Summary of “Your Data is Being Manipulated”

At this moment, AI is at the center of every business conversation.
Governments, and researchers are obsessed with data.
We are currently seeing an evolution in how data is being manipulated.
If we believe that data can and should be used to inform people and fuel technology, we need to start building the infrastructure necessary to limit the corruption and abuse of that data - and grapple with how biased and problematic data might work its way into technology and, through that, into the foundations of our society.
In short, I think we need to reconsider what security looks like in a data-driven world.
Part 1: Gaming the SystemLike search engines, social media introduced a whole new target for manipulation.
This attracted all sorts of people, from social media marketers to state actors.
The economic and political incentives are obvious, but alongside these powerful actors, there are also a whole host of people with less-than-obvious intentions coordinating attacks on these systems.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Sergio Ermotti Q&A: How UBS Became Home to Half the World’s Billionaires”

BLOOMBERG MARKETS Almost half the world’s billionaires bank with you.
SERGIO ERMOTTI It’s always fascinating to hear how they became so successful.
BM Is there a limit to how big UBS can grow from an assets perspective?
BM How does that affect how you manage this business?
If you look at risk management and how you run a bank nowadays, you always think about stress.
Long-term is, How do we get the organization to move toward the next 10 years? And how do we embrace those challenges and changes in a positive way? And fortunately or unfortunately, I’m paid to think not just about the positive.
If you look at how we measure people today, it’s not just if you’re the best client adviser, or banker, or trader.
You need to constantly think about how you keep yourself relevant in front of clients, how you create value for shareholders, how you attract and retain the best people.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Netflix’s Ted Sarandos: Peak TV Is “An Analog Idea””

Peak TV is an “Analog idea,” Netflix’s head of content Ted Sarandos said at the Vanity Fair Summit in Beverly Hills on Tuesday.
Sarandos also pointed out that Netflix is in his opinion perfect for film too.
Sarandos said Netflix is extremely important for films like Beasts of No Nation, which didn’t do well in the theater, but was a huge streaming hit.
“With the exception of Star Wars, more people on Netflix watched Beasts of No Nation than any other movie in the world.
Sarandos’ co-panelist, Ava DuVernay, who had much success with her Netflix documentary film 13th-including an Oscar nomination-said she doesn’t feel the need for numbers feedback anyway.
“I can feel the energy rolling in. It’s not hard numbers, but it is a general idea of how things go. I don’t need numbers to know.” Of the experience of working with Netflix, she said, “It’s fantastic to be able to make something and present it in an elevated manner to an audience that’s been targeted and well marketed to,” adding that “13th was available in 190 million countries,” thanks to Netflix.
“He has earned it to come back on his terms, and his terms were to come back and produce a talk show that has some of the characteristics of a Barbara Walters special, but to inject his brand of comedy into it.” On making that choice Sarandos said, “We have a bunch of audience in that specific age demographic and whether they’re likely to be Netflix subscribers or not.some people will join Netflix to watch that. There are some people who will not quit because that show’s coming on next month.”
DuVernay perhaps expressed best how much viewing habits have changed in the past few years, and how Netflix has embraced that when she said, “Can you imagine this? You used to have to go home, sit in a chair at a certain time and sit there where it played and wait through the commercials! We did this for 50 years!”.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Can Hollywood Movies About Climate Change Make a Difference?”

When climate change is depicted on screen, it’s often in an onslaught of fire and brimstone, an apocalyptic vision that hardly leaves room for a hopeful human response.
“Typically, if you really want to mobilize people to act, you don’t scare the hell out of them and convince them that the situation is hopeless,” said Andrew Hoffman, a professor at the University of Michigan who is the author of “How Culture Shapes the Climate Change Debate.”
“Although it’s not easy to do, when you’re talking about climate change, as you can see with what’s happening now,” with the recent hurricanes.
“The movie was 100 percent about fear,” said Ed Maibach, a professor and director of the Center for Climate Change Communication at George Mason University.
“We try not to create programming that is a cause for despair, but rather an opportunity.” Because, he added: “The greatest goal of climate change programs is to first find a new audience and stop preaching to the converted. At the end of the day, we’re trying to find new converts.”
One bright spot in showing environmental alarm onscreen is children’s programs, Ms. Levin said, which “Work beautifully for everyday practices and overall awareness. Parents often watch with them, and they learn together.” And climate change is a frequent topic of visual artists and writers, where the genre known as cli-fi is growing.
One thing too few people do, according to Mr. Boykoff, the University of Colorado researcher, is laugh about climate change.
Mr. Maibach, the George Mason professor and an expert in polling on climate understanding, said the greatest problem facing climate communicators is that Americans are not talking about climate change enough – in any shape.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Combat Consultant: Q&A With Retired General Stanley McChrystal”

Robert Gates, the U.S. Defense Secretary under both Presidents George W. Bush and Barack Obama, once called Stanley McChrystal, who led the counterterrorist force JSOC “Perhaps the finest warrior and leader of men in combat I’ve ever met.” McChrystal was also a maverick thinker within the U.S. military, seeing early that terrorist forces such as al Qaeda in Iraq and ISIS were more sophisticated than they appeared.
Today McChrystal runs the McChrystal Group, which helps companies become faster and more flexible.
Q: What kind of companies seek out the McChrystal Group?
McChrystal: The typical company that comes to us isn’t a failing company.
McChrystal: Because managers are classically taught to lock in a standard operating procedure in which people don’t have to organically collaborate.
McChrystal: People don’t think about this, but ISIS has almost no investment in what it’s doing.
McChrystal: What you can do is tell people how to think about things and the broader mission.
McChrystal: [Laughs] There’s a pile of dissent in the military! It just takes different forms.

The orginal article.

Summary of “The Real Value of Money”

They complained about the long hours, the demanding bosses, the competitive job market, and how all anybody seemed to talk about or care about was money, money, money.
Money is often just the vehicle of interchanging these various forms of value with one another.
Because money is an exchange of experiences, money often results in experience cycles: we give up one experience to earn money that then purchases the opposite experience.
They earn their money through insecurity, and then spend their money on quelling their insecurities, thus never actually building wealth.
Wealth occurs when the way we earn money and the way we spend money are aligned with one another – when our money is earned through a positive experience and spent on other positive experiences.
Once this happens, you no longer own your money; your money owns you.
The real value of money emerges when we leverage it as a tool towards our success rather than making it success itself.
The real value of money begins when we look beyond it and see ourselves as better, as more valuable, than it is.

The orginal article.

Summary of “‘Our minds can be hijacked’: the tech insiders who fear a smartphone dystopia”

Facebook’s “Like” feature was, Rosenstein says, “Wildly” successful: engagement soared as people enjoyed the short-term boost they got from giving or receiving social affirmation, while Facebook harvested valuable data about the preferences of users that could be sold to advertisers.
Harris, who has been branded “The closest thing Silicon Valley has to a conscience”, insists that billions of people have little choice over whether they use these now ubiquitous technologies, and are largely unaware of the invisible ways in which a small number of people in Silicon Valley are shaping their lives.
A graduate of Stanford University, Harris studied under BJ Fogg, a behavioural psychologist revered in tech circles for mastering the ways technological design can be used to persuade people.
“A handful of people, working at a handful of technology companies, through their choices will steer what a billion people are thinking today,” he said at a recent TED talk in Vancouver.
Tech companies can exploit such vulnerabilities to keep people hooked; manipulating, for example, when people receive “Likes” for their posts, ensuring they arrive when an individual is likely to feel vulnerable, or in need of approval, or maybe just bored.
A friend at Facebook told Harris that designers initially decided the notification icon, which alerts people to new activity such as “Friend requests” or “Likes”, should be blue.
He identifies the advent of the smartphone as a turning point, raising the stakes in an arms race for people’s attention.
“The people who run Facebook and Google are good people, whose well-intentioned strategies have led to horrific unintended consequences,” he says.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Research: For Better Brainstorming, Tell an Embarrassing Story”

Subsequent scientific research confirmed Osborn’s instincts: groups who follow his guidelines show more creativity than those who don’t.
In one study, brainstorming groups given quantity goals generated both more ideas and significantly higher quality ideas than those given a quality goal alone.
One of the men behind that research, Paul Paulus, a professor at the University of Texas at Arlington, wondered whether there might be additional ways for companies and teams to improve brainstorming results and tested four more rules: stay focused on the task at hand; don’t just say an idea, explain it; when ideas run dry, restate the problem and encourage more thinking; and prompt those not talking to contribute.
The results of these studies were dramatic: groups that followed both sets of rules generated nearly 50 significantly more unique ideas.
My colleagues, Elizabeth Ruth Wilson and Brian Lucas, and I decided to explore whether people could also be primed for better brainstorming before the idea generation even starts.
We hypothesized that -just as quantity goals paradoxically yield better quality ideas – the “Embarrassing story” condition would lead people to drop their inhibitions and get more creative.
Using the same scoring criteria – fluency and flexibility – we found that the “Embarrassment” teams generated 26% more ideas spanning 15% more use categories than their counterparts.
As uncomfortable as this may seem, especially among colleagues you would typically want to impress, the result will be a broader range of creative ideas, which will surely impress them even more.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Everyone Talks About Living Their Best Life. How Do You Actually Do It?”

You don’t need to come from the right pedigree.
What is it that you actually want? You don’t need to construct a vision board, just be honest with yourself.
How much money will it take until you feel accomplished? What experiences do you want to have? Write it down if it helps you put it into focus.
Most successful people spend countless hours working and training to reach their goals.
In order to create the lifestyle that you dream of, you need to surround yourself with positive people that push and encourage you.
If you’re an entrepreneur, you need to meet investors, potential clients and press years before you need their help.
If your dream is to be a digital nomad and travel blogger, you need to develop connections with those in the industry to find out what separates the successful people from the wannabes.
You don’t need to fulfill your goals as quickly as possible.

The orginal article.

Summary of “8-hour workday may be 5 hours too long, research suggests”

The average worker spends most of the eight-hour workday doing many other things beside work, including eating, socializing, or reading the news.
Over the course of an eight-hour workday, the average employee works for about three hours – two hours and 53 minutes, to be more precise.
A study of UK office workers suggests the three-hour workday might be more sensible.
People can’t sustain hard work for more than a few hours, psychologists have found.
Research suggests the smarter change may actually be to work five, six-hour days.
In Sweden, a government study that ran between January 2015 and January 2017 selected roughly 80 retirement-home workers in Gothenburg to work that exact schedule.
At the end of the study, people said they were happier, less stressed, and enjoyed work more.
“Employers may actually be getting much more out of their employees,” he said, “If they only work 50 or 75 percent of the current work hours.”

The orginal article.