Summary of “America’s Defining Divide Isn’t Left vs. Right. It’s Old vs. Young.”

Older Americans are more likely to vote than millennials and Gen Xers, particularly.
Older voters have unique characteristics and specific interests that transcend the Democratic-Republican divide.
From their economic circumstances to their demographic makeup, the concerns of older voters are only going to become more prominent as the baby boom generation enters retirement.
Older voters have strikingly different wealth and income profiles than younger voters.
The widening gap between the economic realities of older and younger voters could become an even more prominent feature of American politics.
The largest gap between older and younger voters is on the issue of race.
From the existence of prejudice against whites to the necessity of affirmative action, older voters score higher on measures of racial resentment and are more likely to be persuaded by explicit appeals to whiteness.
“The baby boom generation is the most educated ever to reach old age. They lived through the civil rights movement and put more women into the workforce than any previous generation. If anyone can adjust to changing times, it’s them.”

The orginal article.

Summary of “If You’re Over 50, Chances Are the Decision to Leave a”

Through 2016, our analysis found that between the time older workers enter the study and when they leave paid employment, 56 percent are laid off at least once or leave jobs under such financially damaging circumstances that it’s likely they were pushed out rather than choosing to go voluntarily.
Even years afterward, the household incomes of over half of those who experience such work disruptions remain substantially below those of workers who don’t.
Finally, a further 15 percent of over-50 workers who begin with stable jobs quit or leave them after reporting that their pay, hours, work locations or treatment by supervisors have deteriorated.
He’s spent much of his career in human resources, often helping employers show workers – including many, like him, over 50 – the door.
The share of U.S. workers who’ve suffered financially damaging, employer-driven job separations after age 50 has risen steadily from just over 10 percent in 1998 to almost 30 percent in 2016, the analysis shows.
Among workers over 50 who have lost one job, a third go on to lose two or more jobs.
Layoffs are the most common way workers over 50 get pushed out of their jobs, and more than a third of those who sustain one major involuntary departure go on to experience additional ones, as the last decade of Steckel’s work life illustrates.
We found that even when we excluded all but the most consequential cases – those in which workers subsequently experienced at least six months of unemployment or a 50 percent wage decline – 15 percent of workers over 50 who’d had long-term, stable jobs quit or left their positions after their working conditions deteriorated or they felt pressured to do so.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Can we cheat ageing?”

BBC World Service podcast The Inquiry quizzed some of the world’s leading researchers about the nature of ageing – and about the cutting-edge science that could ‘cure’ it, from the role of microbiomes to 3D-printed organs.
Watching her grow older, all while remaining sound, made Wang wonder about the secrets of ageing.
As cells gets older, they divide to replace cells that are dying or getting worn out, but this is not a perfect process.
“It’s almost like the cell saying ‘I’m an old cell and you guys have been around here about the same sort of amount of time as I have, so you must be old too’,” says Lorna Harries, professor of molecular genetics at England’s University of Exeter.
These senescent cells are almost ‘contaminating’ other cells with age and as we grow older, more and more of our cells become senescent until our body is overwhelmed.
To test the skin cell’s age when the experiment ran its course, they applied a particular dye that would turn cells blue if they were senescent.
The experiment effectively rejuvenated old cells and turned them into young cells, making hers the first experiment ever to have reversed ageing in human cells.
Perhaps one day we will be able to replace our damaged organs, take supplements that give us a youthful microbiome and stop our cells from ageing.

The orginal article.

Summary of “The Wilford Brimley Meme That Helps Measure Tom Cruise’s Agelessness”

Tom Cruise was about to turn thirty-one when “The Firm,” the film adaptation of John Grisham’s best-selling novel, hit theatres.
Later in the movie, Cruise beats Brimley up with a leather briefcase.
Cruise has been very, very famous for the past thirty-five years, and in that time it’s been difficult to reconcile his unchanging appearance with the flipping pages on the calendar.
Thankfully, the release of his latest summer blockbuster has resurfaced one of the surest methods: comparing him to his old scenemate Wilford Brimley.
This meme seems to have had its beginnings in 2011, when Cruise turned forty-nine, the same age that Brimley was when he began filming his role in Ron Howard’s movie “Cocoon,” from 1985, a kind of “E.T.” for the olds about a group of seniors living in a retirement community who are given the chance to live forever by leaving Earth on an alien spaceship.
In the years since Cruise blasted through what I’ll call the Brimley Barrier, people online have continued to make the comparison between the two men, citing the fact that Cruise was a year, or two, or three years older than Brimley when he starred in “Cocoon.” Last month, a new tweet on the subject drew the attention of Brimley himself, who retweeted it and said, “This is still hard for me to believe.” Brimley, who is eighty-three, has settled into a late-life role as a meme machine, known among a younger generation less for his years of acting than for his role as the Quaker Oats pitchman, or for his pronunciation of the word “Diabetes” as the television spokesman for Liberty Medical.
The comparison of Brimley and Cruise in middle age doesn’t just make light of the former’s premature fogeydom and the latter’s eternal youthfulness; it also highlights how the mores, signifiers, and very science of aging have changed-that sixty is the new fifty, which is the new forty, and so on.
Even with the help of Henry Cavill, who, at thirty-five, is a year older than Cruise was in the first “Mission: Impossible” movie, Ethan Hunt cannot subdue a foe in an elaborate bathroom brawl.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Smart Homes Have a Problem With Waste and Obsolescence”

This is the way the smart home ends: not with a bang, but with obsolescence.
Obsolescence is nothing new in the world of consumer goods.
One cause of obsolescence is how new gadgets are made available to an increasingly bored consuming public.
Cooling fans would break down, keys would pop off, screens would crack, but like a used car, the machine lasted as long as someone had the money and wherewithal to patch its problems until, ultimately, the price to fix outweighed the cost of a new one.
That’s a way of saying “It wasn’t worth it for us anymore.” This concept is as old as capitalism – fix the old product until you make a new one.
Well, so what? These “Smart” appliances are all cheap enough that we can wear them into obsolescence and replace the old ones with new ones.
Why? Low recycling rates, with new innovations rapidly supplanting the old.
Picture: A bridge again over the Bering Strait, but now made of old fridges and TV that couldn’t connect to the new internet.

The orginal article.

Summary of “The age you feel means more than your actual birthdate”

Imagine, for a moment, that you had no birth certificate and your age was simply based on the way you feel inside.
Most people felt about eight years younger than their actual chronological age.
Feeling between 8 and 13 years older than your actual age resulted in an 18-25% greater risk of death over the study periods, and greater disease burden – even when you control for other demographic factors such as education, race or marital status.
It may be a direct result of those accompanying personality changes, with a lower subjective age meaning that you enjoy a greater range of activities as you age.
The result could be a vicious cycle, with psychological and physiological factors both contributing to a higher subjective age and worse health, which makes us feel even older and more vulnerable.
This switches at around 25, when the felt age drops behind the chronological age.
Some psychologists have speculated that a lower subjective age is a form of self-defence, protecting us from the negative age stereotypes – as seen in a nuanced study by Anna Kornadt at Bielefeld University in Germany.
Given its predictive power – beyond our actual chronological age – Stephan believes that doctors should be asking all their patients about their subjective age to identify the people who are most at risk of future health problems to plan their existing health care more effectively.

The orginal article.

Summary of “A record number of folks age 85 and older are working. Here’s what they’re doing.”

Seventy may be the new 60, and 80 may be the new 70, but 85 is still pretty old to work in America.
Overall, 255,000 Americans 85 years old or older were working over the past 12 months.
Labor Department figures show that at every year of age above 55, U.S. residents are working or looking for work at the highest rates on record.
Workers age 30 and younger are staying on the sidelines at rates not seen since the 1960s and ’70s, when women weren’t yet entering the workforce at the level they are today.
People who are still working at age 85 or above are, as you might guess, unusual.
Workers age 85 and older are more common in less physical industries, such as management and sales, than they are in demanding ones such as manufacturing and construction.
Nobody questions whether older workers can make a difference.
Few people of any age get the opportunity to work as crossing guards, funeral directors or musicians.

The orginal article.

Summary of “How to Grow Old: Bertrand Russell on What Makes a Fulfilling Life – Brain Pickings”

“If you can fall in love again and again,” Henry Miller wrote as he contemplated the measure of a life well lived on the precipice of turning eighty, “If you can forgive as well as forget, if you can keep from growing sour, surly, bitter and cynical you’ve got it half licked.”
Seven years earlier, the great British philosopher, mathematician, historian, and Nobel laureate Bertrand Russell considered the same abiding question at the same life-stage in a wonderful short essay titled “How to Grow Old,” penned in his eighty-first year and later published in Portraits from Memory and Other Essays.
Russell places at the heart of a fulfilling life the dissolution of the personal ego into something larger.
Make your interests gradually wider and more impersonal, until bit by bit the walls of the ego recede, and your life becomes increasingly merged in the universal life.
Gradually the river grows wider, the banks recede, the waters flow more quietly, and in the end, without any visible break, they become merged in the sea, and painlessly lose their individual being.
The man who, in old age, can see his life in this way, will not suffer from the fear of death, since the things he cares for will continue.
Portraits from Memory and Other Essays is an uncommonly potent packet of wisdom in its totality.
Complement this particular fragment with Nobel laureate André Gide on how happiness increases with age, Ursula K. Le Guin on aging and what beauty really means, and Grace Paley on the art of growing older – the loveliest thing I’ve ever read o the subject – then revisit Russell on critical thinking, power-knowledge vs. love-knowledge, what “The good life” really means, why “Fruitful monotony” is essential for happiness, and his remarkable response to a fascist’s provocation.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Extra time: how smart exercise keeps you younger for longer”

“Old age should burn and rave at close of day;/ Rage, rage against the dying of the light.” Thomas raged over a pint pot, but the rage in this case is high-intensity training, bursts of challenging – yes, painful – exercise interspersed with periods of lesser exertion and rest.
This is the simple thesis of Play On: How to Get Better with Age by the American journalist and sports fan Jeff Bercovici.
As the writer Bill Gifford puts it: ‘Ageing makes us fat, and then our fat makes us age’.
“Ageing science supports that we should do high intensity every week, getting your heart rate up to at least 80% of its maximum,” says Bercovici.
As the writer Bill Gifford puts it in Spring Chicken, a 2015 tour of anti-ageing science, “Ageing makes us fat, and then our fat makes us age.” It gets worse.
Elite sports performers continue to succeed well past the peak age for their sport, not because they train more but because they train more efficiently.
“By walking just 10 continuous minutes at a brisk pace every day, an individual can reduce their risk of early death by 15%,” says Professor Muir Gray, adviser to PHE. “They can also prevent or delay the onset of disability and further reduce their risk of serious health conditions, such as diabetes, heart disease, dementia and some cancers.” Emma Stevenson, professor of sport and exercise at Newcastle University’s Institute for Ageing, says it is all about functionality – living well, not just longer.
“That way, we age more quickly. We may be living longer but without good nutrition and exercise we lose functionality – like simply being able to get out of a chair – and that is not good quality of life.”

The orginal article.

Summary of “China’s Tech Industry Wants Youth, Not Experience”

Almost immediately, readers seized on his age: At 42, he would have already been considered too old to be an engineer in China, where three-quarters of tech workers are younger than 30, according to China’s largest jobs website, Zhaopin.com.
The idealization of youth is in the DNA of the American tech industry.
In China the discrimination begins even younger than in the U.S. The irony is that most of the country’s famous tech companies were started by men older than 30.
China has used tech advancements to propel its economy forward for decades, but President Xi Jinping’s Made in China 2025 plan kicked activity into a higher gear.
In a country of 1.4 billion people, many Chinese tech companies are able to move faster than their overseas rivals by throwing people at a problem, and younger workers cost less than their more experienced colleagues.
A recent job posting for a front-end developer at a Beijing tech startup explained that the company is willing to relax its requirements for educational attainment but not for age; a college degree isn’t strictly necessary, but if you’re older than 30, don’t bother applying.
“Working in tech is like being a professional athlete,” says Robin Chan, an entrepreneur and angel investor in companies such as Xiaomi and Twitter Inc. “You work extremely hard from 20 to 40 years old and hope you hit it big. After that, it’s time to move on to something else and let someone younger try their hand.”
He, the tech recruiter, remains hopeful that age discrimination will eventually disappear in China.

The orginal article.