Summary of “Toys Are Taking Vacations and Seeing the World”

Azuma grew up, but as she got older, she rediscovered a passion for soft toys.
Azuma isn’t alone-lots of adults make toys a centerpiece of their travel dispatches.
She then identified some common trends, such as the desire to “Accumulate travel culture capital” by sharing pics of toys posed in world tourism hotspots.
Something about pictures of toys by famous world landmarks makes a certain breed of traveler feel particularly worldly-the familiar and the foreign together, as if it is the most natural thing in the world.
Clients ship their toys to Azuma, and they stay with her for two or three weeks, during which time their adventures are promptly reported back to their owners via social media posts.
“From poses to accompanying captions, there was a clear trend of toys appearing to experience travel. The toys were photographed worried about missing public transport, deciding on their next meal and, of course, posing in front of famous tourist sites,” she explains.
Traveling toys are often pictured engaging in human activities, instead of just seeing the sites.
In addition to the agencies in Japan and France, there is now Toy Voyagers, a website that connects traveling toys with hosts, and Omanimali, a toy-passport-issuing organization based in Germany.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Summer camp for adults? Bring on the s’mores! – Experience Magazine”

Everyone is headed to Club Getaway, an all-inclusive, weekend-long sleep-away camp for grown-ups in Kent, Conn. For the next 48 hours, they will sleep on scratchy mattresses in no-frills bunk beds, clamber onto huge inflatables in a lake, play tennis and tug-of-war, all as part of an increasingly sought-after experience: summer camp for adults.
Across the country, adult summer camps take pains to replicate the lost days of youth, right down to the campfires, s’mores, mess hall meals, and classic activities such as tennis, swimming, archery, volleyball, water skiing, and arts and crafts.
There is Camp Bonfire in Philadelphia, Camp Rahh in Seattle, Camp Halcyon in Wisconsin, and Camp No Counselors in multiple locations throughout the U.S. Some are alcohol-free or electronic-device-free; others, like Camp Camp, cater to a specific clientele, in this case the LGBTQ community.
Penny Harvey, a PhD sociology student at Georgia State University who worked as a camp counselor for seven years, says summer camps serve an important purpose for adolescents and adults – allowing them to escape from their day-to-day personas.
“People are able to show up and say, ‘This is who I want to be here.’ You don’t get many chances to be unknown somewhere for a limited time, and have the opportunity to be at a place where you can reinvent yourself,” says Harvey, whose master’s thesis is entitled, “It’s Camp: Summer Camp Culture, the Renegotiation of Social Norms and Regulation of Gender and Sexuality.”
“Adults want to create those bonds again and recreate a camp family,” Harvey says.
As campers finish lunch, color war team leaders are announced, and the adults come running out waving large colored flags.
Marisa Mahler, a clinical psychologist in private practice in New York City, has spent the last two summers as co-director of camper care and camp psychologist at Camp Ramah in New York, a summer retreat for kids.

The orginal article.

Summary of “How to persuade your favorite meat eater to try a meatless Monday |”

“In 2019 30 of the world’s leading scientists released the results of a massive three-year study into global agriculture and declared that meat production is destroying our planet and jeopardizing global health,” said Bruce Friedrich, cofounder and executive director of the Good Food Institute, an organization that supports the creation of plant-based and cell-based meat, in a TED Talk.
The World Health Organization’s International Agency for Research on Cancer has classified processed meat as a human carcinogen due to its association with colorectal cancer, and WHO has classified red meat as “Probably” carcinogenic because of its links to colorectal cancer.
Whether it’s your steak-loving partner or parent or your tween cousin who lives on chicken nuggets, here are 7 steps to take to persuade them to cut down on eating meat.
Let’s call the meat eater in your life “M.” The absolute worst time to engage M in a discussion like this is when they’ve got a forkful of roast beef or roast chicken en route to their mouths.
The meat industry is rapidly changing, and plant-based meat – such as the Impossible Burger and Beyond Meat – is gaining popularity.
Although plant-based meat is currently pricier than conventional meat, the cost is expected to go down as demand and competition rise.
According to Friedrich, plant-based meat will be cheaper than traditional meat.
It’s made from actual meat cells, so it will look and taste just like the meat they currently eat.

The orginal article.

Summary of “The Flaws a Nobel Prize-Winning Economist Wants You to Know About Yourself”

Dominant economic theory these days often makes that assumption.
What was left of this illusion was further dismantled by the The Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences, who awarded the Nobel prize in economics to Richard Thaler, an American economist at the University of Chicago, for his pioneering work in behavioral economics, which examines humanity’s flaws-namely, why we don’t make rational economic decisions.
In 2014, a study by the Economic & Social Research Council found that 51 countries had developed centralized policy units influenced by behavioral sciences.
These flaws-or human traits, to be more charitable-may not seem unusual, but Thaler argues that appreciating the implications of human behavior has lost its importance in dominant economic theory.
As the field relied more and more on mathematics, there was a push to explain the world using rigid, complex economic models.
In a paper last year, Thaler wrote: “It is time stop thinking about behavioral economics as some kind of revolution. Rather, behavioral economics should be considered simply a return to the kind of open-minded, intuitively motivated discipline that was invented by Adam Smith and augmented by increasingly powerful statistical tools and datasets.”
Today, behavioral economics is still considered a somewhat separate subject within the broader discipline.
If Thaler has it his way, the field of study that just won him a Nobel prize won’t exist for long: “If economics does develop along these lines the term ‘behavioral economics’ will eventually disappear from our lexicon. All economics will be as behavioral as the topic requires.”

The orginal article.

Summary of “Why You Should Think Twice Before Getting in a Pool”

You’re more likely to get sick from the pathogens in pool water than a natural body of water.
Water in streams and lakes can contain chemicals like pesticides that seep out of the surrounding land, plus bacteria from animal poop that’s in and around the water.
That’s why we established the Safe Drinking Water Act in the first place-because drinking water easily poses a major public health risk if not properly sanitized.
Most of the pathogens causing problems get transmitted via the fecal-oral route, meaning an infected person swims in water and the bug travels from their anus into the water, and then someone else either swallows that water or inhales aerosolized droplets of it.
About 80 percent of the illnesses contracted from treated water were caused by Cryptosporidium, a parasite that lives in animal intestines and spreads by shedding itself from feces into water sources.
The combination of warm water and lots of people from lots of places is trouble, especially if the staff doesn’t properly chlorinate their water.
Pool supply and hardware stores often carry testing strips for pools that determine chlorine level and pH. They’re light and portable, so you can stash them in your pool bag and make a habit of testing the water.
Any water with lots of humans swimming in it is likely full of potential pathogens, but at least in a larger body of water you’ve got the benefit of dilution.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Quit Trying To Be A Superhero”

Hi there, superhero! How are you? Working on a lot of projects simultaneously? Planning a holiday? Taking care of the family? Paying the bills? Hitting the gym every day? Going out with friends? And always solving problems that are not even yours?
You might think that too much work and responsibilities cause burn out.
I’ve been working hard ever since I was in my teens.
Throughout the years, you’ll get better at coping with stress, effectiveness, and working more hours.
You can’t handle a lot of work if you dread work and always look for pleasure.
The question you should ask yourself is not: “Can I handle hard work?”.
If you want to work with others, you have to trust them.
If you don’t know what your purpose is, work on it now.

The orginal article.

Summary of “The Misery of Company”

Apparently my absence prevented everyone from doing anything, because we weren’t all together to make a group decision, and Organizer Lady was pissed.
Which made no sense, given that the group’s decisions were always just a disguised version of her telling us what she wanted to do, and no one argued.
We were all women, college friends in our twenties, getting together in groups that usually started with two people having an idea for a trip, then inviting friends who also invited friends, so that on any given trip you’d probably know half the people fairly well and the other half in name only.
Rigatoni Weekend is when I gave up and officially decided that my answer to group trip invitations going forward would be an across-the-board hell no.
The one who made all the decisions without having to check with anyone else or uncomfortably stretch my budget to fit the group dynamic.
I know now that the right kind of group travel lets anyone involved make decisions and might include smaller groups splitting off for various activities, with some people doing solo adventures and catching up for dinner.
Or maybe not! It just takes time to find your group, and there might be different groups, depending on the kind of trip.
In May, I did my first group travel trip in years: to Miami, where we all had a wonderful time.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Quit Trying To Be A Superhero”

Hi there, superhero! How are you? Working on a lot of projects simultaneously? Planning a holiday? Taking care of the family? Paying the bills? Hitting the gym every day? Going out with friends? And always solving problems that are not even yours?
You might think that too much work and responsibilities cause burn out.
I’ve been working hard ever since I was in my teens.
Throughout the years, you’ll get better at coping with stress, effectiveness, and working more hours.
You can’t handle a lot of work if you dread work and always look for pleasure.
The question you should ask yourself is not: “Can I handle hard work?”.
If you want to work with others, you have to trust them.
If you don’t know what your purpose is, work on it now.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Silicon Valley’s Crisis of Conscience”

Another iconic image of Esalen is a fictional one: the final scene of “Mad Men.” Don Draper sits, cross-legged and ill at ease, on the Esalen lawn.
Esalen is just outside Silicon Valley, so the executives who visit it have come from the likes of Intel and Xerox PARC-and, more recently, from Apple and Google and Twitter.
“There’s a dawning consciousness emerging in Silicon Valley as people recognize that their conventional success isn’t necessarily making the world a better place,” he told the Times.
“The C.E.O.s, inside they’re hurting. They can’t sleep at night.” If the tech tycoons were already going to Esalen for ethical and spiritual guidance, then perhaps Esalen could guide them toward a less rapacious business model.
For a long time, the prevailing posture of the Silicon Valley élite was smugness bordering on hubris.
For all the talk of Esalen becoming a beacon of moral guidance for the tech élite, the institute’s public schedule looks much as it did in the seventies.
After the piece about Esalen ran in the Times, a new C.E.O. was installed in Tauber’s place, and Esalen’s leadership tried to reassure its Aquarian customer base that their beloved sanctuary would not be overrun by tech bros.
“Esalen played its own part in the collapse of Soviet Communism,” Jeffrey Kripal, a professor at Rice University, wrote in his 2007 book, “Esalen: America and the Religion of No Religion.” If hot-tub diplomacy could help thaw the Cold War, surely it can help diminish human downgrading.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Accept The Awkwardness: How To Make Friends”

Accept The Awkwardness: How To Make Friends Friendship is hard, but the best way to tackle it is to talk about it.
In this episode, you’ll learn from the experts about how to make new friends and deepen your existing relationships.
What does being a friend mean in a world where hackers are trying to be your “Friend” on Facebook?
Accept the awkwardness and assume that other people need new friends, too.
You have to accept that awkwardness and the vulnerability it stems from, because guess what? You can’t have friends without getting vulnerable.
Ask anyone about how to make friends and they will most likely tell you to try a new hobby.
Having friends is one of the most nourishing parts of being alive, so it’s not weird or bad or wrong to prioritize it.
Journalist Rachel Wilkerson Miller gives great advice about being honest when people ask how you’re doing, plus a detailed guide to how to show up for people in small and large ways.

The orginal article.