Summary of “In a world of digital nomads, we will all be made homeless”

The basic deal is simple enough: you can either pay to put your laptop wherever there is space, or stump up a little more for a more dependable desk or entire office – and, in either case, take advantage of the fact that, with operations in 20 countries, WeWork offers the chance to traverse the planet and temporarily set up shop in no end of locations.
As the working day winds on and such distractions – along with the necessity of meeting other footloose hotshots, and comparing “Projects” – take up more of your time, a couple of questions might spring to mind: what is work, and what is leisure? And does the distinction even count for much any more?
If accommodation is proving hard to find, you need company, and your life as a freelance means you have no permanent workplace where you can meet like-minded people, here is a solution: a range of tiny studio flats and slightly bigger dwellings, built around communal areas, kitchens and laundrettes – in the same building as WeWork office space.
Miguel McKelvey, one of the company’s two founders, has said that the idea is partly aimed at people who are “Always working or always semi-working”.
For upwards of $500 a week, such people can now wander around the world, mixing life and work – “Two activities that quickly become indistinguishable within Roam’s confines”, as the New York Times put it.
More generally, the need for a distinction between work and downtime should enter the political vocabulary as a fundamental right, and the organisations dedicated to trying to enforce it – most notably, the network of small freelance unions that are dotted across Europe and the US – need to be encouraged and assisted.
We all know the modern rules: millions of people have to leave where they grew up to find even halfway dependable work; and they find that creating any kind of substitute home somewhere new is impossible.
The idea is apparently to put WeGrow schools in WeWork properties across the world, so digital nomads can carry their disorientated offspring from place to place, and ensure they have just as flimsy an idea of home as their parents do.

The orginal article.

Summary of “The Death of a Once Great City”

I have never seen what is going on now: the systematic, wholesale transformation of New York into a reserve of the obscenely wealthy and the barely here-a place increasingly devoid of the idiosyncrasy, the complexity, the opportunity, and the roiling excitement that make a city great.
For all of New York’s shiny new skin and shiny new numbers, what’s most amazing is how little of its social dysfunction the city has managed to eliminate over the past four decades.
Far from discouraging new construction, New York’s housing policies encourage and subsidize it at every turn-and, in doing so, have only made the city less affordable than ever.
Fumihiko Maki’s 400,000 square foot, $300 million black monolith at 51 Astor Place-nicknamed the Death Star by local residents-may well be the single worst act of vandalism in New York since the original Pennsylvania Station was torn down more than fifty years before, a looming wall that effectively obliterates what was one of the oldest and most vital public places in New York.
To facilitate this process, writes the impassioned social advocate Jeremiah Moss in his wrathful howl Vanishing New York: How a Great City Lost Its Soul, $1 billion worth of public land was transferred, gratis, to two developers, including Sterling Equities, controlled by Mets owner Fred Wilpon and his brother-in-law, Saul Katz.
The result was perverse, a New York that was home to more than a million welfare recipients and featured almost full employment for everyone else; a city where 7 million to 14 million square feet of office space-the size of the entire downtown of a metropolis such as Kansas City or Pittsburgh-was built in New York every year from 1967 to 1970, as Ric Burns and James Sanders noted in their history of the city.
What is the point, after all, of paying a fortune to live in a city that is more and more like everywhere else? New York is now jammed with some 62 million tourists every year, flocking to Disneyfied Broadway that is a pathetic imitation of what it once was.
These industries were constantly in flux, and by the end of World War II, as the only great world city that remained unbloodied and unbowed, New York still had more than a million manufacturing jobs, more than any other city on the planet.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Seahawks Rebuild on Pete Carroll’s Competition Mantra”

In the team meeting room, each player gets up from the seats they were in the year before and finds a new spot around different people.
Kam Chancellor is awaiting scans on his neck to see if he’ll be able to play.
Here’s the curveball: The roster turnover, the departure of all those core players, has actually made it easier for Carroll.
We’re going to share details on a visit Kobe Bryant took to Foxboro in May. The Kobe visit was an interesting one, because of Bryant’s experience as an athlete who played 20 professional seasons.
“We want to turn the page on that as fast as we can. Obviously we can’t get the taste out of our mouth until we start playing football games. We all know that and we respect that. But to talk about it, what does that do? It doesn’t do anything but bring up bad memories. We’ve pushed forward from that.”
“That’s the way John’s approached it. I know it’s the way our coaching staff has approached it. We want to get to winning as soon as we can, and the moves signal that. Tyrod Taylor’s our starting quarterback, we drafted a rookie quarterback, and I think it’s a great situation to be in-we don’t have to play a rookie quarterback right away, because we have a proven guy who’s played in the league, won games, played in playoff games. That’s exciting. I also think it sends a message, creates a narrative that this team is gearing up to win, that everything we’re doing is pointing towards winning.”
Among Bryant’s talking points was the importance of training, and of studying other players, to his ability to play two decades in the NBA. The Patriots who were listening have another pretty good example of longevity in their own locker room, and they made the connection quickly.
I’ll never blame a football player in that situation for trying to leverage a team.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Domino’s Is Fixing America’s Crappy Roads For Pizza Safety And That’s Pretty Embarrassing”

It’s not a William Gibson novel, there’s no plucky protagonist with some sort of cybernetic implant, it’s just America in 2018, with crumbling roads that Domino’s has decided to fix.
Domino’s is tired of their innocent pizzas, who only wish to serve humankind, being beaten all to hell by poorly-maintained roads.
They even have a website that shows, in graphic, pizza-box-cam detail, what brutal hell pizzas are put through when their delivery vehicle impacts a pothole.
To remedy this, Domino’s has been hiring work crews to repair potholes in a number of cities, including Burbank, California, Bartonville, Texas, an impressive 40 holes fixed in Milford, Delaware, and an astounding 150 potholes filled in Athens, Georgia.
Domino’s tags every filled pothole with their logo and the tagline “OH YES WE DID.”.
Remember, this is for the sake of pizza structural integrity, not your comfort.
A statement that says more about the sad state of our road infrastructure and our willingness to take care of it than anything about pizza.
Still, a former pothole bearing the Domino’s logo is better than a big, gaping pothole, so I’m not going to complain too much.

The orginal article.

Summary of “The Critic Whose Olive Garden Review Went Viral Remembers How Anthony Bourdain Spoke Up For Her”

Bourdain defended Hagerty, celebrating her “Triumph over the snarkologists” when the review went viral.
As a result of her online fame, Hagerty wound up flying to New York to do the media rounds, including a hot dog review for the New York Times.
While there, she and Bourdain met for coffee – and she wound up getting a book deal because of it.
In the foreword, Bourdain praised Hagerty as a hard-working, quick-witted food writer with deep knowledge of her community.
“Anthony Bourdain spoke up for me at a time when people all over the country were making great fun of the column I write,” Hagerty told BuzzFeed News.
Bourdain had also laughed when he first read the review, but dropped the snark when he realized how her columns represented her community, she said.
Their coffee meeting in New York was the only time they ever met, and Hagerty said she still thinks about it fondly.
“And one of the wonderful things that happened to me was when Anthony Bourdain spoke up for me and wanted to publish my columns in a book.”

The orginal article.

Summary of “What if Star Wars never happened?”

Despite the decades that have passed since its release, it would be hard to argue that any film is as relevant to the way movies are made today than George Lucas’ 1977 space opera, Star Wars: Episode IV – A New Hope.
Kevin Feige, the Marvel head honcho who presides over what is the most lucrative and successful film franchise currently operating – including Star Wars – talks openly about how much of an impact the original trilogy had on him.
The subsidiary industries that Star Wars has spawned, from toys to novels to video games, has changed how the entertainment business works.
The release of Solo: A Star Wars Story just five months after that of The Last Jedi makes it clear that Star Wars has never been more ubiquitous than it is now; in fact, if Solo’s box office is any indication, audiences might actually be going a little sour on Disney’s attempts to turn the property from a touchstone of childhood and nostalgia into a never-ending modern-day cinematic universe like Marvel and its imitators.
Lucas brings the film in on time and just barely over budget, delivering a well-reviewed movie shot in cinema-verite style that draws comparisons to The Battle of Algiers and Z. But audiences are tired of the Vietnam War, which had finally ended in 1975, and when the movie comes out in 1976, it’s a modest success rather than a breakout hit like Graffiti.
Without Star Wars dominating screens, both William Friedkin’s Sorcerer and Martin Scorsese’s New York, New York gain enough of a foothold to become respectable hits.
Scorsese never hits rock bottom, which means he never deigns to adapt a book he has no interest in, Raging Bull; instead, with Marlon Brando available, he finally attempts to make a film based on the 1890 Wounded Knee massacre.
He never visits Hawaii on the weekend of the release of Star Wars with Lucas, which is when the pair would have come up with the idea for Raiders of the Lost Ark. Bereft after the failure of 1941 and without Raiders to distract him, Spielberg tries to make an adaptation of Blackhawk.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Apple iOS 12 update: the 17 biggest new features coming to the iPhone”

We expected coming into WWDC that iOS 12 would focus less on major new features and more on improving performance and eliminating bugs, and that’s partially true based on what Apple showed onstage today.
Grouped notifications Apple is taking a huge, overdue step to fix its messy notifications situation: iOS 12 will support grouped notifications, so you’ll be able to interact with or dismiss multiple notifications from the same app at once.
It’s called USDZ, and Federighi likened it to “Something like AR Quick Look.” A number of companies including Adobe, Autodesk, and Sketchfab have already announced that they’ll be integrating and building apps around USDZ. Measure app iOS 12’s more powerful augmented reality is being put to use right away in a new Apple app called Measure.
Siri opens to more apps Apple claims Siri is the most popular digital assistant in the world, and to help bolster that lead, it’s allowing developers more integration with iOS 12.
CarPlay is getting Google Maps and Waze Apple announced that its in-car platform CarPlay will add support for two of the most popular turn-by-turn navigation apps – Google Maps and Waze – after the launch of iOS 12.
Apple News The Apple News app is getting minor improvements such as a new Browse tab.
Voice Memos is coming to the iPad and adding iCloud syncing Apple announced that the Voice Memos app has similarly been redesigned and will come to the iPad with the release of iOS 12.
iBooks becomes Apple Books Apple is rebranding its ebook app from iBooks to Apple Books.

The orginal article.

Summary of “How Ford Is Thinking About the Future”

Everyone’s talking about a future in which vehicles are shared rather than owned, autonomous rather than driven, and where car companies make large shares of their profits on digital “Mobility services.” But if you are the Ford Motor Company and face the prospect of investing billions in new technology while your century-old business model is overturned, you might first have a few questions.
To help test drive the future, in 2016 Ford paid about $50 million to acquire Chariot, a startup mobility service.
Here are five to learn from Ford thus far, about mobility services in particular, and more broadly, about how to deal with the uncertainty of new business models in new markets by testing and learning one’s way forward.
Ultimately, Ford has to create a business that’s profitable, and part of that involves designing route maps in which certain customers willingly pay more for rides.
“We are getting pull from enterprises,” Ford Mobility head Marcy Klevorn said recently on a media conference call.
If Ford applied those same ROI expectations to its new logistics business, it would likely kill it before it has a chance to thrive.
While Ford has mitigated much of the risk by starting small and testing, learning, and pivoting along the way, Chariot certainly isn’t the only business model in its new growth space.
Ford X is charged with discovering and developing new business ideas and managing the Transportation Mobility Cloud, which is aimed at enabling vehicles, objects, and city infrastructure to communicate.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Is America Ready for the Next Superstorm?”

The market vendors scooped up the goods at Manhattan piers and hauled them the final few blocks to the market with hand trucks.
Not long after Washington Market was destined for the Bronx, the City Planning Commission began eyeing the aging Fulton Fish Market on the Lower East Side, hoping to reimagine the area as an “Old New York” neighborhood, where shops, a museum, and restored historic buildings could greet visitors who’d just finished their tour of the nineteenth- century ships docked permanently along the pier.
The plan consists of two major components: The first is the physical hardware to keep the electricity flowing to the market; the second is what the EDC, which leads the team, refers to as the plan’s “Human capital,” or protocols for how market vendors and city agencies should respond to various disaster scenarios.
As of today, temporary stacks of sandbags serve to protect the refrigeration for the meat market alone-leaving the produce and fish markets as exposed as they were more than five years ago during Hurricane Sandy.
Just as, 50 years ago, Washington Market needed to relocate from lower Manhattan in order to address the challenges of the time, today, the best way to ensure that Hunts Point Market continues to operate smoothly would be to move it somewhere other than Hunts Point.
Where could Hunts Point Market potentially go? Even before Sandy, the vendors at the market were being courted by New Jersey Governor Chris Christie’s office to move to new facilities in Newark and the Meadowlands.
In Charleston, where floods have increased more than 400 percent since the 1960s, with a record 50 days of flooding in 2016, the real estate market continues to grow, with Forbes recently ranking the city as one of the hottest markets to watch in the country.
So far removed from Sandy, the city has chosen inadequate protection, a decision that depends on the naïve hope that the market will once again be spared by the next disaster.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Egon Schiele on What It Means to Be an Artist and Why Visionaries Always Come from the Minority – Brain Pickings”

To be an artist is to have a particular orientation to the world – the interior world and the exterior world – the exact composition of which is somewhat like temperature, impossible to deconstruct into individual phenomenological components without ceasing to be itself.
Perhaps this is why the question of what it means to be an artist has been the subject of myriad theories, even the most insightful of which are complementary to one another but inherently incomplete.
For James Baldwin, being an artist meant serving as “a sort of emotional or spiritual historian”; for Georgia O’Keeffe, it meant “Making your unknown knownand keeping the unknown always beyond you.” For Albert Camus, the artist was a person endowed with the courage to create dangerously; for E.E. Cummings, with the courage to be oneself.
Adding to the richest meditations on the inner life of artists is the visionary Austrian painter Egon Schiele – an artist whose uncommon genius and creative courage were cut short by his untimely death at twenty-eight in the grip of the Spanish flu pandemic that had taken the life of his young pregnant wife three days before it claimed his own.
In the spring of 1912, after several exhibitions that scandalized Europe with Schiele’s electric eroticism, the twenty-one-year-old artist was arrested for indecency and imprisoned for twenty-four days while awaiting trial – a trial during which the judge demonstratively burned one of Schiele’s drawings over candle flame.
That summer, Schiele, still shaken by the experience, contemplated what it means to be an artist in a world so often hostile to new ways of looking that challenge the status quo and to the seers who invite the rest of us to view that world with new eyes.
One needs to observe and experience the world with naïve, pure eyes in order to attain a great weltanschauung; – that is a living cult.
Writing a decade earlier, on what it means to be an artist, and Kafka, writing a decade later, on why we make art, then revisit Baldwin on the artist’s struggle for integrity and John Muir on the universe as an infinite storm of beauty.

The orginal article.