Summary of “The Lonely Life of a Professional YouTuber”

There are more professional YouTubers than ever before.
More people than ever are tuning in and desiring the life of a YouTuber.
“My flatmate is a YouTuber too, and she sells glitter.” Another YouTuber, Memeulous, lives on one of the floors below.
The tone became more and more ironic and self-deprecating, yet he somehow retained a bit of that old school YouTuber hyper-sincerity when encouraging people to like and subscribe.
Seven months before the now-famous Logan Paul controversy in Japan, a YouTuber was shot in the chest by his wife and co-star while trying to make a prank video.
At the same time, these controversies fuel the YouTuber ecosystem.
In some ways, you can see the YouTuber as the ultimate distillation of modern neoliberal culture: an entire community of self-promoting individualistic entrepreneurs, desperately battling each other for economic success, while their work simultaneously benefits advertisers and drives the success of a corporate monolith: YouTube.
In an era of “Bullshit jobs”, when the radical idea of a post-work society is becoming more realistic by the day, the unconventional career of the professional YouTuber becomes inherently interesting.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Plan a Better Meeting with Design Thinking”

The idea is to put the “User” at the center of the experience – an approach that works with meeting design, too.
Start by putting your own expertise and agenda aside and thinking about the people who will be affected by your meeting.
We compare the design and execution of meetings to the driving navigation app Waze: what is the quickest, safest, most effective way to get to your destination? The first step, immersing yourself with people, was about understanding where you need to go.
Their responses will help you gain more empathy, frame new questions, get even more creative in your meeting design, and increase your potential for success at the actual gathering.
Immersing helps people feel heard, and it ensures that meeting leaders are connected to participants.
Framing pushes the meeting leaders to ensure that there are clear goals for each meeting.
Imagining leads to more creativity and experimentation in the meeting design.
Finally, prototyping-something as simple as getting feedback on your plan from a few people – makes people feel valued, more accountable in the meetings, and more invested in their success.

The orginal article.

Summary of “15 Life Lessons I Learned by 50”

What do 50-year-olds know that 20-year-olds often don’t? originally appeared on Quora – the place to gain and share knowledge, empowering people to learn from others and better understand the world.
Other people’s opinions are suggestions-take them or leave them.
Other people will forget it a lot faster if you just let it roll off your back.
Sure, stuff gets broken-oftentimes accidentally by people you love-and that’s annoying.
Don’t shame people for smoking, drinking, or being fat.
When you’re 20, people often think you’re “Too old” to do these things, but when a 50-something does them, it’s charming.
Don’t make major life decisions to please other people.
Live life for YOU. The world needs good auto mechanics and good attorneys.

The orginal article.

Summary of “The Afterlife of Pablo Escobar”

Known as El Osito, or Little Bear, he was the older brother of the narcotrafficker Pablo Escobar, who was then among the richest men in the world, responsible for a drug-smuggling empire that extended from Colombia to a dozen other countries.
Along with the narcotours that operate out of Medellín, there are souvenir venders selling Escobar baseball caps, ashtrays, mugs, and key rings; Escobar T-shirts are displayed next to soccer jerseys and Pope Francis memorabilia.
The Semana story had spoken of his “Desire to be the country’s number one benefactor.” Old comrades told me that they were attracted by his professed commitment to building a “Medellín without slums.” Popeye insisted that Escobar “Was really a socialist-he just had a different kind of socialism in mind, where everyone would have his own little car, his own little house.” He had paid for the construction of a neighborhood that became known as Barrio Pablo Escobar: five hundred houses and several soccer fields.
On December 2, 1993, police traced a phone call between Escobar and his son, Juan Pablo, to a safe house in the Los Pinos neighborhood of Medellín.
In 2001, after several years of interviews with Escobar’s relatives, friends, and enemies, he published “The Pablo Parable.” Where García Márquez had suggested that Escobar had subjected Colombia to a kind of national hypnosis, Salazar suggested that he had merely been a conduit for the country’s bigotry and violent impulses.
At a panel discussion in 2013, Uribe recalled, “A woman once asked me, ‘Why did you portray Pablo Escobar as loving with his children?’ And I told her, ‘Because that’s how psychopaths are: loving with their kids-and murderers.’ And we need to understand that, if we’re going to stop falling in love with psychopaths.” She insisted that she had not wanted to make Escobar a hero.
Juan Pablo, who was sixteen years old when Escobar was killed, is now forty-one, a brooding, heavyset man with an unmistakable resemblance to his father; the image on the jacket of “In Flagrante” seamlessly melds their faces.
“The country likes to say that it has forgotten Pablo Escobar, but it’s not true,” he told me.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Race, Barriers and Battling Nerves: A Candid Conversation With Oscar’s Only 4 African-American Directing Nominees in 90 Years”

If this elite group were expanded to include all black directors, it would add only Britain’s Steve McQueen, who earned his nomination in 2014 for helming 12 Years a Slave.
With the March 4 ceremony looming and the racial makeup of the Academy and the industry at large under increased scrutiny, THR gathered the quartet for a candid conversation about how success can feel like failure, the doors Black Panther has opened and why not one of these guys was able to enjoy his big night.
PEELE Part of the cultural learning curve with this, too, is tied up with this thing that every time a black achievement happens, it’s a black achievement.
Jordan’s film is not a full black cast, but it’s a black movie and it’s also not a black movie.
Lee, a few years ago, you said as part of a THR Roundtable that you hated when white people wrote for black people.
“SINGLETON There are two sides of this coin. The Last Emperor was a huge hit when it came out, and Bernardo Bertolucci is Italian, not Chinese. But he did his homework. Steven Spielberg did The Color Purple. Black people assailed against that when it came out, but it’s a classic among African-Americans now. But for every one of those films that was made by someone who was from another culture exploring something that they were interested in, there are these stacks of where black people have had to say,”OK, at least they tried.
One of my favorites is Glory, where the Matthew Broderick character is in a lot of ways [director] Edward Zwick saying, “I don’t know the black experience, but I see through the eyes of this character who is empathizing with the black experience.” With Get Out, I wanted to make a movie that ripped the rug out of this idea of the one good white character evil and see what that would do.
Do you have a black superhero movie in your back pocket?

The orginal article.

Summary of “Donald Glover Can’t Save You”

Donald Glover sat behind the wheel of the Nissan Sentra, his door ajar, and lit a joint.
“After the première of the show,” she said, “I asked Donald how he felt, and he said, ‘I’m a very complex person,’ almost apologetically, and walked away.” Glover explained, “The sound was all fucked up and the guy at the controls wouldn’t let me touch it, so it didn’t quite hit. Everyone else was super happy, but I couldn’t be, and I felt really mad at myself, because I was ruining it for everyone else.” He laughed.
“We had a cousin with AIDS and we couldn’t keep her and save her,” Glover said.
Stephen Glover said, “We were wised up early to not celebrating our birthdays and that there was no Santa Claus and no magic. Our mom made us watch ‘Mississippi Burning’ when I was six, and she always warned me about wearing saggy pants and said, ‘If someone sucks your penis, come tell me.'” Glover said, “I know Mom was doing all that to protect us, but it gave me nightmares. I wouldn’t go into bathrooms alone or eat anything except turkey.”
Kevin Feige, Marvel’s president, told me, “When we tested the film, even with that tiny role, Donald was one of the audience’s favorite characters.” Glover said he took the role because “I learn so much. I learn how Marvel movies work, how to handle guest stars, how to make execs happy when they come on set. I gain some of your power. Only now I’m running out of places to learn, at least in America.”
Glover said, of these episodes, “No black people talk to each other like that, or need to. It’s all for white people.” FX told Glover to avoid the N-word in his pilot; the network’s compromise position was that only a white character who says “Really, nigga?” and “You know how niggas out here are” could use it.
Harmon said, “Chevy was the first to realize how immensely gifted Donald was, and the way he expressed his jealousy was to try to throw Donald off. I remember apologizing to Donald after a particularly rough night of Chevy’s non-P.C. verbiage, and Donald said, ‘I don’t even worry about it.'” Glover told me, “I just saw Chevy as fighting time-a true artist has to be O.K. with his reign being over. I can’t help him if he’s thrashing in the water. But I know there’s a human in there somewhere-he’s almost too human.” Glover quit in the fifth season, too bored to do it anymore.
Fam Udeorji had told me, “White Donald would be James Franco-a guy doing a lot of different shit, none of it interesting.” I asked Glover if there was a possibility, given his belief that the black experience was more interesting-albeit far more painful-than the white experience, that White Donald wouldn’t have ended up where Black Donald has.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Black Panther’s Political Message Was Too Conservative for Its Revolutionary Title”

Black Panther is a Ryan Coogler movie, and I love Ryan Coogler movies, especially for the beautiful ways he portrays Black male tenderness on and off-screen.
Black Panther is also a work of Afrofuturism-the multi-genre approach for engaging the positive possibilities of technology for Black people across time and space in art, music, and science-and I love Afrofuturism.
This was largely because I couldn’t get myself to root against its antagonist, Erik Killmonger and because I found its ending political message far more conservative than the revolutionary possibilities teased by anything with “Black” and “Panther” in the title.
As in considering the legacy of Barack Obama’s politics through the brush strokes of Kehinde Wiley-whose presidential portrait of an African American warrior was unveiled just days before Black Panther was released-it’s quite appropriate to have a nuanced opinion of Black Panther’s politics while also celebrating the unabashed joy of seeing Black audiences witness Black life depicted through Black eyes.
Of course, many Black people love Star Wars and, since Billy Dee Williams ruled Cloud City in The Empire Strikes Back in 1980, there has been about one Black person in each Star Wars movie But in Star Wars, Black characters perform a kind of “Diversity” of an accepted, dominate whiteness.
A consequence of seeing one Black character in a diverse cast sends the message that Black people ought to get as close to white people as they can-and not turn to other people of color-if they want to develop intimacy, love, and power.
One of most noble aims of Black Panther is how it dreams of and conceives of an intact Black body-both the intact national body of Wakanda as well the actual intact body of T’Challa in his suit.
When it comes to Killmonger, Black Panther’s politics are not especially liberatory, especially since the film’s title evoke the revolutionary politics of Angela Davis, Huey Newton, Elaine Brown, and the Black Panther Party.

The orginal article.

Summary of “The two mental shifts highly successful people make”

There are two primary mental shifts that occur in the lives of all highly successful people.
Both of these shifts require a great deal of mental stretching from conventional and societal ways of thinking.
Highly successful people are continually learning and striving to better understand the world around them.
Finally, people who have experienced this first mental shift really care about momentum.
Most people get stuck at the first shift If you take complete responsibility for your life and choices, you will develop a love for learning.
In the book, Ego is the Enemy, Ryan Holiday explains that many successful people “Stop being a student.”
The first several habits are to help you experience the first mental shift, or what Covey calls the “Private Victory.”
Once you master these habits, you will go from dependence on others to a high state of independence - the first mental shift.

The orginal article.

Summary of “The Best Brands Are The Ones That Build “Belonging””

The RCC has all the hallmarks of traditional community groups: rituals, local organizers, chapters and clubhouses around the world, symbols, shared identity, and social activities.
This is not the light “Community” that brands often speak of when referring to their customers or social media following-this is real, in-person commitment and engagement.
We have a crisis of belonging-and great brands will step into the vacuum created by social isolation.
A while ago I heard Sherry Turkle, a social studies professor at MIT, talk of us becoming “Connected but alone,” or Alone Together.
Then David Brooks’s assertion that social isolation may be “The central challenge of our era” really struck me.
Participation in organized religions-traditionally responsible for weaving the social fabric-has consistently declined, especially for younger people.
Sebastian Junger, the war correspondent, identified diminished social bonds and shared purpose as the driving force of increased incidences of PTSD. In his book, Tribe, Junger recounts the work of Charles Fritz, an observer employed by the U.S. Strategic Bombing Survey to assess the morale of British civilians during and after the Blitz in World War II. What he found was not social chaos, but a “Community of sufferers” more tightly bonded than before-“Mentally healthy conditions.” “Self interest gets subsumed into group interest,” as Junger puts it.
What’s needed are initiatives that truly combat social isolation with enhanced belonging.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Persuasion as a Skill and Habit”

“The reality is that visionaries like Steve Jobs haven’t been successful because they thought of something amazing and original out of thin air. Rather, they were gifted at constantly persuading many people to follow them on their journey to something amazing and original.” To succeed, startup founders need to cultivate persuasion as a skill and habit he says.
Coherence”People want everything to always be the same. We want smart people to be smart. We want good people to be good,” says Odean.
“A lot of people know this one, but it hits this point home: Let’s says I describe to you a woman who loves folk music and was active in the nuclear protest movement in college. Then I ask you whether she’s more likely to be a bank teller or a feminist bank teller? Most people answer, ‘feminist bank teller’ because it seems most in line with the rest of the story. But there are no feminist bank tellers who are not also bank tellers. By definition, ‘feminist bank teller’ is a narrower category – which makes it less likely that’s the right answer.”
“People desperately want to seem normal and do what seems normal, so the more you can mainstream an outlandish or unseen product or idea, the better,” says Odean.
The onus of action is on the people who want to object or push back and you just made it cognitively more difficult for them.
“People hate losses much more than they like gains,” says Odean.
“Too many people believe they have to be there in person whenever anyone looks at their deck. They have a vision that their skill and rhetoric will be so overwhelmingly awesome that it will change minds on its own – which, if it were true, would probably be disadvantageous. Whatever you managed to push them into believing wouldn’t stick with them the way you need it to – the way it sticks is when they willingly buy in and make the decision to believe you.”
“Basically, you want everything to be as prominent as it is important for people to remember. Increase or decrease prominence using repetition, simple and vivid statements. Prominence and importance must match.”

The orginal article.