Summary of “How to Take 100% Responsibility for Your Life”

It is your responsibility to put yourself into a peak state, every single day.
Why would you want to live any other way? Why would you want to drag yourself through the day and through your life?
Put yourself into a heightened state and then make some profound and committed decisions to move forward.
You already know within yourself that if you really want something, you’ll get it.
Every day you cause yourself to believe it even more by affirming to yourself that what you want is already true.
If you aren’t consistent with yourself, then you don’t love yourself.
Your desire to be viewed as consistent – firstly to others and then eventually to yourself – shifts how you see yourself.
You begin to see yourself based on the commitment you’ve made.

The orginal article.

Summary of “The Guide to Strong Boundaries”

PSA: Setting strong personal boundaries are not a cure-all for your relationship woes.
People with high self-esteem have strong personal boundaries.
Practicing strong personal boundaries is one way to build self-esteem.
It’s a hallmark of a codependent relationship and usually represents two people incapable of strong personal boundaries.
It’s like an addiction they fulfill in one another, and when presented with emotionally healthy people to date, they usually feel bored or a lack of “Chemistry.” They’ll pass on healthy, secure individuals because the secure partner’s solid boundaries will not excite the loose emotional boundaries of the needy person.
A person with strong boundaries understands that it’s unreasonable to expect two people to accommodate each other 100% and fulfill every need the other has.
A person with strong boundaries understands that they may hurt someone’s feelings sometimes, but ultimately they can’t determine how other people feel.
A person with strong boundaries understands that a healthy relationship is not controlling one another’s emotions, but rather each partner supporting each other in their growth and path to self-actualization.

The orginal article.

Summary of “What Japan can teach us about cleanliness”

As every day, the teacher’s final words: “OK everybody, today’s cleaning roster. Lines one and two will clean the classroom. Lines three and four, the corridor and stairs. And line five will clean the toilets.”
Most first-time visitors to Japan are struck by how clean the country is.
So they’re left with the question: how does Japan stay so clean?
“In our home life as well, parents teach us that it’s bad for us not to keep our things and our space clean.”
“I sometimes didn’t want to clean the school,” recalled freelance translator Chika Hayashi, “But I accepted it because it was part of our routine. I think having to clean the school is a very good thing because we learn that it’s important for us to take responsibility for cleaning the things and places that we use.”
In the Zen version of Buddhism, which came to Japan from China in the 12th and 13th Centuries, daily tasks like cleaning and cooking are considered spiritual exercises, no different from meditating.
So why aren’t all Buddhist nations as zealously clean as Japan? Well, long before the arrival of Buddhism, Japan already had its own indigenous religion: Shinto, said to enshrine the very soul of the Japanese identity.
“So it is vital to practice cleanliness. This purifies you and helps avoid bringing calamities to society. That is why Japan is a very clean country.”

The orginal article.

Summary of “The Rise of Anxiety Baking”

Young Americans’ long work hours might mean they’re less likely to come home every night in time to roast a chicken instead of ordering takeout, but many of them seem to have turned to weekend baking as a salve for the ambient anxiety of being alive in these times.
There’s a good reason for that: Baking actually can be really relaxing.
“People are afraid to spend money, and they’re feeling like shit. Baking is cheap, it’s easy, and it’s visceral.”
Folu Akinkuotu, a 28-year-old who lives in Boston and works in e-commerce-and someone whose impressive off-hours baking exploits I follow on social media-also started baking more in college as a way to make friends during her freshman year.
Alice Medrich, a baking expert and cookbook author, agrees that baking is a particularly effective activity for those whose professional lives exist mostly in the abstract.
In addition to the satisfaction of creating, the process of baking itself can be calming.
Buzzwords aside, baking does indeed force you to put down your phone, get your hands dirty, and pay close attention to what you’re doing.
If you’re more inclined toward cooking instead of baking, that can have some of the same positive effects, according to Muskin, but there’s something about dessert that’s just a little bit more fun.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Why We’re Better Off With Fewer Friends”

We never need to lose touch with anyone, ever again, as our Facebook friends and Twitter followers grow by the day.
The growth in the number of our friends has actually been accompanied with an increase in social isolation, as Sherry Turkle describes.
OK, so more friends on Facebook doesn’t appear to be a great thing; what about more friends in the real world? Should we try and gain more face-to-face friends?
Fewer Real Friends Unfortunately, in the US and elsewhere it seems we’re going down the popularity route, instead of building close relationships.
In 1985, a survey asked people about how many friends they had discussed important matters with.
Quality time spent with your 15 closest friends and family will have a direct impact on your happiness, health and longevity.
As Ed Diener and Martin Seligman found from an analysis of very happy people, the thing that united them was strong ties to close friends and family and a commitment to spending real face time with them.
There is definitely joy to be gained from throwing a great party with loads of people and following the lives of our otherwise long-lost friends.

The orginal article.

Summary of “The 5 New Rules of Employee Engagement”

Maybe the question is, what should you not do about it? Employee engagement has become such a hot topic that great swarms of consultants and authors are undoubtedly banging on your door as we speak, armed with enough action plans and PowerPoint presentations to make your head swim.
“The problem with employee engagement experts is they take well-meaning concepts and overengineer them to the point that they don’t bear any resemblance to what normal people understand,” says Neil Morrison, group human resources director for Penguin Random House U.K. “Then we wonder why we have a disengaged work force.”
An important turning point for employee engagement experts came with Daniel H. Pink’s Drive.
The new mantra and related team-building exercises, like group-assembling a bicycle, yielded striking results: Turnover dropped, productivity increased, and employee surveys showed engagement levels rose.
Leading the naysayers was the late Robert Gerst, a Canadian statistician who kicked up a storm in 2013 with an article in the Journal for Quality and Participation that concluded, “The dirty little secret of employee engagement surveys is that they’re largely junk science.” Gerst, who died earlier this year, argued that most consultants conducting such surveys have a built-in conflict of interest: First they reveal that large swaths of your work force are out to lunch, and then they sell you services to improve that dismal situation.
One reason measuring employee engagement is so difficult is there is no consensus on what the term means, exactly.
As employee morale started slipping, Farid tried immersing himself in the literature of engagement and spending more time with his HR people, looking for ways to celebrate achievements and keep people excited.
Rule 5: Actually, Don’t Worry About Engagement After decades of rapid growth, the field of employee engagement is now suffering a well-deserved backlash.

The orginal article.

Summary of “‘We are hurtling towards a surveillance state’: the rise of facial recognition technology”

Two years ago, when facial recognition technology was becoming widely available, the business pivoted from simply reporting into active crime deterrence.
In the past year, as the use of facial recognition technology by police and private companies has increased, the debate has intensified over the threat it could pose to personal privacy and marginalised groups.
Bridges is appealing, but South Wales police are pushing forward with a new trial of a facial recognition app on officers’ mobile phones.
The performance of facial recognition software varies significantly, but the most effective algorithms available, such as Microsoft’s, or NEC’s NeoFace, very rarely fail to match faces using a high-quality photograph.
Last month, the Met and British Transport police revealed that they had supplied images for a database used to carry out facial recognition scans of people who visited the King’s Cross estate “To assist in the prevention of crime”, after previously denying any involvement.
In July, India’s Home Ministry put out a tender for a new Automated Facial Recognition System to help use real-time CCTV footage to identify missing children – but also criminals and others, by comparing the footage with a “Watchlist” curated from police databases or other sources.
Groups such as Liberty and Big Brother Watch say the opposite: since facial recognition, by definition, requires every face in a crowd to be scanned to identify a single suspect, it will turn any country that adopts it into a police state.
Facial recognition gives police and companies the means of identifying and tracking people of interest, while others are free to go about their business.

The orginal article.

Summary of “The Post-Human World”

People in most countries are more likely to die from eating too much rather than too little, more likely to die of old age than a great plague, and more likely to commit suicide than to die in war.
You ask the scary question: What happens to welfare in a future where government no longer needs people?
Already the most advanced armies don’t need [as many] people.
In Scandinavia the tradition of the welfare state is so entrenched that perhaps they’ll continue to provide welfare even for masses of useless people.
If you look at the objective condition of health and so forth, most people in the U.S. and Western Europe have better conditions than they used to.
Thompson: Let’s say the future for most people is a universal basic income, wonderful psychedelic drugs, and virtual reality video games.
You could argue that people already spend most of their lives in virtual games.
You have millions of people playing these virtual reality games.

The orginal article.

Summary of “21st-Century Propaganda: A Guide to Interpreting and Confronting the Dark Arts of Persuasion”

Complacent, technocratic elites who spoke self-assuredly of growth and progress while failing to notice how many people saw little of either.
In recent years we’ve learned much about the human mind that contradicts the view of people as rationally self-interested decision-makers.
Lakoff, who is best known for his work on how the metaphors we use influence our beliefs, argues that people tend to vote in line with their values, not rational beliefs.
If you’re a conservative going into politics, there’s a good chance you’ll study cognitive science, that is, how people really think and how to market things by advertising.
Whether it’s Breitbart for the alt-right or RT for the Kremlin, it’s now possible to create large, well-financed operations that pump out news with a strong agenda and can reach people across the world.
If you have a fiercely loyal base of supporters or can pay them you can mobilize vast groups of people to troll opponents and flood the digital airwaves with your desired message, amplifying it and making it hard to tell how much support it really has.
In an only slightly less controversial study the company showed that it could change people’s likelihood of voting.
Companies such as Cambridge Analytica claim to be able to sway voters’ preferences en masse, using publicly available data skimmed from people’s social-media accounts to build detailed psychological profiles and crafted messages for each person.

The orginal article.

Summary of “They Inherited Wealth and Now They Want to Give It All Away”

Something inside him told him to give away his money, along with the power that money bestows, so he is sitting at the long, gray dining table in a loft on one of the loveliest streets in one of the wealthiest neighborhoods in Manhattan, opening a Google doc.
Too, told him to give away his money, along with the power that money bestows, and he will be following along with Sam’s notes during the meeting.
It’s a Sunday in July, and this is the weekly status meeting of the Action Committee of the New York chapter of Resource Generation, an organization founded on the belief that young wealthy people should give away most or all of their inherited money or excess wealth.
T&C: A lot of it was like, “Oh, the poor rich people feel bad and they want to-“.
“There’s an anti-ICE event, and a lot of great organizations will attend. We want to get 100 people who will take arrests. I’ll pitch it on Wednesday,” he says.
One of Resource Generation’s missions is to get rich people to examine the visible and invisible ways they have benefited from their wealth.
“I had already ­decided to give away my money, but it was a relief to find other people in similar situations.” Back then the group, called Comfort Zone, mainly encouraged young people with wealth to donate ­their ­money.
Kind of top-of-mind is that when young people have grown up without ever having ­wanted anything, it’s very easy, I think, to be overly optimistic and not realize how much it takes to achieve the baseline things of being able to have a comfortable home and put your kids in a good school, and give them experiences that you had as a child.

The orginal article.