Summary of “The Harder-To-Measure Benefits of Getting Older”

What age is someone most likely to achieve their peak performance?
“You don’t need to be 25 years old to have your greatest performance,” says seven-time mountain bike world champion Rebecca Rusch, who, at age 47, was part of the third party ever to summit Mount Kilimanjaro via bike.
Alpine climber Jimmy Chin has said that perhaps his best ever performance was a first ascent up Mount Meru, which he accomplished at age 37 on an expedition with Conrad Anker, who was 48 at the time.
“I’ve had conversations with other climbers about surviving 28. At that age you may think you have enough experience to really go for it, but in reality, you still haven’t seen that much and whatever experience you do have can be easily outweighed by brashness and impatience.”
Chin, now 44, told me he’s realized that with age comes wisdom.
“The older you get the more experiences, successes, and failures you have. You have more information to draw from. The more information you have, the more patterns you recognize. The more patterns you recognize, the better you are at making tough decisions and assessing risk,” he says.
Maybe the best way to conceptualize age and athletic performance is to imagine two curves: one for physiological fitness, which peaks relatively young and then slowly declines; and another for wisdom, which starts off low and gradually rises over time.
A 2013 study published in The Journal of Strength and Conditioning Research found that the median age for a first-time ultra runner is 37 and the median age of all ultramarathon finishers is 43-seven years older than the median age of all marathon finishers in the same year.

The orginal article.

Summary of “What Movie Has the Most Peak Performances?”

Some projects are lucky enough to cast a group of actors who peak at the same time and each deliver career-best performances.
Inspired by a tweet regarding The Talented Mr. Ripley’s window, staff members of The Ringer were asked to submit which movie they think captured the most peak performances from a group of actors.
Frances McDormand is in peak shape no matter what the movie-but her performance as the formidable, worrying, god-save-my-child loving Elaine Miller may be my favorite of hers.
Independence Day Michael Baumann: It’s no surprise that one of the five greatest works of 20th-century American cinema would be so stuffed to the gills with great performances.
Harry Connick Jr. was robbed of Best Supporting Actor in a loaded field that included Cuba Gooding Jr. in Jerry Maguire and William H. Macy in Fargo; Bill Pullman delivered the most moving monologue since Hamlet and the best American presidential speech since JFK dared us to go to the moon; even Brent Spiner, whose peak is undoubtedly Star Trek: The Next Generation, may never have delivered a better performance in a film.
Mulholland Drive Miles Surrey: David Lynch’s masterwork has a trifecta of performances that remain the best the actors have ever delivered, all for different reasons.
While basically all of those actors have given more iconic performances throughout their careers, their complicated, empathetic, and hilarious work in this movie qualifies as their best.
Somewhere along the way of Malkovich playing John Cusack, Cameron Diaz, and a bunch of other strangers inside his own body-not to mention a trippy scene when every single person in a crowded restaurant is Malkovich saying “Malkovich” over and over-he delivered a signature performance to match the stakes of being in a movie with your own name in the title.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Summer Heat Waves Can Slow Our Thinking”

Summer Heat Waves Can Slow Our Thinking : Shots – Health News Hot weather can influence cognitive performance, according to new research.
Young adults living in non-air-conditioned dorms during a heat wave performed worse on math and attention tests.
Can’t cool off this summer? Heat waves can slow us down in ways we may not realize.
New research suggests heat stress can muddle our thinking, making simple math a little harder to do.
As the climate changes, temperatures spike and heat waves are more frequent.
To learn more about how the heat influences young, healthy adults, Allen and his colleagues studied college students living in dorms during a summer heat wave in Boston.
The findings add to a growing body of evidence that documents the effect of heat on mental performance, both in schools and workplaces.
“We all tend to think we can compensate, we can do just fine” during heat waves says Allen.

The orginal article.

Summary of “How “Mindful Running” Can Help You Run Faster, Farther, and More Peacefully”

How dark? If it weren’t for the presence of a small traveling spotlight, runners wouldn’t be able to see more than a few feet in front of them at any given moment.
In a study published in the Journal of Sport and Exercise Psychology, researchers examined 15 cyclists through four 20-kilometer cycling trials, paying attention to how “Optic flow” affected “Perceived exertion”-in other words, the ways in which visual cues influenced how hard athletes thought they were working.
“On the dark track, runners felt less time pressure, which is clearly a good thing for people that run for relaxation purposes.”
How hard can you go, and how fast, and how far? “This aspect of training often neglects the importance of the mind and of mental conditioning in our preparation, performance, and recovery.”
The “Mindful running” school of thought dictates that if you can focus on how you feel while running, unencumbered by the compulsion to set a new personal best every time, that sentiment should factor more into the way you exercise.
Once you start integrating this mindfulness training into your running workouts, you’ll come to realize that the lessons you learn can help you during those more intense runs, too.
Hey, that’s progress! The more often you practice running mindfully, the more you’ll see full-body benefits.
If you don’t have a private blackout track at your disposal, a few gyms now offer dimly-lit treadmill-based classes in which you can give mindful running a shot.

The orginal article.

Summary of “13 Ways to Develop Laser-Like Focus”

Here are some surprising ways to help boost your focus and performance.
If you want to be successful, you have to find strategies that will help you focus despite all of the distractions that prevent you from doing the task at hand.
Luckily, with the help of science, developing laser-like focus is easier than you think.
To learn more, here are 13 ways to develop laser-like focus.
Another advantage of meditation is its ability to help people focus.
According to research, a warmer workplace will help you focus better and be more productive.
In a study, a group of researchers found that by taking a 40-second break and simply looking at a computerized image of a green roof, employees’ focus on a particular task improved.
A study found that people who work in offices filled with natural light experience substantially less eye strain, headaches and blurred visions, all of which deter focus and performance.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Survival of the Mediocre Mediocre”

Mediocrity is in fact the sine qua non of survival itself.
Agency and satisficing are emergent aspects of mediocrity, not explicit calculations involved in the generation of mediocre behavior.
Sometimes antifragility will point to mediocrity as the way, and other times mediocrity will exhibit antifragility.
Computers have learned to be mediocre, but haven’t yet learned to compete at mediocrity out in the open world.
Mediocrity qua mediocrity? We still have an edge there.
Soft mediocrity is mediocrity revealed through middling performance in domains where A-Ark excellence is actually possible on one end of the performance spectrum, and error-free correct, reliable C-Ark useful performance is possible at the other.
So a mediocre chess player, or a sloppy assembly line worker both exhibit soft mediocrity, because both excellence and error-free play are achievable and meaningful.
While disruption always involves mediocrity, mediocrity does not always imply disruption.

The orginal article.

Summary of “When Empowering Employees Works, and When It Doesn’t”

Second, by empowering their employees, these leaders are also more likely to be trusted by their subordinates, compared to leaders who do not empower their employees.
Third, leaders who empowered employees were more effective at influencing employee performance in Eastern, compared to Western, cultures, and they had a more positive impact on employees who had less experience working in their organizations.
One study in our analysis found that by trying to provide employees with additional responsibility and challenges at work, empowering leaders burdened their employees and increased their level of job stress.
Our results again showed that the effects of leading by empowering others are determined by how employees perceive their leader’s behavior.
To our surprise, we found that leaders who were perceived as empowering by employees in companies located in Eastern cultures had a bigger effect on routine performance than leaders in Western cultures.
We found that empowering leadership had a stronger positive influence on the day-to-day performance of employees who had less experience in the organization compared to employees who had been in their jobs for longer.
In other words, empowering leaders saw greater improvements in job performance among less experienced employees than among more experienced employees.
Longitudinal studies were very rare and thus we could not determine causality – our correlations do not confirm whether empowering leadership caused increases in employee performance or whether employees who performed better were more likely to be given additional responsibility and empowered by their leaders.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Apple apologizes for iPhone slowdown drama, offers $29 battery replacements”

Apple says in its letter that batteries are “Consumable components,” and is offering anyone with an iPhone 6 or later a battery replacement for $29 starting in late January through December 2018 – a discount of $50 from the usual replacement cost.
This is a significant change in attitude around iPhone batteries – a decade ago, when the first iPhone came out, Apple said most iPhone users would never need to replace their batteries.
iPhone owners have long believed Apple artificially slows down older phones to drive new sales.
Apple had actually announced this change to performance along with iOS 10.2.1 a year ago, as the fix to a problem with the iPhone 6 that caused unexpected shutdowns if older batteries couldn’t provide enough power to the processor.
For its part, Apple continues to insist that it’s never artificially slowed down phones – just that it’s aggressively managing phone performance to maximize the lifespan of iPhone batteries.
Processor speed is just one piece of the battery- and performance-management puzzle, according to Apple: iPhones with older batteries may also more aggressively dim their screens, have lower maximum speaker volumes, and even have their camera flashes disabled when the system needs more peak power than the battery can provide.
In any event, Apple has a long way to go rebuilding trust with its customers – this story broke well past the tech press and hit TV morning shows and local news with zero nuance about “Smoothing instantaneous peaks” and battery chemistry degradation.
In its letter, Apple says “We’ve always wanted our customers to be able to use their iPhones as long as possible.” If Apple is serious about that, and equally serious about the battery being a consumable, these first two steps are just the beginning of a major reset in the way we think about maintaining the most important devices in our lives.

The orginal article.

Summary of “but Most Organizations Only Focus on One”

Our research into over 20,000 workers of all skill levels across U.S. industries, and a review of hundreds of academic studies on the psychology of human performance, shows that most leaders and organizations tend to focus on just one type of performance.
Essentially, tactical performance is how well you stick to your plan, and adaptive performance is how well you diverge from your plan.
If you’ve ever interacted with a customer representative who is clearly reading a script back to you, you’re witnessing tactical performance destroying adaptive performance.
We asked the management team if we could eliminate the narrow metrics and bonuses, which rewarded only tactical performance, and focus more on the adaptive.
The focus was on learning and adaptation – not on hitting performance goals.
When you find yourself saying things like “I wish my people took more ownership,” “I wish we operated more like a startup,” or “I wish we were more nimble,” remember that most organizations have created so much emphasis on tactical performance that their people cannot adapt.
Maintaining great performance over the long term will require organizations to also emphasize adaptive performance.
Start to measure the effectiveness of the conditions that affect adaptive performance, from how you motivate people to how you build your organization’s structures, performance review systems, and planning processes.

The orginal article.

Summary of “The Best Senior Teams Thrive on Disagreement”

Should enterprise leadership teams also pursue cohesion? To explore this question, over the course of six years, we surveyed senior-most leadership teams 99 times at companies representing a variety of industries, including financial services, food and beverage, energy, technology, healthcare, and retail.
Top teams need to navigate greater complexity and uncertainty than teams lower on the org chart.
More specifically, we examined what differentiated the top 25% of performing teams from the rest of the teams we studied when it came to taking calculated risks to lead the industry.
Based on our research, one of the best predictors of high-performing teams is their ability to consistently scan the external environment for consumer, competitor, and industry knowledge and to use that knowledge to adapt.
The best teams do not lose the focus of the external world when getting pulled into internal transformations, change, and turmoil.
Schulte notes that “For innovation to happen, senior teams need to create a culture where those who are closest to the customer can share, challenge, and feel heard.” He also notes that the responsibility of enterprise leadership teams is to “Create empowering cultures of micro-innovation in conjunction with clear, top-down plans to best set up organizations for success.”
For enterprise-wide teams to successfully traverse the tensions outlined above, trust and positive team dynamics are foundational.
While you want the team to operate from the standpoint of what ‘s best for the enterprise rather than what ‘s best for one ‘s individual function, often the way you get there is by people in each department laying out their concerns.

The orginal article.