Summary of “Goals Don’t Replace Systems -and Vice Versa”

People who claim that setting goals are a bad thing are out of their minds.
I know there’s a lot of confusion about goals and systems these days.
A lot of us share the idea that you either have a system or set goals.
So in this article, I’ll explain why goals and systems complement each other, and why I have both.
Why You Need Goals Every time I read about people who claim you shouldn’t set goals, I get upset.
One thing we must be aware of is that we keep an open mind: Goals and systems change all the time.
Change your goals and systems as your priorities change.
Why You Need Higher Goals We’ve established that we need both goals and systems to live a good life.

The orginal article.

Summary of “The Most Important Skill for 21st-Century Students Is the Discipline to Say “No””

Can you code? Speak a second language? How high is your IQ? There’s much debate on what students need most to succeed in an increasingly competitive world.
The challenges of automation, globalization, and political upheaval leave out the fact that we’re living an age of information overload. According to CNN’s Fareed Zakaria, the one thing that children will need to learn is “Intellectual discipline.” The ability to recall facts and parrot popular arguments has become obsolete.
In a panel on “Education in the Post-Truth World” at WISE 2017’s summit for education, Zakaria contrasts how the barrage of media effect how young people take in and process information.
In other words, students need to return to the fundamentals of education where you question the information and the source, which allows you to gain a greater understanding.
The report concludes: “Overall, young people’s ability to reason about the information on the Internet can be summed up in one word: bleak.”
Our primary sources of information come from the internet and social media but this, in turn, becomes a minefield for sorting out fact from fiction.
We’re at an inflection point where paring down and drilling deep into information is going to be a necessity.
The future is always uncertain but what seems clear is that one of the most powerful tools anyone can harness is the single-minded pursuit of mastering how to seek the truth from information.

The orginal article.

Summary of “The worker shortage is impacting the US economy”

The US economy had 7.4 million job openings in June, but only 6 million people were looking for work, according to data released by the US Department of Labor.
Employers have been complaining about a shortage of skilled workers in recent years, particularly workers with advanced degrees in STEM fields.
In order to fill all the open jobs and keep the economy growing, Congress will need to allow more low-skilled immigrants to work – legally.
If 7.4 million jobs are open and only 6 million people are looking for work, then employers need to find a lot more workers.
“Companies looking to attract enough blue-collar workers will have to continue increasing wages and, as a result, possibly experience diminished profits,” wrote Gad Levanon, chief economist for North America at the Conference Board, a global economic research organization that has studied the recent US labor shortage.
Since taking office, his administration has tried to scale back nearly every avenue of legal immigration, ignoring the high demand for unskilled immigrant workers, even though he employs undocumented workers at his own golf clubs.
“If President Trump wants employers to produce and build more in America, the US will need to improve education and skills in manufacturing and IT. But the economy will also need more foreign workers, and better guest worker programs to bring them in legally,” the publication said in March 2017.
Providing more work visas for skilled and unskilled immigrants seems like an obvious solution to ease the labor shortage.

The orginal article.

Summary of “The Power of Imperfect Starts”

What is optimal for them right now isn’t necessarily needed for you to get started.
If you set your bar at “Amazing,” it’s awfully difficult to start.
Comparing your current situation to someone who is already successful can often make you feel like you lack the required resources to get started at all.
You don’t need new cooking bowls to start eating healthy.
You don’t need a new backpack to start traveling.
You can point out how your business mentor is successful because they use XYZ software, but they probably got started without it.
Don’t let visions of what is optimal prevent you from getting started in the first place.
An imperfect start can always be improved, but obsessing over a perfect plan will never take you anywhere on its own.

The orginal article.

Summary of “The 7 Basic Human Needs That Successful Businesses Focus On”

Let’s start with the concept of basic human needs.
The famous economist Manfred Max Neef said, “That the aim of development must be neither producerism not consumerism, but the satisfaction of fundamental human needs, which are not only needs of humanity, but needs of being as well.”
Neef created the ‘Human Scale Development,’ which states, among other things, the following two assumptions: First, fundamental human needs are finite, being limited in number and classifiable.
Second, Neef stated that fundamental human needs are the same in all cultures and in all historical periods.
The idea that all of us, as human beings, have basic needs can be quite revolutionary, especially when you grow up in a society that imposes needs, represented by “Shoulds” and “Should-nots” passed down by previous generations.
These highly successful companies learned early on the importance of connecting their business directly to human needs.
If your main needs are connection and expression, then you want to market to groups that also prioritize those needs.
Once you have identified your own needs and your chosen market and its needs, then it’s time to define your company’s values and needs.

The orginal article.

Summary of “How to Give Constructive Criticism at Work”

You’re working with someone whose work isn’t exactly what you need it to be, and you need to ask them to do it differently.
Corrective feedback isn’t a referendum on anyone’s value as a person – it’s just a normal and expected part of the process of improving work.
Do you resent your own manager when she asks you to approach something differently? Or does it feel like a pretty normal and expected interaction? Plus, you probably want to know how you could improve your work and wouldn’t appreciate someone withholding important feedback from you out of fear of awkwardness – thus leaving you to repeat the same mistake or work quality problem over and over.
Assume that whoever you need to deliver feedback to also appreciates knowing how to make their work better.
You can’t shy away from giving your employees feedback if you’re the one in charge; you have a professional and ethical obligation to talk to them about where they stand and how they could do better.
While you need to be committed to giving feedback if you manage people or projects, that doesn’t mean that you should give it whenever it occurs to you without thinking about your timing.
If you’ve ever read a management book, you’ve probably heard of the “Feedback sandwich”: a technique where you sandwich criticism in between two compliments.
Truly, you should want feedback to be a regular, normal thing, because regular feedback leads to better work outcomes.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Want to Be a Great Storyteller? First, Break These Habits”

You’ve heard dozens of times that you’re more likely to engage your audience when you tell a story in your presentation.
Bad Habit No. 1: Giving Too Much Background Your audience won’t understand your story without at least some background information.
Even small doses of narrative evidence can go a long way to backing up the point you want your story to make.
If your story is too drawn out, you risk losing your audience’s attention.
Bad Habit No. 4: Not Including Any Dialogue You need dialogue to bring a story to life, and one line can make for a great climax.
Bad Habit No. 5: Taking Your Audience Through Unnecessary Detours Don’t go off on tangents when you’re building up the action of your story.
You’re telling a story to make your presentation engaging, which means that how you tell it matters just as much as what the narrative entails.
Avoid these traps, and you won’t just tell better stories, you’ll maximize the impact of your overall message, and maybe even leave your audience wanting more.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Want to Be a Great Storyteller? First, Break These Habits”

You’ve heard dozens of times that you’re more likely to engage your audience when you tell a story in your presentation.
Bad Habit No. 1: Giving Too Much Background Your audience won’t understand your story without at least some background information.
Even small doses of narrative evidence can go a long way to backing up the point you want your story to make.
If your story is too drawn out, you risk losing your audience’s attention.
Bad Habit No. 4: Not Including Any Dialogue You need dialogue to bring a story to life, and one line can make for a great climax.
Bad Habit No. 5: Taking Your Audience Through Unnecessary Detours Don’t go off on tangents when you’re building up the action of your story.
You’re telling a story to make your presentation engaging, which means that how you tell it matters just as much as what the narrative entails.
Avoid these traps, and you won’t just tell better stories, you’ll maximize the impact of your overall message, and maybe even leave your audience wanting more.

The orginal article.

Summary of “How to Create a Morning Routine for School, Starting in the Summer”

Summer feels antithetical to morning routines – the days are longer, the weather is perfect for backyard sports and neighborhood adventures, and, of course, there’s sleeping in.
Unstructured days and late starts on summer mornings can make the morning routines harder when it’s time to return to school.
That’s why parents should establish a morning routine for summer and take the pain out of transition.
“The key to a good transition from summer to the routines needed for school is to never give up on having a routine,” explains Dr. Ari Yares, a licensed psychologist and nationally certified school psychologist with more than 15 years of experience working with families and children with academic and behavioral problems.
Kids still need that structure, and a summer routine can also help make those summer days a little bit easier for everyone involved.
It doesn’t have to be the same routine as the school year, but every day should have some structure.
Transitions are easier when they happen slowly, so the transition to a school morning routine should happen over weeks.
ADVERTISEMENT. “As with any transition, it is going to be easier to slowly transition into the school-year routine than it will be to abruptly switch from lazy summer to a frenetic school year,” recommends Yares.

The orginal article.

Summary of “The Only Five Email Folders Your Inbox Will Ever Need”

For every email I deleted, two more landed in my inbox.
Where do you file an important update that covers two unrelated projects? What do you do with that same email if it requires a response?
If I think I may need to reference an email again, I’ll save it to this folder.
Email will quickly become your master if you don’t take charge.
Occasionally I’ll add items to that list based on the content of an email that didn’t require a response.
If an email thread results in deciding that we need to schedule a meeting, I’ll make a note to prep my boss with some information from those emails-but I’ll delete them once I’ve finished that prep session.
Don’t confuse having an opinion with leadership, or mounting email volume with weightier job duties.
My rule is simple: If my wife asked me to come home early and I was willing to leave emails in the “Today” folder, that doesn’t mean I need to blast through them once I get home-it means those emails didn’t belong in that folder to begin with.

The orginal article.