Summary of “The Quietest Place in America Is Becoming a Warzone”

After years of painstaking acoustic measurements, Hempton identified this spot on Washington’s Olympic Peninsula as the quietest place in the U.S.-the spot most free of our man-made noise pollution.
The EPA still has a statutory obligation to handle noise pollution, but the Noise Control Act has been all but defunded by Congress.
In a 2000 paper reviewing noise pollution impacts on health, two Danish scientists noted that most of the effects of sound on our health “Were already known or at least hypothesized” in the 1960s.
In between waxing about how sound affects human’s “Deep ecology,” the best return period of ocean waves to reach a state of calm, and the impact of white noise on cortisol, he revealed more about why One Square Inch is so special.
One Square Inch stood out for the length of time without human noise and its accessibility to the Hoh River trail.
“The jet noise was intense enough that my microphones seemed to ‘blow out’ a bit,” she told Earther.
While Youngberg is out there with his phone and decibel meter, the Navy has relied on modeling the potential noise pollution rather than measuring it directly.
Doing the research in a place with so few forms of artificial noise makes it that much easier to tease out the effect of air traffic on wildlife.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Why quitting your job without a backup plan can help your career”

“Sometimes you need time to detox and heal from abusive situations so that you don’t jump into something just as bad to get away from your current job,” says Rhonda Ansted, career coach and Founder of Be the Change Career Consulting.
Leaving your job without any savings in the bank is likely to lead to you feeling forced to take any job out of financial necessity.
If you can’t job search while working your current job.
Looking for a new job while employed means you can never truly give your all to your search, and you may not have the time to explore all of the opportunities available, never mind booking time off to go to interviews.
“It didn’t feel fair to the company I was working for, and it would have limited the time I was able to spend charting my next move,” says First, who quit her job without having another one lined up, freeing up her time to do a thorough job search.
Quitting your job without a backup plan has the same effect on your nervous system as walking into the desert without any water.
Assess the toll your unhappiness in your current job is having on your health.
Quitting your job with no plan in place allows you to be open to new opportunities that you may never have considered if you simply took the next opportunity that fell in your lap.

The orginal article.

Summary of “How to introduce yourself so you’ll be unforgettable |”

If you can move beyond the boring basics when you’re asked “What do you do?”, you’ll set yourself up for new relationships, opportunities and revelations, says introduction expert Joanna Bloor.
As Bloor puts it, “When you get your introduction right, the opportunity is not only to genuinely connect with people, but you’ll also be allowed to do the work you really want to do.”
Bloor asks her clients, “What is it you would like to be known for?” It’s an uncomfortable question, but she finds it jolts people out of their comfort zones.
My typical response to “What do you do?” is “I’m a journalist and playwright.” But after she asked me what I loved about these professions and what I hoped to accomplish through them, she helped me craft a much deeper and more compelling response: “The world can be an overwhelming place, so I help people connect to each other by telling stories as a journalist as a playwright.”
If you’re having a difficult time identifying your talents, she suggests you turn to the people who know you well and ask them “What is it you see that I do well and that I’m unaware is really special?” You’ll generally find common themes or language in their responses, says Bloor, even if they’re people from different parts of your life.
What were you great at during that age? According to Bloor, that special skill can often apply to your present and future selves and help you see how you’re different from everyone else.
“After you’ve crafted your opener, practice it on five people you know well. Then, a few days later, ask them ‘What do you remember most about my intro?” Their few-days-later response will tell you what is most memorable about your opener, what you could alter, and what you might try to lean into when meeting new people.
Bloor suggests prefacing it with, “I’ve just learned a new way of introducing myself and I’m experimenting with it. Can I try it out on you?” People love to be asked for their advice or input.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Why Solutions to Problems Suddenly Pop into our Minds”

While not actually working on the problem at all, a possible solution would pop into his mind.
Why do solutions to problems suddenly pop into our minds?
The brain’s networks of neurons are highly interconnected, so there seems little scope for assigning different problems to different brain networks.
If the brain solves problems through the cooperation computation of vast networks of individually sluggish neurons, then any specific network of neurons can work on just one solution to one problem at a time.
Whether mathematical, musical, or of any other kind, is the very antithesis of a routine, specialized problem with a dedicated brain network: On the contrary, thinking about such problems will need to engage most of the brain.
What is special about such problems is that you can’t solve them through a routine set of steps-you have to look at the problem in the “Right way” before you can make progress.
Poincaré’s description of his particular method of solving mathematical problems suggests why he was particularly susceptible to brilliant flashes of insight.
Crucially, for Poincaré, mathematical problems were transformed into perceptual problems: and with the right perceptual intuition, the creating a proof would be relatively routine, if slow.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Marine Biologist Bitten by a Crocodile Featured on Shark Week”

In April, Márquez was filming a program for the Discovery Channel’s Shark Week programming in the Cuban archipelago Jardines de la Reina.
The incident was depicted on the Shark Week documentary Cuba’s Secret Shark Lair, which aired on Monday.
MARQUEZ: The irony is: I was bitten by a crocodile during Shark Week.
We were really really privileged and really lucky to get to go to this beautiful place.
Crocodiles will either bite down harder, and then I would start feeling pain, and then: There goes all my rational thinking, really.
The medic, came up, got his medic bag, and opened up my brand new scuba suit, which I was really sad about.
I got some really strong antibiotics, which did save my leg from any further infection, but also really, totally, royally screwed over my stomach lining.
I’ve still got two of the really deep bite wounds that are still open and slowly closing.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Veterans Speak Out Against The Militarization Of Sports”

Bill Astore is a retired Air Force Lieutenant Colonel who writes about the increased militarization of sports – and its perils – on Bracing Views, his personal blog, as well as the website Tom Dispatch.
“I’m like all the other fans: a big plane goes overhead – ‘Wow!’ That’s kind of awe inspiring. But at the same time, to me, it’s not something that I see should be flying over a sports stadium before a baseball game or a football game. You know, these are weapons of death. They may be required, but they certainly shouldn’t be celebrated and applauded.”
“And the only time we see it, sometimes, is when they bring out a wounded soldier, for example. And maybe he or she has lost two or three limbs, but they’re brought out into an NFL stadium or an MLB baseball game. And the impression that you get is, ‘Everything’s OK, see?’ But we don’t see this person struggling to get around at home. And maybe being depressed because they’ve suffered this horrible wound in war.”
“A friend of mine that I played travel baseball with, he had enlisted after high school and was an infantry marine. And he was in Iraq during my freshman year in college. And it used to keep me up at night. And it would bother me a lot where I would kind of sit there and be, like, ‘Man, I’m playing a lot of online poker, going to econ classes and going out to bars and, like, we have a war going on.’ I felt like I was missing out and not contributing or not doing my part.”
“They had wanted me to throw out the first pitch at Fenway during one of the games. It would’ve been a good story of having the manager’s son being a Marine and throwing out a first pitch at Fenway. But I was horribly uncomfortable with that and didn’t think I had done anything to deserve that and gave them a firm pass on that one.”
“Like, if your goal was to hire as few veterans as possible, that’s pretty impressive.
They’ve really gone out of their way to avoid being able to even identify the veterans.
Where do sports go from here? I asked one baseball executive, who told me his sport promotes the military not out of patriotism but out of fear – the fear of being called unpatriotic.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Generation Z: ‘We have more to do than drink and take drugs'”

Generation Z – one of several terms used to describe post-millennial youth born after 1996 – prefer juice bars to pub crawls, rank quality family time ahead of sex and prioritise good grades before friendship, at least according to a report published by the British Pregnancy Advisory Service last week.
“I’m not surprised those [statistics] show that’s the case: it makes sense. We have a lot more to distract us now.”
“We’re quite different because there’s more stuff to do at each other’s houses and we have more technology – like, we have video games.”
Owen Munro adds: “My generation feels bitter about all the things we won’t be able to do because of what the older generation chose.”
“People are more sexually experimental in my school, more than I thought,” says Owen Munro.
Generation Z-ers will, after all, be living longer and more healthily, and looking better for it.
Generation X. Invented: irony, McJobs and disaffected slackerism.
Generation Z. Invented: the ability to hold a conversation and simultaneously scroll through their phones.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Mel Brooks: Portrait of an Artist as an Old Man”

Mel Brooks has just turned 92, and, as far as anyone can tell, he is unaltered.
At other times, he murmurs rapidly, teenage-style, “Yeah! Yeah! Yeah!” No one is ever likely to miss a Mel Brooks joke, since he speaks, sometimes roars, with great precision.
On Broadway, in 2007, Brooks and the director Susan Stroman mounted a musical version of the material, a show that Brooks now calls “Lugubrious.” It was only moderately successful, so he cut about 40 minutes, bringing the entire evening down to about two hours, and that version has been playing at the Garrick Theatre in London since last September.
On one occasion, Reiner asked him, “How do you differentiate between tragedy and comedy?” and Brooks answered, “If I’ll cut my finger, that’s tragedy. Comedy is if you walk into an open sewer and die.”
Brooks hit emotional pay dirt by teasing the sensitivities of the Jews, and he did it even more aggressively 13 years later in History of the World: Part I. That movie, an alarming pastiche-masterwork panned by several critical stiffs, including me, might be called a celebration of barbarous behavior throughout the ages-in the caves, during the Roman Empire, during the Spanish Inquisition, in the court of Louis XVI. Brooks again made musical comedy out of Jewish suffering-this time the persecutions of the Spanish Inquisition, with strung-up bearded Jews tormented by a singing-and-dancing Grand Inquisitor while merry nuns, also giving Jews a hard time, shed their habits and dive into a pool one after another like Esther Williams’s swimming chorines.
A few years later, he wound up writing gags and skits for the legendary comic Sid Caesar, whom he had first met in the Catskills during World War II. By 1950, Brooks was in Caesar’s writers’ room, which eventually included such luminaries as Lucille Kallen, Mel Tolkin, Larry Gelbart, Neil Simon, and Woody Allen, all of them laboring for the great man’s TV shows and specials: most famously Your Show of Shows, which ran from 1950 to 1954, and then Caesar’s Hour, which ran from 1954 to 1957.
He turned to Brooks without warning and said, “Here is a man who was actually at the scene of the crucifixion 2,000 years ago.”
Mel Brooks comes to his office in Culver City from Monday to Friday.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Why I’m No Longer a Russiagate Skeptic”

To recap: Deputy Attorney General Rod Rosenstein revealed indictments against 12 Russians for the hacks of the Democratic National Committee, and we learned that Russian hackers went after Hillary Clinton’s private office for the first time on the very day Trump said, “Russia, if you’re listening, I hope you’re able to find the 30,000 emails that are missing.” At the NATO summit in Brussels, Trump attacked a close European ally-Germany-and generally questioned the value of the alliance.
Why does Trump inevitably return to questioning the irrefutable evidence that Russia meddled in the 2016 election? We can dispense with the explanation, conveyed anonymously by senior administration officials, that “His brain can’t process that collusion and cyberattacks are two different things.” We can also forget about the widely held theory that he views the various Russia investigations as a threat to the legitimacy of his election, and therefore a devastating blow to his sense of self-worth.
What does any of that have to do with his tender ego? Do we really think Trump has an informed position on, say, Montenegro’s history of aggression? Could Trump find Montenegro on a map?
What about my argument that Trump was constitutionally incapable of keeping a secret? That, too, is no longer operative.
Yes, the GOP base is impressionable, and perhaps Republican voters would accept it if Trump came out and said, “You bet, Russia helped get me elected, and wasn’t that a good thing? We couldn’t let Crooked Hillary win!” But nobody would say his odd solicitousness toward the Kremlin leader is a political winner, and it certainly causes an unnecessary amount of friction with Republicans in Congress.
You don’t even have to buy the theory that Trump’s business is overly dependent on illicit flows of Russia money, giving Putin leverage.
In a larger sense, everything we need to know about Trump’s strange relationship with Russia is already out in the open.
Trump may have grudgingly admitted that Russia did the deed, but nobody should be surprised if he starts shedding doubt on it all over again.

The orginal article.

Summary of “My Mother and Her Scammer”

Then to the local bank where my mother had a checking account.
The scammer had told my mother that she’d be receiving her millions just as soon as she paid some federal taxes and fees-not directly to the United States Treasury, of course, but to a couple of helpful people whose job is handling that sort of thing.
How could even an elderly widow have believed something so obviously phony? Actually my mother was no more gullible than other people, without whose coöperation the theft could not have occurred.
Why didn’t Schwab? And, if the broker was suspicious enough to call me before allowing my mother to make a second huge withdrawal, why not before allowing her to make the first? The senior-fraud page of the F.B.I.’s Web site says, “People who grew up in the 1930s, 1940s, and 1950s were generally raised to be polite and trusting.” But tottering oldsters aren’t the only vulnerable people in the world.
Immediately after Anne had visited our mother’s apartment and taken away her checkbooks, our mother called not me or my brother or any of her friends but Sam.
She visited my mother two days after we’d discovered the fraud, and, among other things, encouraged her to eat, even though at that point my mother felt so devastated by what she had done that she wasn’t sure she even wanted to live.
Quite a few people who lived on the street I grew up on lived where my mother does; she’s the last survivor.
We’re pretty sure that the initial contact between the scammers and my mother was not over the Internet but through her mailbox, which almost every day contains at least one official-looking invitation to enter a sweepstakes by making a small donation to a worthy cause; her fiasco began with a handful of well-intentioned five-dollar checks.

The orginal article.