Summary of “The Infuriating Story of How the Government Stalled Coronavirus Testing”

Though it was not the only university lab able to get testing online quickly-the University of Nebraska’s lab also had a test early on-the University of Washington’s Virology Lab was extremely fortunate.
Once the FDA allowed them to use their test, the lab was lucky again.
In the meantime, manufacturers like Roche, a massive biomedical manufacturer freed by President Trump’s move to lift restrictions on testing, said it was racing to get hundreds of thousands of test kits out to healthcare providers.
Experts were citing South Korea as a model for widespread testing of its population, but it is a much smaller country than the United States, and, at its maximum, it was running 15,000 tests per day.
South Korea was also testing before the virus exploded into Europe.
A consistent eight percent of the samples they were testing were positive for SARS-CoV-2.
It turned out that the FDA hadn’t fully lifted its requirement that individual labs get permission for testing.
The FDA had merely given them a grace period: labs still had to apply for the Emergency Use Authorization within 14 days of when they started testing.

The orginal article.

Summary of “How To Quit Your Life, And Then Start It Over”

There is no manual for how to quit your life and start over.
The hardest part about quitting your life and starting over is making the decision to quit your life and start over.
For some reason, this foolish approach to life worked for me-more or less-for most of the nine years that I lived in New York.
Despite the fact that things were basically working for me in New York, they weren’t working for me in a bigger picture way.
As we stood idly on our office escalator, she laid it out for me: If you make a spreadsheet of your life-one column of good things that currently exist, another of the not so good things, and a third of things you say you want but don’t have-you’ll be able to make a conclusion, at least intellectually, about whether you should quit what you’re doing and start over.
I listened to my friend talk about the negative circumstances that filled her life in New York City, and what could be possible elsewhere.
Dating in New York felt like banging my head, over and over, against the same brick wall.
I’d been out the night before with the guy I was seeing and a close girlfriend, eating one final perfect New York meal, and ending the night with one final cocktails at my local bar, which meant that, fittingly, on my final morning in New York, I was hungover.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Dying Alone in Japan: The Industry Devoted to What’s Left Behind”

The roots of the problem reach back to the country’s post-World War II boom years, which produced levels of consumption unprecedented in historically conservative Japan.
It’s a personal seal, used like a signature in Japan.
Her family is ethnically Korean, but Han’s lived in Japan all her life.
Japan charges high fees for trash disposal, which has contributed to a strong resale market for old goods.
In 2016, Japan’s secondhand industry earned $16 billion, up 7.4 percent over 2015 and 30 percent over 2012, amounting to about 4.1 percent of Japan’s overall retail market.
Over coffee, Hamada offers her version of what’s behind Japan’s burst of secondhand enthusiasm: “Mottainai,” she says, invoking a difficult-to-translate Japanese word that expresses a sense of regret over waste, as well as a desire to conserve.
Japan’s reputation for quality manufacturing has long been marketable-and that reputation rubs off on goods used in Japan.
“It’s not just about mottainai.” She, too, sees the long-term challenge for Japan’s secondhand industry posed by rising incomes in developing countries.

The orginal article.

Summary of “The Perks of Trail Running in a Virtual World”

This was an easy kind of running for someone who did not really like running.
Now, after 14 months out west, I’m back at my normal home in New York City, where the pleasure of running is no longer tied to a casually transcendent experience in nature.
Treadmill running is identical to trail running in the way that shaking a carton of orange juice is identical to giving your lover a hand job-the gesture is the same, but the outcome is different.
The treadmill twists a sport into a riddle: How can you run forever without moving or uphill for miles without ever going down? If an old-fashioned treadmill simulates running, then the Life Fitness model goes above and beyond to simulate all the facets of human life.
While trail running passively quiets my brain, treadmill running tests the extent to which I can quiet my brain by force.
The feature approximates outdoor running well enough, but I find its failures most compelling.
For my first 20 indoor runs in New York, I could only figure out how to run the premade demo: a mashup route of several cities across New Zealand.
Inside the gym at my YMCA, running the rim of the virtual Grand Canyon, I thought of all the places I’d rather be: the tombs of ancient Egypt, the airspace above Manhattan, the halls of an abandoned 1980s shopping mall.

The orginal article.

Summary of “The Hit Man Next Door: Did a Jersey Gymnastics Coach Kill for the Mob?”

If Passalaqua was a seasoned hit man, he was leading a surprising double life: as a former Olympic hopeful and 30-year owner of a family-friendly gymnastics center for youth tumbling teams and cheerleaders.
Holly Baumgartner, who began taking classes there at age five, recalls Passalaqua as a compassionate disciplinarian who comforted her when she fell with his adage “Progress, not perfection.” “He wasn’t just a coach to me,” she says.
The Jersey moms admired Passalaqua not only as a devoted coach, but as charming eye candy.
His oldest son, Joseph “Joey” Passalaqua IV, recounts fond memories growing up around the gymnastics club.
“My wife is on one StairMaster, my mistress is on another and my girlfriend is on the one next to her.” His son recalls passing his father’s Hummer on the highway – inside, a young woman was straddled over Passalaqua, having sex with him.
In 1989, Passalaqua claims, he became a made man in the presence of Gotti and Sammy “The Bull” Gravano.
Regardless of whether his Mob ties were real or imagined, Passalaqua fashioned himself as the ultimate Jersey hero.
Passalaqua ran on the Republican ticket for Middlesex Township Council, donated to Republican campaigns and framed a photo of himself with former New Jersey Gov. Christine Todd Whitman.

The orginal article.

Summary of “How to Think Like a Futurist”

We cannot solve them using short-term thinking.
If we want to move forward into a different future, we must adopt what I call the “Longpath.” We need to shift over to using three ways of thinking to approach the major problems we’re tackling.
When we think about doing good in the world, almost all of us think about doing it sometime between our birth and our death.
With transgenerational thinking, you can expand how you think about problems, your role in solving them and the consequences.
Putting on the transgenerational thinking cap means asking, “Okay, I can do that, but what is it teaching them?” Instead, I might bring paper with me so we could draw together, or I could try to engage them in conversation.
In general, I’ve found that when we consider major world problems like poverty, climate change or cancer, we optimistically think about a techno-utopia that solves them.
Telos comes from Greek, and it means “Ultimate aim” or “Ultimate purpose.” This entails asking yourself one question: “To what end?” As we try to solve a particular problem, we also should think about what will come after we solve it.
We do have control, but it requires strategic thinking and action on our part, imagining many possible futures, and thinking beyond our own lifespans.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Stop Hiding Behind Complexity”

Photo by energepic.com on Pexels.com.
Sometimes complexity is necessary but often it’s not.
A lot of times people make things complex so they can sell them.
What about the demand side? Why do people buy this stuff over and over again?
Perhaps because complexity is a way to avoid facing the reality that what really matters for most things in life is simply showing up and doing the work.
Put differently: maybe part of our attraction to complexity is that you can hide behind it.
The harder it is to stick to over the long-haul.
Complexity gives you excuses and ways out and endless options for switching things up all the time.

The orginal article.

Summary of “The Greatest Grammys Snubs of All Time”

DL. 2008: Herbie Hancock’s River: The Joni Letters over Amy Winehouse’s Back to BlackEvery now and then the Grammys will really Grammy by sneaking Lifetime Achievement Awards into its Album of the Year category.
The Grammys voting panel could not have known that Herbie would ultimately outlive her and that Back to Black would become her final album.
Five years after the release of Babel and Channel Orange, which album feels more like its part of the conversation? Which album better reflects the state of the world as we currently understand it? Is it the fine-enough pop-folk album, or the first nuanced, complicated major statement from one of the most important artists we have right now? Maybe my wishing for the latter is putting too much emphasis on an idealized version of the Grammys that never really existed, or maybe they just got it wrong.
How a band whose debut album came out in 2009 wins Best New Artist in 2013 behind the successes of its second album is something of a mystery.
DL. 2015: Beck’s Morning Phase over Beyoncé’s BeyoncéNo year forced us to consider what the Grammys are really awarding when they denote a specific body of music Album of the Year more than 2015.
We can pretend that the Album of the Year award only takes into consideration the songs on the album divorced from all other context, but that way of thinking fails to take into account what Beyoncé did with her self-titled magnum opus, which was to rethink the album experience as we knew it.
It’s an album for the ages, and the fact that it couldn’t even take home Album of the Year is a landmark even in a long history of Recording Academy short-sightedness.
“The Lemonade album was so monumental and so well thought out and so beautiful and soul-baring. We all got to see another side to you that we don’t always see. You are our light.” 21 and Lemonade are legacy albums from hopeful legacy artists, but 25 is most known for breaking sales records.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Scientific American Blog Network”

As is the way of news cycles, in recent days we’re back to hearing about plans for setting humans up on Mars.
Whatever you think about Musk’s pronouncements, or his businesses, there are some very serious scientific hurdles to setting humans up on Mars.
We actually have rather good data on the radiation situation on Mars from the Radiation Assessment Detector that has been riding along with the Curiosity rover since its launch from Earth.
The bottom line is that the extremely thin atmosphere on Mars, and the absence of a strong global magnetic field, result in a complex and potent particle radiation environment.
There are lower energy solar wind particles and much higher energy cosmic ray particles crashing into Mars all the time.
If we consider just the dose on Mars, the rate of exposure averaged over one Earth year is just over 20 times that of the maximum allowed for a Department of Energy radiation worker in the US. And that’s for a one-off trip.
Now imagine you’re a settler, perhaps in your 20s and you’re planning on living on Mars for at least another 50 Earth years.
Discuss, the “Flavor” of the radiation environment on Mars is simply unlike that on Earth, not just measured by extremes but by its make up, comprising different components than on Earth’s surface.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Venezuela crisis: How fleeing Venezuelans survive a dangerous migration by foot”

Seven months later, when Venezuela had deteriorated to the point that his remittances no longer covered the food bill, he walked back home to fetch his wife and son.
Another son had already arrived in Peru and sent Fonseca a message warning her the trip was difficult.
Duque retired upstairs, where she, her husband and son live with nine volunteers – all Venezuelans who decided to stay and help others.
Alfaro owned a home and earned enough at a local supermarket to live comfortably with her son, Luis Mario Fuenmayor Alfaro.
Alfaro clung to the dream until 2015, when armed men broke into her house and shot her son in the hand and leg.
“What we’re doing in Venezuela is dying of hunger. How could we pay for a passport if we can’t even afford food? We’re not leaving – we’re escaping.”
Cans of fish, handed out by the Red Cross, have become a leading currency out here.
A wide-eyed woman traveling with her 13-year-old son and niece begged him to let them on.

The orginal article.