Summary of “When a parent dies by suicide, how are the children told?”

Compared with those who’ve lost a parent to other forms of sudden death, children bereaved by suicide are more likely to suffer adverse outcomes.
Since such prejudice can extend to the close family members of those who actually die by suicide, it’s easy to see why so many are wary of acknowledging the suicide of a parent.
One woman who’d lost her father to suicide six years prior wondered aloud: ‘Will the stigma be attached to the children, to the children’s children, and to their children in turn?’.
Research on the emotional impact of parental suicide is surprisingly slim, with much of the literature tending to focus on suicide bereavement in the opposite direction.
Many children attribute the suicide to something they’d recently done to upset the parent.
In other situations, the child is spared from exposure to the act itself, but the living parent is adamant that the child not be told of the suicide.
‘For adult children of suicide,’ writes Cain, ‘the most salient precipitate in their relationship with their offspring is the fear-laden expectation that their youngsters will also commit suicide especially if a particular child [is] perceived as resembling the suicided grandparent in some significant respect – looks, temperament, talents, or interests.
‘ Because many such adult children of suicides keep the information assiduously hidden as a family secret, the third generation might be completely unaware of why their parent treats them the way they do.

The orginal article.

Summary of “How to Grant Your Child an Inner Life”

So many of the worst nightmares of parenting start with a phone call: a child out of arm’s reach, not in the house, not in her bed.
There probably are teen-agers out there who could face an existential fear without a single Internet search, without texting or posting or sharing, who could cover their tracks sufficiently to prevent a determined parent from snooping, but I haven’t met any.
A motivated parent can give their young driver a car that shuts off the radio, won’t go above a certain speed, and sends text alerts home if the car goes outside a pre-approved area.
A movement for “Free-range parenting” has pushed back against this culture of obsessive supervision, which also criminalizes the dilemmas faced by single parents, two-career parents, and parents who don’t earn enough to pay for constant childcare.
Its leaders point out, among other things, that U.S. crime rates have fallen dramatically over the last twenty years, and it’s safer for children to be alone now than it was in the nineteen-seventies and eighties, when today’s parents were young.
Kids her age seem to accept, reluctantly, that the price of having a social life is having their parents one step away from everything they do, sharing the same accounts, playlists, search histories.
Anxious parenting is an optimization economy with no upper limit, which turns every second of a child’s life, in and out of school, into a commodity: from nanny-cams to high-impact strollers to Kumon to internship consultants to college-essay tutors, and it privileges those who have the least to worry about.
That kind of laissez-faire parenting, bordering on neglect, seems diametrically opposed to the hyperattentive parenting of my generation, but these approaches share one instructive point: they’re primarily concerned with how to succeed and how not to die.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Communal living with kids”

Many cohousing kids talked about learning to play sports that their parents didn’t know anything about from various members of the community, learning to cook dishes that their own parents didn’t cook, and even getting spiritual and emotional counsel from people other than their parents when going through a challenging time.
Many cohousing kids talked about the power of being exposed to a wide range of professions through the adults in their communities.
Like Durrett, most cohousing kids have been coloring under a table or building Legos in proximity to more meetings than they could possibly count.
While most so-called typical families face food insecurity, strains on their time or energy, sickness, and any number of other challenges within the four walls of their own private homes, cohousing kids are raised in an environment where many of these things are treated as collective problems and possibilities for growth.
Helen Thomson, who grew up in Heartwood Cohousing near Durango, Colorado, from the age of 5 until she left for the University of Montana, explains: “I think that all of us who grew up in Heartwood are much better at communicating and working together than many other kids our age.”
Cohousing kids often have freedom to roam between houses and in the shared outdoor spaces, even as little kids.
Many of the kids who grew up in cohousing attest to having a different way of moving through the world than most people.
For all its potential flaws, almost all of the young adults I interviewed said that, given the chance, they would raise their own kids in cohousing.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Your Company Needs a Better Retention Plan for Working Parents”

If you’re having serious trouble finding the talent you need already, it’s probably time to start paying attention to ways you can attract this huge pool of working mothers and fathers, retain them, and ensure they deliver at work.
Not only is the sheer number of working parents large and growing, but those men and women also carry much heavier loads than previous generations have.
Today’s working parents are three times more likely, on average, to be part of dual-career couples or to be single than they are to spouses at home full-time.
As wonderful as many technological changes are, some have also made working parenthood harder: iPhone in hand, there’s no reason, or excuse, to ever be “Off” of work, even during the parent-teacher conference or family dinner.
Because more working parents care more – and may vote with their feet.
How you treat working parents is an indicator of how you treat talent in general, especially in the eyes of prospective or more junior employees.
Bottom line: Without a good approach to working parenthood that you’re willing to showcase publicly and some visible examples of moms and dads succeeding and thriving in your organization, you’ll have a hard time developing a reputation as a great boss or persuading people that your company is “a great place to work.”
Ultimately, every leader and organization will find different ways to solve the Working Parent Problem.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Singapore’s ‘kiasu’ culture makes FOMO look like child’s play”

Singapore’s ‘kiasu’ culture makes FOMO look like child’s play – Los Angeles Times.
Long before Americans discovered FOMO – the fear of missing out -Singaporeans were fixated with its more excessive forebear, kiasu.
If you stand in line for hours just because there’s a gift at the end, then you’re kiasu.
If you’re a parent who volunteers hours of your free time at a school just so your offspring has a better chance of enrolling there one day, then you’re most definitely kiasu.
Foreign policy in Singapore isn’t immune to kiasu either.
There are modest signs of a kiasu backlash, including last year when a small group of parents formed “Life Beyond Grades,” an organization that seeks to relieve academic pressure on children to focus on their wider well-being.
A survey released last year by the Institute of Policy Studies, a local think tank, found that Singaporeans perceived their society to be kiasu more than any other trait.
“On one hand, there are Singaporeans who wear it like a mark of national character, even pride. Others laugh at it, and still others see being kiasu as being a bit of an embarrassment due to the over-the-top behavior it can encourage.”

The orginal article.

Summary of “Parenting Books Aren’t Much Help for Actual Parenting”

I had struggled with milk production, but the books had been adamant: Breast is best.
I was only weeks into being a parent, but according to the books, I had managed to fail at the three most important things so far-childbirth, breastfeeding, and soothing.
Research shows that parenting books can be damaging to new parents, adding to mothers’ stress and heightening their chances of developing postpartum depression.
Missed breastfeeding your newborns in the “Golden” first hour of their life? Too late, your bond is irreparably harmed.
Allowed your toddler to play with your phone? Not potty-trained by 3? Yelled at your kid? Too late, too late, too late.
Parenting is as high stakes as it gets-another person’s life is in your hands.
After almost a decade of raising a kid and talking to parents for my podcast, The Longest Shortest Time, I’ve realized something: We’re all winging it.
For breastfeeding, I sat her upright and facing me, as if seated in an invisible chair-a position that nobody mentions in breastfeeding books.

The orginal article.

Summary of “The Diabolical Genius of the Baby Advice Industry”

So “Two or three” books became six, and 10, and eventually 23, all with titles that, even before the sleep deprivation set in, had begun to blur into one other: The Baby Book and Secrets of the Baby Whisperer and The Happiest Baby on the Block and Healthy Sleep Habits, Happy Child and The Contented Little Baby Book.
Such mysteries begin to disperse when you realise that baby advice isn’t only, or perhaps even mainly, about raising children.
This same urge to recast a baby as something fundamentally mundane and familiar suffuses the debate over sleep, where hostilities between the Baby Trainers and the Natural Parents are most acute.
From five or six months old, I learned, we could choose to let our baby cry himself to sleep for a few nights, which the Baby Trainers felt was essential if he were ever to learn to “Self-soothe”, but which the Natural Parents swore would cause lasting neurological damage.
Not for the last time in the history of the baby advice industry, Liedloff turned her disdain for parenting experts into a successful career as one, publishing a 1975 book, The Continuum Concept, which urged American and European parents to embrace the laid-back ways of the Ye’kuana.
It sold healthily, but its greatest effect was undoubtedly in the influence it had on William Sears, a devout Christian paediatrician from Illinois who incorporated its message into his own childcare philosophy, coining the term “Attachment parenting” and achieving breakthrough success in 1992 with The Baby Book: Everything You Need to Know about Your Baby from Birth to Age Two, written with his wife, Martha.
The anthropological literature is littered with contemporary examples of baby-rearing practices that would appal both Baby Trainers and Natural Parents: among the Hausa-Fulani of west Africa, for example, there is a taboo against mothers making eye contact with their children; the Swazi of southern Africa sometimes don’t even name a baby until it is several months old.
Last year, Amy Brown, a health researcher at Swansea University, conducted a study involving 354 new mothers, examining their use of parenting books “That encourage parents to try to put their babies into strict sleeping and feeding routines” – the manuals of the Baby Trainers.

The orginal article.

Summary of “The Atavist Magazine”

Mrs. Clark had once yanked Deon’s ear so hard that she ripped the skin where it connected to the boy’s head. When teachers sent Gladina home early from preschool after a bookshelf fell on her, Mrs. Clark spanked the little girl for disrupting her daily schedule, then made Gladina sit in a corner until Deon got home.
Once, while the family was in the Orlando airport, returning from one of their trips, Deon and Mrs. Richards got in an argument, and he told her, “I hate you.” When the family got home, Mr. Richards spanked Deon.
The investigator noted that Deon’s tendency to run away “May be indicative of abuse in his past” and that he’d been adopted because his birth mother “Beat his sister.” It isn’t clear if she knew anything more specific about Deon’s early life.
According to the investigator’s report, Mrs. Richards said that Deon was going through a rebellious stage and that he needed mental-health treatment, though there’s no evidence that she attempted to connect Deon with a therapist.
Still, Deon stayed with his parents until one night in mid-December, when he came home late and Mr. Richards, suspecting that Deon was high, refused to let him into the house.
The state’s position was that family reunification was still in Deon’s best interest, but in court the Richardses requested a no-contact clause, which prohibited Deon from reaching out to them and suspended any family counseling.
Still, because the Richardses had parental rights, caseworkers had to ask their permission for everything-from sending Deon to get a haircut to obtaining his state-issued ID. The family also remained entitled to a $300 monthly adoption subsidy until Deon turned 18.
“Deon is motivated and has many supports in place.” In staid language, Deon’s lack of support is framed almost as an asset: In lieu of a nuclear family, he had an endless roster of paid employees who divvied up parenthood’s material tasks.

The orginal article.

Summary of “What it’s like to be the parent of an Instagram influencer kid”

What it’s like to be the parent of an Instagram influencer kid.
The influencer marketing industry is on track to be worth $5 billion to $10 billion by 2020, and children are a growing part of Instagram’s influencer economy.
Of Instagram’s 800 million users, as of September 2017, 80% of them follow a business, and the company reports that more than 60% of these people say they discover new products on Instagram.
Though Instagram influencing has exploded over the past five years, Marans estimates that the platform’s biggest kid stars, like the twins Mila and Emma Stauffer, have popped up only in the last few years.
Many parents of child influencers started using Instagram after their children already had popular YouTube followings or traditional modeling careers.
A kid influencer can command about $100 per 1,000 followers per post, according to Kyle Hjelmeseth, the founder of the influencer management company God and Beauty.
Clements started taking them for traditional auditions and, on the recommendation of a friend, started their Instagram page, which blew up after a bunch of beauty influencers shared their photos.
“If kid is performing in typical ad, we know what laws apply. That’s because that kid is going to a set, missing school, and that’s where the child’s welfare comes in,” she says.

The orginal article.

Summary of “If You’re Scared Of Math, Your Kids Might Be Too”

If You’re Scared Of Math, Your Kids Might Be Too A new study shows that creating an environment in which math is part of everyday life, can help kids do better in the subject.
One reason for a kid’s math anxiety? How their parents feel about the subject.
“A parent might say, ‘oh I’m not a math person, it’s okay if you’re not good at math either,'” Sian Beilock, cognitive scientist and President of Barnard College, says.
Families did this for a total of three years – while kids grew from first to third grade – because this is when kids tend to solidify their fear of math.
After a year of reading these stories, parents felt more confident in their children’s math potential and valued the importance of math skills more.
Now, after three years, when those students were tested on their math ability, they did just as well as the kids whose parents felt confident about math.
Using the app to read bedtime stories didn’t get rid of math anxiety – it was a way for families to normalize math at home and foster a relaxed dialogue around the subject.
Creating an environment in which math is part of everyday life won’t transform kids into overnight math sensations, but perhaps it can help kids realize math is a subject for curiosity, discussion and growth.

The orginal article.