Summary of “Don’t Know What You Want? Improve These 7 Universal Skills”

What does success look like? What do you want from life? What career do you want?
We think it’s the worst thing in the world if you don’t know what you want to do in life.
One of the biggest thinking errors that I’ve made was that I thought I needed to know what I exactly wanted to do with my life.
The truth is that no one knows what they truly want.
So it’s not important to know exactly what you want to do with your life.
It’s not even realistic to boldly claim “I know what I want!”.
If you can’t decide what direction you want to go in life, that’s automatically your #1 goal in life – to figure out where you want to go.
Persuasion: Learn how to get what you want in an ethical way.

The orginal article.

Summary of “3 Women on Being the Caregiver of a Disabled Sibling”

More American women than you think are currently waiting for their parents to die – knowing when that happens, they will end up caring for their disabled siblings.
Their childhoods are a dress rehearsal for this inevitability: Research shows that in these families, starting in early childhood, sisters are much more likely than their brothers to help parents care for developmentally disabled children – for example, helping to dress or feed their siblings.
Once disabled children graduate from high school and age out of federally mandated special-education services, which expire at age 22 – a milestone that has been called “The services cliff” – families must ask not just what happens next, but what will happen after the parents are gone.
Below, three women share what it’s like to be ambitious in their careers, date, and communicate with their families while caring for a disabled sibling.
I distinctly remember being like 12, and all of a sudden my parents started going to the gym every day – they had kind of let go of their health but then they were like, if we don’t change, Rekha is going to keep getting bigger, and we have to be able to physically care for her.
My parents were very upfront, like, this is your little sister, she needs your help, don’t ever let her down.
My parents were very up-front, like, this is your little sister, she needs your help, don’t ever let her down.
If my parents pass away, my sister will be my responsibility.

The orginal article.

Summary of “A Simple Formula for Changing Our Behavior”

I’m always inclined to ask: Why do I react the way I do? The answer is a complicated fusion of reasons including my love for my daughter, my desire to teach her, my low tolerance for messiness, my need to be in control, my longing for her success, and the list goes on.
Because knowing why I act a certain way does not change my behavior.
Practicing a new behavior, showing up in a new way, or acting differently, feels inauthentic.
Changing a dance that’s been danced many times before will never feel natural.
If we want to learn, we need to tolerate the feeling of inauthenticity long enough to integrate the new way of being.
Long enough for the new way of being to feel natural.
Yesterday, my daughter was doing homework late at night and I had to ask her to work in the dining room instead of her bedroom because her younger sister needed to go to bed.
“Sweetie,” I said, “Your sister needs to go to sleep and we need to move you into the dining room. How can I help?” Identify the problem, state what needs to happen, and offer to help.

The orginal article.

Summary of “The Power of Imperfect Starts”

What is optimal for them right now isn’t necessarily needed for you to get started.
If you set your bar at “Amazing,” it’s awfully difficult to start.
Comparing your current situation to someone who is already successful can often make you feel like you lack the required resources to get started at all.
You don’t need new cooking bowls to start eating healthy.
You don’t need a new backpack to start traveling.
You can point out how your business mentor is successful because they use XYZ software, but they probably got started without it.
Don’t let visions of what is optimal prevent you from getting started in the first place.
An imperfect start can always be improved, but obsessing over a perfect plan will never take you anywhere on its own.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Alain de Botton on Love, Vulnerability, and the Psychological Paradox of the Sulk”

“Why is love rich beyond all other possible human experiences and a sweet burden to those seized in its grasp?” philosopher Martin Heidegger asked in his electrifying love letters to Hannah Arendt.
“Because we become what we love and yet remain ourselves.” Still, nearly every anguishing aspect of love arises from the inescapable tension between this longing for transformative awakening and the sleepwalking selfhood of our habitual patterns.
The multiple sharp-edged facets of this question are what Alain de Botton explores in The Course of Love – a meditation on the beautiful, tragic tendernesses and fragilities of the human heart, at once unnerving and assuring in its psychological insightfulness.
A sequel of sorts to his 1993 novel On Love, the book is bold bending of form that fuses fiction and De Botton’s supreme forte, the essay – twined with the narrative thread of the romance between the two protagonists are astute observations at the meeting point of psychology and philosophy, spinning out from the particular problems of the couple to unravel broader insight into the universal complexities of the human heart.
As the book progresses, one gets the distinct and surprisingly pleasurable sense that De Botton has sculpted the love story around the robust armature of these philosophical meditations; that the essay is the raison d’ĂȘtre for the fiction.
In one of these contemplative interstitials, De Botton examines the paradoxical psychology of one of the most common and most puzzling phenomena between lovers: sulking.
The sulker may be six foot one and holding down adult employment, but the real message is poignantly retrogressive: “Deep inside, I remain an infant, and right now I need you to be my parent. I need you correctly to guess what is truly ailing me, as people did when I was a baby, when my ideas of love were first formed.”
Complement it with philosopher Erich Fromm on what is keeping us from mastering the art of loving, sociologist Eva Illouz on why love hurts, and Anna Dostoyevsky on the secret to a happy marriage, then revisit De Botton on the seven psychological functions of art and what philosophy is for.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Millions of people suffering from mold toxicity go undiagnosed, experts say”

Toxic mold exposure is on the rise, and most people aren’t even aware they’re at risk, according to experts.
“There are millions of people suffering from mold toxicity that don’t know it because it’s going majorly undiagnosed,” said Dr. Neil Nathan, a Board Certified Family Physician and author of the book “Toxic”.
Some of the symptoms for mold toxicity include fatigue, headaches, nausea, anxiety, Irritable Bowel Syndrome, muscle aches, brain fog, weight gain, adrenal fatigue and sensitivities to light and sound.
Nathan, who has a website for mold toxicity resources said it’s never too late to get treatment, but curing it can only happen by clearing all toxic mold from your home, office, car and eventually the body.
“We only have a few physicians in our area who know about mold and the reason they do is because they’ve been through it themselves,” said Dwyer, who was treated for mold toxicity after discovering her home had water damage.
“If more medical professionals got educated about mold toxicity and its effects on the human body, there would be fewer cases of misdiagnosis. They came out with studies in 2017 that showed mold can be a direct link to Alzheimer’s and other kinds of dementia, and once these patients get treatment for mold, their symptoms improved. Cognitive impairment is a big factor with mold. So is muscle and joint pain and lethargy, which can be misdiagnosed as chronic fatigue, the list goes on.”
ISEAI.org as resources for testing and diagnosing mold toxicity.
“Sadly, it’s common for many people to feel that way because much of the medical community isn’t familiar with these mold illnesses. I hope that by sharing my story, it will bring much needed awareness to the condition and help those who are suffering finally get properly diagnosed.”

The orginal article.

Summary of “4 career reflection questions you should ask yourself”

3 minute Read. As 2018 comes to a close, career reflection is the most important thing you can do to prepare for the year ahead. It offers you the opportunity to look back, see what goals you already met, and figure out where you’re at with regards to your long-term goals.
Here are the questions you should be asking before you set your career resolutions for 2019.Does your work matter?
Do they matter to those around you? Do they matter to your employer? Do they matter to society? If you start here and can honestly say that your work matters, you’re well on your way to a rewarding career.
When you look back on the past year, ask yourself if you managed to keep up with the technological changes in your field.
Your career will fast-track itself when your professional peers see you as the technology driver.
Did you work all of this year without giving much thought to where you will be down the road? Where will you be in five years? Ten years? To get to where you want to be, you need to identify where you need to be at various stages of your career.
What roles and responsibilities did they take on? What skills did they acquire along the way? How did they network and get those responsible for their career development to notice and advance their careers? From that learning, map out your game plan so that you don’t leave your career advancement to chance.
Just like everything else in life, career success and satisfaction won’t come without strong intentions on your part.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Why driving is hard-even for AIs”

So I’ve been analyzing the way I drive: How did I know that the other driver was going to turn left ahead of me? Why am I paying attention to the unleashed dog on the sidewalk but not the branches of the trees overhead? What subconscious cues tell me that a light is about to change to red or that the door of a parked car is about to open?
The car itself already takes care of a million details that make the car go, stop, and steer, and that process was complex enough when I was young and cars were essentially mechanical and electric.
Uber suspended its autonomous car program early in 2018 when one of its cars struck and killed a bicyclist.
The commercially available car currently considered the most autonomous-the Cadillac CT6 with Super Cruise-makes it to Level 2… but only on the 130,000 miles that its maps know.
As fast as a car’s onboard computer may be, it must also be able to learn and understand its surroundings, then make immediate decisions on its own-and it must know when to consult with remote resources when necessary.
If there are other cars around when your car takes action to avoid the cat, your car should be able to communicate with them, too, so they can understand instantly whether they need to brake, swerve, or accelerate; otherwise, your car might hit them instead of the cat.
For your car to understand all those hazards, it needs a bit of infrastructure called V2X-“Vehicle to everything” or V2I. And, since it will be a good long time before every vehicle on the road is self-driving and safe, your car will have to take into account bad driving by the considerable number of meat-piloted vehicles still on the road. That’s a lot of resources just to keep you and grandma happy.
Maybe someday, in order to drive in rural areas, you’ll still need to operate a car on your own-just as it’s still handy today to know how to use a stick shift.

The orginal article.

Summary of “25 Lessons Business School Won’t Ever Teach You”

There are a lot of great lessons you can learn in business school.
Some of the most important lessons you’ll ever learn about how to be successful in business comes from getting out there and doing it.
If you’re hoping that MBA will be your golden ticket to kickstarting a successful career in business, consider these all-important 25 lessons that you’ll have to learn outside the classroom.
This is a topic rarely covered in business school.
Business school will teach you the steps you should follow when forming a business: how to do research, come up with a plan, make a budget, choose a business structure and so on.
Weighing opportunity versus potential failure is often personal – you must take into account so many factors beyond the business formulas you learn in school.
Business school may teach you that disruption begins with defining a solution to a problem and then finding a way to add value to customers’ experience.
Learning to navigate the harsh business world will teach you more than you can ever learn in a classroom.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Stay Confident During Your Job Search by Focusing on the Process, Not the Outcome”

There are several reasons you want to avoid appearing – at networking events or in job interviews – as if you need the job too much.
The more worried you are that your job search is dragging on, the less likely you are to project the sense that you will handle whatever the job requires.
Process goals are particularly valuable during an arduous job search.
First, you are likely to be less frustrated about the job search when you are paying attention to the specific actions you need to take.
You may not succeed at getting a job on any particular day, but you may have succeeded at applying for new positions, meeting new people, or learning new things.
Second, many of the things you need to do to get a job are things you need to do after you get hired as well.
If you develop habits to read and learn skills, you’ll retain the benefits of those activities even after you start a new job.
Instead of getting desperate that you’ll never get a job – and scaring off potential employees – focus on the job search process, not just the outcome.

The orginal article.