Summary of “The problem with “shop local,” explained by Jeremiah Moss”

In the ’90s, the stretch of Bleecker Street that snakes north through New York City’s Greenwich Village was home to dozens of independently owned bookshops, sex shops, antique stores, and framing galleries.
Throughout New York City’s transition from a place where a middle-class person could maybe make a living opening and running a business to a place where, well, good luck with that, there’s been one person chronicling it all: Jeremiah Moss.
Moss is the author of the blog Vanishing New York, where since 2007 he’s been lamenting the death of mom-and-pop stores all over the city and engaging in activism to try to save them.
Moss has been a staunch critic of this trend, which is certainly not limited to New York City.
I spoke with Moss over the phone about his piece, in which he criticizes the neoliberalism – the free-market, capitalist approach to governance – that permeated in New York in response to the city’s financial crisis in the late ’70s and ultimately spread globally.
Neoliberal ideas around privatization or regulation – running the government like a corporation, austerity for the working classes – those ideas had been floating around, but they didn’t have any success until the fiscal crisis in New York City of the 1970s.
So if running cities like corporations is contributing to the demise of small businesses and turning citizens into consumers, why are these ideas still so popular?
People, particularly younger people and retired people, it seems, want to be in the city.

The orginal article.

Summary of “How Julia Louis-Dreyfus quietly became the most successful sitcom star ever”

Thus was born the legend of Julia Louis-Dreyfus, who would become one of the greatest sitcom stars in modern television history.
From “Seinfeld” to “The New Adventures of Old Christine” to her remarkable portrayal of Vice President Selina Meyer, Louis-Dreyfus has earned 11 Emmys, including six in a row.
Even if Louis-Dreyfus didn’t create “Seinfeld,” her nine seasons on the hit established a new kind of sitcom actress on a new kind of sitcom.
Julia Louis-Dreyfus remembers first taking the stage in fourth grade.
Judith and GĂ©rard Louis-Dreyfus divorced when their daughter was just 3, so Julia spent much of her childhood shuttling between her father, who lived in New York, and her mother, who lived in the District.
“Women like her. Men like her. On ‘Veep,’ we use it to let her do really horrible things. When people tell me that they wish Selina was president, that’s not what they mean. They wish Julia Louis-Dreyfus was president.”
During her tenure, Louis-Dreyfus was often on the air, whether playing bit parts, grumpy teen news commentator Patti Lynn Hunnsucker or reviving her Northwestern-born televangelist April May June.
“And she is the best number one on the call sheet I have ever worked with, or for. Completely approachable, completely collaborative, warm, friendly, funny, everything you could possibly want your Julia Louis-Dreyfus to be.”

The orginal article.

Summary of “The most important science policy issue in every state”

“This is the most important election of our lifetime,” says Bill Holland, State Policy Director for the League of Conservation Voters.
While state waters extend only 3.5 miles offshore, companies wanting to develop in the zone would still have to get state permission to build pipelines and other infrastructure.
State lawmakers are taking a multipronged approach to tackling the problem: They’ve limited fills to three days to keep doctors from overprescribing the meds; state Attorney General Andy Beshear has sued seven pharmaceutical companies for failing to disclose how addictive their painkillers are; and a bipartisan bill to legalize medical cannabis, which for some could be used as an alternative pain medication, will likely be reintroduced in the 2019 legislature.
Her opponent, state Attorney General Bill Schuette, led the investigation of the crisis that resulted in charges against 15 former and current Flint and state officials.
The Empire State has a lot of water cleanup ahead. According to the state Department of Environmental Conservation, as of this past August, 54 bodies of water have harmful algae blooms-rapidly growing nutrient colonies that can kill marine life and cause illness in humans.
Though the state sided with the villagers and set aside $25 million for relief efforts, the town is still waiting on an alternative source of H2O. Lawmakers are addressing the state’s overall clean-water issues broadly: They’ve passed $2.5 billion in funding to replace pipes and install new treatment systems; estimates from the state comptroller’s office put the cost of proper plumbing closer to $40 billion.
The groups sued the state in July; the plaintiffs contend that Meridian underestimated how much sulfur, methane, and other pollutants the facility will emit, and that the state health department’s monitoring requirements are inadequate.
Some lawmakers and residents worry that the state will repeat the same policy missteps with the natural-gas industry that it did with coal: imposing only a few regulations to protect water and ecosystems, and offering generous tax breaks that result in little revenue for the state.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Why New York Has So Many Empty Storefronts”

Read: How basic economics could solve Manhattan’s traffic problems.
Second, the pain of soaring rents is exacerbated by the growth of online shopping.
It’s typically simplistic to point at a problem in the U.S. and say, “Well, because Amazon.” But it is no coincidence that New York storefront vacancy is climbing just as warehousing vacancy in the U.S. has officially reached an all-century low: A lot of goods are moving from storefronts to warehouses, where they are placed in little brown boxes rather than big brown bags.
The internet won’t cut my hair, and not even the most homesick midwesterner goes online to order a deep dish to be delivered from Chicago to New York.
Online shopping has digitized a particular kind of business-mostly durable, nonperishable, and tradable goods-that one used to seek out in department stores or similar establishments.
One might expect that new companies would fill the vacuum, particularly given the evidence that e-commerce companies can boost online sales by opening physical locations.
The upshot is a stubborn market imbalance: The fastest-growing online retailers are looking to experiment with short-term leases, but the landlords are holding out for long-term tenants.
New York’s problems today are an omen for the future of cities.

The orginal article.

Summary of “What next for photography in the age of Instagram?”

In 2012, I wrote an essay about the shifting nature of photography in an era of unprecedented image overload. Back then, Facebook users alone were uploading 300m photographs a day, while the number of images posted on Flickr and Instagram had exceeded the 11bn mark.
Back in 2012, the anxieties of many photographers tended to converge around the notion of authenticity: would digital technology undermine the craft of analogue photography and, more worryingly, its veracity? Would the invisible hand of Photoshop render not just the process, but the so-called “Truth” of photography, obsolete?
Although British art institutions were embarrassingly late in acknowledging the importance of photography curation – Tate appointed their first photography curator in 2009, almost 70 years after the Museum of Modern Art in New York did so – galleries are now finally according the medium the space it deserves as an art form.
The new photography wing of the Victoria and Albert museum has just opened and, next spring, the Swedish organisation Fotografiska will open an 8,300 sq metre space in Whitechapel and another vast gallery in New York, both dedicated to contemporary photography.
What of the photography itself? Faced with the unprecedented flow of digital images, one has to ask if the traditional status of photography as a way of documenting the world has been altered irrevocably.
To this end, younger photographers such as Daisuke Yokota and Maya Rochat, both included in Tate Modern’s recent exhibition, Shape of Light: 100 Years of Photography and Abstract Art, make work that is, on one level, a dynamic reflection of the dilemma of the contemporary photographer in an age of image overload. Yokota has treated images with heat and iron powder, and subjected others to constant rephotographing, rescanning and reprinting.
Although certain influential photographers such as Eggleston and Shore had always insisted on the essentially democratic nature of their approach, the smartphone camera has already made photography democratic in a way that no one could have predicted.
The future is already here and photography is the medium shaping it – and us – in ways that make all these anxieties about the meaning of photography seem almost irrelevant.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Rick Stein obituary: daughter writes it as funny mystery”

“Rick Stein, 71, of Wilmington was reported missing and presumed dead on September 27, 2018 when investigators say the single-engine plane he was piloting, The Northrop, suddenly lost communication with air traffic control and disappeared over the Atlantic Ocean off the coast of Rehoboth Beach. Philadelphia police confirm Stein had been a patient at Thomas Jefferson University Hospital where he was being treated for a rare form of cancer. Hospital spokesman Walter Heisenberg says doctors from Stein’s surgical team went to visit him on rounds when they discovered his room was empty. Security footage shows Stein leaving the building at approximately 3:30 Thursday afternoon, but then the video feed mysteriously cuts off.”
“Authorities say they believe Stein took an Uber to the Philadelphia airport where they assume he somehow gained access to the aircraft. ‘The sea was angry that day,’ said NTSB lead investigator Greg Fields in a news conference. ‘We have no idea where Mr. Stein may be, but any hope for a rescue is unlikely.”‘.
She quotes Stein’s brother as saying Stein couldn’t have been a pilot; the two owned a jewelry and Oriental rug gallery together.
His sister says she thought Stein was a cartoonist and freelance television critic for the New Yorker.
“David Walsh, Stein’s son-in-law, said he was certain Stein was a political satirist for Huffington Post while grandsons Drake and Sam said they believed Stein wrote an Internet sports column for ESPN covering Duke basketball, FC Barcelona soccer, the Denver Broncos and the Tour de France. Stein’s granddaughter Evangeline claims he was a YouTube sensation who had just signed a seven-figure deal with Netflix.”
One nephew said he is sure Stein was a trail guide in Rocky Mountain National Park, and another said his uncle was a consultant for a record chain and ran a group of legal recreational marijuana dispensaries.
“Detectives say they were unable to interview Mrs. Stein, however neighbors say they witnessed her leaving the home the couple shared wearing dark sunglasses and a fedora, loading multiple suitcases into her car. FAA records show she purchased a pair of one-way tickets to Rome which was Mr. Stein’s favorite city. An anonymous source with the airline reports the name used to book the other ticket was Juan Morefore DeRoad, which, according to the FBI, was an alias Stein used for many years.”
Once the obituary, also posted on the Chandler Funeral Home and Crematory site, was published, dozens of friends and strangers alike joined the goof and wrote in about many fantastic and outlandish achievements they said belonged to Stein.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Columbus Day: Christopher Columbus discovered the potato, tomato, tobacco and other New World crops”

On Columbus Day, the country commemorates the grand global changes – discoveries and destruction alike – that unfolded after Christopher Columbus linked the New World and the Old.
They transformed cultures, reshuffled politics and spawned new economic systems that then, in a globalizing feedback loop, took root back in the New World, as well.
Diseases common in the Old World quickly devastated the indigenous populations in the New.
“What happened after Columbus,” writes science journalist Charles Mann in “1493,” his book on the topic, “Was nothing less than the forming of a single new world from the collision of two old worlds – three, if one counts Africa as separate from Eurasia.”
“There really was no spicy food in the world before the Columbian Exchange,” said Nancy Qian, an economics professor at Northwestern University who has studied how the back-and-forth flow of new foods, animals and germs reshaped the world.
Before Columbus landed on Hispaniola, the European diet was a bland affair.
There, according to Mann, “Native plant breeders radically transformed the fruits, making them bigger, redder, and, most important, more edible.” The result would transform the cuisine of Italy and bestow upon the world pizza, ketchup and the Bloody Mary.
The journey of a stolen Christopher Columbus letter recounting his voyage to the Americas.

The orginal article.

Summary of “MoviePass is now forcing former users to opt out of new plan or risk being charged”

The latest attempt from struggling theater subscription service MoviePass to retain its dwindling user base comes in the form of yet another change to its monthly plan.
This time the company is automatically enrolling lapsed former subscribers into its service, saying its choosing those users to be part of a “Select test group” to try a version of MoviePass similar to its original one-movie-per-day plan.
In an email sent to select MoviePass customers who decided not to opt into the company’s revised three-movie monthly plan, first unveiled last month, the company says it’s decided to enroll those people into a new subscription because “We really hope you begin enjoying your MoviePass subscription.” If they don’t want to be charged for the service, MoviePass is demanding they proactively opt-out of the plan they were enrolled in without their consent by Thursday, October 4th. good end to the week.
I tried to kill my moviepass account by just not opting into the new plan last month and now there’s a new plan and they are trying to charge me money again unless i opt out pic.
Brian feldman September 28, 2018 MoviePass hit what can only as an inevitable brick wall back in July, when it basically ran out of cash, suffered a massive outage it had to borrow a loan to afford to fix, and began drastically limiting the benefits of its subscription for all users to avoid completely going under.
Being able to see 30 movies a month is useless when you can only see one movie per theater – the MoviePass app is telling me, an existing subscriber, that the only movie available to see at my local AMC theater is literally one 4:30PM PT showing of the animated film Smallfoot.
When MoviePass realized that it had to change the terms of its subscription for its annual members prior to the start of a new billing cycle – a move that opened it up to legal action – the company tried to make amends by offering refunds or the option to transition to a paid out monthly plan.
In August 2018, we announced a new offering for three movies a month for $9.95, giving subscribers the ability to opt-in to this plan if they wanted to continue as a MoviePass subscriber.

The orginal article.

Summary of “How A Hapless Bitcoin Entrepreneur Got Swept Up In The Crypto Craze And Started A Multimillion-Dollar Ponzi Scheme”

Over the following year, as interest in cryptocurrencies continued to grow, Pelletier pitched himself as an expert who could take people’s bitcoin and grow its value through a complicated mining process.
Pelletier found investors on websites that allowed people to give and receive loans in bitcoin.
As the cost of bitcoin mining continued to climb and his mining strategy failed, Pelletier began using the bitcoin from new investors to pay the interest he owed others, creating what was in effect a multimillion-dollar Ponzi scheme.
This frenzy enabled the emergence of a crypto loans industry that allowed people like Pelletier to create online profiles to entice others to hand over their bitcoin – with no actual legal agreement in place to pay it back.
In the end, an entire industry disappeared into the ether, leaving behind a trail of destruction – as well as Ponzi schemes like what Pelletier ended up running.
The US Securities and Exchange Commission has been warning people against crypto Ponzi schemes as far back as 2013, two years before Pelletier started attracting investors.
Pelletier began seeking loans at least as early as spring 2015 to fund his bitcoin mining operation.
Bitcoin transactions are publicly accessible, and one of his “Wallets” shows that Pelletier received more than $6.6 million worth of bitcoin at today’s prices.

The orginal article.

Summary of “30 Days to a Smarter Brain”

Everyone wants a better, and smarter brain to process information faster and have better memory recall.
In 30 days or less, you can adopt some of these habits to boost your brain power, improve your mental clarity and build a better brain.
“When you’re learning something new, and your brain is feeling like it wants to take a nap, that’s when you know you’re doing things that are growing your brain neurologically, not just maintaining it,” says Dr. Jennifer Jones, a psychologist, and expert in the science of success.
Michael Merzenich, a pioneer of plasticity research, and author of Soft-wired: How the New Science of Brain Plasticity Can Change Your Life says that going beyond the familiar is essential to brain health.
Your brain needs you to read every dayReading heightens brain connectivity.
The reading brain can be likened to the real-time collaborative effort of a symphony orchestra, with various parts of the brain working together, like sections of instruments, to maximize our ability to decode the written text in front of us.
Judy Willis MD, a neurologist, and former classroom teacher explains, “The practice of writing can enhance the brain’s intake, processing, retaining, and retrieving of information it promotes the brain’s attentive focus boosts long-term memory, illuminates patterns, gives the brain time for reflection, and when well-guided, is a source of conceptual development and stimulus of the brain’s highest cognition.
“Don’t sit stillSitting still all day, every day is dangerous.Love it or hate it, physical activity can have potent effects on your brain and mood.The brain is often described as being”like a muscle”.

The orginal article.