Summary of “Android 9 Pie review: Google gets more thoughtful”

That’s where Android Pie’s improved Do Not Disturb mode comes in.
Lens, Assistant, Duplex – it’s no secret that Google believes artificial intelligence is the way forward.
What’s really interesting about the way Google wove AI into Android Pie is how subtle it is.
None of the features we’re about to discuss are conceptually very exciting, but there’s little question that they make day-to-day life using Pie more pleasant.
Consider the subway ride I mentioned earlier – that’s an example of what Google calls App Actions.
See, Android Pie basically keeps an eye on what you’re doing and when, chews on that data for a while, and brings those actions directly into the phone’s app launcher when they seem appropriate.
Google seems to have prioritized the quality and timeliness of these suggestions over quantity.
While we were filming our video review, Pie suggested I listen to a Japanese band in Spotify, or, uh, call myself.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Android 9 Pie review: the predictive OS”

The story with Android 9 Pie isn’t radically different, but it changes some of those tried and true lines a bit.
For the first time, I’ve had a chance to test the official release of a new version of Android on a phone not made by Google, the Essential Phone.
The many features in Android 9 Pie cohere into something that feels more polished than the last few versions of Android.
Along with all of this, the traditional Android back button will still show up from time to time next to the home button because Google hasn’t yet developed a gesture for “Back.”
In my initial look at Android 9 Pie, I called it Google’s “Most ambitious update in years.” I still think that’s true, but unfortunately, right now, Android doesn’t quite reach those ambitions.
Through battery management and notification changes, Google is continuing its efforts to corral an ecosystem of bad-acting apps through a better-managed OS. The other big trend is one I’ve been talking about for a couple years now: moving toward making AI the new UI. Android 9 Pie is full of new ideas of how an OS can be smarter Two years ago at the Code conference, CEO Sundar Pichai told Walt Mossberg that Google intended to be more “Opinionated” about its own phones, and the Googlification of Android on Pixel phones is stronger than ever now.
Apple still trounces Android when it comes to getting phones updated to the latest OS. Last year, Google built the Treble infrastructure to make it easier for companies to push out these big OS updates faster.
As happy as I am with all the individual features in Android 9 Pie, I’ll be even happier if the Android ecosystem gets its act together and releases it.

The orginal article.

Summary of “You’re Doing It Wrong: 3 Bad Habits That Are Ruining Your Phone’s Battery « Smartphones :: Gadget Hacks”

From talking to individual respondents, it appears many people were like me and confused about which charging habits are actually bad for your battery.
As a result, it exacerbates many bad habits regarding poor battery mismanagement.
Often with my laptop, I would watch videos and do homework late into the night, eking out what little battery I had left to accomplish whatever task I had. Afterward, I would plug it into the charger and go to sleep for the night to wake up to a full charge – but I never stopped to think about what happens to the battery overnight after it hits 100%. Even back then, without fast charging, it didn’t take eight hours to fully charge a battery.
At 77°F, the battery capacity reduced by 20%, meaning the maximum amount of energy the battery could store was now 80% of its original capacity.
To restore your capacity, you’d need to fully discharge your battery so that your battery would remember its full capacity.
Depth of discharge is the difference between the starting battery percentage and ending battery percentage, which determines the number of discharge cycles your battery has.
Most of us have at least 30 minutes to spare while getting ready, and by that time, fast charging should have your battery up to at least 50%. Depending on the battery percentage when you began charging, 30 minutes could give you an all-day charge.
Instead of 100% capacity, electric vehicles charge only to 80% and deplete to only 30%. This way, every electric vehicle lives its entire life in the sweet zone, and when the battery capacity begins to reduce, the system slowly increases the depth of discharge to maintain the same battery life while preserving the battery.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Does Having the Best Camera Phone Matter?: Reviews by Wirecutter”

It’s important to remember that even if a phone produces brilliant photos, it won’t necessarily be a pleasure to use-or capable of getting the shots you want.
When I asked phone reviewer TJ Donegan of Reviewed.com what makes a camera stand out, he told me that it’s more about the phone’s user interface and the camera’s speed and responsiveness than image quality.
“I used the LG V30 for about five months, and the camera was unbearably slow,” he explained.
“I’d miss shots all the time. The S9 camera badly over-saturates, but I’d rather have the shot.” These are details that any phone review worth its salt would report.
In the past, third-party camera apps were sometimes faster or produced better results than Apple’s, Samsung’s, or Google’s own software.
Those days are largely gone, in part because the phone manufacturers got better at it, and in part because only they know how to properly take advantage of the proprietary hardware included in the recent generations of smartphones: dual-lens systems, special image processing circuitry, and so on.
That said, though phone makers have increased the power of their built-in editing tools-including advanced features like levels adjustments, photo-editing apps are still helpful for getting the most out of your shots.
The editor built into Instagram is also surprisingly powerful, and it eliminates a step if that’s where your photos are headed anyway.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Letter from Shenzhen”

In another village, I use my phone to note down a mysterious, recurring banner I see for “农村淘宝, cun.
Free-floating, these places are libertarian islands in the city, where village mayors can still sell their land to developers in an act of self-eradication, ridding the skyline of themselves and their diminutive buildings forever.
Guangzhou’s neighbor, Shenzhen, is also full of urban villages.
As I stand in the Shenzhen Open Innovation Lab with my friend and collaborator Maya, we listen to the SZ OIL’s founder, David Li, tell us the history of Shenzhen.
Even in one of the poorest provinces in China, QR codes will follow you from towns to villages.
David points to Taobao villages, 淘宝村, as an example of how far tech companies in China are willing to go to expand their user base.
Taobao villages are a concerted effort by Alibaba to bring e-commerce into the countryside, where Taobao provides the infrastructure and training for villagers to sell their goods online.
At the heart of it always hums the question, just how cultural is the construction of technology? As many scholars such as Joe Karaganis, Jinying Li, and Lucy Montgomery have asked, how can piracy help expand media and technological access in China? Why is creative reuse and the lack of intellectual property protections in Shenzhen seen as knock-off culture by many in the US, when the actual conditions are more like open-source? How does the vibrant economy in southern China challenge Western notions of authorship and copyright? Is technology less universal than we think?

The orginal article.

Summary of “Is My Phone Recording Everything I Say?”

Vice recently fueled the paranoia with an article that declared “Your phone is listening and it’s not paranoia,” a conclusion the author reached based on a 5-day experiment where he talked about “Going back to uni” and “Needing cheap shirts” in front of his phone and then saw ads for shirts and university classes on Facebook.
The apps included those belonging to Facebook, as well as over 8,000 apps that send information to Facebook.
Using 10 Android phones, the researchers used an automated program to interact with each of those apps and then analyzed the traffic generated.
Appsee’s CEO Zahi Boussiba told me that his company’s terms of service “Clearly state that our customers must disclose the use of a 3rd party technology, and our terms forbid customers from tracking any personal data with Appsee.” He said their customers can blacklist sensitive parts of their app to prevent Appsee from recording it, and pointed out that a number of Appsee competitors also offer “Full-session replay technology” for both iOS and Android apps.
GoPuff used Appsee to help optimize performance of its app, so the recording wasn’t unexpected on the company side, but it’s concerning that a third party can record your phone screen with no notice to you.
The phones were in a controlled environment, not wandering the world in a way that might trigger them: For the first few months of the study the phones were near students in a lab at Northeastern University and thus surrounded by ambient conversation, but the phones made so much noise, as apps were constantly being played with on them, that they were eventually moved into a closet.
It’s also possible that the researchers could have missed audio recordings of conversations if the app transcribed the conversation to text on the phone before sending it out.
The uncanny accuracy of the ads you see almost certainly isn’t the result of the phone literally eavesdropping on you; it’s a combination of good targeting based on the amount of your digital and real world behavior that is captured via apps, along with the fact that you aren’t as unique as you think you are.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Isn’t it time we declared our independence from bloatware?”

Google’s Photos app is so thirsty for any images I generate with my phone that it will ask me if I want to automatically back up new folders I create.
Candy Crush Saga on Windows, the News Republic app on HTC phones, and the Oath bundle that Samsung preloads on Verizon Galaxy S9s all serve corporate interests before those of the user.
Oath CEO Tim Armstrong, speaking to Reuters, leaves no doubt about it: “This gets ads one step closer to being direct to consumer. You can’t be more direct than being on the mobile phone home screen and app environment.”
I’ve reviewed flagship LG phones with as many as 54 carrier-imposed bloatware apps, accompanied by carrier branding on the box, a carrier splash screen integrated into the boot-up sequence, and even a carrier-specific home screen theme.
That’s the thing: if everyone in Korea is used to seeing a thicket of carrier apps and nonsense preloaded on their phone, if no one is showing consumers a better option, they just accept it as an unhappy status quo and get on with life.
Google’s Pixel phones are hard to find in stores, but they also present a version of Android that is far worthier of a user’s trust than the typical, overly inquisitive Android OEM variation.
Revelations about Facebook’s negligence with user data, Android OEMs outright lying to their users about software updates, and the recent bizarre example of Samsung phones spontaneously texting photos to random contacts have raised the requirement for trustworthiness as well as high specs from a device maker.
Roid OEMs have tiny profit margins and pressure from carriers – what’s Microsoft’s excuse? I have some sympathy for Android phone makers, who are faced with microscopic profit margins and a shortage of their own software expertise.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Talking to Google Duplex: Google’s human-like phone AI feels revolutionary”

At I/O 2018, Google shocked the world with a demo of “Google Duplex,” an AI system for accomplishing real-world tasks over the phone.
Then all of a sudden, Google said it was ready to talk more about Duplex.
In a consumer Google Duplex interaction, a user would say something like “OK Google, reserve a table for four at the THEP Thai Restaurant at 6pm.” From there, the Google Assistant would fire up Duplex and make the call.
To start, a Google rep went around the room and took reservation requirements from the group, things like “What time should the reservation be for?” or “How many people?” Our requirements were punched into a computer, and the phone soon rang.
In my group, I took the first phone call from Google Duplex.
Listening to recordings of Duplex are one thing, but participating in a call with Google’s phone bot is a totally different experience.
During the I/O keynote, Google played a brief, pre-recorded Duplex call.
Google basically built a secretary AI with Duplex, but it doesn’t speak with the practiced confidence of someone accustomed to making reservations-it often sounds like a teenager ordering a pizza.

The orginal article.