Summary of “24 life skills every adult should master before turning 30”

We’ve put together our own handbook of sorts for anyone transitioning from their 20s to their 30s, which lists many of the skills you’ll need to survive as an adult in the modern world.
Many of us fear the word “No” because we don’t want to let other people down.
People who lack the ability to empathize and take an interest in other people are often narcissists.
“Sometimes your body language tells people everything they need to know before you ever open your mouth,” writes Dean Bokhari.
Another, surprisingly simple, tactic is to simply spend more time with the people you’d like to befriend.
“It’s amazing how many people can’t do the simplest of things – like balance a checkbook, fill out a tax form, make sure that there’s more coming in than going out, [set] aside reserves for contingencies,” writes Miles Fidelman.
“[T]he ability to speak confidently to a large mass of people is a skill to be learnt,” writes Ramachandra Bhakta in a since-deleted answer.
Very few people in the study said they preferred standard pick-up lines – so it’s best to avoid those, no matter how clever you think you are.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Tech’s Two Philosophies – Stratechery by Ben Thompson”

Even though Apple’s developer conference is still a few weeks away, I think it’s safe to say that the demo of Google Duplex at yesterday’s Google I/O keynote will go down as the most impressive of the tech conference season.
In Google’s view, computers help you get things done – and save you time – by doing things for you.
Zuckerberg, as so often seems to be the case with Facebook, comes across as a somewhat more fervent and definitely more creepy version of Google: not only does Facebook want to do things for you, it wants to do things its chief executive explicitly says would not be done otherwise.
The Messianic fervor that seems to have overtaken Zuckerberg in the last year simply means that Facebook has adopted a more extreme version of the same philosophy that guides Google: computers doing things for people.
Pichai, in the opening of Google’s keynote, acknowledged that “We feel a deep sense of responsibility to get this right”, but inherent in that statement is the centrality of Google generally and the direct culpability of its managers.
There is certainly an argument to be made that these two philosophies arise out of their historical context; it is no accident that Apple and Microsoft, the two “Bicycle of the mind” companies, were founded only a year apart, and for decades had broadly similar business models: sure, Microsoft licensed software, while Apple sold software-differentiated hardware, but both were and are at their core personal computer companies and, by extension, platforms.
Aggregators, on the other hand, particularly Google and Facebook, deal in information, and ads are simply another type of information.
Still, that doesn’t make the two philosophies any less real: Google and Facebook have always been predicated on doing things for the user, just as Microsoft and Apple have been built on enabling users and developers to make things completely unforeseen.

The orginal article.

Summary of “A Letter to My Daughter About the Black Magic of Banking”

As you grow up and experience more of the ups and downs of the economy, you will notice a piece of mindbending hypocrisy: during the good times, bankers, entrepreneurs-rich people in general-tend to be against government.
Entrepreneurs need bankers to lend to them, who need entrepreneurs to pay interest.
Bankers need governments to protect them, who need bankers to fuel the economy.
Who has provided the government with the requisite loans? The bankers, of course! And where have the bankers found the money? I hardly need tell you that they have conjured it from thin air.
Why? Because a market society’s bankers need public debt as surely as fish need water to swim in.
When the government borrows, say, $100 million from a banker for, say, a ten-year period, in return it provides the banker with a piece of paper, an IOU, by which it legally guarantees to repay the money in ten years’ time as well as pay an additional yearly amount to the banker in interest-say, $5 million a year.
Bonds are, in bankers’ parlance, “The most liquid of assets.” As such, they lubricate the banking system to keep its cogs and wheels turning.
In bad times, when bankers pick up the phone to the government and demand that the state’s central bank bail them out, it does so not just by creating new money, as we have already seen, but also by issuing even more bonds and using them to borrow more money from other bankers, often foreign ones, to pass on to the local bankers.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Want To Be A Great Storyteller? First, Break These Habits”

You’ve heard dozens of times that you’re more likely to engage your audience when you tell a story in your presentation.
A story that’s powerful and relevant can galvanize people and inspire action.
Your audience won’t understand your story without at least some background information.
Even small doses of narrative evidence can go a long way to backing up the point you want your story to make.
If your story is too drawn out, you risk losing your audience’s attention.
You need dialogue to bring a story to life, and one line can make for a great climax.
You’re telling a story to make your presentation engaging, which means that how you tell it matters just as much as what the narrative entails.
Avoid these traps, and you won’t just tell better stories, you’ll maximize the impact of your overall message, and maybe even leave your audience wanting more.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Who should hold the keys to our data?”

Within 48 hours, the data had been turned from a pile of figures into a resource that could save lives and that could help people to pressure government to deal with black spots.
There is big data, personal data, open data, aggregate data and anonymised data.
The single thing that every citizen and every corporate decision-maker needs to understand is that the enormous data stores that government, government agencies, corporations, trusts and individuals hold are as much a key part of national and international infrastructure as the road network.
Several companies have practical designs that offer each individual their own data account, on a cloud independent of any agency or commercial organisation.
The data would be unreadable as a whole to anyone other than the individual owner, who would allow other people access to selected parts of it, at their own discretion.
There are real gains to be made if citizens hold their own data and huge organisations don’t.
Yes, yes, the spooks and cops want to keep their own files about terrorists and not discuss the morals of data retention much with the lucky names on the list, and we are perfectly happy with that.
The central requirement is that, if you own a car, that fact and details of your car must be in your data store, whether you like it or not; authorised agencies must be able to look simultaneously at everyone’s store, to find a car they are interested in and must be able to do it without you knowing.

The orginal article.

Summary of “The Secret to Magic Mornings? Put the Kids to Work”

To foster competence, we had to do some heavy lifting in the early years to help our kids learn how to do things for themselves.
The kids fill in their menus for the next day.
Mornings without milk and bread don’t work, so shopping is one of our responsibilities.
If you’re constantly telling the kids what to do in the mornings, save your energy by creating a simple checklist for them to follow.
Start the day off by getting up earlier than you need to – and by getting the kids up earlier than they need to.
Then let them know it’s time to get moving and you’re there to help if they need it.
Most of the time, your job is to sit, smile and help out where needed.
Before you know it your family really can have magic mornings.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Why gaining a basic understanding of blockchain is absolutely worth your time”

Blockchain is a technology that has the potential to disrupt many of the legacy systems and centralized industries of today.
Like a camera for a photo, a hammer for a nail, or a tweezer for an eyebrow, blockchain is a tool for a system.
The first step to caring is understanding that blockchain is just behind-the-scenes code.
If you want the systems of the future to work for you, include yourself in blockchain.
The more people who can understand what blockchain is at a high level, the more people who can make it better, dream up applications to new systems, and accelerate its implementation.
What are the norms of a community? Who are all the stakeholders? What do they need? What do they value? These human-behavior questions are central to systems design and maintenance, and because blockchain is potentially a massive disrupter to our current systems, the most successful applications will incorporate insights about human behavior.
We need a diverse set of voices critiquing not only the user experience, systems design, and code of new blockchain products, but also their biases.
Start saying these words out loud, just to hear them in your voice: “I’m interested in blockchain.” Search for examples in your area of expertise that are being paired with blockchain, whether it’s “Blockchain for insurance” or “Blockchain for bargain shopping.”

The orginal article.

Summary of “How Big Your Emergency Fund Should Be”

No one thinks they need an emergency fund when all is going well.
Think about it: How stable is your job, really? And what about family members who may need help? “An emergency fund is not an investment. It should be thought of as an insurance policy that you are self-funding,” says Danielle Schultz, an Illinois-based Certified Financial Planner.
“A guy with only a few thousand dollars in an emergency fund almost certainly does not have enough set aside to cover expenses should he get fired and take eight months to find a new job…or have to decamp from his apartment because of a fire,” says Schultz.
As Schultz said, it can take years to get your emergency fund to a level that would guarantee you stability.
Rather than increase the size of the emergency fund, you’re probably better off putting more money toward the debt.
Again, you’re likely better off maxing out retirement accounts and then putting extra toward the mortgage than building the emergency fund even bigger.
You need an emergency fund, there’s no doubt about that.
Vince, you say you’re fairly financially stable-don’t you want to stay that way? “Having an emergency fund, even in a very boring low-interest rate earning account, gives you the freedom to take some risks in your investment accounts,” adds Hockenbury.

The orginal article.

Summary of “The two-pizza rule and the secret of Amazon’s success”

In the early days of Amazon, Jeff Bezos instituted a rule: every internal team should be small enough that it can be fed with two pizzas.
Amazon is good at being an e-commerce company that sells things, but what it’s great at is making new e-commerce companies that sell new things.
Perhaps the best example of that approach in action is the birth and growth of AWS. That’s the division of Amazon that provides cloud computing services, both internally and for other companies – including those that are competitors to Amazon in other areas.
The business is now 10% of Amazon’s overall revenue, making so much money that financial regulations forced the company to report it as a top-level division in its own right: Amazon divides its company into “US and Canada”, “International”, and “AWS”.
While AWS saw Amazon open up its internal technology to external customers, another part of the company does the same trick with Amazon’s actual website.
Marketplace goes one better than the pizza rule, allowing Amazon to expand into new sectors without needing to employ a single extra employee.
“E-commerce companies such as Amazon process billions of orders every year,” a team of Amazon researchers wrote.
Amazon has long faced criticism over its treatment of warehouse workers: as with many companies in its sector, huge valuations and high-tech aspirations sit uneasily alongside the low-paid, low-skilled work that makes the company tick over.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Where have all the pilots gone? – TechCrunch”

You’d think better technology, greater demand, economic growth, and population growth would mean more and more pilots.
Counterintuitive fact is that fewer and fewer people are flying, and now Earth needs pilots, badly.
“Airline industry facing a massive shortfall of pilots.” “Yes, there is a definite pilot shortage. It is true in all parts of aviation.” “The US Air Force is short more than one-quarter of the fighter pilots it needs.” “Asian airlines are running out of trained pilots.” “‘Extraordinary’ Pilot Shortage Threatens Flights; 637,000 Needed.
The number of active pilots in the US has declined from over 800,000 in 1980 to barely 600,000 in 2017, a quarter of whom are student pilots, a certificate for which you need no experience at all.
A private pilot in a little Cessna is very different from an airline transport pilot guiding a 777.
Second, even if we get there, when will it be practical? While individuals might volunteer to be bleeding-edge adopters, how can you prove its validity to the FAA and other regulatory authorities? We’d need to add many more nines before self-flying software start competing with professional human pilots, who, unlike human drivers, have a remarkable safety record; commercial aviation had zero fatalities in 2017.
Better autopilots for ordinary conditions are one thing, but removing pilots from flying entirely is quite another.
There are a lot of old airplanes and old pilots out there.

The orginal article.