Summary of “What You Need to Stand Out in a Noisy World”

For years, I’ve been grappling with the question of how professionals in an increasingly noisy and frenetic world can ensure their expertise is recognized.
These are social proof, which gives people a reason to listen to you; content creation, which allows them to evaluate the quality of your ideas; and your network, which allows your ideas to spread. Without at least two of these, though ideally you have all three, it’s structurally almost impossible for your message to break through.
You can leverage the power of social proof to ensure your ideas are taken more seriously – immediately – by making an effort to align yourself with people and institutions that are known and respected within your industry.
Social proof enables others to “Relax” about you; they don’t need to be so vigilant in evaluating your credentials because you’ve already been vetted by others.
Content Creation You can’t become recognized for your ideas if you don’t share them.
The first is that access to a diverse group of people exposes you to different perspectives that can spark new ideas and enables you to refine your ideas by receiving thoughtful and relevant feedback.
The second is that a wide network enables your ideas to spread faster, because you’re starting with a larger base of people who are motivated to speak, tweet, blog, and write about your ideas with their own audiences.
At a foundational level, you need to be viewed as credible, you need to share your ideas publicly so others can see your expertise for themselves, and you need to have a network that’s eager to spread the word.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Schitt’s Creek and the Making of an Emmy Underdog Success”

As Tuesday’s nominations underscored with the shocking success of Pop TV’s Schitt’s Creek and BBC America’s Killing Eve, the big guys haven’t locked up a monopoly on Emmy gold just yet.
In a sign there’s a limit to how much Emmy love money can buy, those two underdog shows from smaller networks ended up scoring multiple nominations in major categories, while high-profile projects from Julia Roberts, Emma Stone, and George Clooney were virtually ignored by voters.
While the network’s PR team certainly worked overtime to raise the show’s profile, “The idea of us putting together huge Emmy campaigns and spending a lot of money to go get Emmys was never something we would ever do. [So] when the Emmy chatter started happening it happened organically,” he said.
While grassroots support might not have meant much to Emmy voters ten or 15 years ago – or else Buffy the Vampire Slayer and Veronica Mars would’ve taken home a slew of statuettes – in the age of social media and dozens of entertainment-news websites, bottom-up Emmy campaigns today actually have a chance of working.
Even if Emmy voters never saw Orphan Black trend on Twitter, they likely read the countless stories about the Clone Club or the rave reviews, creating a feedback loop that ultimately helped Maslany score three Emmy noms and one win.
“Dan [Levy] had an Ellen appearance strategically placed during Emmy season. We flew the cast out to do Deadline’s The Contenders series. Some of the cast were on the MTV Movie and TV Awards As a smaller network, we can’t compete with huge billboards asking for Emmys. We’ve just done what we can to remind everyone of the great show that everyone loves and to just throw some fuel on the fire that already exists.”
“The goal is really to break through that clutter.” It may have worked: After being ignored by voters for the first two years of Noah’s run, The Daily Show – an Emmy darling during Jon Stewart’s tenure as anchor – was finally nominated for Best Variety/Talk Show in 2018, and again this week.
“These types of campaigns get additional exposure for those shows, so the Emmy window is a piece of the year-round promotional plan. Every opportunity we can to spotlight the show and raise awareness for it, the better.”

The orginal article.

Summary of “Forget Coding-Here’s The Skill You Need Most When You Start Your Career”

In order to move up, over, side to side, and double back when you need to, all while making your way upward, the trait you need most is adaptability, not this or that tech skill.
If you’re less than a decade into your career, it’s probably time to prioritize building your network the same way the generation ahead of you was told to develop their skills.
How do you build a network right out the gates, when your limited time in the workforce limits the range of people you’ve come into contact with? Here are a few tips.
Second, start networking with alumni before you’re an alum yourself.
Twitter isn’t just another social network, it’s a powerful networking and education platform.
If networking is a job skill you can develop like any other, it helps to give yourself some structure.
Just giving what you can help you show your network that you’ll be there for them when they need you.
More than any technical skill, one of the best ways to advance your career from the very beginning is to start thinking of networking as part of your day job-even before you land one.

The orginal article.

Summary of “The fight for the bundle is the war for the future of TV”

For most people, watching TV meant buying a bundle of channels from a pay TV distributor like Comcast.
As the bundle breaks up, TV viewers will have more choice about what they watch and what they pay for, at least in the near term.
For years, the conventional wisdom about big TV was that the bundle wouldn’t budge.
For years, the conventional wisdom seemed correct: Even as TV viewing declined, the number of households paying for TV bundles remained constant.
A few months later, in August 2015, Disney CEO Bob Iger acknowledged that his ESPN network had suffered “Some subscriber losses” as pay TV customers cut the cord or looked for bundles that didn’t include ESPN. In case both of those events now seem like commonsense water-is-wet announcements, understand the context: Selling HBO a la carte over the web, was a major shift for Time Warner, which had traditionally relied on distributors like Comcast and Charter to market HBO to their customers, almost always by attaching the service to a bundle.
Now Disney, like every other big TV programmers, is facing a dilemma: How do they give customers the thing they want – the ability to pay for the shows or networks or packages of networks – while continuing to sell the things Disney would prefer they buy? The answer differs from network to network, but most of the solutions are some sort of half-measure: Find a way to make some stuff available outside the bundle while keeping most of the must-have stuff inside the bundle.
Interpreting TV distributors’ moves to bulk up their bundles isn’t a sign of strength for the bundle – it’s a sign of weakness.
This is scary stuff for the TV guys, which is why they are trying very hard to keep the bundle alive as long as they can: Picture the Winterfell defenders taking on the hordes this week, and the Hound’s moment of clarity: “You can’t fight death!”.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Hospital viruses: Fake cancerous nodes in CT scans, created by malware, trick radiologists”

What if the scan had shown faked cancerous nodules, placed there by malware exploiting vulnerabilities in widely used CT and MRI scanning equipment? Researchers in Israel say they have developed such malware to draw attention to serious security weaknesses in critical medical imaging equipment used for diagnosing conditions and the networks that transmit those images – vulnerabilities that could have potentially life-altering consequences if unaddressed.
The malware they created would let attackers automatically add realistic, malignant-seeming growths to CT or MRI scans before radiologists and doctors examine them.
In a blind study the researchers conducted involving real CT lung scans, 70 of which were altered by their malware, they were able to trick three skilled radiologists into misdiagnosing conditions nearly every time.
In cases where the malware removed real cancerous nodules from scans, the radiologists said those patients were healthy 94 percent of the time.
Even after the radiologists were told that the scans had been altered by malware and were given a second set of 20 scans, half of which were modified, they still were tricked into believing the scans with fake nodules were real 60 percent of the time, leading them to misdiagnoses involving those patients.
The researchers ran their test against a lung-cancer screening software tool that radiologists often use to confirm their diagnoses and were able to trick it into misdiagnosing the scans with false tumors every time.
Attackers could choose to modify random scans to create chaos and mistrust in hospital equipment, or they could target specific patients, searching for scans tagged with a specific patient’s name or ID number.
The radiologists in the BGU study recommended follow-up treatment and referrals to a specialist for all of the patients with scans that showed cancerous lung nodules.

The orginal article.

Summary of “The Best Ways to Use Social Media to Expand Your Network”

Too many people focus on trying to network with senior people.
People earlier in their careers respond most often to an initial message, while VPs and C-level professionals respond the least to people they don’t already know.
People don’t have the patience to read long messages that look and feel spammy, especially if it’s the first time they’re hearing from you.
If you’re in a transitional period – starting at a new company, switching industries, or moving to a new city – recognize the opportunity to reach out to people, ask for their advice, and absorb their wisdom.
You don’t have to offer to help in every circumstance, but make yourself available as a resource to people, particularly to people who are just starting out in their careers.
As you build your online network, don’t neglect the people you already know.
Social media opens up incredible possibilities for strengthening your professional network.
Make sure you approach online networking as an extension of how you interact with others in the real world: connect with people personally by finding common ground, then build trust and long-term relationships, rather than one-time transactions.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Research: Men and Women Need Different Kinds of Networks to Succeed”

Women benefited in terms of post-MBA job placement from being central in the network too; but to achieve the executive positions with the highest levels of authority and pay they also had to have an inner circle of close female contacts, despite having similar qualifications to men including education and work experience.
While men had inner circles in their networks too – contacts that they communicated with most – we found that the gender composition of males’ inner circles was not related to job placement.
We estimated the average size of students’ networks to be approximately 12-18 students, which is consistent with paper and pencil self-report network surveys.
Also for each student, we computed the number of same-sex contacts in their network that was greater than expected given the size of their network and the proportion of women and men students in the class.
We found that the social networks of men and women MBA students affected their post-graduation job placement.
While women who had networks that most resembled those of successful men placed into leadership positions that were among the lowest in authority and pay.
If Jane is a second-year MBA student whose inner circle includes classmates Mary, Cindy, and Reshma, but these three women each have networks with few overlapping contacts, then Jane will benefit not only from her three inner-circle-mates but also their non-overlapping contacts.
Our study suggests that women face a greater challenge in networking to find professional opportunities – they, more than men, need to maintain both wide networks and informative inner circles in order to land the best positions.

The orginal article.

Summary of “5G Is Going to Transform Smartphones”

The next big step: building the 5G networks to connect these 5G devices to.
A 5G connection could theoretically hit 10 gigabits per second – that’s 100 times faster than the data networks we all use today.
Most 5G networks will use much higher frequencies, ranging from 2.5 GHz to 300 GHz. But thanks to the laws of physics, low-frequency waves travel much further distances than high-frequency waves.
The shorter range for 5G networks will require many, many more base stations to be installed than in previous generations of cell coverage.
“So that’s what 5G is going to make possible.” One of the key promises of AVs is a network of cars all in communication with each other, able to send data back and forth to avoid collisions and smooth out traffic patterns.
If engineers can use 5G networks to offload that onboard computing to the cloud, it would be much easier to make AR glasses lightweight and stylish – all you’d need on the hardware side would be a very simple CPU, a small 5G modem, and a battery.
Until a significant number of U.S. cities have 5G connection, and until a significant number of phones hop on 5G networks, downloading a movie in three seconds will be a neat trick, but the technology won’t change your life.
As 5G networks spread over the next two years, and Apple offers up its own 5G-capable phone, that will change.

The orginal article.

Summary of “The real reason America is scared of Huawei: internet-connected everything”

What is 5G? Rather than a protocol or device, 5G refers to an array of networking technologies meant to work in concert to connect everything from self-driving cars to home appliances over the air.
In a second mode, 5G networks will use much higher, millimeter-wave frequencies that can transmit data at higher speeds, albeit over shorter ranges.
Since 5G is meant to be compatible with existing 4G, 3G, and Wi-Fi networks-in some cases using mesh networking that cuts out central control of a network entirely-existing security issues will also carry over to the new networks.
With 5G, a layer of control software will help ensure seamless connectivity, create virtual networks, and offer new network features.
A network operator might create a private 5G network for a bank and the bank could use features of the network to verify the identities of app users.
Two research papers offer a good overview of the risks and potential solutions: 5G Security: Analysis of Threats and Solutions; Security for 5G Mobile Wireless Networks.
“If you do it correctly, you will actually have a more robust network,” says Muriel M├ędard, a professor who leads the Network Coding and Reliable Communications Group at MIT. 5.
As the world’s biggest supplier of networking equipment and second largest smartphone maker, Huawei is in a prime position to snatch the lion’s share of a 5G market that, by some estimates, could be worth $123 billion in five years’ time.

The orginal article.

Summary of “How to Make Friends in a New City”

Whether you’ve been promoted, taken a new job, or just needed to make a change – moving to a new city can be a scary endeavor.
For working adults, making new friends can be tough.
By teaching ourselves to understand how networks function, most of us can build, at least, a basic new network much faster than we built our old one.
You may find that you already know someone who lives in your new city.
This one may sound obvious, but many of us only reach out to our closest friends when we need help making new connections.
Take the time to ask many friends and colleagues if they know anyone worth meeting in your new city.
Once you land in your new city, it may be tempting to seek out meetups, networking events, and the like.
These are just a few steps you can take to build a network in your new city, and they’re certainly not the only thing you’ll be doing when you land.

The orginal article.