Summary of “Why Nordic countries might not be as happy as you think”

Nordic countries like Finland and Norway may regularly come out on top of world happiness indexes for wellbeing year-on-year – but new research shows the happiness is far from universal.
A report authored by the Nordic Council of Ministers and the Happiness Research Institute in Copenhagen aims to provide a more nuanced picture of life in the Nordic nations – suggesting their reputations as utopias for happiness are masking significant problems for some parts of the population, especially young people.
The world’s happiest – and least happy – countries in 2018Happiest Least happy 1.
Their data found these problems being reported by young people in particular.
The authors say that in Nordic countries high incomes protected people against feeling they were suffering or struggling.
Ethnic minorities living in Nordic countries were less happy.
Very religious people were more likely to be happier.
So while 3.9% of people in the Nordic region may report scores so low they are classed as “Suffering” – that level is as high as 26.9% in Russia and 17% in France.

The orginal article.

Summary of “What Is the Nordic Diet? It’s the Newest, Healthiest Way to Eat”

Nutrition experts are buzzing about the Nordic diet, an eating plan that focuses on fatty fish like salmon, mackerel, and herring, as well as berries and root vegetables.
The Nordic Diet is inspired by the cuisine of countries like Iceland, Norway, and Sweden.
Following the Nordic diet also means cutting out processed foods and most high-fat meats.
The diet’s been adapted from the Baltic Sea Diet Pyramid, adds Lauren Antonucci, R.D.N., C.S.S.D., a registered dietitian, and director of New York-based Nutrition Energy.
In 2004, nutrition pros and chefs coined the term “New Nordic Diet” in an effort to elevate the Nordic style of eating.
It’s similar to the ├╝ber-healthy Mediterranean diet, with one key difference: while the Mediterranean diet is known for its focus on olive oil, the Nordic diet actually promotes rapeseed oil, a.k.a. canola oil.
A major review by the World Health Organization found that both Mediterranean and Nordic diets reduced risk of cancer, diabetes, and cardiovascular disease.
How to eat the Nordic wayYou don’t have to overhaul your diet or deprive yourself of food to go Nordic.

The orginal article.

Summary of “The United States could have Nordic-style welfare programs, too”

Left-leaning Americans should be thrilled that a new subgenre of political commentary has emerged aimed at explaining why the United States simply can’t brook Nordic-style welfare programs.
The reasons adduced to argue that the United States has no hope of establishing programs like the ones enjoyed by Europe’s social democracies are more disturbing than commonly credited.
In a 2014 Slate essay calling for an end to the United States’ Nordic fantasies, Emily Tamkin cited the “Homogeneity of the Nordic countries, on which, one could argue, their stability and equality hinges.” This would prove to be a running theme.
The United States is a liberal democracy, and a unique one at that: While many of Europe’s liberal democracies were formed with a distinctive nationalist bent – that is, as nation-states, or countries composed primarily of single, self-governing ethnic groups – the United States was never any such thing.
Romantic nationalists argued that a country built on a contract – the theoretical premise that one can be an American as long as it’s in his or her best interest, and no longer if it isn’t – simply couldn’t be as successful as states united by language, tradition, an intrinsic sense of shared destiny, and so on.
On the above view, the United States was always doomed to merely marginal achievements where justice, equality and freedom are concerned.
This is where the thinking of romantic nationalists dovetails with today’s Scandi-skeptics: If the United States has a poverty rate about triple that of Denmark, or a child poverty rate about eight times higher, or millions more lacking access to health insurance, each camp would propose, it’s at least partially due to the kind of country we are.
The United States might have to chart a different political and sociocultural path to the universal programs Scandinavians enjoy, but if some zeal for justice and equality is there, I’m not sure why we can’t aspire to cultivate more.

The orginal article.