Summary of “To Fit Into Silicon Valley, Wear These Wool Shoes”

Guests wore other shoes – New Balance, Top-Siders, Tevas and a rare dress shoe were spotted – but the furry-looking Allbird was by far the most common.
At Allbirds’ office, in one of San Francisco’s oldest buildings on a high-end shopping street downtown, he and Mr. Brown, both 36, told the story of how they became Silicon Valley’s cobblers.
He liked design and, before attending business school, made simple leather shoes for his friends.
With a research grant from New Zealand’s wool industry, Mr. Brown began a Kickstarter campaign to make wool shoes in 2014.
Within four days, he had sold $120,000 worth of shoes through the crowdfunding website.
Mr. Zwillinger, an engineer in biotechnology, was working in Silicon Valley and struggling to sell algae oil as a replacement for petroleum.
Allbirds are made of a very fine merino wool, each strand 17.5 microns wide.
In mid-2016, Mr. Zwillinger noticed tech leaders posting about the shoes on Snapchat and Twitter.

The orginal article.

Summary of “How A.I. Is Creating Building Blocks to Reshape Music and Art”

As Mr. Eck says, these systems are at least approaching the point – still many, many years away – when a machine can instantly build a new Beatles song or perhaps trillions of new Beatles songs, each sounding a lot like the music the Beatles themselves recorded, but also a little different.
Rather than layering sounds, Mr. Eck and his team are combining them to form something that didn’t exist before, creating new ways that artists can work.
Across the worlds of both art and technology, many are already developing an appetite for building new art through neural networks and other A.I. techniques.
In 2015, a separate team of researchers inside Google created DeepDream, a tool that uses neural networks to generate haunting, hallucinogenic imagescapes from existing photography, and this has spawned new art inside Google and out.
Allison Parrish, a New York University professor who builds software that generates poetry, points out that artists have been using computers to generate art since the 1950s.
“Much like as Jackson Pollock figured out a new way to paint by just opening the paint can and splashing it on the canvas beneath him,” she said, “These new computational techniques create a broader palette for artists.”
Through a project called SketchRNN, he is building neural networks that can draw.
If you play with them, you realize that they are themselves art, living works built by Mr. Ha. A.I. isn’t just creating new kinds of art; it’s creating new kinds of artists.

The orginal article.

Summary of “The Last Bad Patriots Team”

“Sure enough,” Milloy said of their conversation, “It was about Belichick.” Days prior, in the immediate aftermath of the Patriots losing six of their final eight games and missing the ’99 playoffs, Kraft fired Pete Carroll.
“-Former Patriots linebacker Chris Slade The local businessman spent much of the ’90s attempting to find a new home for the Patriots, who at the time played in painfully outdated Foxboro Stadium.
In 1999, after a quest marked by flirtations with South Boston, Providence, and Hartford, Kraft brokered an agreement to build the Patriots a privately funded new stadium in Foxborough.
First, the Patriots inquired about interviewing Belichick and the Jets denied the request.
Ian O’Connor, then with suburban New York paper The Journal News, even wrote a column headlined “Patriots will regret hiring Belichick.” Last August, Hayden Bird of Boston.com dug up the article and later interviewed its author, who called the piece his “Version of Pete Carroll throwing the ball at the goal line.”
As bad as it looks now, bashing the Patriots for bringing on Belichick wasn’t quite a ghost-pepper-level hot take.
“Bill definitely saw something in [Brady]. You never hear of teams keeping a fourth-string quarterback.”-Former Patriots offensive lineman Joe Andruzzi Milloy admits now that he didn’t know what the Patriots had in Brady.
On December 17, after the Patriots defeated the Bills, 13-10, at Ralph Wilson Stadium, Brown, Terry Glenn, and Law requested permission to not board the team charter.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Aziz Ansari Quit the Internet”

Aziz Ansari recently deleted the web browser from his phone and laptop.
As he explained in an interview with GQ, when he gets into a cab, he now leaves his phone in his pocket and simply sits there and thinks; when he gets home, instead of “Looking at websites for an hour and half, checking to see if there’s a new thing,” he reads a book.
“Whenever you check for a new post on Instagram or whenever you go on The New York Times to see if there’s a new thing, it’s not even about the content. It’s just about seeing a new thing. You get addicted to that feeling. You’re not going to be able to control yourself. So the only way to fight that is to take yourself out of the equation and remove all these things.”
“What about important news and politics?”, he asks.
“I got the world by the balls professionally. Personally, I’m alone right nowSo right now, I have it by the balls, but I’m feeling it slowly going away and I’m worried about finding new balls.”
Escaping the fizzy chatter of the online world can support deep insight and creative achievement.
Ansari, in other words, perhaps encapsulates both the highs and lows of a committing to a deep life in a distracted world.
On a related note, I just finished reading Michael Harris’s new book, Solitude: In Pursuit of a Singular Life in a Crowded World.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Nobody Knows What Lies Beneath New York City”

In the ’90s, he led the creation of a map of New York City that stands as a pre-Google Earth model of urban cartographic complexity, troves of data integrated to reveal the location of everything from billboards to curbs.
New York City’s daunting infrastructural labyrinth is like the “Here be dragons” decorating ancient maps.
At the same time, Leidner likes to point out, the spray-painted symbols Con Edison leaves all over the streets of New York form a de facto map of the infrastructure for anyone paying attention.
The Belgian government responded by ordering the creation, over the next three years, of an underground infrastructure map that depicts every asset owned or controlled by more than 300 utilities in Flanders, a region several times larger than New York City, with about three-quarters of the population.
New York’s existing three layers-the DEP’s water and sewer documents, plus the more recent mapping of subway stations-mean it’s starting its project many steps ahead. “Other than Flanders, I do not believe any other city in the world has gone as far as us,” Leidner says, “Even though we haven’t yet prevailed upon private utilities to create maps of their networks.” Much of this future cooperation will likely hinge on Con Edison coming on board and sharing its data.
Whatever form the New York map takes, it will likely have two attributes that will make it more sophisticated than Belgium’s KLIP. First, while Belgium’s is only 2D, New York’s will provide visuals in three dimensions.
Ahearn, the Hunter College GIS mastermind who aided Leidner’s team after Sept. 11, argues that New York should use the city’s existing sewer map, which is already part of the base map, as an anchoring point.
Clear as urban mud, right? Now consider the other special attribute of the New York map.

The orginal article.

Summary of “When Falling In Love Meant Embracing A New Cuisine”

When Falling In Love Meant Embracing A New Cuisine : The Salt When a meat-and-potatoes white girl from the Midwest fell for an Indian vegetarian, it raised complicated questions about what it means to pass on our food cultures from one generation to the next.
It’s Part Two in The Sporkful’s new special series, Your Mom’s Food, about the complications that come up when we pass our cultures on from one generation to the next.
Sajan’s mom is an amazing cook, and I loved eating her food and learning her Punjabi recipes.
I’ve never really talked with my mom about the food tensions in our relationship.
I’ve been away from home for so long, I’ve become attached to lots of new foods.
After ten years of fighting upset stomachs with khichri and starting my days with chai, Indian food has also become my food.
There are so many different ways to show love through food – you can cook for someone, you can feed them.
Anne Noyes Saini produces the James Beard Award-nominated food podcast The Sporkful, which is available in Apple Podcasts, Stitcher or wherever you get your podcasts.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Restaurants Are the New Factories”

Restaurants > Health Care.In some metros, restaurants are powering the entire economy.
More than a third of Cleveland’s new jobs since 2015 are in restaurants, according to EMSI data.
The same is true for New Orleans, but since 2010.Unlike mining or manufacturing, which tends to cluster in a handful of regions, the restaurant boom is spread across the country.
New fine-dining restaurants, which tend to require more waitstaff, are blooming in all the predictable places-San Francisco, Nashville, and Austin.
Restaurants are dominating local economies in a diverse range of places, from poor metros like Little Rock, to rich places like Washington, D.C., and military hubs like Virginia Beach.
For the past three decades, restaurants have steadily grown, as part of the most fundamental shift in American work-from making things to serving people.
At current rates of growth, more people will work at restaurants than in manufacturing in 2020.
What’s more, although it might feel like a golden age of restaurants in America, the truth is that the United States might have too many restaurants, particularly “Family-casual” chains like Applebee’s, which have struggled to keep up with rising labor costs.

The orginal article.

Summary of “We’re in the early stages of a visual revolution in journalism”

The much-lamented and much-snarked-about phrase “Pivot to video” is, if I’m being honest, somewhat warranted – video advertising is becoming central to every digital media company’s revenue model.
I see short-form social video, and visually driven, mobile tap-through stories as much the same media.
Not just with the ads that surround and dictate that newshole, but with storytelling that drives meaningful consumption, and that the collective journalism community believes creates real impact.
Studies, UX and otherwise, show that readers quickly scroll right past the words to the video, to the picture, then to the next piece of media, and so on.
Are short-form “Videos” – the most-pursued new form for companies pivoting to video – the best one? Absolutely maybe.
It is true that users generally don’t want to watch a beautiful four-minute mini-doc that comes after a 30-second pre-roll ad. That’s video as we now know it.
What that looks like is not exactly a “Video” – that’s a new form of journalism.
For the newsroom of the future, it’s incumbent on us to get ahead and lead with teams of journalists outfitted to meet this moment – reporters, illustrators, designers, motion experts, producers, video editors.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Attempt to Read a Book Every Week”

I started reading a new book every week two months ago.
I share the books I read with my Postanly Newsletter subscribers every Friday.
“If you don’t have time to read, you don’t have the time to write. Simple as that.” says Stephen King.Reading opens your heart to new ideas, new cultures, and new worldviews.
You don’t have to spend a whole month reading a single book.
Even insanely busy and succesful people like Warren Buffet, Elon Musk, Bill Gates, Tim Ferriss, Ryan Holiday MAKE time to read. “I just sit in my office and read all day” says Warren Buffet.
Life is too short to read books you don’t really want to read.Tim Ferriss, New York Times Best-Selling Author says, he reads 1-4 books per week.
“If I’m going for speed, I’ll use the following, which can help you 2-3x your word-per-minute rate in 15-20 minutes without sacrificing comprehension: Scientific Speed Reading: How to Read 300% Faster in 20 Minutes It takes some practice, but it works when time is of the essence.”It’s now 80/20 for me - what you read is much more important than how much or how quickly you read.” says Tim.Why One a Week?First, figure out why: why one books a week?
Don’t just read a book a week because you want to crush a goal or embrace successful people’s habits.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Sportswriting’s Old-Timers Game”

The second old-ballplayer gripe goes like this: “OK, the new guy’s great. But he’s not a complete player.” In February, Hall of Famer Goose Gossage got off a rant about pitcher endurance and the league’s “Pampered babies” that eventually landed on the greatest closer of them all, Mariano Rivera.
“I look at games today,” Robertson told Mike & Mike last year, “And they’ll start a defense at the foul line. When I played, they were picking me up when you got the ball inbounds. So it’s a different strategy about playing defense.” See, if coaches had just thought to D up on Curry as soon he got the ball, the Run TMC Warriors could have claimed their rightful place in history.
For more than a decade, Rick Barry has been telling any writer who needed a column that NBA players who can’t shoot free throws should shoot them underhanded, just like he did.
Outside of sports, you see the opposite dynamic: the crowd cheering as a veteran emerges from the magic cornfield to tell Junior how the game ought to be played.
In March, when former pitcher Bert Blyleven farted up a take about baseball players celebrating too much, Extra Mustard’s Jon Tayler argued that we should just stop asking former ballplayers what they think about the modern game.
Imagine a star player being the greatest for his entire career.
Oscar Robertson says Russell Westbrook plays basketball the right way because, by playing for triple-doubles, Westbrook is saying Robertson played basketball the right way.
An old sportswriter saying us youngsters couldn’t have hacked it back in the day is like an old basketball player saying he wouldn’t have let Steph Curry get off a shot.

The orginal article.