Summary of “Colin Kaepernick’s settlement with the NFL was a big win for the leader of the league’s protest movement.”

On Friday, the NFL and representatives for Colin Kaepernick and Eric Reid announced that they had settled a grievance suit with the two players over alleged collusion to keep them out of the league because of their protests during the anthem.
“For the past several months, counsel for Mr. Kaepernick and Mr. Reid have engaged in an ongoing dialogue with representatives of the NFL. As a result of those discussions, the parties have decided to resolve the pending grievances,” the NFL and Kaepernick and Reid’s attorneys said in a joint announcement.
Bleacher Report’s Mike Freeman reported that NFL teams were speculating the settlement with Kaepernick alone could have been in the $60 million to $80 million range.
Kaepernick filed his grievance against the league in October 2017, alleging that one or more teams had colluded with each other and/or the league to keep him out of the NFL because of his decision to kneel during the national anthem in the 2016-17 season as a protest against police brutality and systemic racism.
Reid, who was the first player to join Kaepernick’s protest movement when they played together on the San Francisco 49ers, alleged in his grievance that he’d been blackballed for continuing to protest following Kaepernick’s exclusion from the NFL. Reid, who did not drop his grievance after signing a deal with the Carolina Panthers this season, recently re-signed with the team, getting a three-year contract worth more than $21 million.
The 31-year-old Kaepernick still does not have a job in the NFL after two seasons without a contract.
It’s unclear what will happen in the future on that front, but it seems as though that question will now be answered in negotiations between the league and the NFL Players Association and not unilaterally by Roger Goodell and the NFL’s owners.
It’s also unclear whether Kaepernick will ever get another chance to play in the NFL. If this settlement proves anything it’s that there was no good reason for him to be kept off NFL rosters in the first place-and there’s still no good reason for him to be kept from playing in the NFL going forward.

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Summary of “Inside story of how legendary NFL broadcaster Bob Costas ended up excised from football and out at NBC”

Over the previous decade, Costas had become the face of football on NBC, hosting one of TV’s most-watched programs, “Sunday Night Football.” As part of every broadcast, Costas would take two minutes at halftime to speak directly to the program’s 18 million viewers about the NFL issues of the day.
What would ensue that week – and in the years that followed – reveals for the first time how a broadcasting icon went from fronting America’s most popular sport to being excised from last year’s Super Bowl and, ultimately, ending his nearly 40-year career with NBC. Outside the Lines spoke with the 66-year-old Costas dozens of times over the course of the past year.
BY DECEMBER 2015, nobody at NBC should have been surprised that Bob Costas would want to speak his mind about football.
The New York Daily News asked NBC for comment, and a spokesman responded, “Bob’s opinions are his own, and they do not represent those of the NBC Sports Group” – prompting a story from Raissman under the headline, “NBC throws Bob Costas under the bus and in the process sends warning to rest of its talent.”
Sensing a budding problem with his employer, Costas says he decided to appear on CNN on Saturday morning to make it clear he wasn’t being critical of NBC. So, for the third time in a week, Costas was talking publicly about football and brain damage.
McCarthy says the NFL did not ask NBC to remove Costas from the Super Bowl.
Costas repeatedly suggested that Outside the Lines reach out to his longtime NBC producer and one of his closest friends, Bruce Cornblatt, saying he would be an excellent resource who would be happy to talk.
Instead, the news trickled out when Costas confirmed it to the New York Post in a Jan. 19 story headlined, “Bob Costas and NBC are quietly and officially broken up.”

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Summary of “Rams’ $5 billion stadium complex might be perfect for L.A.”

The future is taking shape in the concrete pillars and sloped canopy roof of a transformative new stadium that will serve as home to the Super Bowl-bound Los Angeles Rams and Los Angeles Chargers when the world’s most expensive sports complex opens in 2020.
At a cost estimated at more than $5 billion, the development – its formal name is the LA Stadium & Entertainment District at Hollywood Park – includes a 70,240-seat stadium and 6,000-seat performance center under one roof that will anchor a 298-acre complex of office buildings, shops, restaurants, residential units, hotels and parks.
It is the vision of Rams owner E. Stanley Kroenke, a Missouri-born billionaire developer and sports mogul, who took to heart NFL Commissioner Roger Goodell’s insistence that any new stadium built for pro football’s return to Los Angeles must be iconic and serve as home to two teams.
Both the Rams and Chargers require the purchase of stadium seat licenses, or SSLs, in addition to the regular ticket price.
“This is a really good deal compared to virtually any football stadium that has been built in the last 30 years,” Noll said, adding a caveat about potential lost revenue from developments that might otherwise have been constructed on the 298-acre site.
When completed, it will more than double the cost of the next-most expensive NFL stadium – the $1.8 billion Las Vegas stadium being built for the relocating Oakland Raiders and also due to open in 2020.
Just behind the Las Vegas stadium in terms of cost are New York’s MetLife, home of the Giants and Jets – it was privately funded but built on land owned by the state of New Jersey – and Atlanta’s Mercedes-Benz Stadium, host of this year’s Super Bowl.
This posed a design challenge for the architect, Dallas-based HKS. The solution was an NFL stadium tailored to the Southern Californian lifestyle like a bespoke suit: the first indoor-outdoor stadium.

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Summary of “How Mike Pereira Changed the Way We Watch Football Forever”

Mike Pereira thinks about the first Sunday of his broadcasting career often.
In many ways, Johnson’s non-catch illustrated the era Pereira would help usher in: The NFL’s rules were constantly changing, and it was Pereira’s job to tell America what the hell was happening.
“God bless [referee] Gene Steratore for saying, ‘The ruling on the field stands - incomplete,’ because if they changed it I might be fired,” Pereira said.
I wanted to watch football with the people whose job is to explain the moments in a game that few people understand, so I joined Pereira and Blandino on the Sunday of this season’s Week 4 at Fox’s NFL studio in Los Angeles.
There are probably more glamorous places to watch a football game - the owner’s box at Jerry World, maybe - but nothing matches sitting with Pereira and Blandino for eight hours.
The call, as Pereira remembers it, was brief: “‘Pereira, it’s Hill, you aren’t retiring.
“Then you look like you don’t know what you’re talking about. They may get the call wrong and what you were saying is the correct call.” Added Pereira: “It’s, ‘We were wrong,’ it’s never that the league is wrong. I don’t like the guessing game, but I understand it.” Pereira considers supporting the broadcast team a bigger job than interpreting the rules on camera, whether that involves telling a producer which rule is coming into play in their game or putting together videos or talks for Fox broadcasters so that they’ll better understand the rules.
As for his current role: “The job now is stressful, but I’m playing golf on Monday. Coaches still called me, but when I was talking to Mike Shanahan I was on the third tee. I got to say, ‘Hey, not my job anymore.'” Pereira had other motivations for leaving the league in 2009.

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Summary of “Nike’s Big Gamble on Colin Kaepernick”

For the past two years, Nike has kept Colin Kaepernick on the bench despite an endorsement partnership that dates back to 2011.
Kaepernick’s protest made him hugely controversial, and during the past two years, Nike hasn’t used the former 49ers quarterback as a spokesman even though he was under contract.
On Monday, Nike introduced Kaepernick as the face of its 30th anniversary “Just Do It” campaign, kicking off a new deal worth millions of dollars, comparable to the most lucrative deals Nike gives out to NFL players.
Kaepernick is suing the NFL, a Nike partner, alleging he’s been blacklisted for inspiring a wave of protests.
He’s misreading the situation if he thinks that Nike re-signed Kaepernick for political reasons.
Kaepernick and Reid aren’t the only people in this story who are suing former employers-in August, four women who used to work at Nike headquarters filed a class-action lawsuit that said Nike systematically paid women less than men and turned a blind eye to sexual harassment.
Maybe Nike figures that the far right is going to throw a tantrum no matter what the NFL and its corporate partners do, and if that’s going to happen they might as well sell some athleisure to people who don’t find Kaepernick’s message of racial equality offensive.
Nike betting on Kaepernick is encouraging for those of us who find his message not only inoffensive but worthy.

The orginal article.

Summary of “NFL protests: 2 years of NFL protests, explained”

Exactly two years later, the controversy over NFL players’ decision to protest against racial inequality by kneeling during the national anthem before NFL games has enmeshed the country’s most popular sports league – one whose 32 teams are worth roughly $75 billion, more than the MLB and the NBA combined – in a political and cultural firestorm it most definitely did not want.
As the anthem protests expanded, so did the backlash The anthem protests began with Colin Kaepernick, who first sat during the anthem and then, after speaking with a former NFL player who had served as a Green Beret, knelt.
Though some conservatives viewed Kaepernick’s protest as an expression of free speech, many on the right didn’t see it that way, seeing the protests as an example of the “Politicization of sports” or “Symbolic of how liberalism has been allowed to spread unchecked through our culture,” and, most importantly, indicative of anti-Americanism run amok, as NFL players “Disrespected” the American flag and veterans of the wars fought to protect it.
There are 32 NFL teams, with 53 active players on each team, for a total of 1,696 NFL players active at a time.
Donald J. Trump October 10, 2017 Complicated, with no ending in sight Now, with preseason games taking place and about a month left until the NFL regular season, the NFL owners and players are still battling over the protests.
In May, the NFL and the owners agreed to a policy in which players would be expected to stand for the anthem if they were on the sidelines but were given the option of remaining in the locker room instead, with fines levied by the NFL for any protests.
NFL players who just wanted to go back to the pre-2009 system – where players stayed in the locker room for the national anthem – filed a grievance with the league via the NFL players union.
Many NFL players want to find a way to settle the issue – as do NFL owners and the league itself.

The orginal article.

Summary of “We Made Aaron Rodgers NFL Commissioner for a Day”

The first thing Rodgers would want to address is “Owners and lawyers” passing rules in the offseason without player involvement: “The owners shouldn’t be able to pass rules without ratifying it through the players.” This, he said, includes rules about the offseason structure and limits on practice time that directly affect players.
Rodgers does not have a blanket idea in mind for an anthem-related policy, saying he simply would ask for the Players Association’s input.
The NFL has no such drama in its offseason; elite players rarely reach the open market or switch teams.
Rodgers has two seasons left on his contract, and he’s widely expected to become one of the highest-paid players in league history when he signs a new pact.
Rodgers is clear that something should be done to increase player involvement in decisions at owners meetings.
He’s skeptical of the new kickoff rule, which owners passed in May. Rodgers doesn’t think the new policy, which bans running head starts before the kick, will make it any less likely that players will collide.
In ESPN’s 2018 “World Fame 100,” which measures worldwide fame, the top NFL player, Tom Brady, checks in at no.
He also thinks teams should do more to highlight the causes players support off the field: “That would help to change some of the issues.” Rodgers said that more people should look at the percentages of NFL players arrested and see that there isn’t an epidemic of crime among NFL players: “Compare that per capita for the population, obviously our numbers are a lot lower. But it’s the summertime, it’s slow, and there’s not a whole lot going on; that’s obviously big news. I wish that we could continue to highlight the things guys were doing with their own causes.”

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Summary of “Lincoln Riley’s Oklahoma Success Has the NFL Watching”

What’s separated Riley is the way he systemically and aggressively stresses defenses at every level, marries his passing game to his running game, and makes something that is simple enough to allow players to play at breakneck speed at the same time so complicated for opponents.
“I’d say in all the years at Texas Tech, all the years at East Carolina and the first couple years here, I had a true football discussion with maybe one NFL team. The interest in people reaching out to do that has changed a lot. And that’s probably due to some of the players we had, and how much they were studied.”
“In the past when you had damn near unlimited hours with these guys from an NFL perspective, your play sheets, the amount of stuff you put in, you’d have all the time in the world to do it.”
“The two teams in the NFL that look the most like us, or several other college teams, were the two teams playing in the Super Bowl,” Riley said, “So when people are having success with it, that’s not going to slow down.” Riley credits coaches like Pats coordinator Josh McDaniels and Eagles coach Doug Pederson for adapting certain run-action and RPO looks to the pros.
“We’ve just really drafted well over the last 10 years,” Jones said, “And when that happens, your young players that you draft, you keep them so they can push old players off. That’s what’s happened here. We feel very confident, comfortable that we have players on our roster, young players that are ready to step up and do the job. If you don’t ever give them opportunity, you won’t ever see what you have.”
Deandre Baker, DB, Georgia: Size is an issue, but he’s played a lot of football at a blueblood program, starting the last two years and emerging in 2017 as an All-SEC player.
If you’re ever wondering how much goes into a single NFL play, or whether that was more than just luck, you should check out the video on the CBS Denver site.
I’m glad tipping players being selected to play in professional sports leagues ahead of a broadcast was seen as a crime against humanity.

The orginal article.

Summary of “The Winners and Losers From Round 1 of the 2018 NFL Draft”

Loser: Roger Goodell The NFL had a plan to prevent Roger Goodell from being bathed in boos at the start of the draft.
Smith also called Maryland’s D.J. Moore his “Spirit animal” and said that the wide receiver will give you “Instant grits all day long.” Smith was the undisputed star of the NFL Network’s draft coverage, and I now believe that all NFL games should be broadcast with Steve Smith’s running commentary.
Winner: All the Teams That Didn’t Draft Josh Allen Congrats to the Browns for listening to me and drafting Baker Mayfield instead of Josh Allen! Baker Mayfield was historically efficient at passing in college, setting the record for yards per passing attempt as a senior.
Since the pick ahead of theirs was used on a quarterback who struggles to throw a football to his teammates, the Bears got to draft Roquan Smith, who, in my opinion, was the best defender in college football last year.
First, the Giants made Saquon Barkley the highest-selected running back since Reggie Bush in 2006, using the second pick in the draft on the Penn State playmaker.
Sam Farmer April 27, 2018 Some feel that Rosen might be the best quarterback in the draft, and that the Cardinals got great value to find him at no.
The draft itself was kind of a bummer for Daniels-he went undrafted in the first round while centers Frank Ragnow and Billy Price did go off the board-but it doesn’t seem to matter to Daniels.
Cam Inman April 26, 2018 We have already discovered the complete futility of the seven-round mock draft, but this year, even the first round was impossible to project.

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Summary of “It Might Not Help Vince McMahon, but the NFL Needs the XFL”

No, it’s a boon for the league because the past 70 years suggest that no one benefits from more football quite like the NFL. The history of the NFL is that its good ideas often start somewhere else.
The NFL is in the midst of a season in which Blake Bortles made a conference championship game-it seems misguided to think that there’s so much talent in the NFL that the runoff will make its way to the XFL for less money and things will still look good.
Historically there have been a lot of attempts to topple the NFL. There was the XFL in 2001, the USFL in the ’80s, the World Football League in the ’70s, the Canadian Football League’s brief American expansion in the ’90s, and by far the most successful upstart, the AFL in the 1960s, which later merged with the NFL. Without any semi-legitimate second option, there’s been no serious place for NFL players to develop in the offseason since NFL Europe folded in 2007.
There is a long history of the league borrowing ideas from its rivals, so let’s start with an idea the NFL took from McMahon’s league: their television production.
If you enjoyed the SkyCam angles this year, you can thank the XFL on NBC. A few months after the league folded in 2001, Monday Night Football “Approached the NFL about using a variety of the gimmicks XFL execs bragged about last season.” The main “Gimmick” in question was SkyCam.
Jim Kelly, Reggie White, and Herschel Walker starred in the ’80s in the USFL. The XFL wouldn’t dream of such a competition for top college players-they’ll instead have to settle for the fringes-and that works just fine for the NFL. The best guidepost for a league like the new XFL would be the old XFL, which rejuvenated careers of players long forgotten and turned them into decent NFL starters.
At a time when there’s undoubtedly a shortage of great quarterbacks, a Last Chance Saloon where one or two passers could work their way back into the NFL would help.
Hank Stram, famed coach of the Kansas City Chiefs and one of the innovators of the odd formation and the 3-4 defense, talked extensively about how open the AFL was to new ideas as opposed to the staid NFL. This included the “Odd” front and a variety of offensive formations-things quickly accepted into the NFL mainstream after they proved to work.

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