Summary of “How ’30 Rock’ Made Tracy Morgan’s Fake Award Into a Real-Life Goal”

Part 1: Tracy Learns What an EGOT Is Kay Cannon: In the 30 Rock writers’ room, we had a group of people who really had their finger on the pulse of what was going on in pop culture and just things that have happened in the past.
Part 2: Tracy Gets His EGOT Necklace Cannon: Tracy already wore a lot of necklaces and chains and stuff like that in general, so it just seemed natural for him to put on the EGOT necklace.
Part 3: Tracy Meets Whoopi After purchasing the necklace, Tracy seeks advice from Whoopi Goldberg, a real-life EGOTer, about how to EGOT. On his way out, he attempts to steal her Oscar.
Part 5: Tracy Gets a Tony Tracy stages an improvised one-man Broadway show and receives rave reviews.
Ceraulo: The one-man show came from looking at it as, “OK, it’s Tracy Jordan, and he’s gonna try to win a Tony award. Again, he’s not gonna do it correctly. He’s gonna do it in a Tracy Jordan way, so what would he do?”.
Morgan: The phone book thing came from Chris Rock saying one time that Tracy Morgan could make the phone book sound funny.
Scardino: As unlikely as it is for Tracy to become an EGOT, then there was the additional problem of “Well, now you actually have a standard you are going to be held to and live up to.” And that was fun to shoot, because any time Tracy gets to act like a big baby and complain was funny.
I’ve got two Emmy awards, but ultimately, the truth is 30 Rock was a great, great, creative expression by so many people and made so many people laugh, and who cares if we won awards or not? That’s not really the point, so I think that’s what we’re finally saying with the Tracy story is like, it’s kind of baloney.

The orginal article.

Summary of “The Oscars’ ‘Green Book’ and ‘Bohemian Rhapsody’ Controversy”

A musical love letter to classic Hollywood, a dark comedy about a woman’s rage, a civil-rights road movie, and a VH1-style rock biopic are not four films that you would immediately lump together – unless you follow the Oscars, in which case you know that La La Land, Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri, Green Book, and Bohemian Rhapsody all hold the dubious distinction of becoming their respective seasons’ official villains to a certain segment of the awards-watching public.
Obviously, we won’t know if Green Book and Bohemian Rhapsody will follow in those same footsteps for a few more weeks.
With First Man floundering, Green Book became Universal’s lead horse in the Oscars race, and Variety and The Hollywood Reporter in particular have given plenty of column inches over to its defense.
Team Green Book has been working hard to combat allegations that it’s a film for white people: Producer Octavia Spencer introduced the film at the Globes, and icons like Kareem Abdul-Jabbar, Quincy Jones, and Harry Belafonte have publicly co-signed Vallelonga’s efforts.
At the Golden Globes, the movie’s team, all of whom were perfectly fine making a movie with Bryan Singer as recently as a year-and-a-half ago, embraced the polite fiction that the movie was directed by no one.
All they want to do is enjoy a movie about an interracial friendship, or the band they loved as a teenager, and now people are saying that, as good-hearted progressives, they aren’t supposed to like them? It’s not as if Green Book and Bohemian Rhapsody are the works of Richard Wagner; these are big mainstream movies about how being gay is okay, and how lifelong friendships can result if we throw away our biases.
As with the president, all this controversy may have the unintended effect of pulling the movies’ fans in closer.
What the two disparate reactions to Green Book and Bohemian Rhapsody are really about is a dispute over the utility of pop-culture comfort food.

The orginal article.

Summary of “What the Oscars’ New “Popular Film” Category Says About the Art-and Business-of the Movies”

The gap between the art and the business of movies is larger than ever, and the planned changes to the Oscars announced today by the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences look like a desperate response to that chasm.
The Academy plans to move the airdate of the ceremony up to early February, to shrink the telecast to three hours in order to offer “a more accessible Oscars for our viewers worldwide,” and to create a new category “For outstanding achievement in popular film.”
Their over-all effect suggests a reaction to a much greater problem facing Hollywood: its increasing irrelevance to the art of the movies.
What’s more, in worldwide receipts-where Hollywood’s big-budget films now make a majority of their money-most of these films fell still lower in the charts, because culturally specific, locally anchored movies don’t travel as readily as ones made from preëxisting fantasy sources.
When a new generation of filmmakers, richly educated in the most extreme trends of the art of the cinema thanks to the availability of VHS tapes and DVDs, brought forth movies of a new, original sensibility, they found themselves increasingly confined by the commercial demands of studio budgets and studio producers.
It’s no accident that the very notion of the Oscar campaign, of the high-powered behind-the-scenes exertion for awards, is the brainchild of Harvey Weinstein, an independent producer with Miramax who leveraged awards to vault his films and his company to a level of importance in Hollywood commensurate with that of the studios.
Because of this very commercial significance of awards for commercially minor films, the Academy’s decision to create a new award for “Popular films” is more than absurd and desperate: it’s rankly offensive.
The new category appears to be a play by the studios to siphon off some of the commercial benefits of the awards-to redistribute Oscar-related money upward from independent producers to the studios, from productions costing and yielding tens of millions to ones costing and yielding hundreds of millions.

The orginal article.

Summary of “The Winners and Losers of the 2018 Academy Awards”

Let’s take stock of the biggest winners and losers from Sunday night’s ceremony-from The Shape of Water to Jimmy Kimmel to hot dog cannons.
Winner: Jimmy Kimmel’s Monologue After overseeing the biggest debacle in Oscars history last year, Kimmel came to play in 2018.
Kimmel’s best contribution-slash innovation-came when he promised a Jet Ski to the Oscar winner with the night’s shortest acceptance speech.
Winner: Rita Moreno What would you call an 86-year-old EGOT winner wearing the same dress she wore when she accepted an Oscar in 1962, 56 years later? A flex to end all flexes.
Winner(s): Maya Rudolph and Tiffany Haddish If these two aren’t the hosts of next year’s Oscars, we all lose.
Winner: Roger Deakins The 14th time is the charm! But seriously, this is such a cathartic win for Deakins, who’s been robbed at least a few times of a Best Cinematography Oscar.
Loser: Surprises One of the downsides of having so many awards shows that precede the Oscars is that certain categories feel like they’ve been decided months in advance.
Winner: The Shape of Water Yes, turns out a movie about fish sex can win Best Picture! The Shape of Water’s Oscars-leading 13 nominations were a pretty good indicator that Guillermo del Toro’s film would fare well on Sunday, and though it ended up nabbing only four of those awards, two of them ended up being in the biggest categories-Best Director for del Toro, and Best Picture.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Snubs, Surprises, and a Staring Contest: The Academy Awards Nominations”

Phantom Thread’s six nominations, including shockers for Best Picture and Best Director, was the loudest possible indicator of a shift in how the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences votes.
Just four of 32 experts at the predictive awards site Gold Derby tapped Phantom Thread for a Best Picture nomination and not a single one predicted Anderson.
It’s an unlikely Academy movie and proof that there is still a great unknowable in the Oscars, a chance for the truly strange.
The oldest, born just one week prior, is Faces Places director Agnès Varda, whose film was named among the five Best Documentary entries.
Hell, Kobe Bryant became the first NBA player to be nominated, for his short film, Dear Basketball.
The nine films nominated for Best Picture combined to earn more than $566 million in the United States-less than Star Wars: The Last Jedi’s domestic box office.
During her four-year reign as Academy president, Cheryl Boone Isaacs added more than 1,500 new members to the organization, widening the scope, including more women, minorities, and international members than ever before.
For director Barry Jenkins and the dozens of people who made that film, that Oscars must have felt like a dream.

The orginal article.