Summary of “The Key to Act Two”

The essential truth about Act 2, which you must recognize in order to navigate it well, is this: Unless you make a special effort, you are probably not going to get damaged enough in Act 1 to become a key.
The trick to Act 2 is to recognize that Act 1 was mostly about turning into a key.
So whatever else it unlocks, the main thing unlocked by the key you turn into during Act 1 is your ability to actually inhabit your own life through Act 2.
For us in the 90%, unless you recognize that Act 1 is a key-making act, and figure out what sort of key you’ve turned into, and what sort of locks you should go looking for, you’re destined to end up, somewhere in the neighborhood of 40, going, “Err somebody call the superintendent, I can’t get into my apartment.”
You’ve heard of nature and nurture, right? Nature and nurture get you to the end of Act I and to the bathroom line in the lobby, but if that’s all you have, you aren’t a key.
So the key to becoming a key is to seek out the right tortures that can bind the undetermined variables in interesting, unique, hard-to-hack ways that have a shot at unlocking an interesting door instead of turning you a hackable signaling puppet.
Whether you arrive at keydom with an agile or waterfall Act 1, the question is, what exactly is a key in human condition terms? How do you know when you’ve become one? What do you do once you’ve become one? How do you protect it? Why should you protect it?
To be a key is to potentially become immortal, because what you have unlocked cannot be locked up again once you’re dead, because, heh, you’re the only key remember?

The orginal article.

Summary of “How to Think about “Implicit Bias””

Implicit bias diverts attention from more damaging instances of explicitbigotry.
First, much of the controversy centers on the most famous implicit bias test, the Implicit Association Test.
A majority of people taking this test show evidence of implicit bias, suggesting that most people are implicitly biased even if they do not think of themselves as prejudiced.
None of these measures is without limitations, but they show the same pattern of reliable bias as the IAT. There is a mountain of evidence-independent of any single test-that implicit bias is real.
Implicit bias researchers have always warned against using the tests for predicting individual outcomes, like how a particular manager will behave in job interviews-they’ve never been in the palm-reading business.
Metro areas with greater average implicit bias have larger racial disparities in police shootings.
Counties with greater average implicit bias have larger racial disparities in infant health problems.
One reason people on both the right and the left are skeptical of implicit bias might be pretty simple: it isn’t nice to think we aren’t very nice.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Tiger is set to return to the Masters, and a new generation of fans will be watching”

Watching Tiger this spring reminded me of an old Roger Federer quote.
A new Tiger biography released March 27, written by Jeff Benedict and Armen Keteyian, exhaustively details Tiger’s childhood, his meteoric rise and fall, scandals and all.
“My goal all along had been that, by playing and winning golf, I could somehow help golfers, and perhaps people outside the game, be color blind,” Tiger wrote in the book “The 1997 Masters: My Story” co-written with Lorne Rubenstein.
The second time Trump and Tiger played, “Get Out” director Jordan Peele retweeted a video of Trump and Tiger together with the caption “Now you’re in The Sunken Place” and the tweet went viral, but any controversy over the round quickly faded.
The last thing anyone wants is to see Tiger double over pain at the 13th tee at the Masters because he has just seen Bubba Watson drive one over the trees and carry the dogleg and his ego can’t resist swinging so hard and Tiger reaches his breaking point.
I recently spoke to Golf Channel analyst and occasional Tiger Woods skeptic Brandel Chamblee, and we were joking about what it’s like to be on the record, as both of us are, about how a Tiger comeback was unlikely.
Rose: You don’t? Tiger: No. Rose: You’ve accepted that? Tiger: I’ve accepted I’m going to get more.
Another generation of golf fans – my kids, your kids, Tiger’s kids – will get to witness some magic that seemed, not long ago, improbable.

The orginal article.

Summary of “How to bring a high street back from the dead”

According to the Centre for Retail Research, more than 11,000 major high street outlets have gone bust since 2008, affecting almost 140,000 employees.
What is certain is that the traditional high street of the last 50 years, founded on chain stores and well-known brands, is undergoing a brutal transformation.
Less than a mile away, a stroll down Bishopthorpe Road reveals many of the elements that are on everyone’s wishlist for a decent local high street: a handful of excellent cafes and restaurants, hardware shop, chemist, baker, two greengrocers, a brace of small supermarkets, pub, bike shop, deli and butcher.
The street was voted Britain’s best high street in 2015.
What is really fascinating about this success is that it is not a glamorous location, a street laden with tourist attractions or backed by upmarket housing; it is a socially mixed area and, at first glance, a very ordinary British shopping street.
“The measurements for success from engineers were about how many cars or people we could move through a space as quickly as possible. But there was very little conversation about how people actually use, enjoy and love streets, and how lingering should actually be a measurable definition of success for a great street.”
In the past people went to the high street for shopping and work, just like today, but they also went for entertainment and leisure.
Since then independent shops have moved in, accounting for 89% of retail growth, and making Ely high street a success story akin to York’s Bishopthorpe Road. Gehl’s influence is apparent in healthy cities all around the world.

The orginal article.

Summary of “The DASH Diet Helps Depression Symptoms”

In a recently released abstract, researchers studying 964 elderly participants over six and a half years found those who followed the DASH diet, which emphasizes whole grains, fruits, and vegetables, had lower rates of depression, while those who ate a traditional Western diet were more prone to depression.
“Medications to treat depression are wonderful, but for many people, it’s going to be a combination of things.”
The study has not been published yet in a peer-reviewed journal, but other researchers have found similar antidepression benefits from the DASH diet, which was developed by the U.S. National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute.
Past research has found that following the DASH diet was associated with reduced depression in adolescent girls and with less physician-diagnosed depression among thousands of Spaniards.
The evidence suggests diet improves depression symptoms even when controlling for factors like income or education, says Felice Jacka, a professor of nutritional psychiatry at Australia’s Deakin University.
Jacka found in 2010 that women who ate a diet high in produce, meat, fish, and whole grains had lower odds of major depression and anxiety than others.
Jacka told me that at this point, the connection between diet and depression is so well-established that more studies like Cherian’s aren’t really necessary.
The DASH diet itself is nothing revolutionary-a typical dinner consists of a lean meat, baked potato, and lots of vegetables.

The orginal article.

Summary of “The unstoppable rise of veganism: how a fringe movement went mainstream”

350%. Rise in the number of vegans in Britain from 2006-2016; 542,000 people said they were vegans in 2016.
Big chains such as Marks & Spencer and Pret a Manger have introduced vegan ranges, Wagamama has a new vegan menu, Pizza Hut recently joined Pizza Express and Zizzi in offering vegan pizzas, while last year Guinness went vegan and stopped using fish bladders in its brewing process, after two and a half centuries.
“But things are changing rapidly – and if you’re trying to go vegan, you’re a pioneer.” She talks about shopping challenges and getting around social stigma, meal-planning and vitamin supplements, how to make holidays and dining out easier, how to check labels and online resources – and the group of new vegans and could-be-vegans asks keen questions and shares local tips.
“What surprised us was people were coming from all over Blackpool. There were hidden vegans in Blackpool who were struggling in silence! That was June last year and at that point we decided to turn the restaurant 100% vegan and it just exploded on Facebook. I went vegan as well, as head chef, and I feel better for it. We have such a wide range of people coming in: we’ll have a table of six people who are protesters from an anti-fracking demonstration , sat next to a table of two people who are multimillionaires, sat next to international rugby players.”
“At the moment, it’s so faddy, and there are Instagram influencers who are becoming vegan, and maybe it works for them, in their specific scenarios. The key point is always individualisation and research – to know why you’re doing it and how to do it properly, rather than just jumping on a trend. People can run the risk of being deficient in b12, even protein and iron.” She is keen to point out though that, done correctly, going vegan can be very good for health.
Things are slowly changing, with the vegan junk food movement for example and I’m glad to add to the visible women of colour in that space.
We don’t see each other as being rival businesses; the ultimate aim is to grow the vegan movement.
We must be getting half-a-dozen new people a week coming in and saying: “Someone in my family has gone vegan and I don’t know what to feed them; can you help?” Or: “My son went vegan three months ago and we’ve all joined him now.” There is a domino effect within families and parents are listening to their children.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Perception Is Reality”

One of the most important lessons I have learned from my mentor about working in large teams is this: People can only judge their perception of you.
Often, there’s a difference between perception and reality, right?
Based on my own mistakes, I told him what one of my mentors told me: Perception is reality, keep that in mind.
Change What People Perceive By now, you might wonder “How do I change other people’s perceptions?” The answer lies in the science of influence.
How does our behavior influence the behavior of others? How does other people’s behavior influence our behavior? I’ll give you an example.
My perception of one of our team members was that she lacked interest in our business.
No matter what you do, start applying the perception is reality mindset to your life, right now.
Listen If you want to hear more thoughts on why perception is reality; listen to my podcast episode about it.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Every Yes Is Also a No”

It’s easy to see why: saying no to something unimportant gives you more time to spend on things that are.
When you say no to something, what exactly are you saying yes to?
While I originally put these photos here because they’re nice to look at, over time, they’ve turned into a reminder of what I’m saying no to when I say yes to something else.
Every time I say yes to traveling somewhere, I say no to spending time with the people in those picture frames.
These are what you say no to when you say yes to working late, watching Netflix, and using your smartphone in bed.
These are what you say no to when you say yes to unnecessary projects, checking your email superfluously, or agreeing to an unnecessary meeting.
You make more intentional decisions when you consider what you’re saying no to when you say yes to something else.
Make sure the things you say yes to are both meaningful and valuable-because every yes is also a no.

The orginal article.

Summary of “7 Harsh Truths That Will Improve Your Leadership Skills Overnight”

You don’t manage people; you lead people and manage the work.
If you find yourself in the precarious position of wondering “Where do I stand as a leader,” at some point you must face some brutal truths about what it takes to motivate and inspire on a human, emotional, and psychological level.
The brutal truth that good leaders will first pump the fear out of the room.
Every leader needs to ask a very important, look-in-the-mirror, question: “Does my behavior increase trust?” If you are considering elevating your leadership skills, trust is a pillar your leadership should stand on.
The brutal truth that good leaders are willing to listen to feedback.
Many leaders don’t want to listen to ideas, opinions, and constructive feedback from others about their own leadership.
The brutal truth that good leaders are positive, even when things go bad. Good leaders practice positive thinking.
The brutal truth that good leaders put strict boundaries on themselves.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Research: Learning a Little About Something Makes Us Overconfident”

The students thought they were much further along in the learning curve toward workplace success than their future employers did.
Specifically, our research focused on the common task of probabilistic learning in which people learn to read cues from the environment to predict some outcome.
Participants estimated their accuracy rate was 73% when it had not hit even 60%. It appears that Alexander Pope was right when he said that a little learning is a dangerous thing.
In our studies, just a little learning was enough to make participants feel they had learned the task.
Other research has found that doctors learning to do spinal surgery usually do not begin to make mistakes until their 15th iteration of the surgery.
As with probabilistic learning, it has been shown that most people under the age of 18 have little knowledge of personal finance.
Personal finance is something most learn by trial and error.
Of course, the beginner must struggle to learn – but the beginner must also guard against an illusion they have learned too quickly.

The orginal article.