Summary of “A Preview of Your Chinese Future – Foreign Policy”

Beyond its technical achievements, does China’s vision for the future still represent a recognizable world? Is it a break from the current world order in some fundamental way? Or is it still the world we live in today, only more balanced and more divided between different economic poles in Europe, Asia, and America-a continuation of the sort of globalization we have come to know?
The description is of course inspired by the existing world order and tries to project a future where China has replaced the United States, but the essential shape of things-institutions, values, and relations-remains largely unmodified.
Jonathan Holslag imagines a future Asian order replicating more or less perfectly the European order we know from the last few decades, with China occupying the core, as Germany and France do in Europe.
Fast trains and airlines channel millions of tourists to quiet or quaint places: to Tibet, emerging as the Chinese Pyrenees; to the Northeast, the future Chinese Alps; to Xinjiang, the new Andalusia; and to the southern beaches, China’s Mediterranean.
China’s new multinationals have tied all other Asian countries to the motherland by means of roads, railways, pipelines, and financial flows.
China’s Italy, is vibrant and enthralling, yet heavily penetrated by Chinese companies, banks, and high livers.
There are many reasons one cannot extrapolate from China’s extraordinary rise over the past four decades to the shape of future events and developments.
The Chinese made 50 times more mobile payments in 2016 than U.S. consumers did, tripling to $5.5 trillion in China while U.S. payments only grew 39 percent, to $112 billion.

The orginal article.

Summary of “MST3K creator Joel Hodgson on 30 years of making fun of movies.”

Hey, thanks for coming to Mystery Science Theater 3000,” host and show creator Joel Hodgson says with the friendly, sleepy air of a TGI Fridays host already deep into a weeknight shift.
In the past 30 years, MST3K has undergone many well-documented ups and downs-a pickup by Comedy Central, Hodgson’s departure, the addition of new host Mike Nelson, a pickup by what was then known as the Sci-Fi Channel, cancellation, years of absence, Hodgson’s return and an accompanying Kickstarter campaign, the addition of new host Jonah Ray for its two seasons at Netflix-but its core remains fundamentally the same.
“A lot of people don’t know this, but I read for the part of Woody for Cheers,” Hodgson tells me by phone.
MST3K is now based, like Hodgson, in Los Angeles, but the move to the coast hasn’t endangered its longevity: not counting an 18-year gap that produced no new episodes, the show has endured multiple cast and production changeovers and outlasted all imitators.
“Most of the time they’re mostly just wishing they were 13 again, and I can’t do that. There’s a funny disconnect that happens, where you are forever a certain age while you’re a viewer.” Hodgson’s solution has included making a break from the past with Jonah Ray as the new host and a supporting cast that now includes Hampton Yount, Baron Vaughn, Patton Oswalt, Felicia Day, and Rebecca Hanson.
“I’m 58 years old,” Hodgson explains.
Having just completed a six-week, 41-show tour with Ray, Hodgson has gotten a chance to see the fondness of new fans firsthand.
Where the show will be in 30 years remains an open question, but Hodgson never considered it lasting this long or anticipated it would have the legacy and impact it’s had, one that would lead to everyone from Dan Harmon to The Name of the Wind author Patrick Rothfuss pitching in on the new episodes.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Edward Gorey’s Enigmatic World”

In his little books of sinister whimsy, Gorey was true to his belief in leaving things out, so that the reader’s thoughts could flower.
There is a new book out on Gorey, the first biography, by the cultural critic Mark Dery, titled “Born to Be Posthumous: The Eccentric Life and Mysterious Genius of Edward Gorey”.
Look at the book’s title, “Born to Be Posthumous: The Eccentric Life and Mysterious Genius of Edward Gorey.” In what sense was Gorey born to be posthumous? To me, he seems to have done O.K.-found some happiness, created some admirable art-while still living.
Strangely, the avowal just seems to make Dery madder, probably because this question, which he has tracked obsessively in his book-and which is the center of his claim that Gorey was an unfathomable mystery-is waved away by Gorey so casually.
Maybe Gorey is the one who’s right, by refusing the “Whole business of constructing identity … around sexuality.” Dery quotes the choreographer Peter Anastos, a friend of Gorey’s, who says that, starting in the nineteen-sixties and seventies, “People let their homosexuality become the absolute center of their lives and there was nothing else. I’ve known a lot of guys Ted’s age and … they just see it in a whole different way. Being gay is not the center of their lives…. Ted never struck me as closeted; he was just who he was.”
Gorey took endless pains over these funny and melancholy books.
First, in 1967, the Gotham Book Mart, a small, musty midtown bookstore that had been the main purveyor of Gorey literature, was bought by a book dealer, Andreas Brown, who believed in promotion and was good at it.
What the posters advertised was not “Dracula” but “The Edward Gorey production of Dracula.” Gorey’s contract gave him ten per cent of the profits, and this helped to support him for the rest of his life.

The orginal article.

Summary of “The Expectations and Realities of Six-Man Football in Small-Town Texas”

On the afternoon of August 31, New Home School football players had just rallied to edge out the cheerleaders in a team hula-hoop competition when junior Riley Stokes-dressed as a leopard-grabbed a cordless microphone.
For more than three decades, the town of a little more than 350-located about 20 miles south of Lubbock-has been represented by a six-man football team, the University Interscholastic League’s special concession to its smallest schools.
Mayor Harry Schneemann, who played football for Leakey in the early 1960s, noted the lack of a true industry in the 410-person town.
Despite qualifying for six-man football, Leakey has played eleven-man ever since.
Donnie Dutton, who served as the school’s athletic director for the past four years, said Leakey’s motivation for playing up for so long was primarily convenience-there was a dearth of six-man opponents located within a reasonable distance, which meant away games could be hard to navigate.
Six-man is played on a smaller field, requires fifteen yards for a first down instead of ten, allows all offensive players to catch a pass, and requires an additional exchange of the ball following the snap from center for an offensive player to run past the line of scrimmage.
Last winter, Leakey hired Shannon Williams, a football coach with a strong background in six-man play.
“There’s a lot of kids, a lot of hungry kids. Everything that will be taught to them will be my program, so that’s all they will know about six-man. You’re not going into a town that will press for spread offense or tight, anything like that. Everything is new and they’re eager for it.”

The orginal article.

Summary of “The 100 greatest innovations of 2018”

There’s at least one thing we’re sure even the savviest silicone noggin can’t do: put together Popular Science’s annual list of the year’s most pivotal, influential, and just plain awesome innovations.
Our 31st annual Best of What’s New list is the culmination of a year spent obsessing over, arguing about, and experiencing the newest technologies and discoveries across 10 distinct disciplines.
Why? Because the effects of each of the feats will reverberate for years down the road. And, while we have you, let’s all just take a moment to appreciate that this year’s collection includes a full-on jet pack.
Let’s not waste any time: There’s a jet suit in this year’s Best of What’s New list, yet somehow that’s not even what we dubbed the Innovation of the Year.
In large part, the items on year’s list of the best new gadgets don’t change the world as much as they change the way we, as tech-loving super nerds, see it.
When you consider an electric supercar that snaps back your head with acceleration or a set of tungsten-coated brakes that’ll have you straining against your seatbelt faster than you can say “Internal combustion engine,” it’s easy to conclude 2018 was a heckuva year for the road-going brilliance.
There are no tanks or firetrucks or massive surveillance initiatives among the items we’ve dubbed the best security innovations of 2018.
Countless new products and medications hit stores’ shelves and doctors’ prescription pads every year.

The orginal article.

Summary of “A radio play about radio that became the first fake-news story”

Everybody loves a good story – especially the newspapers threatened by radio news, the social scientists seeking a claim to relevance, and Welles, great ham that he was.
‘ In that first broadcast of the Columbia Workshop, the announcer declared that the show dedicated itself to ‘familiarising you with the story behind radio and to experiment in new techniques with the hope of discovering or evolving new and better forms of radio presentation, with a special emphasis on radio drama.
As with reports on Hitler, a radio announcer narrated MacLeish’s play.
Once again, an announcer begins the play by foregrounding the mystical, hypnotic medium of radio – ‘Ladies and gentlemen: you have only one thought tonight all of you.
According to David Goodman, author of Radio’s Civic Ambition, War of the Worlds was a radio play about the intelligence of the listening audience; from the start, it was ‘a radio play about listening to the radio’.
Radio became physical, and Wilmuth was not a listener anymore, but a participant.
In the anxious world of 1930s listening, a radio that knew your mind was a radio that could change it.
The hard facts of the night are hidden in the long shadow of his and our tall tale – War of the Worlds was a radio play about radio, and the panic legend is in part a story about its tellers.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Ed Smith And The Imagination Machine: The Untold Story Of A Black Vide”

Ed Smith at the Winter CES show in 1981 with the Imagination Machine II personal computer.
During a time when black Americans struggled for social justice, Manhattan-based APF hired Smith to design the core element of its future electronics business.
“Get your chauffeur’s license so you can learn how to drive a truck,” Smith recalls him saying, “Because that’s all you’re ever going to do.” And yet such expectations could not suppress Ed Smith’s intense curiosity about how things worked.
Smith tried to pull his dad off, but the elder Smith knocked him unconscious.
Ed Smith loved his job at Marbelite; it introduced him not only to new concepts in electronics, but also to a wider world.
Smith embraced the opportunity now laid out before him: “I threw on my suit and [grabbed] my briefcase, and I’m off to Chicago.” During a large lunchtime sales call, Smith found himself in Sears Tower, then the tallest building in the world, pitching APF’s new computer to Sears executives.
Throughout 1980, Smith traveled the country showing off the Imagination Machine to executives at department stores and computer retail chains, with a string of optimistic successes.
1980 passed with very modest sales of the MP1000 and the Imagination Machine, and in January 1981, Smith traveled to CES for the last time as an APF employee to demonstrate the Imagination Machine II, a remodeled unit with more memory and integrated MP1000 circuitry that looked nearly identical to the original except for a smooth surface on its top where the core console used to sit.

The orginal article.

Summary of “10 Proven Ways to Learn Faster”

Learning new things is a huge part of life – we should always be striving to learn and grow.
So how can you make the most of your time by speeding up the learning process? Thanks to neuroscience, we now have a better understanding of how we learn and the most effective ways our brains process and hold on to information.
If you want to get a jump start on expanding your knowledge, here are 10 proven ways you can start learning faster today.
The better your notes are, the faster you’ll learn.
Before you learn a new topic, make sure you learn different strategies for note taking, such as the Cornell Method, which helps you organize class notes into easily digestible summaries.
When you use multiple ways to learn something, you’ll use more regions of the brain to store information about that subject.
The more resources you use, the faster you’ll learn.
The more you can relate new concepts to ideas that you already understand, the faster the you’ll learn the new information.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Stay Confident During Your Job Search by Focusing on the Process, Not the Outcome”

There are several reasons you want to avoid appearing – at networking events or in job interviews – as if you need the job too much.
The more worried you are that your job search is dragging on, the less likely you are to project the sense that you will handle whatever the job requires.
Process goals are particularly valuable during an arduous job search.
First, you are likely to be less frustrated about the job search when you are paying attention to the specific actions you need to take.
You may not succeed at getting a job on any particular day, but you may have succeeded at applying for new positions, meeting new people, or learning new things.
Second, many of the things you need to do to get a job are things you need to do after you get hired as well.
If you develop habits to read and learn skills, you’ll retain the benefits of those activities even after you start a new job.
Instead of getting desperate that you’ll never get a job – and scaring off potential employees – focus on the job search process, not just the outcome.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Why a longtime Google exec thinks we need to slow the internet down a bit”

“The philosophy of the Internet has assumed that friction is always part of the problem,” writes Kosslyn.
The problem now isn’t too much friction; it’s too little.
Less friction means more time spent, more ads seen, more sales made.
As I look around today, I find myself yearning for a bit more of the friction of yesteryear.
Friction creates space in the system where judgment can intercede, where second thoughts can be had, where decisions can be made.
Look at organizations with longer time lags and more editors and you get better, calmer, more considered coverage.
Too much friction can be annoying – there are plenty of days I feel like posting something without waiting for an edit, and much news needs to be known quickly – but too little friction can be dangerous.
The blockbuster New York Times story on Facebook’s political tactics reveals a company paying off high-priced opposition researchers to make sure regulators don’t try to add the friction individual users don’t have the power to apply themselves.

The orginal article.