Summary of “Emotional Intelligence: The Social Skills You Weren’t Taught in School”

Most of us aren’t taught how to identify or deal with our own emotions, or the emotions of others.
Emotional intelligence is a shorthand that psychological researchers use to describe how well individuals can manage their own emotions and react to the emotions of others.
People who exhibit emotional intelligence have the less obvious skills necessary to get ahead in life, such as managing conflict resolution, reading and responding to the needs of others, and keeping their own emotions from overflowing and disrupting their lives.
Measuring emotional intelligence is relatively new in the field of psychology, only first being explored in the mid-80s. Several models are currently being developed, but for our purposes, we’ll examine what’s known as the “Mixed model,” developed by psychologist Daniel Goleman.
The order of these emotional competencies isn’t all that relevant, as we all learn many of these skills simultaneously as we grow.
My struggle with depression taught me that some emotions persist long after the overflow.
Some social skills just involve meeting new people , socializing with people of different mindsets , or just playing games.
Resolving conflict can be one of the best ways to learn how to apply your emotional skills.

The orginal article.

Summary of “How to survive the teenage years: a parents’ guide”

Does it have to be this way? We asked the experts, from our own advice columnist to counsellors, writers and gaming gurus, people with professional and personal experience of the teenage years.
“Parents are biologically driven to protect their child, but in evolutionary terms, the protected child has to grow up and separate, and so the period of adolescence is there for that to happen,” says Nicola Morgan, who writes about teenagers.
“Video games are a big part of childhood and teenage life, so getting to grips with them can be a window to understanding and engaging with your teenager,” says journalist and gamer Andy Robertson, author of Taming Gaming.
Discuss with them how many hours a day they think it’s appropriate to play, what kind of games you are comfortable with.
“What I don’t understand are parents who want their children to acquiesce when they’re little, but magically know their own minds when they’re a teenager – that’s where the difficulty seems to be.”
Natasha Devon, a children’s mental health campaigner and the author of A Beginner’s Guide to Being Mental: An A-Z, often gets asked when “Normal” teenage behaviour becomes a mental health issue.
Consider whether your reaction to your teenager’s behaviour is coloured by your own experiences.
“Keep checking in with your teenage self – what would that person make of your adult life now?”.

The orginal article.

Summary of “What can depersonalisation disorder say about the self?”

People can be trapped outside themselves, unable to inhabit their own experiences, feelings and thoughts – like Mach, if he were unable to reconnect to himself after spying the shabby pedagogue in the mirror.
Jane suffers from depersonalisation disorder – a condition that typically manifests as a profound and distressing feeling of estrangement from one’s own self and body, including one’s experiences, memories and thoughts.
Sufferers report feeling like zombies, robots or machines, just going through the motions of their own lives.
If the self is a mere sham or a trick, why does the loss of ‘self-illusion’ trigger such dramatic feelings of unreality? Why does losing a link to your self make you feel as if you are dead or sleepwalking? If depersonalisation is a misfiring of some psychological coping mechanism, why is living with the condition so unbearable?
The world is in the globe, but you feel like you’re on the outside of the glass.
If we get stuck in I-as-object, we no longer feel we’re affecting and being affected by the world and others.
When the depersonalisation is very deep, I still seek to ‘be’ and be with someone else, because it feels like that constant source of interaction is the only thing that allows me to maintain a connection with the world.
As the years have passed and I’ve been in and out of bouts of depersonalisation, I’ve built up a body of evidence to suggest that I will never lose touch with myself completely, though I still feel uncomfortably close to losing that tenuous link.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Life and death on a superyacht: ‘If something goes wrong, they can just raise the anchor and leave'”

Britain’s seafaring history has made it the biggest source of employees; crewing on a superyacht is so popular among young adventurers that Southampton Solent University now offers degree-level training at its Warsash Superyacht Academy.
Michael Hanlon, 22, left Cumbria for his dream job as a deckhand and watersports instructor on 62-metre superyacht Faith, owned by the Canadian fashion billionaire Lawrence Stroll, in March 2013.
In 2010, Robin Black received a call from the captain of the £15m sailing superyacht Burrasca, on which Black’s son Will was bosun, or officer in charge of crew and equipment.
“How could they just leave a family to deal with the death of one of their crew, and the police and paperwork and everything? I can’t believe that if something goes wrong – if someone dies – they can just raise the anchor and leave.”
If something goes wrong on a superyacht, it can be incredibly difficult for crew and their families to understand which laws and rights apply.
Superyacht owners can view crew as “Dispensable and replaceable” and don’t consider the impact on their families.
Most recently, McGowan has been representing the 42-strong crew of a £67m superyacht owned by the Indian multimillionaire Vijay Mallya.
At the same time, knowing he had worked two shifts back to back, she is taking the opportunity to highlight the plight of some other superyacht crew, who she says are often forced to work long hours – conditions that might be illegal in the UK. “It was Michael’s dream job,” she says.

The orginal article.

Summary of “What is beauty if not a jolt that awakens us to the world?”

‘ It’s a well-meaning attempt at democratisation, allowing us all the power to declare beauty even where others might dissent.
In Timaeus, Plato recognised beauty as the harmony and proportion of parts, made manifest in the ‘forms’ of the world.
The beautiful demands that we call it beautiful – we can recognise beauty anywhere and name it instantly – and yet there is something unsatisfactory in the idea that beauty could be narrowed to a singular set of characteristics or the isolated qualities of a given object.
The Roman philosopher Boethius, writing of the beauty of music in his sixth-century treatise De Musica, observes that when harmonious compositions of sound please us ‘we come to recognise that we ourselves are united according to this same principle of similarity’.
His didacticism over what constitutes beauty is a mark of his enormous confidence in his own ability to judge: smallness, smoothness, delicacy, gradual variety, fair colour, grace and elegance, he insists, are ‘the real cause of beauty’ and that in which ‘it really consists’.
Crucially, something unites us in our judgments of beauty.
It’s a cloying, rather vague expression, but there is something to this idea of a compact, the notion of a mutual realisation that unfolds between us and the object of our attention when we are engaged in judgments of beauty.
Who doesn’t know that jolting experience of adjacency, when a song sways us or a gesture penetrates, when we are beside ourselves, as it were, somehow outside of our ordinary sensations and thoughts? Isn’t this the beautiful? More recently, in Only a Promise of Happiness, the philosopher Alexander Nehamas characterised beauty as a kind of beckoning, an invitation to further exploration and interpretation.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Don’t Study the Competition. Study Winners in Other Industries.”

When top-earning entrepreneurs need more creative inspiration, or we need to accelerate the growth of our businesses, here’s what we do instead: We study winners and losers in other industries.
I’ll explain why in a moment, but I need to fully debunk this myth that it’s smart to study the competition.
That’s why high-performing CEOs and entrepreneurs keep their thoughts completely focused on success, whether that means studying successful businesses in other industries or envisioning the success of their own businesses.
Studying winners in other industries makes you innovative.
The key to faster innovation is to study innovative leaders in other industries so you can borrow their strategies and be the first to implement them in your own industry.
The point is that Subway was the first fast food place to position itself as “Healthy” and because of that it became the fastest growing, most recognized sandwich company on the planet, all because it copied the winners in a different industry.
That’s because it’s just as important to study failures in other industries as it is to study successes.
Studying losers in other industries keeps you sharp.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Who should hold the keys to our data?”

Within 48 hours, the data had been turned from a pile of figures into a resource that could save lives and that could help people to pressure government to deal with black spots.
There is big data, personal data, open data, aggregate data and anonymised data.
The single thing that every citizen and every corporate decision-maker needs to understand is that the enormous data stores that government, government agencies, corporations, trusts and individuals hold are as much a key part of national and international infrastructure as the road network.
Several companies have practical designs that offer each individual their own data account, on a cloud independent of any agency or commercial organisation.
The data would be unreadable as a whole to anyone other than the individual owner, who would allow other people access to selected parts of it, at their own discretion.
There are real gains to be made if citizens hold their own data and huge organisations don’t.
Yes, yes, the spooks and cops want to keep their own files about terrorists and not discuss the morals of data retention much with the lucky names on the list, and we are perfectly happy with that.
The central requirement is that, if you own a car, that fact and details of your car must be in your data store, whether you like it or not; authorised agencies must be able to look simultaneously at everyone’s store, to find a car they are interested in and must be able to do it without you knowing.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Fight Grows Over Who Owns Real Estate Drowned by Climate Change”

Carpenter sued the sheriff, as well as Castex Energy Inc., which owns the property around the pond, for interfering with his business.
Carpenter’s suit reflects a legal and political dilemma that’s beginning to reverberate around the country: As seas rise and coasts wash away, who owns the land that goes underwater? Versions of that debate are taking place in courtrooms, legislatures, and government offices, raising the question of whether and when climate change justifies seizing private property.
Because it’s Mother Nature taking the land, not the government, there’s no legal requirement for the government to compensate property owners.
In Louisiana, the combination of rising seas, subsiding land around the Mississippi Delta, and the reduced deposit of sediment-thanks to man-made flood controls-has put the state at the forefront of the battle over erosion and property rights.
In Florida, rising seas and erosion have sparked a different debate: As beaches recede, should private property owners near the coast be forced to let the public use their share of what remains? In Walton County, part of Florida’s Panhandle that includes Miramar Beach, the line between public and private land has always been tenuous.
The state owns everything below the high-tide line, but the dry beach is a mix of public and private property.
In other parts of the country, the fight over submerged land has taken a surreal twist: Who owns land that the government saves from oblivion? Since 1984, Maria Levenson has owned a beachfront lot on the southern shore of Dauphin Island, Ala., a slender strip of land at the mouth of Mobile Bay.
Patti Powell, director of the State Lands Division of Alabama’s Department of Conservation and Natural Resources, which is studying whether to rebuild the shore, says there’s no policy determining whether Levenson and other property owners would still hold the land if it gets reclaimed.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Teach Kids Compassion By Creating Stories About Others”

It’s easy to conclude that people generally suck.
As a parent, I want to teach my daughter to view others with compassion over judgment-a tough skill to learn, but one that will serve her every day.
We take turns creating stories from observations of people and events on trips to and from school.
If we see a man walking rapidly on the sidewalk with tattooed arms and a sleeveless vest, we might make up a story that he’s late for work because his car broke down, so he’s walking fast to get help.
Maybe he owns a tattoo parlor across the bridge and is a walking advertisement for his business.
What if we didn’t? What if we taught them to wonder about people, even those who might hurt them? What if we reminded them that everyone is fighting a hard battle? What if will pushed them to challenge their assumptions and give others the benefit of the doubt-or even better, ask them about their lives? In Brené Brown’s book Rising Strong, she asks her husband if he believes people are doing the best they can.
With your kids, help them use their natural love for stories to come up with their own narratives for the toddler throwing a tantrum in the grocery store, the man who’s getting upset at the bank or the bully in the book their reading.
In the end, the story they’re changing will be their own.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Jeff Bezos v the world: why all companies fear ‘death by Amazon'”

“All Amazon had to do was pick the best one and copy it,” said Rachel Greer, a former product manager for Amazon who runs a consulting firm for Amazon vendors.
Rain Design isn’t the first company to fall victim to the aggressive techniques Amazon uses to achieve market dominance.
“If you try to measure power by how many executives are up at night because of X company, I think Amazon would win,” said Lina Khan, legal fellow with the Open Markets Program at the thinktank New America.
Amazon has a restaurant delivery service, a music streaming service and an Etsy clone called Amazon Homemade.
“Amazon’s north star is to delight the customer,” said Gene Munster, a former Amazon analyst who runs an investment firm, Loup Ventures.
Despite its treasure trove of personal data – the kind that allows retailers to predict if their teenage customers are pregnant before their parents know – Amazon has mostly avoided using that data in ways that unnerve people.
Since 2012, Bespoke Investment Group has been tracking an index of 54 retail stocks, known as the “Death by Amazon index”, that it considers most vulnerable to Amazon.
Between February 2012 and January 2018, Amazon’s value rose 560%, the S&P index rose 102%, and the Death by Amazon index grew just 42.8%. Amazon still has a lot of room to grow.

The orginal article.