Summary of “Self-storage: How warehouses for personal junk became a $38 billion industry”

According to SpareFoot, a company that tracks the self-storage industry, the United States boasts more than 50,000 facilities and roughly 2.311 billion square feet of rentable space.
Though the adage “Sex sells” is hard to dispute, the decidedly unsexy self-storage industry made $32.7 billion in 2016, according to Bloomberg, nearly three times Hollywood’s box office gross.
The last few years have seen record-setting investment in self-storage expansion, including $4 billion alone in 2017.
The unstoppable expansion of self-storage The history of the storage industry has been one of steady growth and remarkable resilience.
In the ’90s and early aughts, when cities started seeing residential growth, self-storage found a new generation of space-starved consumers moving into neighborhoods filled with warehouse space ripe for repurposing.
High-end self-storage sites can command two or three times the rent per square foot than commercial or residential uses, and in many major metros, these warehouses are 90 percent occupied.
Can self-storage outrun our need for more stuff and more space? Has self-storage hit a saturation point? With growth potentially becoming a glut, some analysts believe builders may have finally caught up with demand.
New Yorkers who feel like self-storage warehouses have sprung up everywhere haven’t seen anything yet.

The orginal article.

Summary of “A New Generation of Food Magazines Thinks Small, and in Ink”

LinYee Yuan’s new twice-yearly print publication, Mold, came about as an expansion of her website, and a way to explore its story ideas more deeply, around themes such as the microbiome or food waste.
Mold is driven by this sense of urgency – telling stories at the intersection of food and design that look to the future.
Ms. Yuan raised more than $35,000 on Kickstarter last year and pulled together the first two issues of Mold in her apartment in New York City; she now prints about 5,000 copies of each issue and sells them locally, as well as in Britain, France, Germany, Singapore and Taiwan.
Stephen Satterfield, a former sommelier who used to run the food site Nopalize, was frustrated with the food coverage in traditional food magazines, which he said often suffers from a lack of diverse viewpoints, and a lack of context.
“I knew we were going to ask where things came from, and that was going to be the point of view we brought into conversations about food,” he said of his new quarterly magazine, Whetstone.
Mr. Satterfield, 33, lives in San Francisco, but produces the magazine on the road, where he spends most of his time.
“The new democracy in media is that if you have a flagship product and grow a following around that, you’re able to leverage it into more ambitious, larger projects,” said Mr. Satterfield, who aims to expand Whetstone into video production.
Mr. Satterfield said it wasn’t unusual for him to text back and forth, candidly, with new subscribers.

The orginal article.

Summary of “There are good reasons for ignoring the news”

Did you hear about the rich American who’s cut himself off from all news since Donald Trump was elected? There’s no reason why you should.
Plus, his non-consumption of news media seems to involve a lot of slightly precious “Business”.
The NYT interviewer touched upon criticism it had received in a way that, to me, merely encapsulated its appeal: “To avoid current affairs is in some ways a luxury that many people cannot afford.” I mean, why not just liken it to a holiday in the Maldives? A lobster dinner? A dishwasher? Yes, not everybody can afford it: for many, ignoring the news is impossible because it affects them directly – just as, for many, buying a dishwasher is impossible.
You’d need to have ignored the news for a very long time to be willing to believe that’s what Earth is.
That’s appropriately capitalistic: keeping up with the news, like buying a dishwasher, involves purchasing stuff.
Ignoring the news doesn’t add to the GDP and so, unlike other luxuries that do more tangible harm, it can be widely condemned without commercial risk.
Over the past few weeks, while not having to find subjects for columns, my own attitude to reading the news has become a medium-strength raft of sanctions.
The way the news reaches us these days, with so much of it either “Fake” or “Breaking”, is worse than ignorance.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Kacey Musgraves’s ‘Golden Hour’: March 2018 Cover Story”

On a dreary afternoon in late March, Kacey Musgraves pulls up to a Walgreens in the town of Sioux City, which sits at the intersection of South Dakota, Nebraska, and Iowa, tucked just inside the border of the latter.
Earlier in the day, we were sitting at Crave, a regional “Fusion” chain Musgraves found on Yelp that rests next to the Missouri River in the shadow of the arena where she’s playing tonight and a Hard Rock Hotel & Casino where I’ll later lose money playing roulette.
Where Musgraves had previously worked closely with a small group of collaborators headlined by the songwriters Shane McAnally and Luke Laird, Golden Hour was created with a different team: Ian Fitchuk and Daniel Tashian, two Nashville-based songwriters and session players who Musgraves knew previously but had never written with.
“Butterflies,” the first song Musgraves wrote after meeting Kelly, is about how the excitement of a new crush can make you feel like you’ve rediscovered yourself.
The album began to take shape in the fall of 2016, after Musgraves met Tashian and Fitchuk at Tashian’s house in Nashville.
Musgraves says Fitchuk and Tashian were crucial in landing the album in a place that still felt true to her artistry.
The conversation surrounding Musgraves inevitably ends up settling in the same spot: hand-wringing over her place in modern country music.
In Sioux City, Musgraves ends her set with her latest single, the disco experiment “High Horse.” She walks off the stage under a shower of confetti and into the bowels of the arena, where she goofs around with her band for Instagram content before retreating back to her bus as Little Big Town takes the stage.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Restaurants make big bucks off people who aren’t eating a thing”

Slammed by soaring costs for food, labor and rent, New York’s bars, restaurants and nightclubs are using a growing crop of third-party apps and services to rent out their dining rooms, coat-check areas and even their bathrooms to make extra cash.
Luluapp – a mobile app that, for a fee, promises to direct tourists and other assorted weak bladders to the nearest available bathroom – says it has already signed up more than 100 New York restaurants and bars ahead of its summer launch.
Instead, he decided to work with Bagbnb, a Rome-based luggage storage startup that claims to work with bars and restaurants in 60 cities worldwide, including 26 venues in the Big Apple.
Bagbnb, which splits its $6, per-bag fee with restaurants, has also expanded by offering commissions to tour operators, Airbnb hosts and hotels for suggesting its services to their lodgers.
“It can be a little hectic in the morning when you have 10 people lined up ready to drop off their bags,” said Chelsea Feldcher, a manager at Pennsylvania 6, a restaurant near Penn Station that started using Bagbnb a few months go.
“But obviously any extra revenue is great for us and we are introducing new people to the restaurant.”
KettleSpace, a six-month-old startup, has inked about half a dozen deals with restaurants and bars to open their dining rooms to freelancers and entrepreneurs during the off hours.
“KettleSpace is the cheapest alternative that I found,” said Bradley Orego, a graphic designer and professional dancer who was working at P.S. Kitchen, a restaurant off Times Square at 248 W. 48th St., on a recent afternoon.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Mike D, In Conversation”

When the Beastie Boys’ career came to a tragic halt in 2012 after the death of Adam “MCA” Yauch, the remaining band members, Adam Horovitz and Mike Diamond, were faced with the difficult task of creating futures for themselves that weren’t mired in the past.
Thirty-seven years after forming the band, Mike can say, with a smile, “I learned a lot of things in the Beastie Boys – including how to appreciate a good time.”
Has working on the book affected your thinking about the Beastie Boys’ career? The conventional narrative, as I see it, is that there were three defining milestones for you guys: Licensed to Ill, Paul’s Boutique, and “Sabotage.” Does that jibe with your understanding of the band’s trajectory?No.
You’ve lived primarily in L.A. for a while but I’ll always think of the Beastie Boys as being quintessential New York characters.
Just to go back to the band a little more specifically: Did your relationships with the two Adams change over time? From what I’ve read, in the very early days of the Beastie Boys they occasionally gave you the business – almost in a young-male hazing way.
We’re kind of joking around here, but the idea of a New Yorker moving to California and becoming a laid-back surfer-guy is almost a cliché you could imagine the Beastie Boys having fun with in their younger days.
A highlight of Spike Jonze’s post-skateboard music-video career, it’s as iconic as the song’s overdriven bass, played by MCA. Released in 1993, the Beastie Boys’ third record finds them playing more instrumentally, with Ad-Rock on guitar, MCA on bass, and Mike D on drums.
With an early start in his NYU dorm, Simmons founded Def Jam Recordings in 1984; the next year, he released the Beastie Boys second single “Rock Hard” on the new label.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Emma Gonzalez profile: What you need to know about the Marjory Stoneman Douglas student”

She hid in the auditorium while Nikolas Cruz was firing on her classmates: Gonzalez says that as she waited in the dark room at Marjory Stoneman Douglas on February 14, she searched Google News for updates.
Her father fled Cuba and is a lawyer: Gonzalez was born in the US. Her dad sought refuge from Fidel Castro’s regime by moving to New York in 1968.
Her mother is a math tutor and worries about her: In an interview with CBS’ “60 Minutes,” mom, Beth, reminded viewers that Gonzalez is still young despite the strength she’s displaying: “It’s like she built herself a pair of wings out of balsa wood and duct tape and jumped off a building, and we’re just like running along beneath her with a net, which she doesn’t want or think that she needs.”She’s says being open about her sexuality has helped propel her activism: Gonzalez has been president of her school’s Gay-Straight Alliance for three years.
She shaved her head two weeks before school began in September.
She’s been on the cover of Time: The April 2 issue of the magazine features Marjory Stoneman Douglas students who are leading the national conversation about gun control.
Along with Gonzalez, it also features David Hogg, Cameron Kasky, Alex Wind and Jaclyn Corin with the word “ENOUGH,” written in bold letters and imposed across the image.
She’s still planning on college after graduation: Just four days before the shooting, Gonzalez went on a tour of New College of Florida in Sarasota.
That’s still her plan, People magazine reported.

The orginal article.

Summary of “The Hilarious Life and Agonizing Death of Online Comedy”

Such articles “Provided a great way to educate readers about the plight of The Onion and only The Onion,” cracks editor-in-chief Chad Nackers.
Newer comedy sites like women’s media spoof Reductress and the essay and humor outlet Very Smart Brothas have attracted audiences into the millions by critiquing social norms and current events from a fresh perspective.
The Onion itself, known primarily for its writing, eventually expanded to the world of video with its cable news knockoff, The Onion News Network.
The same efficiency that makes The Onion so successful as comedy also makes it vulnerable as a generator of ad revenue.
“We’ve been doing Area Man stuff for the entire existence of The Onion,” Nackers observes, but recently he’s encountered more and more readers who don’t understand that the banality of The Onion’s observational humor is the point - probably because they’re not regular readers.
“It’s the classic local news story, but instead of it being about something more important, it’s just about some mundane thing in life that happens. Some people get it, but the other half is like, ‘So they’re just doing real articles now?'”.
Launched in response to a debate within New York’s comedy community over an accused assailant’s ban from the Upright Citizens Brigade network, the package included pieces like “‘Most Women Lie About Rape,’ Says Man Lying About Rape” and “Man Who Sexually Assaulted You Likes Your Facebook Post About Assault,” the latter by Newell herself.
With large-scale comedy sites seemingly a thing of the past, humor outlets are finding new avenues to profitability other than traditional advertising.

The orginal article.

Summary of “The myth of “forcing people out of their cars””

His tweet promoting the article engages in a common, but aggravating, rhetorical framing of the issue by construing a move to allow transit-oriented development as being an effort to “Force” people out of their cars.
Since as best I can tell, it is genuinely the case that most middle-class Americans prefer detached houses and are willing to pay a premium for them, all indications are that a large swath of the newly zoned land would remain as detached houses that people pay a premium to live in.
So some of the land would be reused for townhouses and apartments, greatly increasing the number of people who can afford to live in California.
In terms of parking, most of these new buildings will almost certainly feature new off-street parking spaces.
Cars are useful and places to park cars are useful, and people are normally willing to pay money to obtain useful things.
The question is whether towns should require that new developments come with a certain minimum amount of new parking attached or whether they should simply allow people to decide how much parking they want to pay for.
If you allow for denser construction and fewer parking spaces, you will get some households that don’t own a car.
It’s the status quo that forces a particular form of land use – detached houses with plenty of parking – on the vast majority of the developed land in America.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Towards a world without Facebook – TechCrunch”

Abandon your transparently greedy get-rich-quick schemes, turn away from your casinos of de-facto modern-day penny stocks, and focus your decentralized attention on what the world needs.
Save us, O blockchainers, from the scourge that is Facebook! Decentralize all the things!
Its fundamental flaw is the fundamental flaw of most grandiose decentralized blockchain notions; they are too much, too large, too megalomaniacal, too soon.
Online micropayments didn’t fail again and again because decentralized tokens weren’t a thing yet; they failed because their cognitive load was far too great to sustain their use.
If your consumer decentralized app involves ordinary users knowingly accumulating, spending, or transferring custom tokens, your consumer decentralized app will fail.
Consider Cosmos, designed to allow blockchains to interoperate with one another, forming a decentralized web of chains they call “The Internet of blockchains.” And of course consider Ethereum, which, believe it or not, isn’t just for ICOs, but lets you run arbitrary decentralized code, and, importantly, has serious plans to massively scale its throughput.
Once you’ve built a local social network wherein users control their data, one which is part of a higher-order decentralized network of nodes, all communicating via a common tokenized protocol well, then you have a whole world of new, interesting, and daunting scaling problems.
The world will have Facebook for a long time to come, but Facebook doesn’t have to be part of your world especially if a weird, clunky, charmingly ramshackle little alternative exists, one from which you ultimately find you get far more net emotional and practical value.

The orginal article.