Summary of “25 Lessons Business School Won’t Ever Teach You”

There are a lot of great lessons you can learn in business school.
Some of the most important lessons you’ll ever learn about how to be successful in business comes from getting out there and doing it.
If you’re hoping that MBA will be your golden ticket to kickstarting a successful career in business, consider these all-important 25 lessons that you’ll have to learn outside the classroom.
This is a topic rarely covered in business school.
Business school will teach you the steps you should follow when forming a business: how to do research, come up with a plan, make a budget, choose a business structure and so on.
Weighing opportunity versus potential failure is often personal – you must take into account so many factors beyond the business formulas you learn in school.
Business school may teach you that disruption begins with defining a solution to a problem and then finding a way to add value to customers’ experience.
Learning to navigate the harsh business world will teach you more than you can ever learn in a classroom.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Stay Confident During Your Job Search by Focusing on the Process, Not the Outcome”

There are several reasons you want to avoid appearing – at networking events or in job interviews – as if you need the job too much.
The more worried you are that your job search is dragging on, the less likely you are to project the sense that you will handle whatever the job requires.
Process goals are particularly valuable during an arduous job search.
First, you are likely to be less frustrated about the job search when you are paying attention to the specific actions you need to take.
You may not succeed at getting a job on any particular day, but you may have succeeded at applying for new positions, meeting new people, or learning new things.
Second, many of the things you need to do to get a job are things you need to do after you get hired as well.
If you develop habits to read and learn skills, you’ll retain the benefits of those activities even after you start a new job.
Instead of getting desperate that you’ll never get a job – and scaring off potential employees – focus on the job search process, not just the outcome.

The orginal article.

Summary of “One of the fathers of AI is worried about its future”

What do you make of the idea that there’s an AI race between different countries?
We could collectively participate in a race, but as a scientist and somebody who wants to think about the common good, I think we’re better off thinking about how to both build smarter machines and make sure AI is used for the wellbeing of as many people as possible.
The potential for AI to be useful in the developing world is even greater.
Are you worried about just a few AI companies, in the West and perhaps China, dominating the field of AI? Yes, it’s another reason why we need to have more democracy in AI research.
What are you most excited about in terms of new AI research?
I think we need to consider the hard challenges of AI and not be satisfied with short-term, incremental advances.
We need long-term investments and I think academia is the best place to carry that torch.
We don’t really have good algorithms for this, but I think if enough people work at it and consider it important, we will make advances.

The orginal article.

Summary of “U.S. militia groups head to border, stirred by Trump’s call to arms”

FALFURRIAS, Tex. – Gun-carrying civilian groups and border vigilantes have heard a call to arms in President Trump’s warnings about threats to American security posed by caravans of Central American migrants moving through Mexico.
McGauley and others have been roused by the president’s call to restore order and defend the country against what Trump has called “An invasion,” as thousands of Central American migrants advance slowly through southern Mexico toward the U.S. border.
The prospect of armed vigilantes showing up beside thousands of U.S. troops – along with Border Patrol agents, police officers and migrants – is considered serious enough that miliary planners have issued warnings to Army commanders.
According to military planning documents obtained by Newsweek, the military is concerned about the arrival of “Unregulated militia members self-deploying to the border in alleged support” of U.S. Customs and Border Protection.
Manuel Padilla Jr., the top Border Patrol official in the agency’s Rio Grande Valley sector, the nation’s busiest for illegal crossings, said he has not issued any instructions to agents in the field or to landowners whose properties are adjacent to the river.
“We don’t have any specific information about the militias,” said Padilla, reached by phone along the border.
Michael Vickers, a veterinarian and rancher who lives an hour north of the border in Falfurrias, said that he will not let militia members from outside the area onto his property and that he doubts most area landowners would trust outsiders.
The group doesn’t call itself a militia, although it patrols ranchland to intercept migrants who hike through the brush to attempt to avoid Border Patrol checkpoints.

The orginal article.

Summary of “We Need to Talk More About Mental Health at Work”

Yet we’re loath to talk about mental health at work.
Failure to acknowledge an employee’s mental health can hurt productivity, professional relationships, and the bottom line: $17-$44 billion is lost to depression each year, whereas $4 is returned to the economy for every $1 spent caring for people with mental health issues.
EY launched a We Care program two years ago to educate employees about mental health issues, encourage them to seek help if they need it, and be a support to colleagues who might be struggling with mental illness or addiction.
“They told us that it was very taboo – something that people don’t normally talk about – but they were seeing more activity, so we decided to schedule a session to talk about anxiety. Just talk about it and see what would happen.”
Other companies, like Michigan-based furniture store, Herman Miller, offer free onsite counseling sessions to employees and their families, and courses on mental health first aid that teach them how to recognize signs of mental illness in others.
What organizations like EY and Herman Miller realize is that, given the right support, employees who struggle with their mental health can do great work.
The good news is that times are changing, and people like Christina, along with the millions of others who struggle with mental illness, are more likely to get the help they need at work than ever before.
“Look at the huge growth in wellbeing research, practice in the private sector, and society at large. That’s one really good indicator of change.” It’s much more understood and accepted that people have emotional and mental health needs.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Working with a Colleague Who Feels That the World Is Against Them”

So what’s the best way to protect yourself? How can you help your colleague change their mindset? And how do you handle the emotional toll of working with this person?
Remember: your colleague is not purposely trying to make you crazy.
Say your colleague grouses about a boss who they perceive as giving them more work than anyone else on the team.
Empower your colleague and “Brace yourself around the issues,” she says.
“If you say, ‘You’re paranoid and you whine a lot,’ your colleague is not going to hear it.” Instead, focus on the behavior they should be exhibiting not the behavior you wish they’d stop.
Talk to your colleague about their behavior and the effect it’s having on the team.
Your aim is to show your colleague that their mood has a ripple effect.
Case Study #2: Talk to your colleague about the impact his mood has on the team.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Why do digital health startups keep failing?”

Zeo is just one of many digital health startups whose early promise failed to materialize into lasting impact.
Many digital health companies fall short because they apply a strategy to healthcare that was developed and refined in the tech sector, an entirely different industry with its own set of rules.
Consumer technology startups often push quickly to get a minimum viable product to market and then iterate to improve that product based on what most resonates with consumers.
Digital health products need to appeal not just to individual consumers but to a complicated landscape of stakeholders-from doctors and patients to regulators and insurers-all of whom have a say in whether a new technology is adopted.
This is why 61% of digital health companies that start B2C end up pivoting to B2B and selling to insurance companies, employers, hospitals, or other healthcare providers.
Arlen Myers, president of the Society of Physician Entrepreneurs, echoes these concerns, indicating that many digital health startups fail because they “Don’t involve end users early and often enough … don’t satisfy the needs of multiple stakeholders … make products that interfere with physician workflow instead of making it easier … [or] launch products that are not clinically validated.”
48 medical device and digital health companies have originated from projects undertaken in Stanford Biodesign’s fellowships and classes, and the solutions they have developed have provided care for more than 1.5 million patients.
As digital health continues to take off, success will be determined by getting the need right, designing innovative solutions that address stakeholders’ top priorities, and then demonstrating that a product provides better results.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Help Your Team Do More Without Burning Out”

Our immediate behavioral response to friction shares one feature with much of the general advice about speeding up: It is plainly counterproductive and leads to burn out rather than break out.
The key to speeding up without burning up is a concept I call co-drive.
If you need to move on from the first growth curve in your career, and want to take on more challenges, you need to exchange ego-drive for co-drive.
Conveying a sense of urgency is useful, but an excess of urgency suffocates team development and reflection at the very point it is needed.
If you lead by beating the drum, setting tight deadlines, and burning the midnight oil, your team becomes overly dependent on your presence.
Sustainable speed is achievable only if the team propels itself without your presence.
Rather than cubicled problem-solving, sustainable speed requires a shift toward more collective creation: Gathering often, engaging issues openly and inviting others to improve on your own thoughts and decisions.
Headhunters call this change of perspective from ego-drive to co-drive “Executive maturity.” The mature leader’s burning question is: how do I help others perform?

The orginal article.

Summary of “‘Flexitarian’ diets key to feeding people in a warming world”

If the world wants to limit climate change, water scarcity and pollution, then we all need to embrace “Flexitarian” diets, say scientists.
Without action, the impacts of the food system could increase by up to 90%. Fast on the heels of the landmark report of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change comes this new study on how food production and consumption impact major threats to the planet.
The authors say that the food system has a number of significant environmental impacts including being a major driver of climate change, depleting freshwater and pollution through excessive use of nitrogen and phosphorous.
“We can eat a range of healthy diets but what they all have in common, according to the latest scientific evidence, is that they are all relatively plant based,” said lead author Dr Marco Springmann from the University of Oxford.
“You can go from a diet that has small amounts of animal products, some might call it a Mediterranean based diet, we call it a flexitarian diet, over to a pescatarian, vegetarian or vegan diet – we tried to stay with the most conservative one of these which in our view is the flexitarian one, but even this has only one serving of red meat per week.”
If the world moved to this type of diet, the study found that greenhouse gas emissions from agriculture would be reduced by more than half.
“Tackling food loss and waste will require measures across the entire food chain, from storage, and transport, over food packaging and labelling to changes in legislation and business behaviour that promote zero-waste supply chains,” said Fabrice de Clerck, director of science at EAT who funded the study.
“Feeding a world population of 10 billion people is possible – yet only if we change the way we eat, and the way we produce food,” said Johan Rockström, director designate of the Potsdam Institute for Climate Impact Research, who is one of the authors of the study.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Huge reduction in meat-eating ‘essential’ to avoid climate breakdown”

Huge reductions in meat-eating are essential to avoid dangerous climate change, according to the most comprehensive analysis yet of the food system’s impact on the environment.
“Feeding a world population of 10 billion is possible, but only if we change the way we eat and the way we produce food,” said Prof Johan Rockström at the Potsdam Institute for Climate Impact Research in Germany, who was part of the research team.
“Greening the food sector or eating up our planet: this is what is on the menu today.”
“But dietary and technological change [on farms] are the two essential things, and hopefully they can be complemented by reduction in food loss and waste.” About a third of food produced today never reaches the table.
The researchers found a global shift to a “Flexitarian” diet was needed to keep climate change even under 2C, let alone 1.5C. This flexitarian diet means the average world citizen needs to eat 75% less beef, 90% less pork and half the number of eggs, while tripling consumption of beans and pulses and quadrupling nuts and seeds.
The millions of people in poor nations who are undernourished need to eat a little more meat and dairy.
Reducing meat consumption might be achieved by a mix of education, taxes, subsidies for plant-based foods and changes to school and workplace menus, the scientists said.
A global change is needed, he said: “I think we can do it, but we really need much more proactive governments to provide the right framework. People can make a personal difference by changing their diet, but also by knocking on the doors of their politicians and saying we need better environmental regulations – that is also very important. Do not let politicians off the hook.”

The orginal article.