Summary of “To Seem More Competent, Be More Confident”

One important reason this happens is that people are simply not great at assessing competence – a crucial trait for succeeding at work – and perceptions of competence are just as important for success as actual competence.
Because of this, people tend to evaluate competence based on other factors, meaning you have to do more than produce results to convince them of your expertise.
Lo and behold, the person’s prediction had a strong influence on how subjects perceived their competence: Observers evaluated those who made optimistic predictions as much more competent than their modest contemporaries – no matter how accurate those predictions were and how well they actually performed.
A negative forecast may lead you to be perceived as distinctly less competent – no matter how well you actually perform.
Why do people view confident others as more competent, even when their performance suggests otherwise? One explanation is that we have a tendency to believe what we are told, and to confirm our beliefs by selecting information that supports them.
To feel more authentic demonstrating confidence, you may first have to convince yourself.
Do you think they have a good sense of your competence and expertise? If not, could you be demonstrating more confidence in your tasks? This doesn’t necessarily mean praising yourself at every opportunity; rather it means projecting an optimistic attitude.
By displaying more confidence in your abilities, you set yourself up to be recognized for your competence and your contributions.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Why Talented People Don’t Use Their Strengths”

It might never have been built, or at least Cave wouldn’t have built it, had it not been for his boss, Michelle McKenna-Doyle, CIO of the NFL. When McKenna-Doyle was hired, she observed that a number of her people were struggling, but not because they weren’t talented – because they weren’t in roles suited to their strengths.
Experts have long encouraged people to “Play to their strengths.” And why wouldn’t we want to flex our strongest muscle? But based on my observations, this is easier said than done.
Notice these moments: They can point to strengths that you underrate in yourself but are valuable to others.
When people bring up new ideas, you can ask them, Will this leverage what you do well? Are you doing work that draws on your strengths? Are we taking on projects that make the most of your strengths?
Brett Gerstenblatt, VP and creative director at CVS, has his team take a personality assessment, then post their top five strengths on their desk.
Brett wants people to wear their strengths like a badge.
As with McKenna-Doyle, building a team that can play to their strengths begins with analysis.
Then you can measure new ideas, new products, and new projects against these collective superpowers, asking: Are we playing to our strengths? When people feel strong, they are willing to venture into new territory, to play where others are not, and to consider ideas for which there isn’t yet a market.

The orginal article.

Summary of “How to stop being a people pleaser”

3 minute Read. Do you regularly ignore your own work in response to others’ need for your assistance? Do you say “Yes” to meetings that do more to fulfill someone else’s agenda instead of your own? While being a people pleaser may endear you to others in the short term, this behavior can be harmful to your career in the long run.
People pleasers often struggle to say the word “No.” The fear of not being liked, of losing friends or of disappointing others paralyzes them, making the word “No” seem like a swear word.
To practice saying “No,” Martinez suggests starting with small no’s, ones that don’t have any significant ramifications.
Then start to say medium no’s, such as saying no to a friend who invites you out to coffee when you’re feeling overwhelmed with work or other responsibilities.
Make a list of situations that you struggle saying “No” to and work your way through the list, checking off each situation when you do say “No.”
Often saying “No” comes with feeling the need to offer a long explanation for disappointing the asker.
Jonathan Alpert, Manhattan psychotherapist, performance coach, and author of Be Fearless: Change Your Life in 28 Days, suggests providing only a short explanation or none at all, adding that a polite “No” can help people pleasers to be assertive with their decision.
Will you saying “No” to your sister mean that she’ll disown you and never come over for dinner again? Will saying “No” to a coworker who wants to pick your brain about something really mean that you won’t be able to have lunch together again? “When you understand the dynamic and your role, you won’t feel as worried about the consequences of saying no. You’ll realize that your relationships can withstand your saying no,” says Alpert.

The orginal article.

Summary of “The Dalai Lama on Why Leaders Should Be Mindful, Selfless, and Compassionate”

Over the past nearly 60 years, I have engaged with many leaders of governments, companies, and other organizations, and I have observed how our societies have developed and changed.
Leaders, whatever field they work in, have a strong impact on people’s lives and on how the world develops.
What might a better world look like? I believe the answer is straightforward: A better world is one where people are happier.
Why? Because all human beings want to be happy, and no one wants to suffer.
What’s more, as human beings, we are physically, mentally, and emotionally the same.
Human beings, on the other hand, have constitutions, complex legal systems, and police forces; we have remarkable intelligence and a great capacity for love and affection.
As human beings, we have a remarkable intelligence that allows us to analyze and plan for the future.
Through the application of reason, compassion can be extended to all 7 billion human beings.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Why Highly Efficient Leaders Fail”

The high levels of efficiency that allow highly task-focused leaders to be so productive often come at the expense of a more people-based focus.
Highly efficient leaders often lose their focus on people due to a limiting belief that more people-focused activities will slow them down and impede their ability to execute, and to ultimately be successful.
The irony is that an intense focus on efficiency and getting things done makes these leaders less effective overall.
Great leaders are able to balance task-focus with people-focus.
Highly task-focused leaders tend to have tunnel vision in their drive for results, rather than applying a broader lens that recognizes the need to sometimes “Go slow to go fast”.
Leaders who balance task- and people-focus are equally driven and also strive for results, but they keep the broader organizational needs in mind.
In research conducted by Robert Anderson and William Adams for their book Scaling Leadership, they identified that the number one differentiator of effective leaders is strong people skills, and that six out of ten of their biggest strengths related to people skills such as listening, developing others, and empowering their team members.
Overly task-focused leaders also tend to be more reactive, operating from a position of fear, and often displaying highly directive, controlling, or perfectionist behaviors that can alienate others and be disempowering to their teams.

The orginal article.

Summary of “‘Affective Presence’: How You Make Other People Feel”

Unsurprisingly, people who consistently make others feel good are more central to their social networks-in Elfenbein’s study, more of their classmates considered them to be friends.
Hector Madrid, an organizational-behavior professor at the Pontifical Catholic University of Chile, has taken a particular interest in how the affective presence of leaders in the workplace can influence their teams’ performance.
He and his collaborators have found that leaders who make other people feel good by their very presence have teams that are better at sharing information, which leads to more innovation.
Subordinates are more likely to voice their ideas, too, to a leader with positive affective presence.
Madrid suggests that further research might also find that some people have a strong affective presence, while others’ affective presence is weaker.
Both Madrid and Elfenbein suggest that a big part of affective presence may be how people regulate emotions-those of others and their own.
Psychopaths are notoriously charming, and may well use their positive affective presence for manipulative ends.
Neither is negative affective presence necessarily always a bad thing in a leader-think of a football coach yelling at the team at halftime, motivating them to make a comeback.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Stop Giving Toxic People Your Time”

His fundamental proposition is that people are malevolent and that life is suffering.
People have always lied, killed, and deceived their way through life.
Just spend enough time with bad people – eventually, you will become one of them.
A few years ago, when I started to live a conscious life, I had to say goodbye to people who only wanted to live a life of pleasure.
“You’re the average of the five people you spend your time with.” It has become such a cliché.
Would you give $1000 to the people in your life if they asked for it? If the answer is no, stop giving the people who don’t share the same values as you, your time.
I’ve narrowed down the list of people I spend 90% of my time with to my direct family and my two best friends.
So if you have a job you love, and a few people in your life who you love, you don’t even have more time to spend.

The orginal article.

Summary of “10 Lessons I Learned From Making Many Mistakes In My 20s”

One of the biggest mistakes we make is that we assume we always learn from our mistakes.
I’ve met enough people who learned little from their own stupidity.
You know why? It’s damned hard to learn from your mistakes.
Learning from your mistakes does not happen automatically-it requires thinking and reflection.
So here’s my reflection on the lessons I learned from the mistakes I made in my twenties.
It’s time to move your ego to the side and understand that life is not about impressing others.
People who don’t want anything from life and who spend their time watching tv.
What if you keep making mistakes? Who gives a shit!? Just make sure you always learn from it.

The orginal article.

Summary of “16 Mental Shifts for Living a Happier, Wealthier, More Successful Life”

Part of the reason these things are difficult for us to achieve is that we never really define what our purpose is in life.
Here are 16 life changing ways you can attain success, wealth and happiness and live your best life.1.
Ask yourself, are you building your life in a way that will make you happy? And if you aren’t, why not? What is holding you back? It’s time to take responsibility for your life.
Choose a handful of things that you value most and you want to be the focal point of your life.
What do you really care about? What commitments are most important to you? You need to develop a clear vision for what your big life goals are, what you’re hoping to achieve, and then focus on the things that will get you there.
We must train ourselves to embrace delayed gratification in order to achieve the things that we really want in life.
You’re never going to become successful, rich and happy living a boring, dull, uninspired life.
Happiness and satisfaction comes from living a life that have meaning to you, each step of the way.

The orginal article.

Summary of “How to overcome common decision-making obstacles”

Leaders face some common obstacles that get in the way of their decision-making skills, says Richard Horwath, CEO of Strategic Thinking Institute, and author of StrategyMan vs. the Anti-Strategy Squad. Understanding and overcoming them is essential to breaking destructive decision-making patterns and getting to better outcomes.
“The biggest issue that I see when it comes to decision making for managers is this idea of anchors,” Horwath says.
To overcome the distraction of anchors, Horwath recommends writing down the decision you need to make.
Overconfidence, or excessive optimism or belief in your own judgment, is another trap, says Alain Samson, PhD, founder of BehavioralEconomics.com and chief science officer at Syntoniq, a company specialized in assessing biases in financial decision making.
Think through the downside potential and the impact your decision may have on others to give yourself a reality check.
Confirmation bias, in which we look for and interpret information in ways that support what we believe, can be influenced by a decision to be “Right” or wishful thinking, he says.
If you tend to be an impulsive decision maker, impose a “Cooling-off” period before you finalize big decisions.
Reflect on your own personal patterns and motivations in decision making.

The orginal article.