Summary of “The U.S. Still Has No Plan to Ramp Up COVID-19 Testing”

“We went up to about 150,000 tests a day, and then we plateaued there for a few weeks,” Jha, the Harvard professor, said.
“Some places had reagents, but not enough swabs. Some places had swabs but not the medium you transport them in. And some places had enough capacity, but they hadn’t changed their policies from when only the sickest people could get tested,” Jha said.
In the District of Columbia, where the number of new cases is increasing, Mayor Muriel Bowser said at a press conference today that the city only had enough reagents to test about 1,500 people per day.
How many tests might eventually be enough isn’t clear, in part because the number depends on the size of the underlying outbreak.
Rivers told Congress this week that scaling up to 3 to 4 million tests a week-equal to about 500,000 a day-would allow more serious contact tracing to begin.
It’s unlikely the U.S. can test that many people every day if it continues to use only the polymerase chain reaction, or PCR, nasal-swab tests currently in use, Jha said.
Antigen tests, which are similar to the rapid flu tests used in doctors’ offices, might be some of the first to become available.
This lack of any plan does not only seem to mar the federal testing effort.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Goals Don’t Replace Systems -and Vice Versa”

People who claim that setting goals are a bad thing are out of their minds.
I know there’s a lot of confusion about goals and systems these days.
A lot of us share the idea that you either have a system or set goals.
So in this article, I’ll explain why goals and systems complement each other, and why I have both.
Why You Need Goals Every time I read about people who claim you shouldn’t set goals, I get upset.
One thing we must be aware of is that we keep an open mind: Goals and systems change all the time.
Change your goals and systems as your priorities change.
Why You Need Higher Goals We’ve established that we need both goals and systems to live a good life.

The orginal article.

Summary of “The Best Cleaning Product Only Costs About $1”

Despite what the drugstore cleaning aisle would have you believe, you actually don’t need a different product for every room or mess.
“Pour a little salt inside, then take a lemon wedge to scrub them down,” recommends Maker.
Maker fills a spray bottle with equal parts water and white vinegar before adding about a teaspoon of cornstarch.
Maker recommends pouring a cup into your toilet bowl and swishing it around with a brush to help break down stains and get rid of bacteria.
Pour some coarse salt over half a lemon, and use it to scrub down and disinfect pretty much anything.
Pro tip: Did you know that you need to regularly clean your cheese grater? Citrus can get the job done: “The lemon oil and juice help to cut the dairy fat and break up any of those proteins,” explains Maker.
Maker’s miracle floor cleaner consists of cup water, cup white vinegar, and cup rubbing alcohol.
Pro tip: Maker’s cleaning cocktail works on laminate furniture, too, from the glossy ’80s furniture.

The orginal article.

Summary of “The Best Cleaning Product Only Costs About $1”

Despite what the drugstore cleaning aisle would have you believe, you actually don’t need a different product for every room or mess.
“Pour a little salt inside, then take a lemon wedge to scrub them down,” recommends Maker.
Maker fills a spray bottle with equal parts water and white vinegar before adding about a teaspoon of cornstarch.
Maker recommends pouring a cup into your toilet bowl and swishing it around with a brush to help break down stains and get rid of bacteria.
Pour some coarse salt over half a lemon, and use it to scrub down and disinfect pretty much anything.
Pro tip: Did you know that you need to regularly clean your cheese grater? Citrus can get the job done: “The lemon oil and juice help to cut the dairy fat and break up any of those proteins,” explains Maker.
Maker’s miracle floor cleaner consists of cup water, cup white vinegar, and cup rubbing alcohol.
Pro tip: Maker’s cleaning cocktail works on laminate furniture, too, from the glossy ’80s furniture.

The orginal article.

Summary of “The Doctor Who Helped Defeat Smallpox Explains What’s Coming”

It requires doing the proportionate number of tests that they did-they did well over a quarter of a million tests.
By the time South Korea had done 200,000 tests, we had probably done less than 1,000.
Now that we’ve missed the opportunity for early testing, is it too late for testing to make a difference?
How would they know? Zimbabwe reports zero cases because they don’t have testing capability, not because they don’t have the virus.
We need something that looks like a home pregnancy test, that you can do at home.
The world is not going to begin to look normal until three things have happened.
If we’re only seeing right now one-seventh of the actual disease because we’re not testing enough, and we’re just blind to it, then we’re in a world of hurt.
Three, maybe most important, we begin to see large numbers of people-in particular nurses, home health care providers, doctors, policemen, firemen, and teachers who have had the disease-are immune, and we have tested them to know that they are not infectious any longer.

The orginal article.

Summary of “How to Survive Isolation With Your Roommates, Your Partner, Your Kids”

‘Low-risk, symptom-free partners living in relative isolation together can certainly use this time to have more sex.
During that time, she learned several lessons applicable to anyone living with roommates.
What If It’s Just Me and the Kids? According to Joshua David Stein, editor-at-large of the parenting publication Fatherly, if you’re practicing social distancing with your kids, now is the time to readjust your rule structure.
Fatherly has compiled a list of at-home activities for bored kids, the internet abounds with kid-friendly podcasts, museum tours and educational videos, and Stein notes that it’s a good time to get outside and take advantage of local parks, too.
If your kids are worried about grandparents they’re unable to visit during the pandemic, Stein suggests: “Without lying, frame it in a way that will assuage their worries as much as possible. Like, ‘Grandma is doing fine, for her safety and our safety, we’re going to rely on FaceTime for now.'” It’s also to be expected that your patience will wear thin at times.
“It’s not the best thing in the world but it’s not the end of the world, don’t beat yourself up about it, try to do better next time.”
What If I’m Suddenly Spending a Lot More Time With My Live-In Partner? “This is a situation where you kind of know what is going to happen so you have time to come up with a gameplan,” says Erin Davidson, a couples and sex therapist.
While it may be a tricky time to date, low-risk, symptom-free partners living in relative isolation together can certainly use this time to have more sex.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Stop Feeling Guilty About Your To-Do List”

It’s the end of the workday, and your to-do list has barely been touched.
“You look at what you didn’t get done, and you get that sinking feeling deep in your soul that you are not enough.” But, she says, “You mustn’t feel like a failure.” Conquering workplace guilt involves a combination of getting savvier about how you chip away at your to-do list, improving how you manage your own expectations about what you can realistically achieve over the course of a day, and building self-compassion for those times when you fail to live up to them.
Once you’ve developed an understanding of your bandwidth and retooled your to-do list accordingly, it’s time to set expectations with others.
Try to accept that your to-do list will never be done, and you will always have things you really wished you’d gotten to.
Case Study #1: Edit your to-do list and cut yourself some slack.
During the period of reflection, he realized that his to-do list was too long.
Katelyn Holbrook says that the guilt induced by all the unchecked boxes on her to-do list grew as she progressed in her career.
Katelyn, a mom of three young kids, vividly remembers how awful she felt as some tasks remained on her to-do list longer than she would have liked.

The orginal article.

Summary of “How To Wake Up And Not Feel Like Going Right Back To Bed”

How do some people manage to look so darn perky as they sip coffee and smoothies in their Instagram stories in the morning? It all comes down to establishing a winning routine, one that’s easy for you to do every day and leaves you feeling awake, alert, and inspired.
Yoga might not be your jam, but what about a few basic stretches instead? And journaling can feel a little cliche, but what about a Google Doc where you list one thing daily that you’re grateful for? We don’t all need to be fitness and wellness junkies, but we can all get a little bit better at managing our mornings and crushing the rest of our day.
Getting your primary workout for the day done before the flood of emails, Instagrams, and text is going to make the day feel a lot smoother.
“You could say I am a notorious overcommitter and a workaholic-slash-iPhone-aholic-who isn’t?-so I decided to get serious with my morning routine, to start to cultivate more peace and serenity in my daily life. I start each day with a digital detox where I do not look at my phone until I feel ready to be. on. and communicate with the world!”.
Add a Yoga Flow.It’s no shock that Strala Yoga creator Tara Stiles starts every morning with a yoga flow, though as a new mom, her routine varies daily depending on what she needs and how she feels.
That’s a good thing! Even if you’re not nursing a newborn, switching up your yoga flow makes the morning a bit more exciting.
Strala Yoga has a ton of quick and simple morning flows that Stiles created, and most of them run between seven and 12 minutes.
“Quite frankly, I’d rather forget to brush my teeth!” If tongue scraping isn’t for you, that’s fine, too, but having a morning beauty/cleansing routine can go a long way toward making you feel more awake and alert if you’re having a tough time crawling out of bed and perking up.

The orginal article.

Summary of “4 Ways to Improve Your Strategic Thinking Skills”

So what specific steps can you take to be more strategic in your current role?
If you believe that strategic thinking is only for senior executives, think again.
With a fresh understanding of trends and issues, you can practice using strategic thinking by asking yourself, “How do I broaden what I consider?” Questions are the language of strategy.
Lisa came to appreciate that her life and prior experience gave her a unique, yet myopic, strategic lens.
When working on an employee retention project she asked herself, “What does success look like in Year 1?” “What does it look like in Year 3?” “What could impact the outcome in a negative way?” “What are the early signs of success/failure?” “What do business partners need to understand to ensure its success?” and “Do the outcomes support the broader goals of the organization?” By asking these tough questions first, she recognized that she could better engage with colleagues and senior executives early on in ways that would benefit the project – and would help shape the perception that she was thoughtful and strategic.
Speak: Sound Strategic Strategic thinkers also know how to speak the language.
Lisa didn’t realize that the way she spoke created the perception that she was not strategic.
The quest to build your strategic skills can be uncomfortable.

The orginal article.

Summary of “How to step out of the shop-spend-consume cycle |”

“Spend some time without it; in other words, try to miss it,” says González Schuett.
“Because there’s so much to be learned from missing things. Plus, you’ll exponentially increase your short-term happiness once you get it again.”
In her no-buying year, González Schuett learned to sew on replacement buttons, and she even watched a YouTube video to figure out how to repair her washing machine.
By purchasing something that’s pre-owned, you’ll keep from adding to the sum total of things in circulation – since the thing you’ll buy is already out in the world – and you’ll also save money.
Try to pick things that are made to last, and when you are done, consider selling, donating or swapping them, instead of throwing them away.
Rather than buying a tool or gadget for a one-off project, “Knock on your neighbor’s door when you need a screwdriver,” recommends González Schuett.
She says, “What a burden for both of you to each own both things and how enriching to go back to knowing your neighbors.”
As González Schuett puts it, “Consider yourself a custodian of things, rather than an owner.” When you think about it, you’ll realize that there are ways to enjoy things without owing them – take the library, for example.

The orginal article.