Summary of “The Legend of Nintendo”

Few people who play Nintendo games are likely to notice their fingerprints, though there are pious aficionados who vigilantly assess their work, bridling at signs of impurity like Tolstoy devotees picking over a new translation of War and Peace.
The only place to play Nintendo games was on Nintendo devices.
“If we think 20 years down the line, we may look back at the decision not to supply Nintendo games to smartphones and think that is the reason why the company is still here,” Satoru Iwata, then the company’s president, told the Wall Street Journal in 2013.
The following year, Niantic released Pokémon Go, a mobile game that thrust Nintendo back into the news.
More symptoms emerged in November, when the company released the NES Classic Edition, a miniaturized, rebooted version of the Nintendo Entertainment System, the console that had made the company a household name in Europe and America in the ’80s. The updated version was carefully calibrated to rekindle the latent passion of lapsed fans, with 30 of the most popular NES games built in.
At $59.99 per unit with no additional games, NES Classics were a low-margin item; much more important for the company was to whet the world’s appetite for Nintendo games in preparation for the Switch.
Nintendo has a few plans in motion: a partnership with Cygames Inc., a Japanese developer specializing in mobile games, and the launch in September of an online subscription service for the Switch, which will allow gamers to compete against one another and play a slate of retro titles.
In early June, Nintendo released a free online demo of the upcoming Mario Tennis Aces-a tournament game expected to be one of the first major attractions for its network service.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Inside Nintendo’s secretive creative process”

Nintendo is coming out of a rough patch in its 128-year history.
Takahashi paints innovation as a side-product of Nintendo’s working culture – something about which the company has always been notoriously secretive.
In the last few years it has started to open up just a little; its regular Nintendo Direct broadcasts show the faces behind games such as Mario, Zelda, Animal Crossing and Splatoon.
For a long time, the creative face of Nintendo was Shigeru Miyamoto, the creator of Mario – but now there is a newer generation of game creators in the limelight, including Splatoon’s director Tsubasa Sakaguchi, who joined the company in 2004.
Nintendo does not prioritise experience in its hiring, says Takahashi – instead it looks for focus.
“This is the advantage we have at Nintendo as a software/hardware integrated organisation – when we do research for our new hardware systems, our software developers, our artists, our programmers and our hardware engineers all get together and decide what we should aim for. We’ve been doing that for many years.”
Nintendo Labo – the company’s most recent big idea, which uses the Switch console to turn cardboard models into interactive toys – is emblematic of Nintendo’s preference for finding new ways to use old or cheap technology, rather than rushing to keep up with cutting edge.
The remark recalls a philosophy ascribed to legendary Nintendo engineer Gunpei Yokoi who referred to his great achievements – the Game & Watch and Game Boy – as “Lateral thinking with withered technology”.

The orginal article.

Summary of “The Nintendo Switch might be my favorite console ever”

For a long time, I’ve felt like no piece of video game hardware could surpass the original Nintendo DS in my mind.
One game doesn’t make a system, and Nintendo has since proven that even once the euphoric sensation of playing Breath of the Wild on the go wears off, the Switch still has a lot to offer.
Titles like Super Mario Odyssey and Splatoon 2 aren’t console games or portable games; they’re just games, and I can decide how and where I want to play them.
The Switch offers a degree of flexibility that means games can conform to my life, not the other way around.
It’s gotten to the point that I will play titles I don’t even have much interest in, or replay games I’ve played before, just because they’re on the Switch.
No game console, whether from Nintendo or anyone else, has had such a dramatic impact on how I play and think about games.
When people talk about their favorite game console, they usually pick the one with their favorite games.
It’s not just that the Switch has great games – it’s that games are better when they’re on the Switch.

The orginal article.

Summary of “The Nintendo Switch and Labo make pieces of cardboard feel like magic”

New Mario and Zelda games don’t come along every year, so to keep the momentum going for 2018, Nintendo came up with something else: cardboard.
Last month we got our first glimpse of Labo, a DIY set of cardboard accessories that, once assembled, interact with the Switch and let you play various mini-games.
Nintendo envisions parents working alongside their kids to turn these flat sheets of cardboard into creations like an RC car, a piano, a fishing pole, and even a robot suit that straps to your body.
Nintendo has applied a surprising level of ingenuity and creativity to pieces of cardboard.
This build is the simplest of all; all the required pieces are in a single pane of cardboard, whereas more ambitious projects like the fishing pole are spread across multiple, lettered sheets.
Nintendo is also encouraging users to personalize the Toy-Cons with markers, stickers, and so on to give the cardboard a bit of flair.
Successfully reeling in a big fish requires a certain kind of finesse, and you’ll feel an extra tick of pride having done it with the cardboard fishing pole you just spent over an hour crafting.
It’s undoubtedly the most complicated Labo build of them all and involves a big cardboard backpack, a pulley system for the controllers in your hands, a flip-down cardboard visor for your head, and even parts that strap to your feet.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Nintendo is making a bunch of awesome DIY cardboard toys for the Switch”

Now, the company plans to follow up the red-hot debut of the Switch with a new initiative that taps into what Nintendo president Tatsumi Kimishima calls “New ways of playing” – and it involves a lot of cardboard.
Today, the company revealed a new initiative dubbed Nintendo Labo, which involves DIY cardboard accessories that can transform the Switch’s Joy-Con controllers into everything from a fishing rod to a piano to a full-on robot suit.
The product itself comes in the form of a kit that includes a Nintendo Switch cartridge and a series of cardboard sheets, along with a handful of other building accessories like string and plastic connectors.
After you pop the cartridge into the Switch, a series of on-screen instructions on the tablet take you through the steps for building each of the different accessories, which Nintendo is calling Toy-Con.
You can then see all of the same keys on the Switch’s screen, and as you press the cardboard keys, the associated ones on the Switch will also be pressed and make a sound.
Labo is both unlike anything Nintendo has made before, and something that feels distinctly Nintendo.
When the company teased this morning that it would be announcing a “New interactive experience for Nintendo Switch that’s specifically crafted for kids and those who are kids at heart,” few people probably guessed DIY accessories.
It feels quintessentially Nintendo – and could end up being a great companion to the Switch.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Nintendo Labo Almost Tossed In Trash At Ratings Board”

Germany’s software ratings board almost had an unfortunate accident with Nintendo’s innovative and recently announced Labo kits.
The USK tweeted that after receiving the kits for ratings, cleaning staff mistook the bits and pieces of cardboard and paper that make up the peripherals for Labo as trash.
USK January 18, 2018 Basteln gehört natürlich zum Testprozess dazu! Anmalen ist für die Altersprüfung leider nicht relevant, überhaupt Ihr wisst doch wir können nur Kennzeichen malen 🎨.- USK January 18, 2018 Nintendo Labo was unveiled during a surprise announcement earlier this week.
Labo appears to deliver not just new ways to play for the Nintendo Switch, but a bit of learning along the way as the process of building the cardboard peripherals seems designed to teach as well.
Nintendo says you can use the kits to build a functioning 13-key piano that brings your musical creations to life once the Nintendo Switch console and Right Joy-Con controller are inserted.
With another kit you can control a motorbike by constructing a functioning set of handlebars, with a Joy-Con inserted in each side and the Nintendo Switch console cradled in the middle.
The Variety Kit, one of the two that Labo launches with, allows you to make a variety of Toy-Con including two Toy-Con RC Cars, a Toy-Con Fishing Rod, a Toy-Con House, a Toy-Con Motorbike and a Toy-Con Piano.
Both kits include everything you need to assemble your Toy-Con creations, including the building materials and relevant Nintendo Switch software.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Nintendo’s Resurgence Was the Best Tech Story of 2017”

Couple the Switch’s success with the highly sought-after SNES Classic, and Nintendo is clearly having its best year in a long time.
In an era filled with cynical IP cash-ins across entertainment, Nintendo used a formulaic, nostalgic franchise to deliver a fresh reinvention of open-world gaming mechanics.
The gushing praise for the game, the best-reviewed title of the year, proved that endlessly cynical gamers will always have a soft spot for a Nintendo classic done right.
“It’s been a while since I’ve had a Nintendo product but I’ve always been a follower in terms of the latest games,” Torres says.
The Switch’s success has surprised not only industry watchers but Nintendo itself.
During its years in the Wii U wilderness, Nintendo talked a lot about diversifying its business across multiple platforms, including smartphone games and a vague “Health-based platform”.
For gamers who don’t care about the latest Mario or Zelda title, Nintendo has offered the SNES Classic as a go-to holiday gift.
The Switch is likely to draw less scrutiny and ire if it’s not looking to reshape the way we play games and instead humbly presenting the very best of what Nintendo has to offer, in the living room and on the go.

The orginal article.