Summary of “A Grand Plan to Clean the Great Pacific Garbage Patch”

A round screen set in the stage floor displayed 3-D images of Earth; behind Slat, another screen charted the rapid accumulation of plastic in the Pacific Ocean since the nineteen-fifties.
Slat’s destination was the Great Pacific Garbage Patch, midway between California and Hawaii, an area within what is known as the North Pacific Subtropical Convergence Zone.
By 2040, Slat promised, he could clear ninety per cent of the trash from the North Pacific gyre.
“It’s like Davos, but with just a hundred people. The King of the Netherlands was there, David Petraeus. A lot of people think it’s some sort of conspiracy thing.” Rudkowski referring to the Bilderberg participants, had asked Slat how his mission to clean the oceans would “Work with their world-domination plan.”
Slat, who had been to the city many times before, said, “No, but it’s even more interesting every time.” Dubois and Welsh walked ahead, and Slat bid me farewell.
Although Slat’s engineers were increasingly convinced that mooring a structure to the seabed would not work, Slat was reluctant to let go of the idea.
In mid-September, Eriksen sent an e-mail blast to a Listserv called Marine Debris, in which he called Slat’s mission “a misdirected activity” that “Makes it harder for those working to focus the narrative to prevention.” Eriksen reminded me, by phone, that only one per cent of the plastic entering the ocean is on the surface of the North Pacific gyre.
Once there, Slat and I watched other surfers for a while, then Slat spotted a small ridge.

The orginal article.

Summary of “How an Olympic Hopeful Robbed 26 Banks on His Bike”

Nobody in town was surprised when Tom was selected to attend the Olympic training camp in Colorado Springs in 1987.
Tom received massages, soaked in hot tubs, had his bike fine-tuned by mechanics, and was subjected to a battery of testing to measure everything from body fat to oxygen efficiency.
Every morning at the YMCA, Tom worked through the Olympic strength-training regimen to build muscle mass.
On March 24, Tom robbed two banks: the Southwest Community Bank in Encinitas and the U.S. Bank in Carlsbad. “D-d-do you want the s-s-second drawer, too?” the 20-year-old blond U.S. Bank teller had nervously stuttered.
In the summer of 2001, Tom joined a club cycling team run by Higher Gear, a bike shop in Wilmette, not far from the LaSalle Bank in Highland Park, one of the nine suburban Chicago banks he had robbed at this point.
One day, the bike shop’s manager mentioned to Tom that a local rider was selling a used Steelman, a 12-speed road bike built in 1996.
“Uh, yeah, so your bike was stolen from me,” Tom said cryptically.
Ever since he’d traveled to Colorado for the Olympic training camp, Tom kept thinking that his life should be momentous enough to carry him far away from Libertyville.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Ted Bundy’s Living Victim Tells Her Story – Rolling Stone”

There are so many books about Ted Bundy that Kleiner has been able to dedicate an entire section of her library to them, and books are just the tip of the Bundy iceberg.
In 2018, Kleiner signed up for Twitter, and a Ted Bundy fan account responded to her first tweet: “Oh, there you are, Kathy.”
Ted Bundy may have lived and breathed, but Kathy Kleiner lived too – despite his best efforts – and she’d like to talk about it.
Kathy Kleiner learned to fight for her life long before Bundy ever opened her bedroom door.
The room was so small that Bundy was basically able to hit Kleiner with one side of the club, spin around, and hit Chandler with the other side.
Kleiner heard her say, “With such a brutal attack, what are the chances that he would put her underwear back on?” The friend stroked her hair, and for the first time that night, Kleiner felt her fear drain away.
This was the first taste of the peculiar loneliness Kleiner would feel as a Bundy victim in a world of Bundy news; she had just survived a brush with one of the most dangerous men in the country, and yet in some ways, she was on her own.
Even Ann Rule, who wrote the definitive book on Bundy, reached out to Kleiner and mailed her an autographed mousepad, but didn’t interview her for The Stranger Beside Me. So Kleiner moved forward alone.

The orginal article.

Summary of “How Bulletproof Founder Dave Asprey Became the Ultimate Biohacker”

Ten days before I met him at his home in British Columbia, Dave Asprey went to a clinic in Park City, Utah, where a surgeon harvested half a liter of bone marrow from his hips, filtered out the stem cells, and injected them into every joint in his body.
Currently, Asprey is best known as the founder of Bulletproof Coffee; he’s the reason everyone started slipping a pat of butter into their coffee a few years back.
While the coffee is what put Asprey on the map, his aspirations are much bigger than that-and having the longest human life span ever recorded is just one part of his plan.
Asprey happily shares his opinion on how often men should ejaculate and how long they should sleep.
At the same time, Asprey didn’t feel like his best self.
At first, Asprey followed the standard medical advice for losing weight-restrict calories, exercise-but even when he was working out for 90 minutes and eating 1,500 to 1,800 calories a day, he wasn’t dropping pounds.
Finally the time was ripe for Asprey, a guy who had been tweaking his own internal systems for years; who knew how to help you get a better return on your meditation investment; who claimed he could feel when his mitochondria were underperforming; who promised strategies for turning humans into superhumans.
In 2017, Asprey opened Bulletproof Labs, a gymlike facility in Santa Monica where you can play around with his favorite biohacking tools.

The orginal article.

Summary of “The Plot Against the Principality of Sealand”

At the trial that autumn, the government’s star witness, 25-year-old Carl Winchester, a friend of one of Jannie’s employees, testified that Jannie had pointed a gun at Orell and pulled the trigger several times, but it never fired.
The prosecution claimed that the three defendants finished him off in the car, while Jannie and the others testified that they were talking calmly when the men began arguing and struggling with Orell, and he fell out of the car and died from his injuries.
In his testimony, he said Orell reached for the gun and struck Jannie – “He lunged at her and almost knocked her down” – when she pulled the trigger.
Orell asked Jannie to give him a ride home, and she agreed on the condition that the two other men came along.
At one point, the prosecutor, Assistant U.S. Attorney Frederick Smithson, said of Jannie: “I believe this woman to be that type of individual that they call accident prone.” He defined that as someone who “Make[s] claims against her paramour or husband for the purpose of harassment and to get various pieces of property from him.”
Judge Joseph McGarraghy refused to allow testimony or evidence about Jannie’s IRS history, and the jury apparently accepted the contention – introduced by the police within days of Orell’s death, repeated frequently in newspapers, and advanced by the prosecution – that Jannie was furious at Orell for snitching.
Orell died from a result of Jannie’s acts of self-defense during a series of drunken brawls.
Jannie’s sole remaining close relative, a daughter now in her 60s, at first denied that Jannie was her mother.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Augmented Reality Vs. Virtual Reality: The Future of Tech”

Augmented Reality Vs. Virtual Reality: The Future of Tech Five years ago, virtual reality was the future, and augmented reality was a joke.
Virtual reality – tech that places small screens in front of your eyes, blocking out the outside world and creative an immersive digital world for you to explore – was suddenly white-hot, with Facebook spending $2 billion to acquire VR headset company Oculus in 2014 and Oculus founder Palmer Luckey appeared on the cover of Time with a rapturous cover story about why VR was “About to change the world.”
Google Glass, the torch bearer for augmented reality – overlaying the world via either a smartphone or smart glasses with digital information – was an expensive embarrassment, thanks to cringeworthy stunts like tech evangelist Robert Scoble taking a picture of himself wearing his Google Glasses in the shower or a bevy of stories about “Glassholes” refusing to take off their Glasses and being kicked out of restaurants and bars.
By 2015, Google officially stopped supporting Google Glass, and augmented reality seemed like it had stalled out.
Four years later, and I’m not so sure I want to live in the world of VR. Headsets designed for virtual reality get sweaty and are awkward to wear if you need glasses.
Thanks to an obscure optometrical problem of “Vergence-accommodation conflict,” your eyes get tired trying to square the circle of focusing on things that appear to be far away but in reality are just being displayed on screens centimeters away from your eyeballs.
If you want proof of augmented reality’s potential, look to this news anchor surrounded by six feet of water.
Augmented Reality Improves It. Five years ago, virtual reality was the future, and augmented reality was a joke.

The orginal article.

Summary of “What the Shutdown Means for a T.S.A. Agent at America’s Busiest Airport”

Earlier this week, Atlanta’s Hartsfield-Jackson International Airport, which is the busiest in the country and also the biggest employer in Georgia, announced security-line waiting times of nearly an hour and a half-more than twice that of any other airport in the country.
On account of the prolonged government shutdown, which began on December 22nd and does not appear to be ending anytime soon, Transportation Security Administration officers are not being paid, and a number of them have decided not to come to work.
“I’ve been cussed out by passengers. Somebody yesterday, in one of these long lines, called an officer a ‘fat heifer.’ I was called a racist and told, ‘That’s why Trump doesn’t like you,’ because I told the man to take his water out. The guy said, ‘I don’t have to.’ I said, ‘Sir, if your time is valuable, you need to take it out.'”.
“At work, I make jokes and talk. I have to. Some people I work with don’t care. They’re pissed. But I just want people the hell out of my face. I don’t want them to linger with their attitude. They’re already agitated: their private jet is broken and they had to get on this regular plane. So let’s get them out as quickly and safely as possible. I’m not a mall cop who wants to flex.”
“People from other airports want to come here because Atlanta is booming and it’s easier to live with a government job. We have a lot of transfers from New York. Coming here is great for your résumé. My dream was to make my T.S.A. job finance my beauty work. But you don’t have a lot of room to have a side job, a social life, to be on social media, to even wear your uniform. They want you to cover up your T.S.A. patches on your uniform shoulders so you aren’t exposed, because people hate T.S.A.”.
“It’s thirty minutes to three hours to process people. The hour-and-a-half wait times here recently in the domestic terminal could easily turn into three-hour wait times if we did everything extremely strictly, by the book. Imagine going from twenty officers down to four. It won’t necessarily be less safe, but it will take a lot longer.”
“I have co-workers that are viva la revolución personalities. They want change now, and they want to be part of it: ‘We should stop coming in during the shutdown and let them feel the pressure.’ For me and my household, I’ll show up. I’ve been through worse. I’ve lived some life. I have some other skill sets, thank God. Other people don’t have that.”
“The focus right now is the Super Bowl. If we don’t get a real check on the 25th, the word is ‘I’m not coming.’ And see what happens then. Everything would come to a halt.”

The orginal article.

Summary of “The Weird Strategy Dr. Seuss Used to Create His Greatest Work”

Setting limits for yourself – whether that involves the time you have to work out, the money you have to start a business, or the number of words you can use in a book – often delivers better results than “Keeping your options open.”
Dr. Seuss found that setting some limits to work within was so useful that he employed this strategy for other books as well.
Time constraints have forced me to produce some of my best work.
Every artist has a limited set of tools to work with.
Once you know your constraints, you can start figuring out how to work with them.
Your job is to see if you can make those 30 minutes a work of art.
Your job is to take those ingredients and make each meal a work of art.
The limitations just determine the size of the canvas you have to work with.

The orginal article.

Summary of “9 Sober Musicians on How They Thrive Creatively Without Drugs or Booze”

Steven Tyler, Julien Baker, Ben Harper, Jason Isbell, Joe Walsh, and other sober musicians on how to thrive creatively without drugs or booze.
We were on tour, and I woke up one morning after going out really late drinking some kind of European form of Jägermeister, as if Jägermeister isn’t already bad enough, some kind of licorice-tasting strange liquor.
I woke up and I thought that I was bleeding out of my ass.
Another member of our touring party had also shit himself in his sleep in the course of the night, and I didn’t know this yet.
All I knew was that I had shit myself, it was all over my underwear and the bed, everywhere.
So I just took my underwear off and I threw them out the window.
I just threw my arms up and said: “Gentlemen, I shit myself last night.” Well, everybody starts laughing and they’re, like, “Oh, my God, he did, too.” About this time, a Saint Bernard runs around the side of the hotel with my underwear in his mouth.
Vince Staples on why he’s always avoided drugs and alcohol.

The orginal article.

Summary of “The Long Toss: Stories of Patrick Mahomes II’s Awe-Inspiring Passing”

The second is that we cannot rule out the possibility of Mahomes actually throwing it out of the stadium.
Mahomes is a rare combination: He can come up with throws that few have thought of, yet has practiced them enough that they work in a game situation.
I ask Mahomes whether teammates find this role challenging considering how long he throws.
“He’s just warming up, but he’s going to throw into you because he’s throwing it as long as he can throw it.” Cook wanted Mahomes to stretch out his arm because he believed in taking a big, downfield shot early in the game and needed the quarterback’s arm ready.
“To be able to throw the ball the way he throws it? I haven’t seen it. No. I saw Aaron Rodgers do a lot of throws, but the way Patrick throws it-he’s special,” Houston says.
He taught his son that the long toss is not about seeing how far you can throw, but about consistency and getting your arm used to throws you’ll make in a game.
“Long toss gives the arm a full range of motion. You throw the ball incrementally, you start throwing with minimal effort, start adding effort and there’s more of a state of relaxation. The angles get higher, you’re gradually throwing more uphill, and you’re giving your arm and your auxiliary muscles the time to open up or stretch out. It gives it optimal freedom in the arm.”
Catching passes from Mahomes is an adventure, because he is capable of anything and can throw from any arm angle.

The orginal article.