
“Because we become what we love and yet remain ourselves.” Still, nearly every anguishing aspect of love arises from the inescapable tension between this longing for transformative awakening and the sleepwalking selfhood of our habitual patterns.
The multiple sharp-edged facets of this question are what Alain de Botton explores in The Course of Love – a meditation on the beautiful, tragic tendernesses and fragilities of the human heart, at once unnerving and assuring in its psychological insightfulness.
A sequel of sorts to his 1993 novel On Love, the book is bold bending of form that fuses fiction and De Botton’s supreme forte, the essay – twined with the narrative thread of the romance between the two protagonists are astute observations at the meeting point of psychology and philosophy, spinning out from the particular problems of the couple to unravel broader insight into the universal complexities of the human heart.
As the book progresses, one gets the distinct and surprisingly pleasurable sense that De Botton has sculpted the love story around the robust armature of these philosophical meditations; that the essay is the raison d’être for the fiction.
In one of these contemplative interstitials, De Botton examines the paradoxical psychology of one of the most common and most puzzling phenomena between lovers: sulking.
The sulker may be six foot one and holding down adult employment, but the real message is poignantly retrogressive: “Deep inside, I remain an infant, and right now I need you to be my parent. I need you correctly to guess what is truly ailing me, as people did when I was a baby, when my ideas of love were first formed.”
Complement it with philosopher Erich Fromm on what is keeping us from mastering the art of loving, sociologist Eva Illouz on why love hurts, and Anna Dostoyevsky on the secret to a happy marriage, then revisit De Botton on the seven psychological functions of art and what philosophy is for.

The orginal article.