Summary of “The New York Review of Books”

It is no wonder that the planet’s carbon emissions, which had seemed to plateau in mid-decade, are again on the rise: preliminary figures indicate that a new record will be set in 2018.This is the backdrop against which the IPCC report arrives, written by ninety-one scientists from forty countries.
The burden of climate change falls first and heaviest on the poorest nations, who of course have done the least to cause the crisis.
The report provides few truly new insights for those who have been paying attention to the issue.
As the new report concedes, there is “No documented historical precedent” for change at the speed that the science requires.
Since the last IPCC report, a series of newspaper exposés has made it clear that the big oil companies knew all about climate change even before it became a public issue in the late 1980s, and that, instead of owning up to that knowledge, they sponsored an enormously expensive campaign to obfuscate the science.
The next Democratic primary season might allow a real climate champion to emerge who would back what the rising progressive star Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez called a “Green New Deal”; in turn a revitalized America could theoretically help lead the planet back to sanity.
In October, the attorney general for New York State filed suit against ExxonMobil, claiming the company defrauded shareholders by downplaying the risks of climate change.
If we keep doing that, climate change will no longer be a problem, because calling something a problem implies there’s still a solution.

The orginal article.

Summary of “How France created the metric system”

It is just one of many sites in Paris that point to the long and fascinating history of the metric system.
Today, the metric system, which was created in France, is the official system of measurement for every country in the world except three: the United States, Liberia and Myanmar, also known as Burma.
In France alone, it was estimated at that time that at least 250,000 different units of weights and measures were in use during the Ancien Régime.
While decimal time did not stick, the new decimal system of measurement, which is the basis of the metre and the kilogram, remains with us today.
Using the latest equipment and the mathematical process of triangulation to measure the meridian arc between these two sea-level locations, and then extrapolating the distance between the North Pole and the equator by extending the arc to an ellipse, the two astronomers aimed to meet back in Paris to come up with the new, universal standard of measurement within one year.
During Delambre’s time, it served as another kind of mausoleum – a warehouse for all the old weights and measures that had been sent in by towns from all over France in anticipation of the new system.
The Paris authorities were so exasperated at the public’s refusal to give up their old measure that they even sent police inspectors to marketplaces to enforce the new system.
Eventually, in 1812, Napoleon abandoned the metric system; although it was still taught in school, he largely let people use whichever measures they liked until it was reinstated in 1840.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Welcome to Paris’s Delicious, Wine-Soaked, Never-Ending Block Party”

Similar joints exist across Paris, but what sets Savoir Vivre’s apart is that all four of its venues-Vivant, Déviant, Da Graziella, and Hôtel Bourbon-are owned by 30-year-old Arnaud Lacombe, who, by a mixture of luck and an intuitive sense of how young people like to party, did the opposite of what most restaurateurs do.
Arnaud’s food-and-libation kingdom is called Savoir Vivre, which literally translates to “Knowing how to live.” Though he didn’t plan to create one of the city’s most raucous nightlife destinations, Arnaud was determined to design an experience around something he thought was too hard to find in Paris: pure pleasure.
So Arnaud bought two sleepy restaurants on the same block and decided to do something drastically un-French: turn one of them, originally a Belle Époque bird shop, into a Neapolitan pizza joint.
Shortly thereafter, Arnaud met a hungry 23-year-old chef named Pierre Touitou, whom he installed in the cramped kitchen of the other restaurant, which he opened as Vivant in 2016.
As is a good all-night rager at Hôtel Bourbon, Arnaud’s third property, which inhabits the basement of the old Bronco space.
Since hosting its first party, in October 2017, Hôtel Bourbon has become a clubhouse for the French fashion elite and celebs like Kid Cudi and Emily Ratajkowski, but Guillaume and Arnaud make sure the 200 guests who make it past the velvet rope represent Paris’s socio-cultural flavor.
There you have the ultimate Paris party game plan, a road map for how to enjoy life in style.
Do any Parisians really spend a whole day on Rue des Petites Écuries, eating pizza Margherita at Da Graziella for lunch, having a glass of Vincent Charlot at Déviant, tucking into whatever Pierre is braising and torching for dinner at Vivant, and then hitting Hôtel Bourbon till the sun comes up? “A lot of friends do it almost every day,” says Arnaud.

The orginal article.

Summary of “I Wanted To Love Paris, But It Didn’t Love Me”

By the time I moved to Paris, I’d resolved at least one part of me: I had decided I wanted to be a writer.
Still, I’d envisioned working on my opus in Paris, sipping cognac in my own Café de Flore or Les Deux Magots, belonging to a new, artsy expatriate coterie of Hemingways and Steins and Fitzgeralds.
Of wealthy, Jewish stock, Stacy visited Paris every year with her mother, strictly for museum and shopping purposes.
I’d scoured online forums: How to fit in, in Paris?
A year after I returned from France, several news outlets published articles about a peculiar malady known as “Paris syndrome.” This transient psychological disorder afflicts certain tourists whose quixotic notions of Paris clash, to disastrous effect, with reality.
Depending on the publication, anywhere from 12 to 20 Japanese visitors a year are diagnosed with Paris syndrome, a handful of whom even require repatriation under medical supervision.
What the journalists did not take into account is that perhaps it is indifference itself that the Japanese desire, the ability to walk the city alone without the constant reminder of their displacement; to experience the same mundane disillusionment as a visitor with green eyes or blonde hair, who holds the same unreasonable fantasies that Paris evokes in us all.
The irony is that when I visited Seoul for the first time, shortly after Paris, every Korean I encountered spoke to me in Japanese.

The orginal article.

Summary of “What you need to know before visiting Paris, France”

In order to be able to enjoy and experience Paris to the fullest, without becoming overwhelmed by the throngs of crowds and places to see, it’s important to go with a plan in mind.
With everything there is to see and do in both the city and surrounding area, you’ll want to stay at least one week, especially if it is your first time visiting.
Make a list of places you want to visit each day, as well as a backup list.
On the opposite end of that, if it’s taking you much longer to visit the sights you wanted to see, then start out by visiting the places that are on the top of your list so you won’t have to miss out on what you want to see most.
The food on the cruise was nothing compared to the food found in the restaurants throughout Paris, and frankly, was long and somewhat boring.
It’s not much different from the rest of Paris and doesn’t have much to offer other than the Sacre-Coeur Cathedral.
Many people don’t realize that there is a Disney park just a short train ride away from Paris.
Wear comfortable shoes, make a list of everything you want to see and make sure to take a lunch break.

The orginal article.

Summary of “This is How a Woman is Erased From Her Job”

This is a story about a woman who was erased from her job as the editor of the most famous literary magazine in America.
I thought about how the award-winning writer Yiyun Li was plucked for the first time from the slush pile for the Paris Review and published by Hughes, and how I had never heard anyone at the Paris Review give Hughes credit for championing her.
It’s clear when he applied for the job, Gourevitch was in the dark about the mess the board left for him in Hughes’ dismissal and didn’t at the time know the details of Hughes’ termination.
Hughes’ job, despite her title of “Executive editor,” was not an interim position, as many have suggested to me might have been the case, including several post-Hughes Paris Review editorial staff members.
Gaffney then explained to me over email how Hughes was forced out, including a key piece of information: Plimpton wanted Hughes to succeed him and entrusted Gaffney to make it happen.
Over the phone, the editor acknowledged somewhat legitimate concerns the board had about their wanting “a public figure” – that Hughes’ low visibility was a concern given the magazine’s fundraising needs – before adding, “The real injustice is how they treated her afterward. It was beyond shabby and beyond conspicuous. You go back and look at the issues she did and they were outstanding.”
Hughes got the promotion, had it rescinded after over a year, and then watched her work be erased.
What else is there to say, but that I’m biased? I am a woman who has worked in an unpaid role for A Public Space on and off for the last decade, with the unflagging support and encouragement in my own professional endeavors from Hughes, even after she witnessed my failures.

The orginal article.