Summary of “Responsibility: Not Apologizing When You Succeed Or Complaining When You Fail”

You absolutely can and should own how you’ve been living and own what you’re learning.
Don’t Complain For FailureLessons are repeated until they are learned.
Learning always involves new understandings and new behaviors, ‘thinking’ and ‘doing.
‘”If your behavior isn’t changing, then you’re not learning.
True learning means you can produce a desired outcome.
If you can’t consistently produce the outcome you want, then you haven’t learned.
You won’t be learning from your experience, and thus you’ll continue moving into your future by recreating your past.
Rather than complaining for failures - or blaming the bad weather or something else - you learn from what is happening and adapt.

The orginal article.

Summary of “How to Survive Dropping Your Kid Off at College”

You worry about money, but dread paying that big holiday-season credit-card bill.
You worry about work, but dread the big sales presentation.
Dread arises from the looming shadow of certainty, while fear tracks the murky unknown.
Dread is fueled by powerlessness, rather than by sorrow, and there’s more reason for kids to feel impotent these days with the internet and smartphones.
Anxiety has overtaken depression among teenagers-kids are bombarded with so many demands that are nonnegotiable, they become overwhelmed by the accompanying dread. As the ASU psychologist Suniya Luthar told The New York Times last year, teenagers “Never get to the point where they can say, ‘I’ve done enough, and now I can stop.'”.
There are a lot of people struggling just to get by for whom dread may still be a common feeling.
Going off to college represents an unusual, shared experience of dread for parents and their children alike.
That makes the college departure a rare opportunity for parents to rekindle their relationship with dread, and maybe even to reform it.

The orginal article.

Summary of “The million-dollar brownstone that no one owned”

No one person will buy it because the house has what’s called a “Clouded history.” And the clouded history is the result of the mortgage crisis that happened 10 years ago, which nearly brought about a second Great Depression and did bring about 8 million Americans losing their homes.
It’s the same thing with a book, or a really long article no one’s going to read. The Big Short tells a good time-and-place story and explains how single mortgages were organized into larger and larger units of value, even though a lot of the mortgages weren’t worth anything.
A year later he took out another for about $200,000, then consolidated that mortgage with the pre-existing one into a single mortgage, for about $1 million.
So he had no real mortgage payments, but he did have a house, and a million dollars.
In 2016, the five biggest mortgage service companies entered into something called the National Mortgage Settlement, wherein these companies agreed to pay $25 billion to the state and federal agencies providing recovery aid for homeowners cheated by banks and lenders, with the indispensable help of MERS. The satisfaction of the mortgage to the house where I lived is notarized by a lady named Jamie Gerber.
According to the mortgage documents, both of Adrian’s loans had belonged to Mortgage IT, and no Mortgage IT officer is mentioned in the chain of title.
Adrian sold another property around this time, a big house in Flatbush with a driveway and a copula for $100,000 to another LLC. ACRIS shows he’d borrowed more than $2 million on it, and that the mortgage was satisfied in Texas by a company called Litton Loan Service, a branch of Goldman Sachs.
In the middle of construction, on May 5, 2017, 220 7th Street LLC took out an additional loan on the house and compounded it, for a total mortgage of $1.8 million.

The orginal article.

Summary of “This is how tiny changes in words you hear impacts your thinking”

“A frame is a mental structure that is represented in the brain by neural circuitry,” Lakoff explains.
Frames shape the way people see the world, and consequently, the goals we seek and the choices that we make.
Think about it this way: Something that has a “95% effective rate” will sell better than something with a “5% failure rate.” It’s all in how you frame it.
Although we can’t see or hear frames, they’re extremely powerful because most of our actions are based on the unconscious and metaphorical frames we already have in place.
“The most common frames are learned as a toddler when you learn about the world,” says Lakoff, “And every time a neural circuit is used, it strengthens.” So it’s not surprising that frames are relatively fixed, and reframing takes quite a bit of dedication and time.
Because subtle differences in languages might shape our thoughts and change how we experience reality, learning a new language can activate new frames.
According to Lakoff, conservatives have a better grasp on the basic principles of framing than progressives do.
Consider the framing around the word “Relief.”

The orginal article.

Summary of “The booming business of luxury chicken diapers”

Around 10 years ago, Baker was raising chickens with her daughter on their small farm in Claremont, New Hampshire when she first saw a YouTube video of a chicken wearing what looked to be an upside-down apron that stretched across its backside.
Chicken diapers work differently depending on the brand.
Most chicken diapers are machine washable and intended to endure for months.
Purely Poultry’s zebra, daisy, and pink camo designs go for around $17, while My Pet Chicken offers custom-made diapers for $30. FeatherWear retails their denim “FlockSuits” – premium diapers that are pitched as “Levi Strauss meets Calvin Klein” for nearly $38. “The market is enormous and there’s lots of competition,” Traci Torres, the owner of My Pet Chicken, told The Outline.
Baker has begun selling another upscale chicken accessory, this one without much of a function – the chicken dress.
To Baker, the growth of the luxury chicken industry tracks with shifting attitudes toward the bird.
“When I first started, I reached out to some of the vets and said, ‘Hey, if people are bringing in sick birds, maybe you would like to offer them a chicken diaper to go home with,’ and they just laughed at me. [They said,] ‘We’re not going to vet a chicken, that’s insane.’ If a chicken is sick, you chop its head off, basically. And now there are whole vets that specialize in chickens.”
Even classic chicken accessories now have luxury counterparts.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Why Higher Rent Can Be a Good Investment”

As housing costs rise to unattainable levels across the country, an increasing number of people under the age of 40 have to come to terms with the fact that they’ll never own a home at all.
Instead, they continue to rent well past the time their parents were home owners, spending more than half of their monthly incomes on a place they’ll never own.
While that’s used as an example of the decaying state of the average American’s finances, a new working paper from the National Bureau of Economic Research argues that, actually, renting is a good investment in its own right.
As the authors of the paper, Esteban Rossi-Hansberg and Adrien Bilal, an economics professor at Princeton University and PhD student, respectively, argue, “The location of individuals determines their job opportunities, living amenities, and housing costs.” Rather than investing in a property to flip in a few decades, tenants are investing in a location asset.
Many people rent in places with a high cost of living for the job opportunities, good schools, cultural offerings, etc.
“Buying more of the asset involves moving to better locations that cost more today but give better returns tomorrow, while selling the asset implies moving to cheaper locations with little opportunities,” the authors write.
W]hen you choose to move to a pricier and amenity-laden city, you’re transferring resources into the future-i.e., saving!-by establishing yourself near opportunities for higher pay and human capital, Rossi-Hansberg and Bilal argue.
As CityLab writes, it could be a nice psychological trick for the perennial renter out there: Think of your rent as an investment gain in your and your children’s future opportunities, rather than a loss because you’ll never own the property.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Top 10 books about self-reinvention”

In my novel The Possible World, three characters each find themselves abruptly spilled into unfamiliar lives: six-year-old Ben, the only survivor of a brutal crime; his doctor Lucy, facing the dissolution of her marriage; centenarian Clare, harbouring her own story of cataclysm, carrying secrets that will affect the destiny of the other two.
All of them struggle with memory, identity and meaning while seeking a way forward into their new lives.
Life After Life by Kate Atkinson The riveting saga of Ursula Todd, who is born and dies in 1910 and is then reborn again and again into the same life, things going a little bit differently each time.
Eleanor Oliphant Is Completely Fine by Gail HoneymanAt first we might pity Eleanor, the 30-year-old odd-bird outcast who lives in a rut of lonely vodka weekends and supermarket pizza.
Her voyage brings her to a crisis: she must decide which of her many selves is the authentic one, and which life can claim to be her destiny.
The Unlikely Pilgrimage of Harold Fry by Rachel Joyce When a mysterious rose-pink envelope arrives for Harold, a 65-year-old man who “Doesn’t know anyone anywhere”, it ruptures his stagnant life.
His Illegal Self by Peter Carey Che Selkirk never knew his parents, outlaw hippie terrorists who abandoned him to a life of sanitised privilege with his wealthy grandmother.
There, memory clouds Joan’s new life in a way she didn’t anticipate, and she realises that there may be a limit to one person’s capacity to self-reinvent.

The orginal article.

Summary of “The real reason the sound of your own voice makes you cringe”

Most of us have shuddered on hearing the sound of our own voice.
Not liking the sound of your own voice is so common that there’s a term for it: voice confrontation.
A common explanation often found in popular media is that because we normally hear our own voice while talking, we receive both sound transferred to our ears externally by air conduction and sound transferred internally through our bones.
Basically, the reasoning is that because our recorded voice does not sound how we expect it to, we don’t like it.
Dr Silke Paulmann, a psychologist at the University of Essex, says, “I would speculate that the fact that we sound more high-pitched than what we think we should leads us to cringe as it doesn’t meet our internal expectations; our voice plays a massive role in forming our identity and I guess no one likes to realise that you’re not really who you think you are.”
When their own voice was secretly mixed in with these samples, participants gave significantly higher ratings to their voice when they did not recognise it as their own.
Through their experiments, the late psychologists Phil Holzemann and Clyde Rousey concluded in 1966 that voice confrontation arises not only from a difference in expected frequency, but also a striking revelation that occurs upon the realisation of all that your voice conveys.
He stands by the Holzemann and Rousey studies, saying: “When we hear our isolated voice which is disembodied from the rest of our behaviour, we may go through the automatic process of evaluating our own voice in the way we routinely do with other people’s voices I think we then compare our own impressions of the voice to how other people must evaluate us socially, leading many people to be upset or dissatisfied with the way they sound because the impressions formed do not fit with social traits they wish to project.”

The orginal article.

Summary of “Nevis: how the world’s most secretive offshore haven refuses to clean up”

The story of Nevis reveals the difficulties the world faces in trying to put an end to tax evasion, fraud and kleptocracy.
As long as Nevis persists in denying foreigners access to the ownership information of its companies – no matter how hard other places work to open up – scoundrels can keep routing their business via Nevis, breaking the chain of traceable ownership, and hiding themselves and their crimes from discovery.
Earlier this week, John Cleese told Newsnight he was so fed up with how Britain is run that he is moving to Nevis for good.
“My approach to getting assets that are in asset protection entities like a Nevis LLC, is that you don’t go to Nevis and try to get the money out – that is a foolhardy enterprise. They passed laws and they set up structures to stop us and to make it expensive and to make it take years and years and years. What we do here is we use some more creative approaches to, for lack of a better term, make them cough up the dough.”
Brantley, the Nevis premier, is fluent and passionate in his defence of the ramparts that Nevis builds for rich people looking to protect their assets from creditors.
A search of the Companies House website reveals how Nevis is able to defang Britain’s attack on secrecy.
Barely 100 metres in the opposite direction on Main Street is the office of Morning Star Holdings, pioneers of the Nevis offshore industry.
Sutton defended Nevis against all allegations, no matter how serious.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Emotional Intelligence: The Social Skills You Weren’t Taught in School”

Most of us aren’t taught how to identify or deal with our own emotions, or the emotions of others.
Emotional intelligence is a shorthand that psychological researchers use to describe how well individuals can manage their own emotions and react to the emotions of others.
People who exhibit emotional intelligence have the less obvious skills necessary to get ahead in life, such as managing conflict resolution, reading and responding to the needs of others, and keeping their own emotions from overflowing and disrupting their lives.
Measuring emotional intelligence is relatively new in the field of psychology, only first being explored in the mid-80s. Several models are currently being developed, but for our purposes, we’ll examine what’s known as the “Mixed model,” developed by psychologist Daniel Goleman.
The order of these emotional competencies isn’t all that relevant, as we all learn many of these skills simultaneously as we grow.
My struggle with depression taught me that some emotions persist long after the overflow.
Some social skills just involve meeting new people , socializing with people of different mindsets , or just playing games.
Resolving conflict can be one of the best ways to learn how to apply your emotional skills.

The orginal article.