Summary of “The Young Man and the Sea Sponge”

Tom Kenny, the voice actor behind SpongeBob’s perpetually enthused munchkin tones has always delighted in the show’s abundance of positive energy.
Stephen Hillenburg, the creator of SpongeBob SquarePants, was 14 when he went scuba diving for the first time.
“SpongeBob should be cool and wear sun glasses and surf,” while another knowledgeably informed Hillenburg that “Pirates were out.”
Burger King wanted SpongeBob flipping burgers on a Burger King-style flame broiler, and Target wanted to market its SpongeBob products with the slogan, “It’s hip to be square,” which Hillenburg coolly rejected on the basis that SpongeBob wasn’t hip.
Like everyone else, Hillenburg started seeing SpongeBob everywhere.
In 2015, as if sensing there was a need for some course correction, Hillenburg took a more active role behind the scenes of SpongeBob SquarePants.
In 2019 so far, Nickelodeon has announced the launch of a dedicated SpongeBob YouTube channel, a new mobile game, a new toy line, SpongeBob Nike sneakers, the SpongeBob Smarty Pants Game Show, collaborations with designer Cynthia Rowley and artists Romero Britto and Jon Burgerman and the Pantone Color Institute – who inaugurated the color “SpongeBob Yellow” – and SpongeBob cosmetics.
Clancy Brown, who voices Mr. Krabs, likened the experience to “Having sex with the lights on.” And, in addition to the new feature film, It’s a Wonderful Sponge, slated for release in 2020, Nickelodeon president Brian Robbins – calling SpongeBob SquarePants “Our Marvel universe” – has promised spin-off shows.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Rocko’s Modern Life creator Joe Murray: Nickelodeon was “loose and crazy””

Joe Murray, creator of classic Nicktoon Rocko’s Modern Life, was there during one of the most interesting steps in the network’s evolution.
It’s easier than ever to compare “Nickelodeon then” and “Nickelodeon now,” in part thanks to the newly released complete-series DVD box set of Rocko’s Modern Life.
Rocko was meant to be in his early 20s. I just kept saying to Nickelodeon, “It’s modern life.”
What kinds of things did Nickelodeon offer notes on? Rocko seemed to get away with a lot, but what about those other adult stories about consumerism, etc.
I think a lot of the satire, things we were saying about lots of different aspects of modern life.
It wasn’t really until the corporate machine started building up with Nickelodeon – at the time, it was kind of a different mentality of, suddenly we have to be earning the right kind of money with the right kind of sponsors.
What seemed to be the priorities of the channel creatively back then, at such an early stage of its life making cartoons? Did Rocko meet Nickelodeon’s apparent needs and requirements?
We snuck in there when things were still kinda loose and crazy – I call it the “Wild West” sometimes, because there was a lot of people that we were getting now starting to work in television.

The orginal article.