Summary of “France to ban mobile phones in schools from September”

The French government is to ban students from using mobile phones in the country’s primary, junior and middle schools.
Children will be allowed to bring their phones to school, but not allowed to get them out at any time until they leave, even during breaks.
Jean-Michel Blanquer, the French education minister, said the measure would come into effect from the start of the next school year in September 2018.
At another school, Mathilde, 12, said: “It’s ridiculous. At my school, we don’t use them in class or during recess, so what’s the problem? If anyone’s caught using one in the toilets or at lunchtime, the phones are confiscated immediately and the person is given detention.”
“It’s probably a good idea when the kids are in school, but they can’t ban them bringing them to school,” said Sabine.
Blanquer has already suggested schools could install lockers for phones, though many city centre schools have little room for them.
“I’ve done a little calculation myself: 5,300 state schools with an average 500 pupils each, that makes around 3 million lockers.”
“How is the school going to stock them? And how are they going to make sure they’re given back to the owner at the end of school?” GĂ©rard Pommier, head of the Federation of Parents in State Schools.

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Summary of “Deciding At What Age To Give A Kid A Smartphone”

Deciding At What Age To Give A Kid A Smartphone : NPR Ed It’s a question most parents will wrestle with at some point – when is the right time to give my child a smartphone? Let’s tick through a few other questions first.
So what’s a parent to do when a child, possibly a very young child, asks for a smartphone?
To learn more, let’s look at two families: one where smartphones are allowed for elementary to middle school-aged kids, and one where they are not.
Sydney Crowe is in sixth grade and has a smartphone.
Mercy’s mom, Brooke Shannon, like many other parents of elementary school kids, faced the cellphone decision early on.
So she started an online pledge that she calls “Wait Until 8th” to create a community of parents within each school waiting to give their kids smartphones until at least eighth grade – when most children are out of elementary and nearing high school.
Many agree that there’s no magic age to give a kid a smartphone.
A nonprofit focused on kids and technology, says rather than considering the age of a child, focus on maturity.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Tim Wu: Why the Courts Will Have to Save Net Neutrality”

Back in 2005, a small phone company based in North Carolina named Madison River began preventing its subscribers from making phone calls using the internet application Vonage.
On Tuesday, the F.C.C. chairman, Ajit Pai, announced plans to eliminate even the most basic net neutrality protections – including the ban on blocking – replacing them with a “Transparency” regime enforced by the Federal Trade Commission.
“Transparency,” of course, is a euphemism for “Doing nothing.” Companies like Madison River, it seems, will soon be able to block internet calls so long as they disclose the blocking.
A broadband carrier like AT&T, if it wanted, might even practice internet censorship akin to that of the Chinese state, blocking its critics and promoting its own agenda.
Allowing such censorship is anathema to the internet’s founding spirit.
As the Supreme Court has said, a federal agency must “Examine the relevant data and articulate a satisfactory explanation for its action.” Given that net neutrality rules have been a huge success by most measures, the justification for killing them would have to be very strong.
From what we know so far, Mr. Pai’s rationale for eliminating the rules is that cable and phone companies, despite years of healthy profit, need to earn even more money than they already do – that is, that the current rates of return do not yield adequate investment incentives.
More specifically, Mr. Pai claims that industry investments have gone down since 2015, the year the Obama administration last strengthened the net neutrality rules.

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Summary of “The Motherboard Guide to Not Getting Hacked”

One of the questions we are asked most often at Motherboard is “How can I prevent myself from getting hacked?”.
The future is probably not going to get better, with real-life disasters caused by internet-connected knick-knacks, smart home robots that could kill you, flying hacker laptops, and the dangers of hackers getting your genetic data.
You, as an individual user, can’t do anything to prevent your email provider, or the company that holds your financial details, from getting hacked.
THREAT MODELING. Everything in this guide starts with “Threat modeling,” which is hacker lingo for assessing how likely it is you are going to get hacked or surveilled.
Some password managers store your passwords encrypted in the cloud, so even if the company gets hacked, your passwords will be safe.
The password manager LastPass has been hacked at least twice, but no actual passwords were stolen because the company stored them securely.
Antiviruses are actually, and ironically, full of security holes, but if you’re not a person who’s at risk of getting targeted by nation-state hackers or pretty advanced criminals, having antivirus is still a good idea.
The security tips provided earlier in this guide still apply: If you can protect yourself from getting hacked, you will have a better shot at preventing yourself from being surveilled.

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Summary of “iPhone X Diary: One week in, and I absolutely love this phone”

The executive summary of this iPhone X Diary piece – almost a week in – is that I still love it, and I have found very little more to complain about.
I’m still of the view that the difference in screen quality between Apple’s excellent IPS LCD iPhones and the OLED screen of the iPhone X is not massive, but there is one benefit I really like.
All in all I would say that Face ID is at least as reliable as Touch ID – which also sometimes fails – and probably more reliable.
With the phone held in my hand, switching the phone off with the side button effectively involves squeezing the phone, so I did several times find myself taking a screenshot instead of putting the phone into sleep.
I’m on record as saying that what I really want is truly wireless charging – where devices are charged anywhere in a room, rather than on a pad – but there is convenience to being able to pick up the phone, wander around the house and then just put it down on a pad rather than having to plug in a Lightning cable.
I love Face ID. Last time my grumbles were the burn-in risk, off-angle screen viewing, the weight and the camera bump on a desk or table.
All I’ve been able to add since then is the occasional Face ID glitch, and my grumble about secure Notes.
Did I mention that I love this phone? If you also have an iPhone X, please share your own impressions in the comments.

The orginal article.

Summary of “‘We’re designing minds’: Industry insider reveals secrets of addictive app trade”

The average Canadian teenager is on track to spend nearly a decade of their life staring at a smartphone, and that’s no accident, according to an industry insider who shared some time-sucking secrets of the app design trade.
Named after the brain molecule that gives us pleasure, Dopamine Labs uses computer coding to influence behaviour – most importantly, to compel people to spend more time with an app and to keep coming back for more.
To make a profit, companies “Need your eyeballs locked in that app as long as humanly possible,” he says.
A push notification, such as a message that someone has commented on your Facebook photo, is a trigger; opening the app is the action; and the reward could be a “Like” or a “Share” of a message you posted.
Emily, a teen from Guelph, Ont., tracked her cellphone use this summer with an app called Moment.
Emily, a 16-year-old from Guelph, Ont., who agreed to track her smartphone use for Marketplace this past summer using an app called Moment, has a Snapchat score of 1.2 million – several hundred thousand points ahead of her friends.
The streak feature is a technique known as a loss aversion, which often involves trying to keep users fixated on an app even when it’s not useful or they don’t enjoy it anymore.
Emily’s tracking app revealed she uses her phone an average of three hours and 35 minutes a day, with most of that time spent on Snapchat.

The orginal article.

Summary of “iPhone X: Tomorrow’s iPhone today”

The iPhone 8 is the latest iteration on the original, offering improvements while maintaining the conventions that have been part of the iPhone since its conception.
In my hand, the iPhone X feels very much like the iPhone 8-the glass makes it much easier to grip than the iPhone 6 or 7.
Since this is an unusual year in which Apple’s releasing two different families of iPhone models, it’s worth going over where the iPhone X is the same as the iPhone 8, and where it’s different.
The iPhone X camera is slightly more advanced than the one on the iPhone 8 Plus, most specifically its telephoto camera module: It’s got a wider aperture, and it’s got built-in optical image stabilization, which is only available on the wide-angle camera on the iPhone 8 Plus.
Of course, the iPhone X can also shoot portrait images via its front-facing selfie camera, thanks to all the same depth-sensing technology that lets it run Face ID. As I mentioned above, I’ve resisted the siren song of the iPhone Plus models for years because they’re just too big to fit in my hand.
It’s worth noting that the iPhone X is not what it was once assumed by some to be: this is not an iPhone 8 Plus crammed into the body of an iPhone 8.
The iPhone Plus can fit more data on its screen, and more apps will optionally display in landscape mode on the iPhone Plus.
iPhone Plus users won’t lose their cameras if they make the move to the iPhone X, but they’ll probably feel a little bit cramped.

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Summary of “iPhone X review: face the future”

I personally think the iPhone 4 is the most beautiful phone of all time, and I’d say the iPhone X is in third place in the iPhone rankings after that phone and the original model.
We’ll just have to see how it goes with the iPhone X. Cameras I haven’t had a lot of time to play with the cameras on the iPhone X, but the short answer is that they look almost exactly like the cameras on the iPhone 8.
Face ID: it works, mostly The single most important feature of the iPhone X is Face ID, the system that unlocks the phone by recognizing your face.
Even that’s an understatement: the entire design and user experience of the iPhone X is built around Face ID. Face ID is what let Apple ditch the home button and Touch ID fingerprint sensor.
If Face ID doesn’t work, the entire promise of the iPhone X falls apart.
You also can’t be too casual about it: I had a lot of problems pulling the iPhone X out of my pocket and having it fail to unlock until Apple clarified that Face ID works best at a distance of 25 to 50 centimeters away from your face, or about 10 to 20 inches.
That’s closer than I usually hold my phone when I pull it out of my pocket to check something, which means I had to actively think about holding the iPhone X closer to my face than every other phone I’ve ever used.
If you’re buying an iPhone X expecting a radical change to your iPhone experience, well, you probably won’t get it.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Why you shouldn’t charge your phone in your car”

The INSIDER Summary: Turns out, charging your phone in your car could do more harm than good.
Plugging your phone into a car’s USB port could stall the charging and even damage the charger.
The best thing to do is to get home to charge your phone at an outlet.
Why? For starters, the USB port in your vehicle probably provides less electricity than your phone really needs to charge.
By plugging your phone into a low-power USB port like the one in your car, you allow the device to swallow up power at a rate that’s much too fast for the port’s capabilities.
As a result, your phone might stall while it charges, or worse – barely charge at all.
While the extent of the damage depends on the type of phone you have and its battery, the odds are high that your device is depleting your car’s battery as it charges.
If your car is an older model, you might want to avoid charging your phone through its USB port.

The orginal article.