Summary of “The Most Efficient Way to Keep Your Resume Up to Date”

When you get a new job save the description and requirements from the application and use it to later add the job to your resume.
In response, u/chaoticnuetral added that it’s good to have your specific job description on hand because it makes it easier to negotiate your salary if future duties are added.
You added your new job to the resume, but you’re there a year, then two.
Learning something new that makes you better at your job.
Adding new responsibilities, job titles, new people you oversee.
As a recruiter, I’d say be careful with making your resume read too much like a job description.
Things like the full dates that I worked there, actual titles I held, actual duties vs ‘resume duties’, pay rate, managers/superiors/good co-workers names and full titles, physical addresses and phone numbers, the real reason why that is no longer my job.
Now, go forth and get new jobs that you’ll be ready to leave immediately!

The orginal article.

Summary of “Jordan Peele Isn’t Slowing Down Anytime Soon”

That’s the distinction held by Jordan Peele, who just a couple if years ago was primarily known as the “Peele” of Comedy Central’s beloved sketch series Key & Peele.
The list of current directors who draw this kind of hype for new projects not based on preexisting work might begin and end with Christopher Nolan and Jordan Peele.
First, there’s Lovecraft Country, a forthcoming HBO series, in which Peele serves as an executive producer.
While some executive-producer credits are merely token stamps to give a project added hype, Peele was the one who initially brought the project to J.J. Abrams’s Bad Robot Productions, according to Deadline.
In a similar vein, Peele is executing producing The Hunt, which is, in simple terms, about huntin’ Nazis.
While Peele isn’t exempt from the Hollywood rebooting craze, the noteworthy IP attached to his name is a worthy extension of the social commentary he conveyed with Get Out and, to a lesser extent, Key & Peele.
Because on top of the exciting prospect of Peele doing The Twilight Zone, a true match made in heaven, it’s also not hard to imagine A-listers appearing on the series.
Get ready for the coming decade of Jordan Peele: his solitary Oscar and Emmy could have a lot more company in no time.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Karr, Wallace, Schneiderman, & the Tyranny of Genius”

As Jezebel’s Whitney Kimball pointed out, “The fact that [Wallace] abused [Karr] is not a revelation; this has been documented and adopted by the literary world as one of Wallace’s character traits.” D.T. Max’s 2012 biography of Wallace, Every Love Story Is a Ghost Story, documented those abuses: Wallace, Max alleges, once pushed Karr from a vehicle.
For Karr and Wallace it’s an even more complicated proposition: our insistent fealty to-our implicit faith in-the notion of genius itself.
One time, Karr recalled, Wallace arrived at a pool party she was attending with her family with bandages on his left shoulder.
Karr called the head of the halfway house and asked her to let Wallace know his attentions were not welcome.
Karr is there, as a slight character, in Max’s biography of Wallace; she’s there, too, as a kind of human predicate, in interviews about him, in assessments of his literary contributions, in effusions about his genius.
The less heroic elements of the male stories-the fact, say, that David Foster Wallace referred to the female fans who attended his book tours as “audience pussy,” or that he wrote in a letter to a friend of a day spent “unpacking, trying to write, chasing tail,” or that he pushed Mary Karr out of a vehicle-get lost in the fog of genius.
“Something I’ve noticed since Wallace’s suicide in 2008,” Glenn Kenny wrote in The Guardian a few years ago, “is that a lot of self-professed David Foster Wallace fans don’t have much use for people who actually knew the guy.
Whenever Jonathan Franzen utters or publishes some pained but unsparing observations about his late friend, Wallace’s fan base recoils, posting comments on the internet about how self-serving he is, or how he really didn’t ‘get’ Wallace.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Google IO keynote summary: the 10 biggest announcements”

Google just wrapped up its 2018 I/O keynote, and today’s event was jam-packed with news.
New Google Assistant voices Google’s virtual assistant is getting some more voice variety.
Google Duplex Perhaps the most jaw-dropping moment of today’s keynote came when Sundar Pichai played back a recording of Google Assistant calling a hair salon and making an appointment in a conversation that legitimately sounded like two humans talking to each other.
Gmail can now draft emails for you by itself Google is expanding on its helpful Smart Reply feature with a more ambitious idea: Smart Compose.
Google Photos gets even smarter editing powers Google Photos is gaining new features like the ability to separate subjects from the background in photos and pop the color or turn the background black and white.
Google News – now curated by AI Google’s news app is being overhauled and its editorial focus is now powered largely by AI. The company says “It uses artificial intelligence to analyze all the content published to the web at any moment, and organize all of those articles, videos, and more into storylines. It spots the ones you might be interested in and puts them in your briefing.” News will also deliver “a range of perspectives” to bring you a little bit outside your bubble.
Google Lens can copy text from the real world into your phone This is something Google has demonstrated before, but now it sounds like the feature is ready and actually coming to Google Lens.
Google Lens still isn’t perfect at identifying precise items of clothing, but Google thinks it can get close enough.

The orginal article.

Summary of “The Weird Science Behind Chain Restaurant Menus”

Appetizers or accompaniments? Separate entrees or combination meals? Should menus be customizable-letting guests build a meal from the ground up-or curated, which feels more premium and ‘chef-driven?’.
“Is there any item on today’s menu that represents the new direction that you want to go?”.
Listing the specials with a chalkboard instead of a digital menu: giving us the daily ‘news.
Even if we decided to offer street tacos or spring rolls on a client’s menu, there were a zillion ways to sauce the proteins, sauté the vegetables, and plate and package them for takeout.
The client’s old menu had suffered from a paradox of plenty.
We were in the business of “menu evolution,” but evolving a menu is tricky work.
Sometimes a client would return wanting help with another menu or a line extension or another project of some kind.
Our agency isn’t in the picture anymore, but every couple of months, I find myself reading about a new menu item that they’ve launched.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Crypto Pioneers Head to Brooklyn to Reshape Finance”

The employees of ConsenSys Inc., the blockchain startup co-created by Ethereum guru Joseph Lubin, have taken over the space at 49 Bogart St. in the Bushwick neighborhood of Brooklyn, New York.
As ConsenSys spins off new ventures and attracts business partners, in Bushwick and adjacent Williamsburg, once part of New York City’s industrial heart, the crypto world has contributed to ongoing gentrification.
“There’s an energy here that you don’t find in Manhattan or anywhere else in New York,” said Tyler Clark, co-founder of blockchain developer Cryptonomic, which he started with a former colleague from JPMorgan Chase & Co. “ConsenSys is an inspiration to us.”
Though Manhattan has its own blockchain businesses, they’re more closely associated with established companies such as Microsoft Corp. and Intel Corp. than rebel Brooklyn would tolerate.
Brooklyn is planting its crypto-flag during New York’s Blockchain Week.
“This is the planting of the flag in Brooklyn for blockchain. Legacy finance is headquartered in Manhattan. Future finance is in Brooklyn.”
R3 designed its own blockchain, called Corda, and this year plans to launch a number of applications, including Tradewind, a gold-exchange company on the Corda blockchain; HQLA X, a securities-lending platform that recently had its first trade; and Fusion LenderComm, an application for syndicated lenders.
According to New York City’s Economic Development Corp., in 2015 there were 93 job openings listed for Brooklyn blockchain companies.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Millennials and the new magnetism of mid-size cities”

At the same time, it struck Bhatia that “Louisville got cool.” The city’s restaurant and bar scene, propelled in part by the surrounding region’s bourbon boom, has blossomed-“I think it’s on par with Chicago, which I realize is a controversial thing to say,” Bhatia says-and the city has a new pro sports team, the Louisville City FC soccer club, which plans to build a new stadium in the Butchertown neighborhood, part of a 40-acre, $200 million development.
In 2017, Bhatia decided to move home, joining a growing number of younger Americans returning to the small- and medium-sized cities they left after college.
Conversations with Bhatia and others, as well as some demographic data, suggests those moving home are part of a boom in the country’s second-tier cities.
The new magnetism of mid-size cities After a decade of investment in parks and greenspace, homegrown tech hubs, and downtown redevelopment, many small and mid-size metros are seeing more signs of life and increased migration, according to a recent Brookings Institution analysis of U.S. Census data.
“Taking the risk of reimagining their city” Moving to smaller cities offers a hands-on opportunity to take part in the renewal and regrowth of smaller downtowns and Main Streets, a new sense of dynamism The Atlantic’s James Fallows has called a “Reinventing of America.”
The ability to afford a home has helped many who moved from superstar metros to so-called second-tier cities connect with their new communities.
Finding a new home, and home base, for remote work The changing nature of work, especially toward service and consulting and tech, and the growth of startups in second-tier cities, has altered the equation for younger workers.
Max Wastler, a 37-year-old travel writer and brand strategist who has previously worked for companies such as Conde Nast Traveler and Basil Hayden, recently returned to his hometown of St. Louis after working in New York City, LA, and Chicago.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Mark Zuckerberg Doesn’t Understand Journalism”

Mark Zuckerberg wants you to know that he cares, really cares, about journalism.
“I view our responsibility in news as two things,” he said in a wide-ranging conversation with a small group of news editors and executives assembled in Palo Alto for a journalism gathering known as Off the Record on Tuesday afternoon.
Zuckerberg runs a media company that distributes news, but doesn’t have a proper newsroom.
According to Zuckerberg, the way you find common ground-a common set of facts-is not through professional news outlets, but via individuals.
While Zuckerberg said Facebook is now ranking news outlets by trustworthiness-in person, he didn’t seem to distinguish among the quality of opinions.
“It’s not about saying here’s one view; here’s the other side,” Zuckerberg said when I asked him to reconcile the contradiction.
In a newspaper, he continued, publishing opinions in close proximity to the news is “Pretty dangerous.” Facebook, on the other hand, is surveying readers to determine which professional news organizations are broadly trustworthy.
At one point, Zuckerberg hinted at the need for government subsidy of American journalism-alluding to the public-television licensing model that supports the BBC. Couldn’t Facebook pay publishers directly by licensing their stories or programming? “Yeah,” Zuckerberg said, “I’m not sure that makes sense.”

The orginal article.

Summary of “Why the utopian vision of William Morris is now within reach”

William Morris is best-known today as a Victorian designer who has never gone out of fashion.
One of the most relevant aspects of Morris’s work today is the framework for a commons-based world of cooperation that he sketched in his utopian novel News from Nowhere, which has striking applications for the age of the internet.
In News from Nowhere, Morris imagined a world in which human happiness and economic activity coincided.
The means of production are democratically controlled, and people find pleasure in sharing their interests, goals and resources.
A new commons-based mode of production, enabled by information and communication technology, what we now call digitisation, redefines how we produce, consume and distribute.
Already a decade ago, Benkler argued in The Wealth of Networks that a new mode of production was emerging that would shape how we produce and consume information.
Commons-based peer production is fundamentally different from the dominant modes of production under industrial capitalism.
Just as digitisation – and specifically social media – can work both for emancipation and supervision, for revolution and its suppression, it also allows for the creation of a new mode of production and new types of social relations outside the market-state nexus.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Arrested Development creator Mitch Hurwitz is bringing his recut, chronological version of season 4 to Netflix on May 4th”

Back in 2014, Arrested Development creator Mitch Hurwitz announced that he had decided to recut the show’s fourth season Netflix revival, abandoning its original structure – with each episode focused on a single character – and replacing it with a version that intercuts all the characters’ stories chronologically.
It wasn’t clear at the time whether that edit would ever be made available to the public, but today, Hurwitz finally announced the new version’s Netflix release date: May 4th. As in, this Friday.
In a statement released on the official Arrested Development Netflix account, Hurwitz announced that the new season would be called Arrested Development Season 4 Remix: Fateful Consequences.
The original season, which premiered on Netflix in 2013, was 15 episodes long; the new cut will be 22 shorter episodes.
Hurwitz describes the original segmented style as “Akin to eating some toast, then some bacon – maybe a sliced tomato followed by some turkey, and realizing, ‘Hey, I think I just had a BLT.'” The episodes in the remixed season will only be 20 minutes long, and they will create a more “Interwoven” narrative.
Hurwitz also writes that the long-awaited fifth season of the series will have a release date “Soon. Like real soon. Like, if you knew when, you would not be wrong to be thinking ‘why are we all just hearing this now?'”.
Because Arrested Development was a cult favorite when Fox canceled the show in 2006, fans were understandably divided on the fourth season’s unexpected narrative style.
The remixed version could placate viewers hankering for a version of the season that feels more like the show they originally embraced.

The orginal article.