Summary of “How to Unlock Your Team’s Creativity”

If a team is creatively blocked, a first step for leadership is to examine whether the processes that surround people are holding them hostage in their thinking.
Reveal “Sticky floors.” Everyone possesses the foundation to become creative, which starts with team members believing in themselves as idea generators who have the ability to become a compelling voice for creative concepts.
As a leader, part of your role in managing teams is to use emotional intelligence to determine whether any team members are unknowingly holding themselves back from tapping into their talents and full potential.
If even one person hides their creative light under a bushel, the whole team suffers.
Take a proactive approach to address this issue: help the team member become aware of the sticky floor, and offer coaching and support around expressing innovative ideas within the team setting.
As part of coaching team members off of their sticky floors, it’s key to help them understand how to develop a growth mindset.
When encountering a sticky floor related to creativity, leaders should coach team members, explaining how the internal belief that they can become more creative helps them continue to develop their skills over time, learning from their mistakes and making improvements.
The goal of getting your team to think beyond the box is a no-brainer, but figuring out how to actually achieve greater group innovation isn’t.

The orginal article.

Summary of “The Dunning-Kruger effect, and how to fight it, explained by psychologist David Dunning”

David Dunning If there is a psychological principle that I think people should know more about, it’s the principle of naive realism.
Brian Resnick Something that I think is both funny and instructive about your work is that people often get the Dunning-Kruger effect wrong, and take away the wrong conclusions from it.
David Dunning There are some clues, I think, that come from the work of Philip Tetlock and his “Superforecasters” – which is that people who think not in terms of certainties but in terms of probabilities tend to do much better in forecasting and anticipating what is going to happen in the world than people who think in certainties.
David Dunning One of the things that really concerns me is that people really don’t make the distinction between facts and opinion.
What’s impressed me in the past few years is how much people not only author their opinions but author their factual beliefs about the world.
Brian Resnick Is there any insight at how you can get people more comfortable saying, “I don’t know?”.
David Dunning That’s an interesting question, because people seem to be uncomfortable about saying, “I don’t know.” That’s one thing we’ve never been able to get people to do.
How do you get people to say, “I don’t know”? I don’t know.

The orginal article.

Summary of “The city with no homeless on its streets”

In 1987, there were more than 18,000 homeless people there.
Only a very small number are actually sleeping on the streets.
Since 2007, their government has built homeless policies on the foundations of the “Housing First” principle.
Put simply, it gives rough sleepers or people who become homeless a stable and permanent home of their own as soon as possible.
HDI. Pia Rosenberg, 64, has lived in the same Housing First project since 2014 after being homeless for two years.
Official figures are based on the number of homeless people counted on the streets on a single autumn evening each year.
Yui Mok/PA. “There are a lot of barriers to people getting into accommodation and certain groups of people are excluded from projects because of their addictions and/or their mental health.”
“Homelessness and rough sleeping is something we just can’t have in our cities, people dying on the streets. It’s not the type of society or city we want to live in.”

The orginal article.

Summary of “Rutger Bregman historian: meet the folk hero of Davos”

It was Rutger Bregman, a Dutch journalist and historian, who used his speaking time at the conference to lambaste the rich attendees for failing to talk about the one thing we know could fight wealth inequality: raising taxes for the kind of people who go to Davos.
“Just stop talking about philanthropy and start talking about taxes. We can invite Bono once more, but we’ve got to be talking about taxes. That’s it. Taxes, taxes, taxes. All the rest is bullshit in my opinion.”
As if to prove his point, one Davos attendee – Ken Goldman, the former CFO of Yahoo – used the question-and-answer period to denounce Bregman and Winnie Byanyima, the executive director of Oxfam International also on the panel, for a “Very one-sided panel,” and demanded that they offer solutions to inequality besides higher taxes.
Rutger Bregman My book was more or less the ticket to Davos.
It’s a fantastic stage to stand on, it’s a really good team that you work with, and I thought that most of the Ted talks I saw at that conference in 2017 were incredible, given by people who really know their subject and did their very best to condense it all into one talk.
So at Davos you’ve got all these people who earned their money through exploitation, rent-seeking, you name it, and then they do a little bit of philanthropy to distract from all of that.
Rutger Bregman It’s interesting to think about a hypothetical world where billionaires like Bill Gates don’t exist, where inequality is way lower in the US, and what that would look like.
Has your experience as a visitor in Davos and TED changed how you think about how a basic income could be achieved?

The orginal article.

Summary of “If You Want A Dream Career, Ask Yourself These 3 Questions”

Have you ever thought about how long your career actually lasts? If you ask me, your career ends when your life ends.
You want to pick a career that gives you a good outlook.
The last thing you want to become is an unfulfilled career hopper.
A person who likes everything and picks a different career every two years.
That’s why you want to make a smart decision about what kind of career you pursue.
I’ve personally used the advice from the renowned management consultant, Peter Drucker, to create a career that’s fulfilling.
Answering these questions have helped me to create my dream career.
When you answer these three questions, I’m sure you will find your dream career.

The orginal article.

Summary of “An art opening at Chernobyl”

I traveled to Ukraine in November 2018 to see the activation of an art project in the Chernobyl exclusion zone.
I was curious to know if the relevance of fake news to Chernobyl referred to Soviet suppression of the facts in 1986, or if they meant that the West spreads fake news now by insisting that Chernobyl is still uninhabitable.
Most people of any political persuasion will now concede that Chernobyl was handled abominably by the Kremlin, which suppressed information and reacted with unacceptable indolence.
As part of the regeneration of Ukraine, there is a desire to move past the tragedy, to put a new face on Chernobyl.
“Others want to change the alienation zone, fill it with new meanings. We hope that the activation of ARTEFACT will be the first point to rethink the tragedy of Chernobyl. Culture always helps to solve important social problems. We hope that cultural events will come to the Exclusion Zone and through art will open the feelings and emotions of nation.”
We will never know for sure how many people were killed or sickened by Chernobyl.
Many people of my generation grew up in the ’90s seeing distressing photographs from Chernobyl of horribly deformed children, lying in state asylums and orphanages.
The area where the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant once stood is not a visually arresting place; it’s more akin to a disused industrial site than a horror film.

The orginal article.

Summary of “7 Strange Questions That Help You Find Your Life Purpose”

After some research, I have put together a series of questions to help you figure out for yourself what is important to you and what can add more meaning to your life.
I made them that way because discovering purpose in our lives should be something that’s fun and interesting, not a chore.
Before you are able to be good at something and do something important, you must first suck at something and have no clue what you’re doing.
In order to suck at something and have no clue what you’re doing, you must embarrass yourself in some shape or form, often repeatedly.
Ergo, due to the transitive property of awesomeness, if you avoid anything that could potentially embarrass you, then you will never end up doing something that feels important.
There’s something you want to do, something you think about doing, something you fantasize about doing, yet you don’t do it.
If your reasons are something like, “I can’t start a business because spending time with my kids is more important to me,” or “Playing Starcraft all day would probably interfere with my music, and music is more important to me,” then OK. Sounds good.
Feeling foolish is part of the path to achieving something important, something meaningful.

The orginal article.

Summary of “A Study on Driverless-Car Ethics Offers a Troubling Look Into Our Values”

The first time Azim Shariff met Iyad Rahwan-the first real time, after communicating with him by phone and e-mail-was in a driverless car.
A car at level four would be highly autonomous in basic situations, like highways, but would need a human operator.
“We would kind of geek out.” One of their most frequent topics of conversation was the ethics of self-driving cars.
In the game, players are presented with a version of the trolley problem: a driverless car can either stay its course and hit what is in its path, or swerve and hit something else.
The U.S. government has clear guidelines for autonomous weapons-they can’t be programmed to make “Kill decisions” on their own-but no formal opinion on the ethics of driverless cars.
What should a company do if another country wants its vehicles to reflect different moral calculations? Should a Western car de-prioritize the young in an Eastern country? Shariff leans toward adjusting each model for the country where it’s meant to operate.
In twenty to fifty years, the majority of cars on the road will likely be driverless.
In a future dominated by driverless cars, moral texture will erode away in favor of a rigid ethical framework.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Time for Happiness”

Some of the best time diary research suggests that in the United States, men’s leisure time has increased by six to nine hours a week over the past 50 years, and women’s leisure time has risen four to eight hours a week.
If the solution to time poverty is so simple – just make choices that give you more time – then why are we all still stressed?
Because we overestimate the amount of time needed to enjoy an experience, we end up wasting small pockets of free time that we could use more effectively.
Last, we suffer from something called future time slack – the belief that we’ll have more time in the future than we do in the present.
HR departments may think that how employees choose between time and money has little to do with them, but a large body of research shows that organizational factors shape the way employees perceive their time and can increase their feelings of stress and undermine social connections and happiness.
The Long View We should also think about how our money and time decisions might have consequences for our happiness farther down the road. If we choose a job in which we make a lot of money but work 80 hours a week, our personal relationships and happiness could suffer in the long term.
My data suggests that as people age and have objectively less time left in their lives, they naturally start to favor more time over more money in their decisions.
Ask yourself whether you make it easier for your employees to ask for more time to complete projects, to spend less time stuck in traffic, to waste less time taking cheaper indirect flights, to reduce their stress and improve their productivity.

The orginal article.

Summary of “How Do You Build a Healthy City? Copenhagen Reveals Its Secrets”

Copenhagen consistently sits at the very top of the UN’s happiness index and is one of the star performers in the Healthy Cities initiative of the World Health Organisation, which, almost unknown and unsung, celebrates its 30th anniversary this year.
Copenhagen is a model for how healthy cities might be created across the world.
Copenhagen has “a very, very good health policy” to last 10 years, side-stepping the vicissitudes of political life, says Katrine Schj√łnning, the city’s head of public health.
Promoting health in everyday life is the first, says the city’s plan, “By making it attractive to cycle, by serving nutritious lunches in our institutions or by enabling educational institutions to offer quit-smoking programmes. Healthy thriving people are more likely to complete an education and find employment. In other words, health enables us to live the life we want.”
An extraordinary 62% of people living in the city cycle to work every day and the vast majority keep it up through cold and wet weather.
“Copenhagen is not a great city in terms of monuments or attractions, but I think it’s a great city in terms of convenience, and it is a people-centred city.”
It is developing a city where it is harder not to be healthy and environmentally friendly, with reduced air pollution thanks to initiatives such as the “Green roofs”.
“We have many people who suffer from stress and depression and anxiety,” says Sisse Marie Welling, the 31-year-old mayor for health and older people, when we meet in City Hall, its imposing rooms and staircases familiar from the TV series The Killing and Borgen.

The orginal article.