Summary of “On Getting Rejected a Lot”

You can be the most talented photographer, the most brilliant scientist, or the most diligent activist, and most things still won’t work out.
The more successful they are, the more rejections they’ve had-because they’re putting themselves out there, taking risks, and still moving forward.
Want a job as a trekking guide in Iceland, which would involve travel and the chance for gorgeous photos? You might as well apply, because it probably won’t work out! Want an internship with the UN or an artist’s residency in Antarctica? It probably won’t happen, but give it a go!
Spend a few hours a week looking for opportunities that would literally change your life: Jobs around the world.
Don’t spam editors or be sloppy, and respect the norms of the industry by, for example, always disclosing simultaneous submissions; you don’t want things to backfire if you do get the go-ahead. But give yourself a goal number of rejections.
If you interview for a job you’re obsessed with, figure out what it is that appeals so much.
Maybe you didn’t realize how badly you wanted to live in Montana until you got rejected from a job in Montana.
That’s how you figure out what you really want.

The orginal article.

Summary of “A Lesson on Parenting From the Kitchen Counter”

One evening, my 4-year-old daughter piped up, asking if she could do something to help with dinner.
Deeply satisfying, yet it was her pride that filled the room.
At the time, my wife, Lisa, was a medical resident, and suddenly evenings in the kitchen with our daughters, Tarpley and Yancey, were my business.
As a kid growing up in South Carolina, the kitchen was an avoided room.
As I found out with my girls, the kitchen is the best room in which to domesticate beastly primates and to teach, well, everything: learning to wield a dangerous tool, long-range planning, focusing on a task, discovery, invention, being the star of the moment, working the back bench.
She and her friend blocked the entrance to the kitchen with chairs-no adults allowed-as if putting on one of their self-written plays.
By middle school, the kitchen was the way all of us ordered our day-who’s cooking tonight?-with, at first, one of two answers and then four.
Fakesgiving dinner, as she calls it, is still how our family reconvenes.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Revenge of the clothes moths: as numbers boom, can they be stopped?”

In houses up and down the country, there is a war being waged against clothes moths.
Unlike the many moths that are in decline, these moths – the webbing clothes moth and the case-bearing clothes moth – are believed to be increasing in numbers.
Moth traps used by English Heritage at its properties and storage sites found a 216% increase in the number of webbing clothes moths caught between 2012 and 2016.
“Wool insulation is great environmentally, but if you stick wool up in your attic you’re going to get moths in it. Even worse, I know one house where they blew wool in cavity walls. They can’t get it out and they’ve got moths – they’re going to have to live with moths the whole time they live in that house.”
Moths will happily breed in warm, centrally heated homes throughout the year, says Pinniger, “But there is a peak of adult emergence usually in April and May, and often another one in late August/early September when you get another generation through. Some of the museums I work with, there are moths all year round because the temperatures are constant, and we’re getting at least three generations a year. Each female can lay 100 eggs. That’s a pretty big potential increase.”
Clothes moths can’t fly very far, so it is unlikely that they come into homes through open windows, although this is possible in urban areas.
“In some cases where we need to go beyond that, we use a commercial product called Constrain, which has a residual effect for a number of months. We use that to treat nooks and crannies where moths might like to hide away.” The National Trust has done a trial using tiny parasitic wasps, which seek out moths’ eggs and lay their own inside, hatching new wasps.
“They’re busy living on your clothes, slowly breaking it down. So, even when you don’t have moths, the idea that your clothes last for ever is an illusion. You’ve also got your skin bacteria that wait for you to put clothing on and then they metabolise your sweat. With that motley crew, the clothes moth is the most charismatic of the bunch.”

The orginal article.

Summary of “A Lesson on Parenting From the Kitchen Counter”

One evening, my 4-year-old daughter piped up, asking if she could do something to help with dinner.
Deeply satisfying, yet it was her pride that filled the room.
At the time, my wife, Lisa, was a medical resident, and suddenly evenings in the kitchen with our daughters, Tarpley and Yancey, were my business.
As a kid growing up in South Carolina, the kitchen was an avoided room.
As I found out with my girls, the kitchen is the best room in which to domesticate beastly primates and to teach, well, everything: learning to wield a dangerous tool, long-range planning, focusing on a task, discovery, invention, being the star of the moment, working the back bench.
She and her friend blocked the entrance to the kitchen with chairs-no adults allowed-as if putting on one of their self-written plays.
By middle school, the kitchen was the way all of us ordered our day-who’s cooking tonight?-with, at first, one of two answers and then four.
Fakesgiving dinner, as she calls it, is still how our family reconvenes.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Less Tweeting, More Doing”

So we spew forth on social media as if those words-whether vitriolic or rational-are a replacement for doing.
Unless you count rifting, tweeting isn’t doing.
As an antidote to my own spewing, both as a columnist whose essays about climate change are as invisible as methane and as a social media user, I’ve been making an effort to do more doing lately.
The public land that we’re etching the trail on is also the result of doing.
Today, college kids and retirees raise hoppy beers and float through the same downtown where the doing began.
The federal-level doing doesn’t get done, and all we’re left with is the governance of deconstruction-each administration dismantling what the prior administration merely reinstated through executive orders.
Writer and activist Rick Bass calls such local doing “Knife fighting.” I reached out to him after he and the Save the Yellowstone Grizzly movement, along with a battalion of scientists and activists and Native peoples, were able to win a delay in the scheduled grizzly hunts in Wyoming and Idaho.
Could a global knife fight of doing follow that trajectory, with local actors changing the course of a community of nations? On a whim, I attended a climate change action march in September.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Meet the Safecracker of Last Resort”

“A lot of times I’m driving with my girlfriend or my son,” Santore told me , “And I’m like, ‘I opened a safe here, I opened a safe here, and do you remember the time we opened a safe there?'” The city is full of safes, he meant: Everyone is hiding something.
As Santore completes one job, another will arise in the form of frantic phone calls-a jewelry business locked out of its vault, a suburban father whose gun safe no longer operates, an investor flipping houses who discovers a locked safe in the floor of her newest conquest.
At one extreme, the safecracker must be a true gearhead, someone who can put his head down, avoid distraction, and deal, one on one, with an inhuman opponent-the safe or vault.
A couple’s wedding rings are locked inside a defective hotel safe and the ceremony starts in only an hour, or a mother is sending her daughter on a college trip to France but the girl’s passport is stuck inside the family safe, or paranoid heirs are tearing each other apart over an inheritance that sits locked inside a jewel safe in their father’s old den.
I learned about a safecracker who seeks out rural auctions in the Midwest to buy the safes of dead farmers, contents included, occasionally finding items of real value inside.
Elaad Israeli, a 35-year-old safecracker with Precision Lock & Safe in Queens, told me that he almost got arrested after unwittingly helping a man rob his own father: The guy’s ID matched the name of the safe’s owner, but it turned out to be a case of Junior ripping off Senior.
John Greenan, a 58-year-old safecracker at Fink Safe & Lock in Chicago, told me about cracking safes at the Federal Reserve building, as well as a long-sealed vault door in the basement of a Chicago cathedral.
One of the local attendees remarked that he had an entire warehouse on the industrial edge of town filled with nearly 80 locked safes that all needed to be opened; the man asked McOmie if he would be willing to lead a workshop there, to show everyone how some of the more difficult and exotic safes could be opened.

The orginal article.

Summary of “In the Straits: The Story of the Inmate Turned Millionaire Turned Lone Survivor”

Seay, who’s been the reassuring voice since they left the dock, has time to get out two chilling syllables.
“He turned out to be completely invaluable,” he would recall years later.
In casinos Seay would get the pair kicked out before they even had a drop to drink.
At the blackjack table one night at Angel of the Winds casino, joking around with each other, they laughed so hard that Seay, stone-cold sober, fell out of his chair.
Whenever Powers sees one get close he shuts his mouth to keep the water out.
With a life jacket still in one hand, Powers pulls Seay up by the jeans, bringing him closer, and places his friend’s head up on his shoulder, so it’s at least a couple of inches higher out of the water.
Elizabeth entered his bedroom one afternoon and found him passed out, with the needle still sticking out of his arm, his lips blue.
Michael Powers spent nearly eight hours in the water, from about 4:45am, when his boat went down, until 12:30pm, when Joe Robinson and crew pulled him out.

The orginal article.

Summary of “I’ll Be Loving You Forever”

Gretchen knew how to suck out mosquito and bee venom with a syringe.
Gretchen knew how to escape from a mugger, if the situation ever arose.
For some reason, despite the fact that I was weird and definitely talked too much, Gretchen wanted to be my friend.
“I’ve liked them since ‘Please Don’t Go Girl’.” Like I said: Gretchen knew everything.
What’cha Gonna Do. The noxious combination of mainstream backlash, an aging fanbase in search of a new transitional object, and a rapidly changing musical landscape – my 1993 anthem with Gretchen was “Smells Like Teen Spirit” – finally caught up with NKOTB in 1994.
It’s nearing 11:00 by the time Gretchen and I sneak onto the MAX along with approximately 400 other ladies of a certain age wearing similar garb.
As the train drops off more passengers and approaches Gretchen’s stop, I’m no longer thinking about Joey McIntyre’s stage presence or Jordan Knight’s unfortunate politics.
Most of the snaps Gretchen takes are kid-only, but I’m in a few of them, still wearing my NKOTB shirt.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Colin O’Brady Wants to Tell You a Story”

For 54 days, O’Brady had trudged alone, fighting whiteouts and howling wind.
O’Brady hadn’t seen Rudd since day six, when the captain had shuffled up beside him in a whiteout.
As news of O’Brady’s victory made its way around the world, ExplorersWeb, an online hub for expedition news that “Makes sure credit is given where credit is due,” pushed back and noted what many in the media had failed to mention-that for the last 300-plus miles of the crossing, O’Brady had followed a man-made “Snow road,” the South Pole Overland Traverse.
When O’Brady takes the stage during lunchtime at the Riverhouse, he tells his story masterfully.
At this point, the story of Colin O’Brady takes off in a rocking montage.
In the early days of his triathlon career, O’Brady made Besaw his manager.
At the time, only two people had completed the Explorers Grand Slam in under a year, but O’Brady did it in 139 days, beating the previous record by 53 days.
At the top of Snow King, Besaw reminds O’Brady of the day’s schedule.

The orginal article.

Summary of “How to use Craigslist Free in NYC”

“I’m soooo sorry I’m late. I had to transfer to the 3 at Atlantic Avenue, and I wasn’t sure where it was, and I just got turned around,” she explained as I handed her a bag containing a heavy, multipart juicer that I hadn’t used-much less looked at-in a couple of years.
For years now, I’ve been getting cheap-indeed free-thrills merely from regularly giving away my possessions on Craigslist.
In New York, where I live, available real estate seems to get smaller and more expensive each year, as the waves of gentrification push ever deeper into the formerly “Outer” boroughs.
When my kitchen cabinets begin to spill over with washed and saved almond butter jars, or my cats decide they don’t care for their new food and water dishes, or I’ve propagated a few too many pothos plants, I turn to a website I have bookmarked on my computer: Craigslist Free.
A short description and a few iPhone photos later, and my post advertising free stuff to whoever will come take it off my hands is out in the world.
Given the rapidity with which strangers respond to my listings, I’ve concluded that there must be people out there who always have a tab open to Craigslist Free-and in my experience, these people are characters.
Corresponding with and meeting these Craigslist characters, in a city that so often feels anonymous, is part of the reason I love Craigslist Free.
Craigslist allows me to do that-and I’m not talking about the “Missed Connections” section.

The orginal article.