Summary of “Is It Unhealthy to Be Overweight?”

Many overweight people feel locked in a fruitless battle with their size.
Telling people it’s perfectly fine to be dozens of pounds overweight would be terrible advice-if it’s wrong.
Like many internecine wars, the dispute mostly comes down to one small thing: how you define the “Overweight” population in the study.
Having those individuals in the pool of normal-weight people makes the normal-weight people seem sicker, and the overweight people seem healthier, than they actually are.
“On average, overweight people lose about one year of life expectancy, and moderately obese people lose about three years of life expectancy,” the paper’s lead author, Emanuele Di Angelantonio, told The Guardian.
Some researchers suggest overweight people might be better equipped to fight off certain diseases, with fat serving as a last-ditch fuel for the ailing body.
For one thing, athletes and other very muscular people might be wrongly categorized as overweight, and some scientists now think it’s stomach fat, not hip fat, that’s the dangerous kind.
Medical advice urging heavy people to lose weight is based on the premise that being overweight is unhealthy.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Stop Treating 70- and 90-Year-Olds the Same”

Older adults are thus more susceptible to infections – more likely to get sick, more likely to require hospitalization and more likely to die.
Older adults who receive tetanus and diphtheria vaccines produce less-effective antibodies, and the vaccines’ protective effect fades faster than it does for younger patients.
Older people may need different dosing or even biologically different vaccines.
Changes in the kidneys, heart, skin and other organs steadily decrease older people’s ability to tolerate chemotherapy and radiation.
Treatments rarely target older adults’ particular physiology, and the old are typically excluded from clinical studies.
Equally troublesome is the failure of studies to measure outcomes that reflect older people’s priorities.
Some may believe that focusing more research and treatment on the old will take resources away from younger populations.
Insurance companies continue to pay top dollar for questionable, useless and even harmful care for older people, money that could be spent on more effective care.

The orginal article.

Summary of “This simple memory trick will stop you ever forgetting your keys or umbrella again”

“Previous research has shown that imagining two objects fusing into one will help people work around these memory deficits; but our work demonstrated that understanding the relationship between the two items is also important,” says Dr Jennifer Ryan, who is also a psychology and psychiatry professor at the University of Toronto.
“We know that cognitive function is impaired during aging and this strategy could be one workaround for minor memory problems, depending on what you need to achieve.”
“We are trying to understand what’s important to unitization and what people need to learn in order to benefit. There is no single strategy that will fix your memory, but one method may be more be suitable than another.”
Previous studies have shown that memory can be boosted by exercising, breathing deeply, tackling crosswords and eating healthily.
Writing down an important task or object to remember, and then saying out loud also boosts the chance of it happening by 50 per cent.
Some research has even suggested singing the memory can help, as it stores it in a different part of the brain.
Concentrating while trying to create a memory, rather than vaguely thinking about it during multitasking can also help to imprint it in neurons.
Notice boards in the home can also act as reinforcement aids as you see the memorable wish every time you walk past, helping to write it into the memory.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Not even remotely possible”

I’m talking about remote work, of course, a subject that provokes surprising vituperation whenever I write about it.
Consider: “We found massive, massive improvement in performance – a 13% improvement in performance from people working at home.” Consider companies like Automattic, Gitlab, InVision, and Zapier, all of which thrive as fully remote companies.
Over the same period, the proportion who only work remotely went to 20% from 15%. The biggest transition from office to remote work isn’t the geography; that’s incidental.
The biggest transition is the mode of communication, which goes from default-synchronous to default-asynchronous I certainly concede that certain forms of work, and certain people, benefit more from synchronous communications; but I put it to you that “Most kinds of software development” is not among them1, and that an ever-increasing fraction of the world’s work can be described as “Most kinds of software development.”
Remote work is not without its flaws and challenges.
Some people prefer a tight-knit work community to the broader but more loose-knit ones that remote work fosters, which is fair enough.
There are exceptions, the kinds of people who learn better from textbooks than from classes; but as a general rule, in my experience, remote work is for people who are already fairly capable and experienced.
Looking at the increasing numbers it seems awfully apparent that remote work is the future for a substantial fraction of the modern work force.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Live Like You Could Lose Everything, But Know There’s Nothing To Lose”

Most people don’t want to assume greater responsibility, and thus, greater freedom.
The more responsibility and security you choose to have, the more you are enabled to be then do and then have.
When you chose greater responsibility over your life and the welfare of others, you can’t help but be compelled to live at a higher standard.
You have a reason, no, a responsibility to be and do your very best in everything you do.
Such a sense of responsibility provides more than enough motivation and urgency to push through exhaustion and sometimes despair.
Here’s the paradox, you have absolutely nothing to lose.
There is No Downside “When I had nothing to lose, I had everything. When I stopped being who I am, I found myself.” - Paulo Coelho.
There’s nothing more beautiful than improving the lives of other people.

The orginal article.

Summary of “In Total Eclipse’s Path, Hope and Uncertainty in Rural Kentucky”

State officials talk of half a million people coming to western Kentucky, where the sun, moon and earth will line up most precisely, the point of greatest eclipse.
Hopkinsville has called itself Eclipseville and is planning to host as many as 200,000 people, more than six times its population.
“People don’t seem like they have the time to sit and read like they used to,” said Syl Mayolo, a former mayor of Wickliffe who, like Mr. Lane, worked at the mill for decades.
Surrounded by acres of soybean and corn fields, is fully in the path of the total eclipse, and the mayor, Jo Wilfong, is not going to let that good fortune pass.
“I’m thinking 5,000 people, but that’s just off the top of my head,” Ms. Wilfong said of how many people she thinks could come.
“We’re just opening up this area to people who have never been here before, who might see this as a business opportunity or a place to live.”
“An eclipse is not going to bring people a job for the next 20 years.”
“Maybe 10 people come, maybe 10,000. I just can’t operate like that. It’s the guessing that’s getting us.”

The orginal article.

Summary of “Tech’s Damaging Myth of the Loner Genius Nerd”

The stereotype of an eccentric genius who would rather work with machines than people was born, according to Nathan Ensmenger, a historian at Indiana University who studies the cultural history of the software industry.
“These are people who aren’t doing physical labor, aren’t playing professional sports. But they can express their masculinity by intense competition, playing pranks on one another, demonstrating their technical prowess, in ways that don’t translate well to mixed-gender environments.”
People who have done both say the skills are different, but equally challenging and valuable.
Edmond Lau runs an engineering coaching business with many clients like Google and Facebook called The Effective Engineer.
At Quip, a workplace productivity company where Mr. Lau is an engineering leader, he leads circles in which engineers talk about how to work together or ask for help.
The product wasn’t one that typical people needed, or wanted.
Some people in the industry say computer science students would benefit from more liberal arts courses.
That’s why the consequences of the Google memo could reach far beyond the particular case, influencing which young people choose to go into technology, and which products they make that affect every aspect of our lives.

The orginal article.

Summary of “5 Traits of People With High Emotional Intelligence”

One of the biggest realizations I’ve had in my career is also one of the purest: the simple fact that people are drawn to likable people.
When you look around, you’ll notice that many people don’t make it a priority to learn the habits of likable people.
Whether interacting with customers, vendors, partners or employees, we can all make great strides in our personal relationships and career by raising our emotional intelligence.
Here are five traits shared by people with high emotional intelligence.
When you build better relationships and come across as likable, people tend to share more information with you, make introductions on your behalf and invite you into new opportunities.
They receive the benefit of the doubt If you treat people well, you’ll get the benefit of the doubt.
They possess long-term vision People with high emotional intelligence understand that entrepreneurship is a journey, and that success is a process.
They can read people better People with high EQ foster their natural curiosity, asking questions – and then listening – to get to know people and situations better.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Why is millennial humor so weird?”

To visit millennial comedy, advertising and memes is to spend time in a dream world where ideas twist and suddenly vanish; where loops of self-referential quips warp and distort with each iteration, tweaked by another user embellishing on someone else’s joke, until nothing coherent is left; where beloved children’s character Winnie the Pooh is depicted in a fan-made comic strip as a 9/11 truther, and grown men in a parody ad dance to shrill synth beats while eating Totino’s pizza rolls out of a tiny pink backpack.
Unlike the subcultural stoner comedy of yesteryear or the giddily absurd humor of classics like Monty Python, this breed of millennial surrealism is both mainstream and tangibly dark – it aims for wide swaths of young people, leaning in to feelings of worry, failure and dread. Meanwhile, online culture allows more people to get in on the action, producing their own contributions to the meaningless, loopy, sometimes-sinister whirling gyre of the moment in the form of memes.
In the simplest terms, memes are any pieces of cultural information that spread among groups by imitation, changing bit by bit along the way.
Adam Downer is a 26-year-old associate staff editor at Know Your Meme, an online encyclopedia of the form where the oldest staffer tops out at about age 32, Downer told me.
Since 2008, Know Your Meme’s staff has indexed some 11,228 memes and adds new entries to its database every day.
The strangest meme he ever worked on, Downer says, was a bizarre mind-virus called “Hey Beter.” The meme consists of four panels, the first including the phrase “Hey Beter,” a riff on “Hey Peter,” referring to the main character of the comedy cartoon series “Family Guy.” What comes next seems to make even less sense: In one iteration, the Sesame Street character Elmo calls out to Peter, then asks him to spell “Whomst’ve,” then blasts him with blue lasers.
In his book “The Weird and the Eerie,” author Mark Fisher points out that, in most cases, “The response to the apparition of a grotesque object will involve laughter as much as revulsion.” And the weird, Fisher goes on, “Is a signal that the concepts and frameworks which we have previously employed are now obsolete.” By staking out a playful space to meditate on emotions that are usually upsetting, millennial surrealism intermixes relief with stress and levity with lunacy.
Twitter user Honkimus Maximus welcomed the news with a meme depicting the “Simpsons” character Mr. Burns googly-eyed and sedate, receiving an injection of memes directly into his veins.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Can Real Life Compete With an Instagram Playground?”

Louisa Wells, a 24-year-old photographer who has been working as an Instagram consultant for the past year, says that even if a space looks nice, its real social network power often boils down to whether it offers the illusion of exclusivity.
“From our perspective, all we’re trying to do is just be in a place that people, as a natural part of their life, are willing to stop by and have an experience.” What’s left unsaid in that logic is that for many people wired into the Instagram circuit, taking a photo is the experience itself.
Before people began to seek out professionalized studio settings for their photos, Instagram was often mocked for hosting a near-uniform stream of humdrum sunsets and manicures.
An Instagram feed was essentially an amateur photo diary that featured everyday objects and people.
According to Lev Manovich, a professor at City University of New York who analyzed 16 million Instagram photos for his book Instagram and Contemporary Image, the social network began to become more professionalized around 2014, as smartphone cameras improved.
“You were not suppose to post any bad pictures. The majority of people still used it in this very casual mode, but anyone who thought about followers or wanted to promote products cared. Basically, Instagram became an art gallery. The way I curate an art gallery is to spend days figuring out which paintings I will feature from this artist and lighting. And that’s how people feel about their Instagrams.”
“Increasingly, shows feature big, bold, spectacular works that translate into showy Instagram pictures or Snap stories, allowing art to wow people who might otherwise rarely set foot inside museums,” Katharine Schwab wrote in The Atlantic last year, referencing the Renwick Gallery’s exhibition, Wonder and the aforementioned Rain Room.
They had proved an entirely separate truth: If you try hard and believe in your selfies, any surface can be the backdrop for the Instagram feed that is your life.

The orginal article.