Summary of “Tell Employees What You Want Them to Strive for”

There were eight competencies leaders needed to succeed, 10 behaviors that marked inclusive diversity, five things employees had to do in order to flourish, and over 100 skills you needed to train on, depending on your profession.
As part of Microsoft’s cultural refresh, Whittinghill – along with CEO Satya Nadella and chief people officer Kathleen Hogan – partnered with us at the NeuroLeadership Institute to revisit Microsoft’s leadership principles.
For anyone interested in developing leadership – in themselves, in their companies – it’s a huge lesson.
Whether you’re in talent management, human capital, or learning design, it’s crucial to understand that for employees to make the most of any sort of internal branding, leadership principles, cultural values, company strategies, and the like have to be designed with the brain in mind.
So too with leadership principles: They only really exist if employees are thinking about them, saying them to themselves, bringing them up in conversation with colleagues.
Working with NLI, the Microsoft senior leadership team came up with six words to maximize memorability – create clarity, generate energy, deliver success – based on what they believed were the most important things that leaders at Microsoft would need to do to lead the company forward.
Microsoft had historically tried to arrive at a leadership model the same way most companies do: by way of subtraction.
I’ve learned firsthand that the more leadership principles get concise, the more you can put them into action.

The orginal article.

Summary of “When You’ve Procrastinated On Your Goals For Too Long”

In the beginning, when we set the goal, we feel usually motivated, for about a day.
As each additional day passes, the resistance starts to grow.
As more time passes by, we feel more overwhelmed, especially if we have attempted to start several times, and failed.
The biggest problem in this scenario is that we think of the sheer size of the goal, or to be more accurate, the list of the activities we need to do, and how much time it will take us to do them all.
There is nothing wrong with the big picture, on the contrary, we need it, but in the beginning, when it’s the planning phase.
Don’t think about the science or that you need 66 days to establish a habit, it will just overwhelm you additionally, which you don’t need.
Next, to the “ONE DAY” principle, the only other one you need is the consistency.
Let’s get down to concrete steps you can take a right this moment to take action and start working on your goal.

The orginal article.

Summary of “People Want 3 Things from Work, But Most Companies Are Built Around Only One”

People don’t need to be loved before they strive for prestige and achievement.
If Maslow were designing his pyramid from scratch today to explain what motivates people at work, beyond the basics, what would it look like? That’s a question we set out to answer at Facebook, in collaboration with our people analytics team.
You could recruit, motivate, and retain people by promising a great career or a close-knit community or a meaningful cause.
Contrary to the belief that Millennials are more concerned with meaning and purpose, we found that younger people cared slightly less about cause – and slightly more about career – than older people.
People ages 55 and above are the only group at Facebook who care significantly more about cause than about career and community.
This tracks with evidence that around mid-life, people become more concerned about contributing to society and less focused on individual career enhancement.
Just as we saw with age and location, across functions people rated career, community, and cause as similarly important.
“To know what one really wants,” Maslow argued, “Is a considerable psychological achievement.” Our data suggest that people are very clear on what they want at work – and they fundamentally want the same things.

The orginal article.

Summary of “The world needs more modest, linear growth companies. Please make some.”

Yes, disruption is driven by such violent expansion, and the world needs some disruption some of the time.
For the other 360 days out of the year, what it also needs is some modest, linear growth.
Linear growth is what happens in domains that aren’t animated by network effects.
Because the world is full of problems that needs solving by people who are willing to put in the work for the long haul.
These problems rarely provide the world with more platforms, but the world has enough platforms.
Network effects have given us spectacular stories of unfathomable growth, but it’s also given us monopolistic conglomerates that poison the market and its variety.
Capitalism as a system is prone to all manners of dysfunction, but few are as fatal as that of monopolies backed by exponential growth.
The path of linear growth has been the trajectory of Basecamp for 14 years today.

The orginal article.

Summary of “If we gave everyone a decent standard of living, could we sustain it?”

Could we meet the needs of everyone on the planet without stripping the Earth of all its resources? A paper in this week’s Nature Sustainability says: kind of.
It should be possible to meet the basic physical needs of everyone on the planet without using up physical resources too quickly.
It wouldn’t be possible to extend a first-world standard of living to everyone without needing “a level of resource use that is two-six times the sustainable level,” researcher Daniel O’Neill and his colleagues report.
Exceeding the “Planetary boundaries” of these resources risks global environmental stability-and we’re not doing well on that front.
To achieve global utopia, every country on the list would need to meet all of its citizens’ needs without exceeding its share of planetary resources.
Countries like Malawi and Nepal aren’t gobbling up resources, but they also aren’t meeting well-being thresholds.
These items have less of a clear relationship to resource use: getting everyone food and healthcare is linked strongly to physical resources, but getting everyone social support is a different ball game.
Extra consumption of resources isn’t as closely tied to advanced needs, the researchers suggest.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Don’t Know What You Want? Improve These 7 Universal Skills”

What does success look like? What do you want from life? What career do you want?
We think it’s the worst thing in the world if you don’t know what you want to do in life.
One of the biggest thinking errors that I’ve made was that I thought I needed to know what I exactly wanted to do with my life.
The truth is that no one knows what they truly want.
So it’s not important to know exactly what you want to do with your life.
It’s not even realistic to boldly claim “I know what I want!”.
If you can’t decide what direction you want to go in life, that’s automatically your #1 goal in life – to figure out where you want to go.
Persuasion: Learn how to get what you want in an ethical way.

The orginal article.

Summary of “This Is How To Increase Emotional Intelligence: 5 Powerful Secrets”

Now most of the work on emotional intelligence has been done around its effects in the workplace but it’ll quickly become obvious how it can improve most any area of your life.
People who have a high degree of self-awareness recognize how their feelings affect them, other people, and their job performance.
I love when people say, “I’m. very emotional. I must have very high emotional intelligence.” Sorry, being very emotional doesn’t make you high in EI; it just makes you a drama queen.
People engaged in such a conversation feel bad moods and emotional impulses just as everyone else does, but they find ways to control them and even to channel them in useful ways.
The ability to understand the emotional makeup of other people.
Skill in treating people according to their emotional reactions.
Emotional empathy: “You feel awful? Then I feel awful too!” Cognitive empathy: “I understand that you are feeling awful. That must suck.” Compassion: “You feel awful? I feel for you. How can I help?”.
Socially skilled people tend to have a wide circle of acquaintances, and they have a knack for finding common ground with people of all kinds-a knack for building rapport.

The orginal article.

Summary of “What Is It About Costco?”

Costco is a place for families, or else individuals of family-sized needs: restaurateurs, corporate picnic planners, fraternity brothers, older couples who eat the same five foods with pious regularity, the clinically depressed who subsist on bulk bags of pretzels and Craisins and little else.
The average Costco shopper has an income of $100,000, and Costco tends to open stores in states where wealthier people live.
The lower-income shoppers who could most benefit from the savings of buying in bulk are, by and large, priced out of the game, because the ability to shop at Costco and its ilk carries many hidden requirements: membership fees, a car, proximity to a limited set of stores, and of course, more cash upfront to buy a pack of eight sirloins in one go, instead of just two.
Where your average grocery store carries about 40,000 different products, Costco carries a tenth of that amount.
Where a supermarket greets you with bursting crates of produce, inclined at an angle toward the shopper as if to say, welcome, Costco’s produce, though equally as fresh, sits at the back of the store in a frigid locker, prepackaged in plastic sleeves and cardboard boxes, unsqueezable.
What joy does Costco offer? What dream is born of balsamic vinegar in liters, staples by the pound, and pillows of maxipads? Costco is not for what you need.
Costco keeps its promise of abundance as well as any store can, and for that, most of its customers are loyal for life.
For some, the idea of getting locked in a store after closing is a nightmare, but that was my dream, because Costco had everything we’d need.

The orginal article.

Summary of “9-5 Is Out. Try The 1-6 Instead.”

Each day, we woke up when we wanted, had a leisurely breakfast, spent four or five hours at a beach, did some reading, then had a relaxing lunch before heading back to our hotel room-usually between 4pm and 6pm-to start working for the day.
After a few hours of work, we’d head for dinner.
The 40 hour work week is a construct-created in the late 19th century-that we’ve all just accepted as necessary.
Only work five hours a day? What would you need to do to make that happen if you had no other choice?
Working fewer hours doesn’t mean you’re getting fewer results.
More free time enhances the quality of my work and expands my mind to think of new, possibly better ways, to serve people.
Being committed to the three things I outlined above has shown me, clearly, that my eight-plus hour work days were really just five hour work days dragged out over eight hours.
How many of us are wasting precious time “Working?” How many 100-year-old constructs are holding us back?!

The orginal article.

Summary of “9-5 Is Out. Try The 1-6 Instead.”

Each day, we woke up when we wanted, had a leisurely breakfast, spent four or five hours at a beach, did some reading, then had a relaxing lunch before heading back to our hotel room-usually between 4pm and 6pm-to start working for the day.
After a few hours of work, we’d head for dinner.
The 40 hour work week is a construct-created in the late 19th century-that we’ve all just accepted as necessary.
Only work five hours a day? What would you need to do to make that happen if you had no other choice?
Working fewer hours doesn’t mean you’re getting fewer results.
More free time enhances the quality of my work and expands my mind to think of new, possibly better ways, to serve people.
Being committed to the three things I outlined above has shown me, clearly, that my eight-plus hour work days were really just five hour work days dragged out over eight hours.
How many of us are wasting precious time “Working?” How many 100-year-old constructs are holding us back?!

The orginal article.