Summary of “Remembering the Ads From the ‘Dot-Com Super Bowl'”

Trump’s explanation for why he wants to keep U.S. troops in Iraq was news to Iraq.
Iraqi President Barham Salih said on Monday that President Donald Trump did not ask Iraq’s permission for U.S. troops stationed there to “Watch Iran.”.
Trump’s nominee for ambassador to South Africa wowed the president by throwing the perfect Mar-a-Lago wedding.
Speaking for nearly a half hour before a few hundred people on the Great Lawn at the Hilton Hawaiian Village in Waikiki, Gabbard also called President Donald Trump’s administration a “Cesspool of corruption” and laid out her support for a progressive domestic agenda that includes Medicare-type health insurance coverage for all and legalization of marijuana.
Gabbard criticized Trump for campaigning against “Regime change wars” when he ran for president in 2016 and then reversing course and bowing “To the wishes of neo-cons that surround him.”
The official line from the White House, as with other matters surrounding the president’s physical health and appearance, is that Mr. Trump’s glow is the result of “Good genes,” according to a senior administration official who would speak only on the condition of anonymity.
Mr. Trump’s former boarding school classmates have described him as a fan of ultraviolet rays, someone who would pop a tanning bulb into a light socket to go “To the beach.” Even James B. Comey, the former F.B.I. director turned presidential foe, speculated on Mr. Trump’s glow.
PRESIDENT DONALD TRUMP: I’m not telegraphing anything.

The orginal article.

Summary of “How to Make Friends in a New City”

Whether you’ve been promoted, taken a new job, or just needed to make a change – moving to a new city can be a scary endeavor.
For working adults, making new friends can be tough.
By teaching ourselves to understand how networks function, most of us can build, at least, a basic new network much faster than we built our old one.
You may find that you already know someone who lives in your new city.
This one may sound obvious, but many of us only reach out to our closest friends when we need help making new connections.
Take the time to ask many friends and colleagues if they know anyone worth meeting in your new city.
Once you land in your new city, it may be tempting to seek out meetups, networking events, and the like.
These are just a few steps you can take to build a network in your new city, and they’re certainly not the only thing you’ll be doing when you land.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Rams’ $5 billion stadium complex might be perfect for L.A.”

The future is taking shape in the concrete pillars and sloped canopy roof of a transformative new stadium that will serve as home to the Super Bowl-bound Los Angeles Rams and Los Angeles Chargers when the world’s most expensive sports complex opens in 2020.
At a cost estimated at more than $5 billion, the development – its formal name is the LA Stadium & Entertainment District at Hollywood Park – includes a 70,240-seat stadium and 6,000-seat performance center under one roof that will anchor a 298-acre complex of office buildings, shops, restaurants, residential units, hotels and parks.
It is the vision of Rams owner E. Stanley Kroenke, a Missouri-born billionaire developer and sports mogul, who took to heart NFL Commissioner Roger Goodell’s insistence that any new stadium built for pro football’s return to Los Angeles must be iconic and serve as home to two teams.
Both the Rams and Chargers require the purchase of stadium seat licenses, or SSLs, in addition to the regular ticket price.
“This is a really good deal compared to virtually any football stadium that has been built in the last 30 years,” Noll said, adding a caveat about potential lost revenue from developments that might otherwise have been constructed on the 298-acre site.
When completed, it will more than double the cost of the next-most expensive NFL stadium – the $1.8 billion Las Vegas stadium being built for the relocating Oakland Raiders and also due to open in 2020.
Just behind the Las Vegas stadium in terms of cost are New York’s MetLife, home of the Giants and Jets – it was privately funded but built on land owned by the state of New Jersey – and Atlanta’s Mercedes-Benz Stadium, host of this year’s Super Bowl.
This posed a design challenge for the architect, Dallas-based HKS. The solution was an NFL stadium tailored to the Southern Californian lifestyle like a bespoke suit: the first indoor-outdoor stadium.

The orginal article.

Summary of “The New Language of Climate Change”

PHOENIX-Leading climate scientists and meteorologists are banking on a new strategy for talking about climate change: take the politics out of it.
Educating the public and policy makers about climate change at a time when elected leaders are doubling down on denials it is happening at all or that humans are responsible for it demands a new lexicon, conference attendees told me-one that can effectively narrate the overwhelming scientific evidence but not get sucked into the controversy fueled most prominently by President Donald Trump.
The hope is to convince the small but powerful minority that stands in the way of new policies to help mitigate climate change’s worst long-term effects-as well as the people who vote for them-that something needs to be done or their own livelihoods and health will be at stake.
Climate Matters is tracking climate trends in 244 cities-including a steadily hotter Phoenix.
Simpson attended the conference at the Phoenix Convention Center to outline his three-year effort to educate farmers about climate change in western Tennessee and eastern Kentucky, where at some dinner tables the term remains a political curse word.
Despite the Democratic takeover of the House, and a new commitment to try to pass climate change legislation, some leading Republican skeptics are still chairing major committees with jurisdiction over climate policy.
Now, some 600 broadcast meteorologists, out of an estimated 2,200 in the United States, are working with Climate Matters, founded in 2010, to craft new ways to communicate climate change to their viewers.
Gandy, who helped found Climate Matters, recounted a recent presentation he delivered at the Rotary Club in Columbia on the dangers of climate change and the need to take sweeping actions soon to confront it.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Why Americans love the Great British Bake Off”

It’s the most British of shows, yet this world of Victoria sponges and Bakewell tarts has Americans transfixed.
What Americans often praise about the show is the lack of cut-throat competition or monetary incentives.
Incredulously, it continued: “That’s right: The winner of The Great British Baking Show wins a title and an engraved cake stand, and that’s it.”
“I’ve been so inspired by the show that I’ve just been using my time off in the kitchen to try new things,” she says.
The Great British Baking Show is now part of US culture.
Saturday Night Live has spoofed it; The Late Late Show has broadcast its staff bake-off; The Daily Show has used it to explain Brexit, calling it the Great British Break-Off.
Great British Bake Off contestant Val Stones is a regular visitor to the US, but says she started to get recognised a lot more this year, after the show went up on Netflix.
“The Great British Baking Show,” it concluded, has become “The perfect set of arms to run into”.

The orginal article.

Summary of “YouTube Is Still Struggling To Rein In Its Recommendation Algorithm”

YouTube declined to provide BuzzFeed News with information about what inputs the Up Next algorithm considers, but said it’s been working to improve the experience for users seeking news and information.
BuzzFeed News’ queries show the company’s recommendation system continues to promote conspiracy videos, videos produced by hate groups, and pirated videos published by accounts that YouTube itself sometimes bans.
From there, the algorithm took an abrupt turn, recommending a video about Miami International Airport, and then a series of episodes of a National Geographic TV show called Ultimate Airport Dubai – “Snakes”, “Firefighters”, “Customs Officers”, “Crystal Meth”, and “Faulty Planes” – posted by a YouTube channel called Ceylon Aviator.
YouTube has admitted that its Up Next algorithm is imperfect and has promised to improve the quality of its recommendations, but these problems persist.
In early 2018, after the US Senate began questioning Google executives about the platform’s possible role in Russian interference in the 2016 election, a spokesperson for YouTube told the Guardian, which was about to publish an investigation into YouTube’s recommendation system, “We know there is more to do here, and we’re looking forward to making more announcements in the months ahead.”.
Clearly, the people behind these channels have figured out how to game YouTube’s recommendation algorithm faster than YouTube can chase them down, leading the company to recommend their pirated videos before imminently deleting them.
Researchers have described YouTube as “The great radicalizer.” After the 2017 Las Vegas shooting, the site consistently recommended conspiracy theories to users searching mundane terms like “Las Vegas shooting.” Similarly, a 2017 report from the Guardian illustrated that YouTube reliably pushed users toward conspiratorial political videos.
In the end, what’s clear is that YouTube’s recommendation algorithm isn’t a partisan monster – it’s an engagement monster.

The orginal article.

Summary of “How Your Mind Gets Better at Processing Bad News”

Some of the most important decisions you will make in your lifetime will occur while you feel stressed and anxious.
My colleague Neil Garrett, now at the Princeton Neuroscience Institute in New Jersey, and I ventured from the safety of our lab to fire stations in the state of Colorado to investigate how the mind operates under high stress.
We found that perceived threat triggered a stress reaction that made the firefighters better at processing information – but only as long as it conveyed bad news.
We then gave them either good news or bad news and asked them to provide new estimates.
In contrast, stress didn’t change how they responded to good news.
If your co-worker is stressed, you are more likely to tense up and feel stressed yourself.
Repeatedly checking your phone, according to a survey conducted by the American Psychological Association, is related to stress.
So a reliable pattern emerges following terrorist attacks and financial market downturns – stress is triggered, spreading from one person to the next, which temporarily enhances the likelihood that people will take in negative reports, which increases stress further.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Does Journalism Have a Future?”

“We are, for the first time in modern history, facing the prospect of how societies would exist without reliable news,” Alan Rusbridger, for twenty years the editor-in-chief of the Guardian, writes in “Breaking News: The Remaking of Journalism and Why It Matters Now.” “There are not that many places left that do quality news well or even aim to do it at all,” Jill Abramson, a former executive editor of the New York Times, writes in “Merchants of Truth: The Business of News and the Fight for Facts.” Like most big-paper reporters and editors who write about the crisis of journalism, Rusbridger and Abramson are interested in national and international news organizations.
In the past half century, and especially in the past two decades, journalism itself-the way news is covered, reported, written, and edited-has changed, including in ways that have made possible the rise of fake news, and not only because of mergers and acquisitions, and corporate ownership, and job losses, and Google Search, and Facebook and BuzzFeed.
“Watergate, like Vietnam, had obscured one of the central new facts about the role of journalism in America,” Halberstam wrote.
The view of the new journalism held by people like my father escaped Halberstam’s notice.
In “On Press: The Liberal Values That Shaped the News,” the historian Matthew Pressman argues that any understanding of the crisis of journalism in the twenty-first century has to begin by vanquishing the ghost of Spiro T. Agnew.
Breitbart left the Huffington Post and started Breitbart News around the same time that Peretti left to focus on his own company, Contagious Media, from which he launched BuzzFeed, where he tested the limits of virality with offerings like the seven best links about gay penguins and “YouTube Porn Hacks.” He explained his methods in a pitch to venture capitalists: “Raw buzz is automatically published the moment it is detected by our algorithm,” and “The future of the industry is advertising as content.”
Even as news organizations were pruning reporters and editors, Facebook was pruning its users’ news, with the commercially appealing but ethically indefensible idea that people should see only the news they want to see.
By some measures, journalism entered a new, Trumpian, gold-plated age during the 2016 campaign, with the Trump bump, when news organizations found that the more they featured Trump the better their Chartbeat numbers, which, arguably, is a lot of what got him elected.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Warren Buffett’s “20 Slot” Rule: How to Simplify Your Life and Maximize Your Results”

It was 1994 and Munger had spent the last 20 years working alongside Warren Buffett as the two men grew Berkshire Hathaway into a billion-dollar corporation.
About halfway through his presentation, hidden among many fantastic lessons, Munger discussed a strategy that Warren Buffett had used with great success throughout his career.
When Warren lectures at business schools, he says, “I could improve your ultimate financial welfare by giving you a ticket with only 20 slots in it so that you had 20 punches-representing all the investments that you got to make in a lifetime. And once you’d punched through the card, you couldn’t make any more investments at all.”
Warren Buffett’s “20-Slot” Rule isn’t just useful for financial investments, it’s a sound approach for time investments as well.
Simplify and Go All In. If you take a look around, you’ll notice very few people actually go “All in” on a single skill or goal for an extended period of time.
Rather than researching carefully and pouring themselves into a goal for a year or two, most people “Dip their toes in the water” and chase a new diet, a new college major, a new exercise routine, a new side business idea, or a new career path for a few weeks or months before jumping onto the next new thing.
If you view your life as a 20-slot punchcard and each slot is a period of focused work for a year or two, then you can see how you can enjoy significant returns on your invested time simply by going all in on a few things.
Unlike financial investments, your 20 “Life slots” are going to get punched whether you like it or not.

The orginal article.

Summary of “See Through Words”

Pretty much every metaphor designer is inspired by Metaphors We Live By, by the Berkeley linguist George Lakoff and the philosopher Mark Johnson at the University of Oregon.
For the practical metaphor designer, psycholinguistic research turns out to be much more useful than philosophical commentary, because it studies how people actually encounter and process new metaphors.
These two competing theories pose a question: do people interpret new metaphors more easily when the comparison between two domains is apt – that is, when the two elements seem to fit with each other? ‘Love is a tree’ might be an example of an apt metaphor, whereas ‘a child is a machine’ seems less so.
Among scholars of language in the brain, the battle over ‘metaphor as category’ versus ‘metaphor as mapping’ continues unresolved.
They’re preoccupied with questions such as why metaphors aren’t reversible or how different types of metaphor balance meaning differently.
To design metaphors, it helps to have a metaphor for metaphor.
My metaphors close the gap in people’s ability to grasp something, or speed up what they’re already on track to see.
To the metaphor designer, a really good, wild metaphor is a special find.

The orginal article.