Summary of “Departing Facebook Security Officer’s Memo: “We Need To Be Willing To Pick Sides””

“With Facebook’s complexity, you need people who can stand up and advocate. Alex has a tremendous depth of expertise and reputation – he’s the person you’d want in your corner to help get the company on track. If you didn’t want him, who else would you want? It’s a big loss.”
We need to change the metrics we measure and the goals we shoot for.
We need to think adversarially in every process, product and engineering decision we make.
We need to build a user experience that conveys honesty and respect, not one optimized to get people to click yes to giving us more access.
We need to intentionally not collect data where possible, and to keep it only as long as we are using it to serve people.
We need to listen to people when they tell us a feature is creepy or point out a negative impact we are having in the world.
We need to be willing to pick sides when there are clear moral or humanitarian issues.
We need to be open, honest and transparent about challenges and what we are doing to fix them.

The orginal article.

Summary of “These 20 pictures will teach you more than reading 100 books”

All you need to do is begin acting in far more powerful ways than you’ve been acting.
Dan Sullivan, founder of Strategic Coach, explains that CONFIDENCE is the thing that entrepreneurs need to protect more than anything else.
In order to develop more confidence, you’ll need to continually upgrade who you are.
“Good timber does not grow with ease: The stronger wind, the stronger trees; The further sky, the greater length; The more the storm, the more the strength. By sun and cold, by rain and snow, In trees and men good timbers grow.” – Douglas Malloch.
If you want more motivation, you generally need a situation that calls upon you to rise above where you currently are.
The more clear you get on that vision, the more WHY will be behind it.
“Social psychologists argue that who we are at any one time depends mostly on the context in which we find ourselves. But who creates the context? The more mindful we are, the more we can create the contexts we are in. Mindfulness lets us see things in a new light and believe in the possibility of change.” – Ellen Langer.
The more bold and aligned your behavior, the more abundant the outcome.

The orginal article.

Summary of “All Your Sunscreen Questions, Answered”

You may remember from your carefree childhood that sunscreen was just a thing for occasional beach days, because those are the only times you need to worry about sunburns.
A good sunscreen will also protect your skin from UVA rays, which cause thickening and aging of the skin.
Science has not found any serious threats to your health from using sunscreen.
Worried about where your sunscreen falls on the Environmental Working Group’s new sunscreen.
Going out without sunscreen poses more risk to your health than any of the ingredients in sunscreens.
A sunscreen labeled “SPF 15” should let you spend about 15 times as long in the sun before you.
You can’t stay out 15 times longer with SPF 15 than you would otherwise; it’s more like 3.5.High SPF sunscreen helps to make up for what you’re missing.
Sunscreen is sunscreen, so you’d think the way you apply it doesn’t really matter, but choosing.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Do You Really Need Less Sleep As You Age?”

That’s why the National Sleep Foundation recommends that teens get eight to ten hours of sleep a night, while younger kids require more.
Does a person’s sleep requirements diminish with age? “No,” says Dr. Leila Kheirandish-Gozal, director of clinical sleep research at the University of Chicago.
“The amount of sleep needed doesn’t change, but the perception of sleep changes.”
“It’s pretty clear that sleep ability decreases with age,” says Michael Grandner, director of the Sleep and Health Research Center at the University of Arizona College of Medicine.
So how much sleep do middle-aged and older adults really need for optimal health? That’s tricky.
In order to produce measurable short-term effects, Grandner says researchers need to severely reduce a person’s sleep-knocking them down to five hours or less per night, which pretty much everyone agrees is too little sleep.
“When people ask me how much sleep they need, I ask them, need for what?” says Max Hirshkowitz, a professor emeritus at Baylor College of Medicine and former chairman of the National Sleep Foundation.
“Do you need sleep to do complex math or drive a truck for 14 hours, or do you need it to watch TV?” There’s evidence that getting eight or nine hours may help people’s brains and bodies perform their best, he says.

The orginal article.

Summary of “3 Common Hiring Mistakes New Managers Should Avoid”

The recruitment, interviewing, hiring, and on-boarding of even one new employee is a time-intensive process every manager takes seriously.
While there are many issues you’re likely to be consciously aware of when you’re hiring – like the specific skills the new person will need, and the tasks you want them to perform – each of us also has a subconscious mind at work.
How are you hoping to “Feel better” as a result of a new hire; what pain points do you expect to heal? If you onboard someone who can do the functional job you need done, but can’t do the emotional job, no matter what they do, you will not be satisfied.
Hiring a new person is an opportunity to do something differently than before – to innovate.
Before you hire someone solely as a way to shrink your own task-list, ask if you may be better served by delegating some tasks to other team members, offering them new mountains to climb.
A more disturbing version of this problem is when a manager wants to hire someone to take on not the boring work, but the “Dirty work.” It’s not just new managers who make this mistake – a few years ago, I was invited to interview for the CFO role at a fast-growing tech company.
In my experience, managers like this aren’t usually conscious of wanting to hire a scapegoat.
By investigating the emotional “Job-to-be-done” of a new hire, as well as the actual job we need them to do, we become less likely to hire the wrong person for the wrong role, and more likely to hire a great person for a great role.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Want to love your job? Read this article”

Having done all this stuff, and been unemployed on several occasions, I can safely say that the only thing worse than working is not having a job.
It’s not the job itself that gives us a sense of purpose, but the pleasure of work.
She offered him a job interview when he was unemployed, depressed, and buying a latte as consolation-not planning to ask for work.
In his recent essay, “The Case Against Work,” Danaher, a law lecturer at the National University of Ireland in Galway, contends that-love it or hate it-we’re all obsessed with work.
Danaher defines work as “The performance of an activity for economic reward or in the hope of receiving some such reward.” He believes that work is bad because many employment contracts allow employers to undermine worker freedom.
The answer isn’t escape from a “Voluntary prison,” but a new way of thinking about how we spend our working days and breaks-making today matter, both on the job and during time off.
Disrespect for your own work can lead you to disrespect the work of others, too.
Being adaptive is a critical life skill that’s practiced at work, whatever job.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Calories and macros and BMI don’t count. Here are the numbers that really matter.”

What’s your blood-sugar level? How many calories are you eating? And are you getting the right percentage of macros? The problem is that sometimes we track, count and obsess over numbers that don’t matter very much for our overall health.
If you have diabetes, lifestyle changes can actually help you reverse the diagnosis – but first you need to know your number.
Size 8: Too many people have a diet goal to be a specific size, but the numbers on clothes are inconsistent and arbitrary.
You don’t need to count every calorie you eat – it’s tedious, often flawed, and it doesn’t help you choose nutrient-dense foods.
If you had the choice between 100 calories of broccoli or fries, you’d probably choose the fries, right? But that wouldn’t provide much nourishment and oversimplifies eating into one silly number.
If you are a lifelong calorie counter, there’s no need to give it up, but remember that it’s not the most vital number for your overall health.
Keeping track of macros is a popular diet, and if it works for you, fantastic! But some dietitians warn that it’s difficult to know the precise macro content of every food you eat, which leads to obsessive use of food diaries and macro-counting apps.
BMI doesn’t take age, gender or bone structure into account, and athletes are often classified as overweight because BMI doesn’t distinguish between muscle and fat! So, don’t rely on this number as your primary measure of health.

The orginal article.

Summary of “You Need a Life Strategy Because Extraordinary Lives Don’t Happen by Accident”

To achieve the life you want, one that will truly make you satisfied, you need to prioritize it above all else.
If you want a life of success, a life filled with spiritual happiness shared with your partner, you need to visualize it.
Your life isn’t your job, it’s not your marriage, it’s not your kids or the people in it.
Visualize and plan who you want to be, and how you want your life to be.1.
You have to make a decision to be obsessed with having the life you want.
They became obsessed and refused to let go of what they wanted their life to be.
Then we plan out our activities for the week to make sure we are working toward that life.
The greatest grief of your life will not be the loss of family members, friends or loved ones, but the loss of your own purpose.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Five Features of Better Arguments”

Earlier this month, amid a particularly trying stretch on social media, I joked that I would soon be launching Ad Hominem, “a new journal of non-ideas founded in response to apparent massive popular demand. Issue One: You’re Trash.” While there never was a golden age of argument, the impersonal hyper-connectedness of the internet and the near omnipresence of our access to it have transformed the civic experience for those who remember something different.
“We have gotten habituated to penalty-free trashing of each other,” says Eric Liu, a former speech writer and policy adviser in the Bill Clinton administration.
Still, Liu believes that “We don’t need fewer arguments today; we need less stupid ones,” a theory he first advanced in The Atlantic just prior to the 2016 presidential election, and that he continues to believe after launching and leading an effort to host more constructive civic exchanges all around the United States.
On Monday at the Aspen Ideas Festival, co-hosted by The Atlantic and the Aspen Institute, he sketched out what he now regards as best practices, drawn from insights gained through his work for the Better Arguments Project.
The framework it has developed to guide local events is worth pondering.

The orginal article.

Summary of “The Myth of the Intrapreneur”

After more than 20 years of researching innovation in large companies, it’s clear to me that the successful intrapreneur is often more myth than reality.
Innovation has to be a company-wide endeavor, supported from top to bottom by systems, structures, and a company culture that nurtures transformative ideas and products.
Companies need to institutionalize innovation rather than expect it to simply flow forth from intrapreneurs operating within existing structures.
If companies want to be able to consistently innovate, they need dedicated innovation professionals to carry out the functions of discovery, development, incubation, acceleration, and scaling.
Our research shows that, in order to develop, incubate, and scale game-changing innovation, organizations need a company-wide innovation management system that includes eight primary elements.
An inclusive organizational structure with interfaces between different parts of the company incorporates the processes and tools and metrics and rewards required for an innovation cycles that takes longer than incremental product innovation.
Companies need to create innovation careers rather than just innovation jobs.
Companies need a strategic plan for professionalizing and institutionalizing innovation across their organizations.

The orginal article.