Summary of “How To Make Music A Useful Part Of Your Life Again”

It’s not “Music on, world off” it’s “Music off, life off.” We need stimulus.
When I brought that with me almost everywhere, the iPhone then made sure I literally had music locked and loaded 24/7.With each new device, music came closer, eventually never leaving our side.
With the advent of the iTunes Music Store in 2003, one by one, these barriers have fallen and enabled compulsive listening to thrive.
With an average battery life of around 8 hours and growing, music isn’t just free and always around, you can also press play and never pause.
While music isn’t exactly multi-tasking, whether it helps you focus depends heavily on what you’re listening to.
“Music is there to take us beyond the everyday, to transcend the ordinary and survey ourselves from a lofty height. Music reconnects us with our instinctual bodily selves when reason, logic and discipline are in danger of crushing us.”However, most of the time, staying in the realm of reason is exactly our job.
“One good thing about music, when it hits you, you feel no pain.” - Bob MarleyThe Truth: Our Brains Never Stood A ChanceWe’ve all been to a wedding.
“Listening to music starts with subcortical structures - the cochlear nuclei, the brain stem, the cerebellum - and then moves up to auditory cortices on both sides of the brain.”The oldest part of your brain is the part that reacts first.

The orginal article.

Summary of “How to get Oprah to say your name, and other life lessons from writer-comedian H. Alan Scott”

A series of interesting conversations with interesting people.
H. Alan Scott’s goal is to tell people stories, make them laugh, and to leave them with a perspective they hadn’t considered before.
We caught up with H. Alan to chat about all of the above, when he’s able to take a break for Bar Mitzvah planning, and what he’s been finding interesting on the web lately.
How did you get into comedy and writing in the first place?I was always a funny kid, and obsessed with Johnny Carson and funny daytime talk shows like The Rosie O’Donnell.
Before the show they let me do a weird set where I got the audience to say my name, “H.” So when I stood up to ask my question, the audience went, “H.” Shirley asked, “What’s H?” I said, “H. Alan Scott,” which promoted Oprah to say, “H. Alan Scott,” which prompted me to die right there on the spot.
Of course I choose how much I share, but I use my life as the basis for my work.
How do you decide what to write about next? And what impression do you hope to leave with your readers and the internet as a whole?My goal with everything I write is for the reader to be left with a perspective they maybe haven’t thought about before, or a fresh take on something.
If you had the chance to escape and read all of your current Pocket saves where would you go to do it?Palm Springs, on a couch, looking at people from the AC.Who would you want to see us interview next?Zach Stafford is the editor-in-chief of Grindr’s new magazine, INTO, and he’s the smartest most brilliant writer I know.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Ashamed to work in Silicon Valley: how techies became the new bankers”

Greg is one of many people working in tech who are increasingly self-conscious about how the industry – represented by consumer-facing tech titans like Google, Facebook, Amazon, Apple, Twitter and Uber – is perceived: as underregulated, overly powerful companies filled with wealthy tech bros and “Brilliant assholes” with little regard for the local communities they occupy.
Silicon Valley has taken over from Wall Street as the political bogeyman of choice, turning tech workers – like it or not – into public ambassadors for the 1%. “I would never say I worked at Facebook,” said one 30-year-old software engineer who left the company last year to pursue an alternative career.
“MBA jerks used to go and work for Wall Street, now wealthy white geeks go to Stanford and then waltz into a VC or tech firm.”
It’s a view echoed by one current Googler in her 20s, who is embarrassed by tech companies’ cluelessness about their reputation outside of the Silicon Valley bubble.
“Some of these folks aren’t the most socially gifted people and therefore suddenly having a culture encouraging this experience for them bleeds into everything, giving them a sense of self-importance and entitlement. It’s effectively like dealing with children all the time,” Greg said, referencing his time at Dropbox when people would “Fly around the office on these stupid scooters and skateboards”.
“Being in tech puts a badge on you. Things are going bad for a large section of the economy in this area and here’s a shiny beacon of people getting paid far too much for what they do. It’s a very easy target especially if you mark yourself as one,” he said.
All of this feeds into the perception that techies are, according to the former Facebooker, “Pod people” who aren’t part of the community.
“There’s a large and growing number of people who have negative emotions about how it is right now and really want to change it.”

The orginal article.

Summary of “The Emotionally Intelligent Way for Introverts to Meet New People and Make a Great First Impression”

Stick me on a stage in front of people I don’t know and I’m nervous, but only at first.
Stick me in a room with a bunch of people I don’t know and expect me to mingle and I’m shy and insecure.
“How do you walk up to complete strangers and make small talk? I’m terrible at it. I always feel like I’m forcing myself on people. I think I’m being presumptuous. I think, ‘Who wants to talk to me?’ Somehow you made it seem really easy.”
“Do you think it’s presumptuous when people walk over to speak to you? Does that make you uncomfortable?”.
“Then go talk to them. Make it your goal to make that one person feel more comfortable, and then you’ll feel more comfortable, too.”
If you’re like me and you find it’s hard to mingle, and awkward to make small talk, use those feelings in a positive way.
You don’t need to be a conversational genius, because the people you rescue won’t notice.
They’ll be too busy feeling less like wallflowers and more like people who belong – and they will always remember that you made them feel that way.

The orginal article.

Summary of “How to Work with a Manipulative Person”

Almost everyone who’s ever gone to work has had to deal with an office manipulator.
Many workplaces promote manipulators because they appear to be effective at getting things done, despite the significant costs their abuse can inflict on productivity and people over time.
Three kinds of responses have proven to be consistently effective for confronting most garden-variety manipulators, even if you have less rank, power, or status.
Manipulators don’t usually show their true colors at the beginning of a relationship.
Over time, she began to doubt her own instincts and started acting like the manipulative colleague’s sidekick rather than championing her own causes.
At one point, a vice president who had an extremely self-serving and manipulative reputation raised his eyebrows in apparent surprise, shook his head repeatedly, and at the end shrugged, as if to indicate to his peers in the room that he either didn’t agree with what his colleague was saying or didn’t understand why he was saying it – all without him saying a word.
Rather than letting her hide her criticisms behind others, I would say things like, “You’ve been clear that you don’t like how James handled his team’s conflict. I’ll be happy to meet with you and James so that you can explain your concern, and then I can work with him on managing his team.” Now that she understands her own behavior pattern and has received support to change, she’s far less likely to offload uncomfortable situations to others.
If your position is senior to the manipulator’s, the most effective thing is to begin a rigorous plan of corrective action promptly, using approaches such as these and providing concrete behavioral feedback until they either drop their inappropriate habits or you remove them.

The orginal article.

Summary of “20 Years Ago, Jeff Bezos Said This 1 Thing Separates People Who Achieve Lasting Success From Those Who Don’t”

Twenty-three years later, he’s one of the richest people in the world.
Bezos built Amazon around things he knew would be stable over time, investing heavily in ensuring that Amazon would provide those things – and improve its delivery of those things.
So the effort we put into those things, spinning those things up, we know the energy we put into it today will still be paying off dividends for our customers 10 years from now.
Focusing on things that won’t change does not guarantee success – but it provides as close a foundation for success as you will find.
Focus on collecting knowledge …. Competing is a fact of professional life: with other businesses, other products, other people.
You can know enough smart people that together you know almost everything.
The goal of networking is to connect with people who can provide a referral, help make a sale, share important information, serve as a mentor, etc.
That’s how successful people weather the storm when times are tough, and become even more successful when business is booming.

The orginal article.

Summary of “What Really Happened on Election Day”

Jerry Falwell Jr., president of Liberty University, Trump’s religious adviser: I called Sean Hannity and said, “I really think he’s going to win tonight.” Sean said, “Well, I’m glad you do, because the exit polls don’t look good.” I found out later that Trump was very pessimistic, too.
Desus Nice, Desus & Mero: It’s one thing to find out Donald Trump is president, but another to be on TV with people watching you watch Donald Trump become president.
Symone Sanders, Strategist for Priorities USA: Omarosa called [into MTV] saying, “It’s a good night over here at Trump Tower.” She’s like, “I knew Donald Trump would be the president. I told everyone months ago. And the day is here!” I was just dumbfounded.
Jerry Falwell Jr.: The crowd at the Trump party was really aggravated because Megyn Kelly didn’t want to call it.
Michael Barbaro: We really labored over a few paragraphs and a few words, just capturing the enormity of a Trump victory.
During the primaries they had the Trump story, “You really want to see how far this goes, don’t you America?”.
Once I digested what had happened with Trump and had a plan, which was to resist and report and not be neutral, then I was able to go to bed.
Melissa Alt: The next day my manager took the cake back to Trump Tower because they didn’t cut it at election night.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Where the Small-Town American Dream Lives On”

Why aren’t people leaving to find work, or better lives, as they used to? Part of the worry is economic: if people become less willing to move for work, unemployment will persist in some places, and jobs will go unfilled in others.
Growing up, Joe Clarey had not liked Orange City; after he graduated from Northwestern, in 2009, he fled to Chicago, where he got a job as an analyst in a global investment firm.
What would people say, after he’d gone on and on for years about how he couldn’t wait to get out of Orange City, and after his fancy Chicago job?
If you lived in a place like Orange City you weren’t used to dealing with people you didn’t know.
People in Orange City received government assistance, but the town was small enough and prosperous enough that it was possible to imagine a world without it.
She wanted to be in a city, where the work was more intense; that choice then led her somewhere politically that she did not expect to go.
People who lived in areas where there was a lot of organizing-where there seemed to be a chance to change things-tended to stay; in places where the revolution didn’t catch on, people left.
On a previous trip home, a man had remarked to her how nice it was that they didn’t have teen pregnancies in Orange City as they did in Modesto, and she, dumbfounded, said to him, “Do you really think they’re not happening? I think people here take a different path.” After much indecision and praying she and Justin chose to move home.

The orginal article.

Summary of “How to Make the Right Connections When You Don’t Already Have an “In””

What if you don’t know the right people who can help you?
Perhaps you’re new to your field, or you’ve changed locations – but regardless of the reason, the problem is the same: if you’re starting with the wrong connections, how can you hope to work your way into the right ones? That’s a challenge I discuss in my new book Entrepreneurial You, and here are four strategies to consider.
Your existing contacts likely want to help you – they just don’t know how, especially if your new realm is outside their area of expertise.
You could say, “I’d love to consult for Google one day. Do you know anyone who works there that you might be able to introduce me to?” Or you could sort by title and tell your friends, “I’m interested in making connections with anyone you know who is a vice president of human resources. Do you know anyone with that role?”.
People’s level of closeness to their LinkedIn contacts varies; be prepared for them to say they don’t actually know the person well, or at all.
Next, be willing to accept “Six degrees of separation.” Of course, it’s much easier when your friends know the right people and can introduce you directly.
If you’re willing to take the extra time and effort to cultivate multiple chains of connections, you can often end up in the right place.
Finally, you can create content to attract the right people to you.

The orginal article.

Summary of “‘We’re designing minds’: Industry insider reveals secrets of addictive app trade”

The average Canadian teenager is on track to spend nearly a decade of their life staring at a smartphone, and that’s no accident, according to an industry insider who shared some time-sucking secrets of the app design trade.
Named after the brain molecule that gives us pleasure, Dopamine Labs uses computer coding to influence behaviour – most importantly, to compel people to spend more time with an app and to keep coming back for more.
To make a profit, companies “Need your eyeballs locked in that app as long as humanly possible,” he says.
A push notification, such as a message that someone has commented on your Facebook photo, is a trigger; opening the app is the action; and the reward could be a “Like” or a “Share” of a message you posted.
Emily, a teen from Guelph, Ont., tracked her cellphone use this summer with an app called Moment.
Emily, a 16-year-old from Guelph, Ont., who agreed to track her smartphone use for Marketplace this past summer using an app called Moment, has a Snapchat score of 1.2 million – several hundred thousand points ahead of her friends.
The streak feature is a technique known as a loss aversion, which often involves trying to keep users fixated on an app even when it’s not useful or they don’t enjoy it anymore.
Emily’s tracking app revealed she uses her phone an average of three hours and 35 minutes a day, with most of that time spent on Snapchat.

The orginal article.