Summary of “App Time for Nap Time: The Parennials Are Here”

Their parents – let’s call them “Parennials” – are challenging all sorts of commonly held beliefs about the American family.
As a result they’re “High-information parents,” said Rebecca Parlakian, the program director for Zero to Three, an organization that has been studying new parents since 1977.”The good news is that parents know more about child development than ever before,” she said.
The bad news is that parents feel overwhelmed by the volume of information, confused about the “Right way” to do things and harshly judged by friends and relatives.
Like many new parents, she felt unprepared for the responsibility.
Ms. Parlakian of Zero to Three said she’s begun to detect a new theme in her annual surveys of parents.
“Given the statement ‘I would like to be more involved with raising my child but my parenting partner interferes with my involvement,’ nearly half the dads agree,” Ms. Parlakian said, “While only 16 percent of moms do.”
Can Granny Pay the Rent?New parents of all ages often face money woes, but with parennials these challenges can feel particularly acute because they reached childbearing age during the Great Recession, are saddled with college debt and are perhaps job-hopping or part of the gig economy.
As a result, many parennials rely on their own baby boomer parents for financial support.

The orginal article.

Summary of “The seven megatrends that could beat global warming: ‘There is reason for hope'”

It is becoming increasingly clear that it does not need to be all bad news: a series of fast-moving global megatrends, spurred by trillion-dollar investments, indicates that humanity might be able to avert the worst impacts of global warming.
“If we were seeing linear progress, I would say good, but we’re not going to make it in time,” says Figueres, now the convener of the Mission 2020 initiative, which warns that the world has only three years to get carbon emissions on a downward curve and on the way to beating global warming.
The most advanced of the megatrends is the renewable energy revolution.
Slashing oil use – a third of all global energy – is a huge challenge but a surging market for battery-powered cars is starting to bite, driven in significant part by fast-growing concerns about urban air pollution.
Batteries are key to electric cars and, by storing energy for when the sun goes down or the wind stops blowing, they are also vital when it comes to enabling renewable energy to reach its full potential.
Just as important as the greening of energy is reducing demand by boosting energy efficiency.
“We could power down European energy use by about 40% in something like 10-15 years, just by making the most efficient appliances available the new minimum.”
“Climate policy is massively underfunding forests – they receive only about 2% of global climate finance.” Furthermore, the $2.3bn committed to forests by rich nations and multilateral institutions since 2010 is tiny compared with the funding for the sectors that drive deforestation.

The orginal article.

Summary of “IDEO’s Sandy Speicher on Constructivism: The uncomfortable secret to creative success is “disequilibrium””

In order to bring yourself back to a calm state of knowing, you have to generate a new “a-ha” inside your mind that reframes your old information with the new information.
A mental model that, through the force of your imagination and intelligence, connects those dissonant dots into new meaning.
Learning isn’t about the consumption of new information.
Synthesis is our natural creative process, and once you start to put those pieces back together into new frameworks of understanding, that’s when the new ideas start to flow.
It’s no longer just about understanding the word “Cow”: Now it’s about designing whole new offerings, experiences, and organizations that go against the convictions that have solidified in our minds.
While I constantly think about the time required to tick off my to-do list, I rarely evaluate how much emotional energy is required to take my work to new creative heights.
So how does this Constructivist learning theory help us support creative teams? What if, as creative leaders, we saw ourselves as great Constructivist teachers instead of orienting around our knowledge and expertise? How would Piaget’s theories change our behavior?
Just like classroom teachers, leaders face pressure to accomplish a set of outcomes within a particular timeframe and often, unintentionally, send signals to their teams that their time messing about in search of a new mental model isn’t valid.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Are the Amish right about new technology?”

The basic stereotype about the Amish – drivers of horse-drawn buggies, wearers of huge beards – is that they’re stuck in the 18th century: if a technology wasn’t invented by then, you won’t find them using it today.
If clicking and swiping have got even the Amish addicted, what hope for the rest of us?
Except, as Kevin Kelly points out in his book What Technology Wants, the Amish have never been unequivocal shunners of modernity.
Visiting Amish communities, he found battery-powered radios, computer-controlled milling machines, solar panels, chemical fertilisers and GM crops.
What distinguishes the Amish stance toward any given invention isn’t that they reject it outright; it’s that they start by assuming they don’t want or need it, then adopt it only if they decide it’s in line with their values.
Generally, these days, “Our default is set to say ‘yes’ to new things,” Kelly notes, whereas for the Amish “The default is set to ‘no'”.
I’m not going to argue that we should adopt Amish values, which are largely illiberal, let alone copy their system for determining which technologies are allowed, which essentially means doing whatever the bishops decide.
I agree with Cal Newport, who highlighted Kelly’s work on his blog the other day: isn’t it alarming that the basic Amish logic – adopt a new technology only if it helps you do what you deem important – feels so alien to us? “The Amish are clear about what they value,” he writes, “And new technologies are evaluated by their impact on these values.”

The orginal article.

Summary of “20 Years Ago, Jeff Bezos Said This 1 Thing Separates People Who Achieve Lasting Success From Those Who Don’t”

Twenty-three years later, he’s one of the richest people in the world.
Bezos built Amazon around things he knew would be stable over time, investing heavily in ensuring that Amazon would provide those things – and improve its delivery of those things.
So the effort we put into those things, spinning those things up, we know the energy we put into it today will still be paying off dividends for our customers 10 years from now.
Focusing on things that won’t change does not guarantee success – but it provides as close a foundation for success as you will find.
Focus on collecting knowledge …. Competing is a fact of professional life: with other businesses, other products, other people.
You can know enough smart people that together you know almost everything.
The goal of networking is to connect with people who can provide a referral, help make a sale, share important information, serve as a mentor, etc.
That’s how successful people weather the storm when times are tough, and become even more successful when business is booming.

The orginal article.

Summary of “The Year in Push Alerts: How breaking news became our lives.”

In an effort to understand this change, and the current news environment, we gathered all the breaking news push alerts that one outlet, the New York Times, sent from the moment Trump won until last Wednesday.
Taken all together on the above interactive, the alerts provide a visceral snapshot of the year that was-the intense bursts of news, the slow days that seemed disorienting without a breaking story, the early morning pushes, the 5-p.m.-on-a-Friday pushes, the pushes of stories that never broke through, the pushes that were impossible to ignore.
We hope you’ll take a few minutes to explore them and reflect on the crazy year, press the pause button when it feels overwhelming, and then read the essays below, which together illuminate the experience of being a consumer of, and in some cases producer of and commentator on, news this year.
Did the onslaught of news dull our ability to distinguish between what matters and what’s noise, or are we finally paying attention? Did we spend our time wisely, or waste it devouring what media and technology companies fed us? Will the pace of news eventually slow down and the phone stop vibrating and the rhythm of our days recalibrate-or is this how it will always be? We’re still too deep in the muck to know.
The Times’ breaking news desk was treating it as a big story.
The past year’s news cycle has been so overwhelming that it has forced publications to think through their push alert strategies in new ways.
Tessa Muggeridge, the Washington Post’s newsletter and alerts editor, told me that the Post has shifted from pushing a mix of breaking news and feature stories to pushing breaking news almost exclusively since Trump’s election.
Are they meant primarily to drive traffic to the website? Or to increase subscriptions? Or simply to build the paper’s brand? Certainly they can give a huge boost to a story’s audience, Times news desk editor Michael Owen told me: “We get a bigger traffic spike from push alerts than we get from anything else.” Yet “There’s no direct payoff” from a given push alert “In terms of mission or business,” Owen said.

The orginal article.

Summary of “What I Learned From Reading Every Google Founders’ Letter”

From its unconventional dutch-auction IPO, to giving employees 20% time to explore any interest related to Google, to balloon-beaming Internet projects, Google, and now Alphabet, has been anything but conventional.
1/ It’s search, stupidWhy did Google succeed and endure in the Internet battlefield when almost all other startups have faded into distant memory?
2008Even as Google has grown into a behemoth, they never took their eyes off the prize in search.
2012As the world moves increasingly digital, the core business value of Google is becoming increasingly stronger as they build even stronger network effects into their search business.
From the beginning, Google gave their team members the ability to work on projects outside of search in a 70-20-10 format.
2012But one of the biggest innovation Larry and Sergey made was to appoint Sundar Pichai as the CEO of Google in 2015.
Sundar Pichai, 2015Takeaway: if you don’t make lots of small and smart bets along the way, you might not live long enough to make the big bets.4/ Culture eats strategy for breakfastWhile Hollywood had some fun at the expense of Google in the movie The Internship, Larry and Sergey never took the culture of Google for granted.
IPOLarry was reviewing every hire even in 2007 when there were 17,000 people at Google.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Your Strategy Won’t Work If You Don’t Identify the New Capabilities You Need”

The strategy was sound, but making it happen required many new capabilities: dozens of sales people had to learn new approaches to selling and relationship building, different sales divisions needed to share information and collaborate, new roles for coordinating enterprise accounts had to be created, financial information had to be presented and analyzed differently, and so on.
Capabilities lie at the heart an organization’s ability to achieve results, so it’s hardly a surprise that different results require different capabilities.
First, many strategic planners and senior executives assume that if the strategy is logical, then people will figure out what to do, and don’t build capabilities development into their plans at all.
Developing capabilities requires experimentation, trial and error, and iterative learning to figure out what will work in each organization’s unique culture, functional structure, and environment.
While some work focused on innovation strategy – the customary task of identifying where the company should place innovation bets – equal attention was paid to understanding the capabilities needed to execute the strategy.
As teams were chartered to pursue promising opportunities, they were also tasked with developing specific capabilities that were critical to the innovation strategy.
As successive phases of this work took place, teams brought learnings to new iterations and new teams, helping to scale and sustain the development of these capabilities.
Then identify opportunities for teams to create or strengthen those capabilities while actually executing some aspect of the strategy.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Who Betrayed Anne Frank? Former F.B.I. Agent Reopens a Cold Case”

Those techniques may allow them to re-evaluate old evidence – for instance, whether the knock on the wall, described in Anne Frank’s diary, was someone telling those hiding that they were being too loud, or whether it could have been a trap.
Such modern and expensive techniques were not available to the Dutch national police when they unsuccessfully investigated the case in 1948 and again in 1963.Much is known about Anne Frank’s life during her two years in hiding, thanks both to her famous diary and the accounts of helpers and friends published after the war.
“It’s a function of how the Dutch perceive themselves during the occupation.”
“We don’t know what happened exactly on that fateful day, and there is something intriguing about an open end in a narrative,” said Ronald Leopold, the executive director of the Anne Frank House foundation, which runs the museum and conducts research into her life and death.
The figure of the betrayer is important in the life of Anne Frank because, unlike the police and soldiers who would be responsible for her death, the betrayer was possibly known by the Frank family, and almost certainly was not someone wearing an official uniform.
While Wilhelm van Maaren, a warehouse foreman, was the primary focus in both Dutch police investigations, the new investigation is open to all possibilities.
“When Otto Frank returned, in the summer of 1945, he assumed someone gave them up,” said Gertjan Broek, a senior historian at the Anne Frank House, which receives 1.3 million visitors a year.
While the idea that the police were tipped off has long been part of the Anne Frank story, not everyone is convinced that betrayal necessarily played a role.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Learning To Spot Fake News: Start With A Gut Check”

Learning To Spot Fake News: Start With A Gut Check : NPR Ed A new approach seeks to equip university students with the tools of fact-checkers.
“We have approached media literacy and news literacy in the past sort of like rhetoricians,” says Mike Caulfield, director of blended and networked learning at Washington State University in Vancouver.
“Fact-checkers,” on the other hand, “Get to the truth of an issue in 60 to 90 seconds.”
Check for previous work: Look around to see whether someone else has already fact-checked the claim or provided a synthesis of research.
Finally, Caulfield argues in his book that one of the most important weapons of fact-checking comes from inside the reader: “When you feel strong emotion – happiness, anger, pride, vindication – and that emotion pushes you to share a ‘fact’ with others, STOP.”.
“We try to convince students to use strong emotions as the mental trigger” for the fact-checking habit, he says.
Students will fact-check, annotate and provide context to news stories that show up in social media feeds.
Last spring, students at Western Kentucky University took up the question “Are the protesters against Trump being paid to protest?” The students traced the claim back to a Tweet by an Austin, Texas, resident that was later retracted.

The orginal article.