Summary of “The Best Television Shows to Stream Now”

T.P. “Miami Vice”: As done by Michael Mann, our great analyst of men in suits at work, this holds up better than most cop shows and many other existential queries after masculinity.
T.P. “Schitt’s Creek”: A family affair from Eugene Levy and his son, Daniel.
T.P. “Six Feet Under”: Now is the time to raid the canon.
D.S.F. “Terrace House”: The Japanese reality show proceeds from the elemental premise of “The Real World,” or, for that matter, college: a carefully curated selection of young strangers gather under one roof to flirt and fight with one another.
T.P. “Top of the Lake”: Tropes of the puzzle-box detective story are built and undone in Jane Campion’s “Top of the Lake,” a moody, impressionistic portrait of a strange New Zealand town, starring Elisabeth Moss as the police officer Robin Griffin.
D.S.F. “TV Party”: No disrespect to “The Robin Byrd Show,” but “TV Party” represents the highest achievement of New York City public-access cable programming.
T.P. “Undone”: Kate Purdy and Raphael Bob-Waksberg’s series “Undone” is created using rotoscoping, by which animation is traced over live-action footage.
Loosely adapted from Deborah Feldman’s memoir, “Unorthodox: The Scandalous Rejection of My Hasidic Roots,” the show tells the story of Esty, a young wife living in the Satmar community of Williamsburg, Brooklyn, and her escape to a secular life in Berlin, Germany.

The orginal article.

Summary of “The Reinvention of Black”

If I want the black to be really immersive and dense, I’d use Bideford black.
Bideford black was one of many carbon-based black pigments used from the 16th through the 19th centuries in Europe.
Bone black gave a warm brownish black, while lamp black and vine black gave cooler shades.
Mixed in paint or ink, it produces a neutral, matte black also known as Pigment Black 1.
Around the middle of the century, paint-makers began to offer a synthetic inorganic black pigment known as Mars black.
Spanish surrealist Salvador Dali used Mars black, and said of Jacques Blockx, who developed one of the earliest commercial Mars black oil paints, “This man, who never painted, will contribute more to the painters of tomorrow than what we will have accomplished, all the modern painters together.
Whereas Malevich used a spectrum of carbon blacks in his paintings, from ivory black to lamp black, his successors wanted to reflect the rapid technological changes in society through the materials they used, and went looking for new black paints.
One, called Abstract Painting, is a huge black square composed of nine smaller squares, each of subtly different blacks: The squares at the corners have a red tinge, while the others have a hint of blue or green.

The orginal article.

Summary of “The Seven Deadly Sins of AI Predictions”

We are surrounded by hysteria about the future of artificial intelligence and robotics-hysteria about how powerful they will become, how quickly, and what they will do to jobs.
Personally, I should probably be wary of the second sentence in his first law, as I am much more conservative than some others about how quickly AI will be ascendant.
Suppose we further show Newton how the device can illuminate the dark, how it can take photos and movies and record sound, how it can be used as a magnifying glass and as a mirror.
Performance Versus CompetenceWe all use cues about how people perform some particular task to estimate how well they might perform some different task.
We naturally assume that this person can answer questions like What is the shape of a Frisbee? Roughly how far can a person throw a Frisbee? Can a person eat a Frisbee? Roughly how many people play Frisbee at once? Can a three-month-old person play Frisbee? Is today’s weather suitable for playing Frisbee?
Besides the fact that they can only label more images and cannot answer questions at all, they have no idea what a person is, that parks are usually outside, that people have ages, that weather is anything more than how it makes a photo look, etc.
Not so for AlphaGo or Deep Blue.Suitcase words mislead people about how well machines are doing at tasks that people can do.
It turns out that many AI researchers and AI pundits, especially those pessimists who indulge in predictions about AI getting out of control and killing people, are similarly imagination-challenged.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Can we escape from information overload?”

One day in December 2016 a 37-year-old British artist named Sam Winston equipped himself with a step-ladder, a pair of scissors, several rolls of black-out cloth and a huge supply of duct tape, and set about a project he had been considering for some time.
As an artist, Sam Winston was often on the lookout for topsy-turvy projects – weird, sidelong ways to unmoor familiar habits or nudge his work in new directions.
Winston’s older brother had died, suddenly, the year before, and bereavement was another prompt for him to hole away in the dark.
Instead a very different figure stalked the darkened landscape of Winston’s mind – one who was suited, lardy and omnipresent in the news after his recent election as president of the United States.
Winston considered himself only a moderate news junkie, bombarded but not an addict.
Winston emerged from the blacked-out studio before his food stocks ran out, around lunchtime on a Saturday.
For a long time Winston watched train after train go by on the tracks outside his studio, relishing the everyday sights he’d been starved of, and at the same time trying to settle his insides.
The next time he retreated into the dark, Winston resolved, he would try to come out after sunset for a gentler transition.

The orginal article.

Summary of “The story behind the split of Tom Brady, Bill Belichick and the Patriots”

After Belichick finished his news conference, Brady emerged from the locker room – no, he shot out of the locker room, with a flurry of people behind him.
What did Brady need that Bill Belichick and Robert Kraft failed to deliver? Was it an extension? Was it joy? Were the relationships, strained for the past few years, broken beyond repair?
THERE HAVE BEEN many moments in recent years when the relationship between Tom Brady and the Patriots had been strained – in the years following his knee surgery in 2008, when he spent more time in Los Angeles and less in Foxborough, culminating in a “Disconnect,” as Yahoo Sports reported, in contract talks in June of 2010; during Deflategate, when many close to Brady felt that Kraft and Belichick had left him alone to take the fall, even after he had defended the franchise during Spygate and throughout his career.
The issues in the Patriots building caused by The Method – how it pitted players against the team training staff, how Belichick felt forced to curtail Guerrero’s access – are widely reported and well-known, but the heart of the problem between Brady and Belichick in late 2017 was the same as it was in March 2020: Brady wanted a contract extension.
Tom Brady Sr. once told me that once Belichick found a quarterback “Who is better for a dollar less, [Tom will] be gone.” Brady Sr. also told Leibovich, “It will end badly.” Some close to Brady actually looked forward to that day, in a weird way, believing that the team would collapse without him – without the human backstop who bailed out everyone’s mistakes, who helped Belichick to all but two of his winning seasons as a head coach, who engineered five Super Bowl wins when trailing or tied in the fourth quarter.
Its scouting reports would shock fans if they could see them, even when it came to Brady – especially when it came to Brady.
It still seemed inevitable, when the Patriots took on the Titans in the playoffs, that somehow, someway, Brady and Belichick would find a way.
A deadline neared: The league year would begin on March 18 at 4 p.m. A call earlier that month between Brady and Belichick ended without an agreed-upon extension, with Brady’s camp viewing it as further proof that the team wanted him only under its rigid terms and the team exploiting the chance to leak that it had an offer for him and that the ball was in Brady’s court.

The orginal article.

Summary of “After the Coronavirus, What Happens to the TV Industry?”

Before the people who run linear TV networks and streaming services start dealing with the very real and very serious implications of closing down the industry, their first task at hand is figuring out how to adjust their programming to match a viewing landscape dramatically different than even just one week ago.
While not everyone is going to want to watch more TV or stream Prime Video, the potential audience for video entertainment is about to skyrocket.
Hulu last week moved up the streaming premiere of its new Pete Davidson feature, Big Time Adolescence, to coincide with its theatrical release, while Disney+ dropped Frozen II more than a month earlier than planned.
Streamers should play a part, too: Replays of any PBS-produced educational programming could be added to all the major commercial platforms, as well as free streamers such as Pluto and the Roku Channel.
The rise of streaming has made watching TV a far more personalized experience: There are no timeslots on Netflix, and only the biggest of shows – Stranger Things, perhaps this month’s Love Island finale – result in the sense that we’re all streaming the same show within a two- or three-day period.
The early conventional wisdom about coronavirus and the streaming business is that, in the short term, it should be a major boon: At-home audiences no longer buying movie tickets, drinking in bars, or seeing live shows will want as many streaming options as possible to help fight boredom.
If the traditional cable bundle starts collapsing even more quickly in coming months – and the lack of professional sports on cable could be the thing that gets many older consumers to finally ditch the cord – it will be in every established streamer’s best interest to make streaming subscriptions more attractive than ever.
The beloved sitcom is currently on a streaming break, having left Netflix on January 1 and not scheduled to return until the launch of HBO Max in May. But imagine the great PR WarnerMedia would get were it to put all episodes of Friends on HBO’s current direct to consumer offering HBO Now, rather than waiting for the new platform to arrive in two months.

The orginal article.

Summary of “The New Age of Astrology”

In the decades between the New Age boom and now, while astrology certainly didn’t go away-you could still regularly find horoscopes in the back pages of magazines-it “Went back to being a little bit more in the background,” says Chani Nicholas, an astrologer based in Los Angeles.
In some ways, astrology is perfectly suited for the internet age.
She has around 1 million monthly readers online, and recently snagged a book deal-one of four new mainstream astrology guidebooks sold in a two-month period in summer 2017, according to Publisher’s Marketplace.
Ruby Warrington is a lifestyle writer whose New Age guidebook Material Girl, Mystical World came out in May 2017-just ahead of the wave of astrology book sales this summer.
JWT and another trend-forecasting group, WGSN, in its report “Millennials: New Spirituality,” lump astrology in with other New Age mystical trends that have caught on with young people in recent years: healing crystals, sound baths, and tarot, among others.
A sincere burgeoning interest in astrology doesn’t mean people are wholesale abandoning rationality for more mystical beliefs.
Nicholas Campion, a historian of astrology, points out that the question of whether people “Believe” in astrology is both impossible to answer, and not really a useful question to ask.
“Astrology is a system that looks at cycles, and we use the language of planets,” says Alec Verkuilen Brogan, a 29-year-old chiropractic student based in the Bay Area who has also studied astrology for 10 years.

The orginal article.

Summary of “What Are Viruses Anyway, and Why Do They Make Us so Sick? 5 Questions Answered”

You have a virus – actually, many – all the time.
As world health leaders try to determine how to respond to the new coronavirus, virus expert Marilyn J. Roossinck answers a few questions.
What Is a Virus? Defining a virus has been a challenge, because every time we come up with a good definition someone discovers a virus that breaks the rules.
Why Does a Virus Make People Sick? When a new human virus disease appears, it is most often because the virus has jumped from a different species into humans.
The virus goes through a process of adjustment to its new host.
In mice a herpes virus prevents infection from the plague bacteria.
Knowing the source also helps scientists understand mutations that might have occurred in the virus’ genome.
Virus infection can suppress the immune system, so patients should be monitored for secondary infections that might require other treatments.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Inside the UNMC Coronavirus Quarantine Center”

The energy of the lab-with the arrival of test results and data sets at ungodly hours, online consultations with colleagues doing lab work in other countries-proved entirely too relentless.
While her work keeps her from sleep, she is passionate about where she finds herself every day.
UNMC received permission to use the test in their own work with COVID-19 patients.
Nebraska Medicine CEO and renowned pathologist James Linder told me before I met a soul at UNMC: “The men and women who choose to work in the field of infectious disease are highly qualified. And they pretty much self-select. It’s like selecting to specialize in surgery, where you’re dealing with open bodies on a surgical table. There’s risk in it, peril. You have to be able to rely on yourself. And trust the team around you. These men and women are interested in the discipline of their process. They must trust their own abilities above all. The rigors appeal to them, and define them.”
“Then I’m going to go downstairs and begin training a new group of seven new nurses, who are going to come onto the staff. A full second team to work with and trust. More lab work to be done. More blood that can be worked with. That’s more work. That’s urgency.”
Do people beyond her family ever react to her presence? I mention the rumors about the children of quarantine workers being shunned from birthday parties.
Normally, he works in oncology and critical care unit, but now, during this coronavirus crisis, having trained and volunteered for assignment in UNMC’s biocontainment center, he’s on an upper floor of the Durham Outpatient Center.
Locals began to accept that this might just be a part of the work that makes living in Nebraska what it is-a kind of heartiness, a resilience.

The orginal article.

Summary of “25 Movies and the Magazine Stories That Inspired Them”

As more publications pursue blockbuster stories with film and television potential, producers in Hollywood and the magazine industry are taking their inspiration from successful article-to-film adaptations of the past that have achieved box office success.
Here are 25 gold-standard film adaptations of magazine articles, published over the course of half a century as cover stories, features, or breaking news, as well as direct links to read all 25 stories online.
Many of these writers’ names will be familiar to readers, as will the majority of the magazines and films themselves, in many cases because celebrated journalists inspired these major motion pictures at the peak of their careers as writers and reporters.
These stories belong on any narrative nonfiction syllabus on their own merit, but I hope these samples are still just the beginning, and that new filmmakers and magazine writers can start to work together far more often on a greater breadth of material, with sufficient editorial guidance and studio backing to support them.
The list of new film and television adaptations based on popular books or podcasts, let alone reporting that has helped support the explosion in streaming documentary formats, would run even longer.
It takes time, access, imagination, and resources to be able to realize ambitious true stories like these in their original form as narrative magazine features.
Writers are the lifeblood of all of these industries, and will always play a pivotal role in any production that is based on a true story.
He even inserted fake mistakes into his fake stories so fact checkers would catch them and feel as if they were doing their jobs.

The orginal article.