Summary of “Why core values are important to an organization”

3 minute Read. In his TEDx talk, Simon Sinek expounded on a simple, yet profound theory on why some products, people, and organizations fail while others succeed.
You can attract loyal employees who share the organization’s beliefs.
Organizations that know their purpose, proclaim it, and put it out there attract people to their organization who share their beliefs.
This has always been true to some degree, but in the past, people were more willing to put up with working for organizations whose values conflicted with their own.
In a world of rapid workplace turnover, employees who identify with the values of an organization are less likely to leave.
They are very aware that this will attract a particular type of customer who will only purchase from an organization that shares their values.
You can evaluate everything that goes out internally and externally against how well it stacks up to the organization’s purpose.
As a result, you’ll be more likely to deliver a consistent message about who you are as an organization, and what you believe in.

The orginal article.

Summary of “To Take Charge of Your Career, Build Your Tribe”

Show me a person who sees uncertainty as opportunity, and I’ll show you a person who has mastered the new world of work.
Years later, she would decline the offer of a salaried residency at a prestigious college for fear that the comforts and demands of an institutional affiliation might take the edge off her work.
Sue Ashford, Amy Wrzesniewski, and I have collected many such stories in the past few years, for a study of knowledge and creative workers who made independence work for them.
In a fluid world of work, sociologist Anthony Giddens once wrote, “The capacity to keep a particular narrative going” is what gives us an identity.
The most important question is not if our favorite stories about ourselves are illusions, but what use those stories are, which means what work they do for us, and what it takes to keep them real.
A self in charge of one’s work productivity or career trajectory.
In contrast to their expansive networks, the people we studied often described having a tight community, often a handful of people, who took the edge off their working lives.
Hard as you might look, my work suggests, you cannot find such communities.

The orginal article.

Summary of “One Reason Mergers Fail: The Two Cultures Aren’t Compatible”

Tight company cultures value consistency and routine.
Tight cultures have an efficient orderliness and reassuring predictability, but are less adaptable.
Loose cultures tend to be open and creative, but are more disorganized.
People in loose cultures prefer visionary, collaborative leaders: those who advocate for change and empower their workers, like Whole Foods’ Mackey.
People in tight cultures desire leaders who embody independence, extreme confidence, and top-down decision making.
To understand more about how mergers between tight and loose cultures work, we collected data on over 4,500 international mergers from 32 different countries between 1989 and 2013.
They should determine the pros and cons of their current levels of tight-loose, as well as the opportunities and threats posed by merging cultures.
How will the Amazon-Whole Foods partnership pan out? It’s too soon to say, but spending more time on integrating their cultures could help.

The orginal article.

Summary of “How Winning Organizations Last 100 Years”

The average lifespan of a U.S. S&P 500 company has fallen by 80% in the last 80 years, and 76% of UK FTSE 100 companies have disappeared in the last 30 years.
They are incredibly strategic, looking 20 to 30 years ahead, to understand how society is evolving, how they can shape it, and how they can get the talent to do this.
Most organizations proudly tell you how much they grew last year – but not the Centennials we studied.
The idea for the study came from some work we were doing with UK Sport, the funding body for the British Olympic teams, to understand how they’d improved their performance over the last 20 years.
As one leader told us, “Profit isn’t our only focus. So, I’m not sure how relevant this is to us.” And another said, “We’d all like to be ‘better not cheaper’. But how do you do this?”.
Encourage these leaders to look 20 to 30 years ahead. For example, 80% of the 100 most successful CEOs in the world have been in office for 10+ years and 3M believes it takes 10-15 years to change a company’s DNA. Test 4.
How can you manage handovers? Can you bring in a successor 4+ years beforehand, and spend 1+ years handing over? GE and Rolls-Royce Engines usually do this for their CEOs, 80% of the 100 most successful CEOs in the world were internally appointed, and HSBC has only appointed 1 external CEO in the last 150 years.
How can you get people to live like a family? Work out how to get employees to hang out together, for 1+ hours every day, sharing problems, ideas and experiences.

The orginal article.

Summary of “The Myth of the Intrapreneur”

After more than 20 years of researching innovation in large companies, it’s clear to me that the successful intrapreneur is often more myth than reality.
Innovation has to be a company-wide endeavor, supported from top to bottom by systems, structures, and a company culture that nurtures transformative ideas and products.
Companies need to institutionalize innovation rather than expect it to simply flow forth from intrapreneurs operating within existing structures.
If companies want to be able to consistently innovate, they need dedicated innovation professionals to carry out the functions of discovery, development, incubation, acceleration, and scaling.
Our research shows that, in order to develop, incubate, and scale game-changing innovation, organizations need a company-wide innovation management system that includes eight primary elements.
An inclusive organizational structure with interfaces between different parts of the company incorporates the processes and tools and metrics and rewards required for an innovation cycles that takes longer than incremental product innovation.
Companies need to create innovation careers rather than just innovation jobs.
Companies need a strategic plan for professionalizing and institutionalizing innovation across their organizations.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Your Flex Work Culture Doesn’t Help Employees If It Hurts Their Careers”

The prevailing assumption is that working mothers are the ones who want and need flexibility at work.
To be sure, many working mothers still shoulder the daunting double shift of full-time work and primary child care responsibilities, and many likely want jobs that give them more flexibility to juggle these important responsibilities.
In two studies, recently published in Sociological Perspectives and Community, Work, & Family, we examined how workplace flexibility bias – employees’ belief that people at their workplace are unlikely to get ahead if they take leave or work flexibly – affects people’s engagement at work, their intentions to stay or leave their jobs, their ability to balance their work and personal lives, and even their health.
Our data comes from a nationally representative sample of about 2,700 U.S. employees collected by the Families & Work Institute.
In the survey, employees were asked about the extent to which others at their workplace were likely to get ahead at work if they took time off or rearranged their schedules for family or personal reasons.
We also find that perceiving bias against people who work flexibly not only impacts work attitudes but also follows employees home.
Why is workplace flexibility bias so harmful to all types of employees? We think employees generally do not like working for organizations that penalize people for having lives outside of work.
If employees at your organization are scared to take leave or work flexibly, there are things you can do.

The orginal article.

Summary of “5 Behaviors of Leaders Who Embrace Change”

Part of the issue is how organizations view the human aspect of the closing date, which is usually treated as the end of the transaction, when it’s really just the start of change.
Leaders in the M&A environment are managing an organization that hasn’t existed before.
In this environment, change agility needs to be part of the new organization’s and leaders’ DNA. It can’t just exist in a few people in the organization; it needs to be the way business gets done.
Successful change-agile leaders at all levels in the organization respond to changes in the business environment by seizing opportunities, including throwing out old models and developing new ways of doing business.
Change-agile leaders demonstrate five integrated behaviors that, together, create a competitive advantage for the organization.
Promote calculated risk-taking and experimentation: Robert Kennedy, paraphrasing George Bernard Shaw, said, “There are those who look at things the way they are, and ask why. I dream of things that never were, and ask why not?” Too often, our traditional organizations’ first response to a risk is to ask, “Why?” Change agility requires leaders to ask “Why not?” and to establish opportunities for pilots, prototypes, and experimentation.
Change-agile leaders and organizations are replacing functional silos with formal and informal organizations that allow for the rapid flow of information and decision-making around a product, customer, or region.
Seeing the opportunity to improve the employee experience and create cost efficiencies across the learning organizations, she brought together her fellow learning leaders.

The orginal article.

Summary of “3 Ways Senior Leaders Create a Toxic Culture”

Whether presiding over the entire company, a function, a region, or a business unit, the people at the top of an organization have a disproportionate level of influence over those they lead. Those further down in the organization look to their leaders for cues on what’s acceptable, and the team’s habits – both good and bad – will be emulated.
At their best, leadership teams synchronize their organizations into cohesive powerhouses.
The implications for an organization whose leadership team is poorly focused are serious: Wasted resources, wasted effort, and widespread confusion become the norm.
Leaders that made the cut had to distinguish themselves among their peers to get the “Big jobs.” But a team of excessively individualistic leaders vying for resources, status, influence, and, most often, their boss’s job, can fracture the organization beneath them.
The difference in performance is profound: Among the high-performing teams, employee engagement averaged 87%, while among lower-performing teams it dropped to 45%. Speaking negatively behind one another’s backs, withholding honest perspectives, or pocket vetoing decisions after they are made should be unacceptable.
Leadership teams should have written norms that they won’t engage in these behaviors, and they should share those norms with the rest of the organization, asking others to hold them accountable.
I’ve seen the best leadership teams handcraft these behavioral norms themselves, publish them to the rest of the organization, and regularly assess performance against them.
If a video camera captured your leadership team in action for a full day, how would you feel about that video being used as training for the rest of the organization? Serving on a leadership team should be viewed as a privilege.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Your Strategic Plans Probably Aren’t Strategic, or Even Plans”

At the start of my public seminars on strategic planning I ask attendees, who rank from board members and CEOs to middle management, to write down an example of a strategy on a sheet of paper.
What exactly is positioning? It’s placement on the strategic factors relevant to each key stakeholder group.
The task of a strategic planning team is to produce positions on these factors that deliver value to the organization’s key stakeholders and meet the objectives of the organization.
A strategy serves an objective by providing a position on the relevant strategic factors – in this case for customers.
Let’s say the strategic planning team identifies “Price” as one strategic factor.
A strategic factor relevant to the same type of objective for customers is “Safety.” By reviewing its materials, we can construe the company’s position on this as: Safety is paramount, and our cars are among the most advanced, reliable, and safest on the road. Now to ensure implementation, a strategic planning team must identify some project- or program-level actions.
The strategic planning team must then decide on the organization’s position on these factors.
My experience in working with clients over many years is that executive teams fail to approach strategic planning from a system-design perspective.

The orginal article.

Summary of “To Take Charge of Your Career, Start by Building Your Tribe”

Show me a person who sees uncertainty as opportunity, and I’ll show you a person who has mastered the new world of work.
Years later, she would decline the offer of a salaried residency at a prestigious college for fear that the comforts and demands of an institutional affiliation might take the edge off her work.
Sue Ashford, Amy Wrzesniewski, and I have collected many such stories in the past few years, for a study of knowledge and creative workers who made independence work for them.
In a fluid world of work, sociologist Anthony Giddens once wrote, “The capacity to keep a particular narrative going” is what gives us an identity.
The most important question is not if our favorite stories about ourselves are illusions, but what use those stories are, which means what work they do for us, and what it takes to keep them real.
A self in charge of one’s work productivity or career trajectory.
In contrast to their expansive networks, the people we studied often described having a tight community, often a handful of people, who took the edge off their working lives.
Hard as you might look, my work suggests, you cannot find such communities.

The orginal article.