Summary of “Turning off your notifications for 24 hours could change your whole perspective”

Incessant notifications accumulate into a more draining effect.
Phone notifications follow the model of “Random reinforcement”, which is known in psychology to be far more difficult to break free of than regular, expected rewards.
One study found that p.eople receive, on average, 63.5 notifications per day.
The widespread addiction to these messages is so strong that, when researchers tried to recruit 30 people for an experiment where all phone notifications would be disabled for a week, they simply couldn’t find the participants.
“We started the recruitment, many people declined participation, because they did not want to be without notifications for a whole week,” write researchers from Carnegie Mellon University and Spanish telecommunications firm Telef√≥nica in their paper, due to be presented at a conference on computer-human interaction next month.
In the study, participants were less distracted and more productive on their day without notifications.
Two years later, the researchers checked in and found that 13 participants still had different settings; some had permanently kept notifications off for certain apps, while others continued to create their own notification black-outs by turning on the “Do not disturb” setting on a regular basis.
The key idea-that turning off notifications can be psychologically beneficial-should be familiar to many, and a refreshing reminder to those who’ve become inured to the buzzing in their pocket.

The orginal article.

Summary of “This Shadowy Company Is Flying Spy Planes Over US Cities”

Acorn’s planes serve as the US military’s “A-Team” for aerial surveillance in Africa, including tracking suspected terrorists’ phones from the air.
Acorn planes that fly for the US military in Africa also carry Nebula, FAA airworthiness documents reveal, along with devices including Windjammer, which can track and disable satellite phones; “Dirtboxes,” which simulate cell phone towers; and Lanshark, which can survey Wi-Fi networks from the air.
Using data collected by the websites Flightradar24 and ADS-B Exchange, which track signals emitted by aircraft transponders, BuzzFeed News spotted planes registered to Commuter Air Technology and Aircraft Logistics Group flying surveillance patterns over cities including Brawley, California; Charlotte, North Carolina; and multiple locations along the Gulf of Mexico in Louisiana, Mississippi, and Alabama.
Ken McGraw, a spokesperson for US Special Operations Command, which is responsible for the Raven exercises, told BuzzFeed News by email that training involving cell phone tracking devices would only target phones operated by the military or its contractors.
Fake cell phone towers on planes can also disrupt phone service on the ground, because phones disengage from the regular network when they try to connect.
“The cell phone companies would be all over them,” said Hardman, who has written on the technology and its legal implications.
US Special Operations Command declined to discuss how it minimizes disruption to normal phone service when using fake cell phone towers from aircraft.
Under most circumstances, federal law enforcement policies require a warrant to track each target phone, which should rule out mass cell phone tracking superimposed over persistent video.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Your Smartphone Can Reduce Your Brainpower, Even If It’s Just Sitting There”

Over the course of the next 90 minutes I will check my phone for texts, likes, and New York Times push alerts at every pang of boredom, anxiety, relaxation, satiety, frustration, or weariness.
A smartphone can tax its user’s cognition simply by sitting next to them on a table, or being anywhere in the same room with them, suggests a study published recently in the Journal of the Association for Consumer Research.
Even if a phone’s out of sight in a bag, even if it’s set to silent, even if it’s powered off, its mere presence will reduce someone’s working memory and problem-solving skills.
These effects are strongest for people who depend on their smartphones, such as those who affirm a statement like, “I would have trouble getting through a normal day without my cell phone.”
Few participants in the study reported feeling distracted by their phone during the exam, even if the data suggested their attention was not at full capacity.
“In a situation where you’re doing something other than, say, using your name, there’s a pretty good chance that whatever your phone represents is more likely to be relevant to you than whatever else is going on.”
In the first experiment, some participants were told to set their phones to silent without vibration and either leave them in their bag or put them on their desk.
In the second experiment, students were asked to leave their phones on their desk, in their bag, or out in the hall, just as in the first experiment.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Have Smartphones Destroyed a Generation?”

More comfortable in their bedrooms than in a car or at a party, today’s teens are physically safer than teens have ever been.
Teens who visit social-networking sites every day but see their friends in person less frequently are the most likely to agree with the statements “A lot of times I feel lonely,” “I often feel left out of things,” and “I often wish I had more good friends.” Teens’ feelings of loneliness spiked in 2013 and have remained high since.
Teens who spend more time on social media also spend more time with their friends in person, on average-highly social teens are more social in both venues, and less social teens are less so.
At the generational level, when teens spend more time on smartphones and less time on in-person social interactions, loneliness is more common.
In 2011, for the first time in 24 years, the teen suicide rate was higher than the teen homicide rate.
The teen suicide rate was even higher in the 1990s, long before smartphones existed.
What’s the connection between smartphones and the apparent psychological distress this generation is experiencing? For all their power to link kids day and night, social media also exacerbate the age-old teen concern about being left out.
Two national surveys show that teens who spend three or more hours a day on electronic devices are 28 percent more likely to get less than seven hours of sleep than those who spend fewer than three hours, and teens who visit social-media sites every day are 19 percent more likely to be sleep deprived.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Why using Airplane mode is an immensely powerful productivity hack that can level up your life”

Airplane mode is a feature that is baked into every device you have, designed to do nothing more than cut you off from the outside world, in the best possible way.
I want to talk about why you need to put your phone on Airplane mode at the right time, for the right reason, because if you can do that, you are going to level up the quality of your life in a major way.
Most of the time, we use Airplane mode out of respect to others.
We’ll put our phones on Airplane mode in meetings, at events, in a movie theatre etc.
We very rarely use Airplane mode out of respect to ourselves.
Start using Airplane mode to block yourself out from the distractions and news and endless, churning cycle of crap that our smartphones have us tuned into.
My phone stays on Airplane mode for that period, and I’m cut off from the endless stream of New Shit that comes down the pipeline constantly.
Airplane mode is a key to this, and I really, really want you to give it a shot.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Are Smartphones Making Us Stupid?”

It’s nice to have some empirical evidence to remind us all to keep our smartphones out of sight whenever we need to be fully present and in the moment.
For their latest research on the reduction of cognitive capacity caused by the mere sight of one’s own smartphone, Adrian Ward and co-authors from McCombs conducted two different experiments with nearly 800 smartphone users.
Participants were randomly assigned to place their smartphones either on the desk face down, in their pocket or personal bag, or in another room.
In the second experiment, the researchers found that participants who had been identified as extremely dependent on their smartphones performed much worse on cognitive tests than their less-dependent peers if they kept their smartphones on the desk, in their pocket, or in a bag.
The good news is that when the smartphone was placed in another room, all study participants-regardless of someone’s pre-existing degree of smartphone dependence-performed equally well on cognitive capacity tests.
Adrian Ward summed up his team’s research findings in a statement to UT Austin: “We see a linear trend that suggests that as the smartphone becomes more noticeable, participants’ available cognitive capacity decreases. Your conscious mind isn’t thinking about your smartphone, but that process-the process of requiring yourself to not think about something-uses up some of your limited cognitive resources. It’s a brain drain.”
Luckily for all of us, putting your smartphone in another room, a pocket, or the bottom of a bag seems to be an easy remedy for this problem.
Remember: Anytime you need to optimize attentional control and cognitive function, keeping smartphones out of sight helps to boost brain power and minimize brain drain.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Put Down the IPhone and Appreciate Apple’s Genius”

Ten years after the introduction of Apple Inc.’s iPhone, and the broader category of smartphones, it’s worth stepping back to see what we have learned.
The iPhone is behind the scenes a triumph of mining science, with a wide variety of raw materials and about 34 billion kilograms of mined rock as an input to date, as discussed by Brian Merchant in his new and excellent book “The One Device: The Secret History of the iPhone.” A single iPhone has behind it the production of 34 kilos of gold ore, with 20.5 grams of cyanide used to extract the most valuable parts of the gold.
The iPhone is possible only because China brought speed and scale to the production process in an unprecedented way.
For me, the most depressing lesson of the iPhone is that most people don’t care about the quality of their cultural inputs as much as I used to think.
How about watching a movie on a small iPhone screen? A whole generation seems to think that’s fine, or maybe preferable.
So many people read not only bestsellers but also literary classics on their iPhone screens, perhaps while riding the subway.
No matter how you use your iPhone, waiting around just isn’t that bad any more.
The iPhone isn’t fundamentally a phone, even though Steve Jobs himself thought that phone service was the killer app for the product.

The orginal article.

Summary of “The Life, Death, and Legacy of iPhone Jailbreaking”

Beginning shortly after the first iPhone was launched, and picking up steam in 2008, jailbreaking was a full-blown cultural and economic phenomenon.
Users themselves have stopped demanding jailbreaks, because Apple simply took jailbreakers’ best ideas and implemented them into iOS. *. When the iPhone 7 was released on September 16, 2016, Todesco found a way to jailbreak the new version of iOS within a few hours of getting his phone in the mail.
The early pioneers of jailbreaking helped turn the original iPhone from a feature-light phone into a powerful tool that could do many of the things our phones do today, from playing video games to tracking your bike rides.
Ten years after the iPhone hit the sleek tables of Apple Stores worldwide, and the first-ever jailbreak, that Wild West is gone.
It’s a world where jailbreaking itself-at least jailbreaking as we’ve come to know it-might be over.
Apple, long aware that jailbreaking was becoming an increasingly mainstream trend, broke its silence on the practice on September 24, 2007, when the company issued a statement: “Apple has discovered that many of the unauthorized iPhone unlocking programs available on the Internet cause irreparable damage to the iPhone’s software, which will likely result in the modified iPhone becoming permanently inoperable when a future Apple-supplied iPhone software update is installed.”
Apple patched the bug that enabled the TIFF exploit, setting off what would be a years-long battle: The iPhone Dev Team and other jailbreaking crews would find a new vulnerability and release new jailbreaks.
One of the reasons was that the iPhone, in part because of the jailbreakers, has became harder to hack.

The orginal article.

Summary of “The mere presence of your smartphone reduces brain power, study shows”

Your cognitive capacity is significantly reduced when your smartphone is within reach – even if it’s off.
McCombs Assistant Professor Adrian Ward and co-authors conducted experiments with nearly 800 smartphone users in an attempt to measure, for the first time, how well people can complete tasks when they have their smartphones nearby even when they’re not using them.
The findings suggest that the mere presence of one’s smartphone reduces available cognitive capacity and impairs cognitive functioning, even though people feel they’re giving their full attention and focus to the task at hand.
“We see a linear trend that suggests that as the smartphone becomes more noticeable, participants’ available cognitive capacity decreases,” Ward said.
“Your conscious mind isn’t thinking about your smartphone, but that process – the process of requiring yourself to not think about something – uses up some of your limited cognitive resources. It’s a brain drain.”
In another experiment, researchers looked at how a person’s self-reported smartphone dependence – or how strongly a person feels he or she needs to have a smartphone in order to get through a typical day – affected cognitive capacity.
Having a smartphone within sight or within easy reach reduces a person’s ability to focus and perform tasks because part of their brain is actively working to not pick up or use the phone.
“The mere presence of their smartphone was enough to reduce their cognitive capacity.”

The orginal article.

Summary of “They Built the First Phone You Loved. Where in the World Is Nokia Now?”

In 2013 it agreed to sell off its phone business, which employed 32,000, to Microsoft Corp. “It’s evident Nokia doesn’t have the resources to fund the required acceleration across mobile phones and smart devices,” said the company’s chairman, Risto Siilasmaa, in announcing the sale.
Every G since then, including 5G, is a descendant of NMT. At first, Motorola dominated the nascent global industry, but Nokia overtook them in 1999, partly by switching to a faster and more secure digital system while its American rival clung to analog.
Apple Inc. and the Korean phone makers Samsung Electronics Co. and LG Electronics Inc. left Nokia far behind.
Siilasmaa founded local cybersecurity company F-Secure Corp., and when he was brought on at Nokia, the phone maker was listing dangerously.
Nokia CEO Stephen Elop, who had come from Microsoft, went back with the phone business, and Siilasmaa took over as interim CEO. The deal was a minor national trauma in Finland.
Last year, Microsoft, faring no better than Nokia with the handset business, sold it to a subsidiary of Chinese phone maker Foxconn Technology Group.
The company has clashed repeatedly with Apple over those patents, resolving the most recent battle in May. The companies also announced that Nokia will provide networking services to Apple, while Apple stores will carry some Nokia items.
Even after the Alcatel-Lucent deal, Nokia still trails Huawei in sales of networking equipment, and business has slowed in recent years as carriers have pared their purchasing in advance of the transition to 5G. The company is also trying to edge back into the consumer electronics business.

The orginal article.