Summary of “Democrats’ Chances Of Winning The Senate Are Looking Stronger”

In the race to replace retiring Republican Sen. Bob Corker, Democrat Phil Bredesen leads GOP Rep. Marsha Blackburn 45 percent to 35 percent, according to a Middle Tennessee State University poll of 600 registered voters.
The MTSU poll put his approval rating in the state at 50 percent, with 41 percent disapproving.
The poll, conducted by Elway Research, showed Rodgers with a 44 percent to 38 percent lead over Democrat Lisa Brown, with 16 percent undecided.
A Quinnipiac poll found that 84 percent of Democrats have a favorable view of the Parkland students who have been calling for new gun-control laws, but only 22 percent of Republicans feel the same – 62 percent of Republicans have an unfavorable view of the students.
A Mason-Dixon poll conducted last week finds that 48 percent of Missourians think he should resign, 36 percent think he should not.
A Mason-Dixon poll of Missouri registered voters also found Republican Josh Hawley in a statistical tie with incumbent Democratic Senator Claire McCaskill, who is up for re-election in November – 45 percent of respondents supported McCaskill and 44 percent preferred Hawley, with 11 percent undecided.
Last week, his approval rating was 40.2 percent, compared with a disapproval rating of 53.8 percent.
Last week, Democrats were up 47.1 percent to 39.1 percent.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Bitcoin, the Biggest Bubble in History, Is Popping”

The greatest bubble in history is popping, according to Bank of America Corp. The cryptocurrency is tracking the downfalls of the other massive asset-price bubbles in history less than one year out from its record, analysts lead by Chief Investment Strategist Michael Hartnett wrote in a note Sunday.
The cryptocurrency has fallen more than 65 percent since peaking in December at $19,511.
Bitcoin rose 2.2 percent to $6,750 on Monday.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Hunger And Homelessness Are Widespread Among College Students, Study Finds”

Hunger And Homelessness Are Widespread Among College Students, Study Finds : The Two-Way More than a third of them don’t have enough to eat and a similar number lack stable housing, according to a survey published Tuesday by researchers at Temple University and the Wisconsin HOPE Lab.
As college students grapple with the rising costs of classes and books, mortgaging their futures with student loans in exchange for a diploma they’re gambling will someday pay off, it turns out many of them are in great financial peril in the present, too.
More than a third of college students don’t always have enough to eat and they lack stable housing, according to a survey published Tuesday by researchers at Temple University and the Wisconsin HOPE Lab.
Overall the study concluded 36 percent of college students say they are food insecure.
Whereas, middle class students “Wouldn’t be going through these issues if they weren’t in college” because “Their resources pale in comparison to those high college prices.”
While the survey did not include any University of California respondents, most of the findings in the current annual study parallel those found by researchers with the UC Berkeley’s Basic Needs Security Work Group, which, in 2016 determined 42 percent of student in the UC system were food insecure.
37 percent of community college students and 29 percent of four-year students reported the food they’d bought just didn’t last and they didn’t have money to buy more.
Among the most surprising findings in the survey, Goldrick-Rab said, “Is that homeless college students devote as much time to the classroom and to studying as do college students who are not homeless. However, they also work more, they commute more, spend more time taking care of other people and they sleep less.”

The orginal article.

Summary of “This Is What Record-Low Unemployment Looks Like in America”

The supply of workers has dried up just as the tourism industry is on an upswing, says store manager Jennifer Smith.
At Wilbur’s chocolate shop, two store managers left last year because they had better prospects in administrative work.
Lanre Bakare, a 36-year-old Nigerian immigrant, was homeless and had little marketable work experience when he was accepted into a training program run by CobbWorks Inc., a federally funded nonprofit that matches workers and businesses in the construction, logistics, information technology, and health-care fields.
CobbWorks has been around since 2000 but has recently expanded its outreach, training people with spotty work histories or criminal backgrounds who employers wouldn’t have considered a few years ago.
The city’s No. 2 employer, Lockheed Martin Corp., is relatively insulated from local labor trends because the market for aerospace engineering work is national.
Still, turnover has increased, because workers have more options than they did a few years ago.
Mary Greeley Medical Center-one of Ames’s largest employers-is working on setting up a ride-sharing program for employees who live in nearby Story City or Des Moines, where the unemployment rate is 2 percentage points higher.
Some companies are trying to snap up workers before they hit the job market.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Most Americans think AI will destroy other people’s jobs, not theirs”

AI is a problem for jobs, say the majority of Americans, but it’s someone else’s problem.
Nearly three-quarters of US adults believe artificial intelligence will “Eliminate more jobs than it creates,” according to a Gallup survey.
For respondents with only a four-year college degree or less, 28 percent were worried about AI taking their job; for people with at least a bachelor degree, that figure was 15 percent.
One survey conducted by Quartz last year found that 90 percent of respondents thought that up to half of all jobs would be lost to automation in five years, but 91 percent said there was “No risk to my job.” Another study from the Pew Research Center in 2016 found the same: 65 percent of respondents said that 50 years from now automation would take over “Much” of the work currently being done by humans, but 80 percent thought their own job would still exist in that time frame.
Studies trying to estimate job losses caused by advances in robotics and AI vary wildly.
What counts as “AI” and when is a job “Destroyed” are up for debate.
Historically it’s the cheerier scenario that’s been true: technology usually leads to a net gain in jobs, destroying some professions but creating new ones in the process.
Enough people are saying it is a problem, but not many individuals will look at their own job and think, “Yes, a computer could probably do all this.” This isn’t ignorance, either.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Zach Lowe 10 things I like and don’t like, including Anthony Davis’ brilliance”

The Bucks secure 78 percent of opponent misses when Maker is on the bench, but only 73.8 percent when he plays, per NBA.com.
Russell has used 32.4 percent of Brooklyn’s possessions with a shot, turnover or drawn foul, fourth-highest among all rotation players, behind only James Harden, Russell Westbrook and Joel Embiid.
Almost half of Russell’s shots have come from midrange, a high number for a perimeter player, per Cleaning The Glass.
The Kings have been playing retrograde double-center lineups all season, and they stepped it up in Monday’s loss/win against Minnesota by sliding Bruno Caboclo – still two years away from being two years away, and maybe a few months away from China – to small forward alongside Skal Labissiere and Kosta Koufos.
Justin Holiday plays only when Zach LaVine doesn’t, and Chicago has transitioned Robin Lopez into a role as hipster chic sideline model.
Most of Memphis’ perimeter players – the guys who should be playing on the wing instead of Martin – have been awful.
Something I’ve always wondered: Teams defend late-season tankery by screaming “Player development,” but how much functional development comes from shoving young guys into uncomfortable roles amid lineups that don’t make sense? How much value is there in letting Josh Jackson fling up floater after floater?
Opponents have outscored the Sixers by about 4.2 points per 100 possessions when Simmons plays without Embiid, per NBA.com.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Baseball’s Economics Aren’t As Skewed As They Seem”

While MLB players have resisted a salary cap that might make it simpler to establish what the players’ share “Should” be, a 50-50 split sounds fairer - and much more sympathy-inducing, from a PR perspective - than a 60-40 split.
In December 2015, MLBPA executive director Tony Clark told the L.A. Times that the players’ share of revenue was “As close to 50 percent as it has been in a long time.” A year later, upon negotiating a new collective bargaining agreement that took effect in 2017, Clark said his expectation was that the split would “Stay right in that general area,” remarking that the union “Wouldn’t have agreed to the deal otherwise.” A 50-50 split seems to be the target that the Players Association has set for itself.
Add in the earnings of baseball’s chronically underpaid, nonunionized minor leaguers - the sport’s only true paupers - and the players’ share of revenue rises to more than 56 percent.
Stephen Walters, a professor of economics at Loyola University Maryland who consults on player evaluation for the Orioles, elaborates via email: “Clubs sign a lot of guys to deals that involve bonuses, a lot of teams pay well to store players in inventory as insurance, and clubs also spend a good amount insuring contracts. Those issues can reconcile the ‘estimates’ from outsiders like Forbes/Cot’s with MLB’s accounting.” Insurance, of course, is a cost to teams but not a boon to players’ bank accounts.
“Based on the publicly available data, the players’ share has definitely declined from what it was 15 years ago.” Just before the strike started in 1994, major leaguers were raking in 58 percent of revenue.
“Total player costs were in the range of 60 percent of revenues in the late 1990s and early 2000s, but fell gradually to the 56-57 percent range by 2010, where they have remained,” Noll says.
“Most likely tougher luxury-tax rules and more extensive revenue sharing that were instituted in the 2002 and 2006 collective bargaining agreements reduced the share of revenues going to players, but that had been completed by 2010.” Zimbalist says he doesn’t disagree with Noll’s analysis.
Compared with their predecessors from the Players Association’s early-2000s share-of-revenue heyday today’s players may have cause to be bitter, even if they have only their own negotiators to blame.

The orginal article.

Summary of “It’s Time to Say It: Retirement Is Dead. This Is What Will Take Its Place”

The truth is that we are doing an enormous disservice to society by setting retirement as an end goal to a long career.
Advances in longevity are making supporting retirement for another 20 to 30 years impossible for 90 percent of all U.S. workers, whose only source of income is Social Security, which only pays from an average of just over $1,300 per month to a max of just over $2,600 per month.
While paid media ads that talk about retirement planning seem to be everywhere, the reality is that very few people are actually benefiting from retirement savings or planning.
Even if you’re lucky enough to be among the 20 percent, who have a $1 million-plus net worth and enough saved up to retire, there is some evidence that the classic notion of retirement may actually be harmful to your health.
Even the unhealthy group reduced their likelihood of dying by 9 percent if they delayed retirement.
What amazes me is that every financial institution’s white paper, study, or promotional piece about retirement planning is missing one critical thing: any mention of continuing to work! We need to wake up.
Rather than perpetuate the mythology of work as penance and retirement as a time to be liberated from it, what if you replaced the concept of retirement with that of a third act in which you can continue to create value and receive value for those things that you truly love to do, while you also establish a balance with other personally fulfilling activities you may want to do more of?
The bottom line is that the old rules were built for an economy and a society in which retirement was seen as a release from bondage-the liberating act from a lifetime of work.

The orginal article.

Summary of “digital paywall business is growing as fast as Facebook and faster than Google”

The Times’ overall digital business, by the way, is growing by 30 percent, altogether faster than Google.
It’s still apt since A) it is Facebook and Google that have been eating away the news business, and B) the Times, a 166-year-old establishment known for being stubbornly and decorously staid, often to the point of self-defeat, is now growing like a Silicon Valley behemoth.
The future of the Times – and of every news publisher – is digital, and the Times aims to create an $800 million digital business by 2020.
When including the Times’ Wirecutter business, led by Perpich, the company booked $607 million in total digital sales for the year.
Would an $800 million business sustain the Times’ current newsroom of 1,300 journalists? That headcount hasn’t changed in years, to the Times’ credit, and it’s clear that supporting such a large newsroom requires the hefty revenues from print.
The Times’ growing native ads business, for example, requires a lot of custom work, effectively amounting to an in-house ad agency.
If the market is being smart, it’s really just applying a startup valuation to the Times’ online business.
Yes, that’s a bit of a walk, but consider: Since 2011, the Times’ digital subscription revenue rose 656 percent and digital ad revenue rose 168 percent, while print continued to get smaller.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Where Did Your Pay Raise Go? It May Have Become a Bonus”

In 1991, for example, spending on temporary rewards and bonuses for salaried employees, known as variable pay, accounted for an average of 3.1 percent of total compensation budgets, while salary increases amounted to 5 percent.
Company spending on one-time bonuses, versus salary increases.
The percentage spent on salary increases never returned to its pre-2009 levels, the Aon Hewitt surveys show, while the percentage spent on bonuses and other short-term rewards climbed to new levels.
Their lifetime earnings – which include salary, wages, bonuses and exercised stock options – have mostly dropped since then.
Salaried workers, rather than hourly wage earners, remain much more likely to be the recipients of such extra payments.
Still, Jesus Ranon, supervisory labor economist at the bureau, said, “You can see in terms of percent of compensation there is an increase in these bonus components.”
When Aon Hewitt asked 2,079 American workers in a second, newly completed survey what they would like to see their employers do with their tax-cut windfall, 65 percent chose a pay raise – twice as many as any other option, including a bonus or a 401(k) contribution.
Takisha Gower, a passenger service agent for Envoy, the air carrier that was previously known as American Eagle and is owned by American Airlines, welcomed her recent $1,000 bonus, which the company credited to the “New tax structure.” She is much more concerned about her base pay week to week, a subject of longstanding contract negotiations.

The orginal article.