Summary of “How Pixar Became a Sequel Factory”

In its initial 10-film run, when even a single flop could have sunk the studio, Pixar released just one sequel.
With Pixar preparing to set out on its own, Disney created a rival animation studio called Circle 7 that began developing sequels to Toy Story 2, Finding Nemo, and Monsters, Inc. These franchises would be fully monetized whether Pixar was involved or not.
The rogue sequels were never made, but Toy Story 3, Monsters University, and Finding Dory were all eventually developed in-house at Pixar.
Since the release of Toy Story, Pixar has been steadily increasing its output and has long known that sequels would be necessary to stabilize its business.
In his book Creativity, Inc., Pixar cofounder Ed Catmull calls sequels “a sort of creative bankruptcy” but notes that the company had a long-term plan to eventually develop one sequel for every two original films.
Lasseter, the chief creative officer for both Pixar and Disney’s animation studio, is leaving the company after accounts of unwanted grabbing and kissing of female subordinates.
After Toy Story 4, due in June 2019, Pixar says it’s taking a break from sequels.
Even now amid the endless Cars and Toy Story films, Pixar is the studio whose original ideas are the most exciting to see brought to life.

The orginal article.

Summary of “And the Pixie Award Goes To …”

Because it’s the Pixies, which is a thing that we made up as a way to talk about a bunch of stuff that’s happened in different Pixar movies.
The Pixie for the Character Who Wasn’t Actually the Best Pixar Character but I’m Going to Say He’s the Best Anyway Because, Whatever, It’s Time We Won a Thing This goes to Miguel from Coco, who technically is not actually the best Pixar character but I’m going to give him the award anyway because, I mean, sometimes cheating is OK. It’s just that we finally got some Mexicans into the lead roles in a Pixar movie, and so I’m going to lift that up whenever I can.
First: This goes to the Love Over Time montage scene from Up, which very well might be the most masterful four-minute stretch of any movie in the Pixar universe, a statement that should carry a mammoth of gravity with it given that the Pixar universe is stuffed fat with brilliant moments.
The Pixie for the Movie That Wasn’t a Pixar Movie but Should’ve Been a Pixar Movie This one goes to Shark Tale, which was not a Pixar movie but should’ve been a Pixar movie.
The Pixie for the Pixar Movie That, If You Only Know the Mechanics of Its Entry Point, You’d Think it Was a Revenge Movie Starring Liam Neeson A husband and wife are enjoying a nice afternoon out while their children nap nearby.
The Pixie for the Most “Nice Try, but No Thanks” Idea in a Pixar Movie I understand the sentiment behind Ratatouille’s “Anyone can cook” life lesson.
The Pixie for the Character Who Seems the Worst but Turns Out to Be the Best This one goes to Sadness from Inside Out, who, at the beginning of the movie feels like little more than a gigantic bummer but then by the end of the movie has worked herself into the most interesting, most complex, most thought-provoking character of all.
The Pixie for the Movie That Already, Even Just a Handful of Years After It’s Come Out, Already Looks Very Prophetic This one goes to Wall-E, a movie that peeks forward at what human life will be like after we wreck the planet and become machine-dependent.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Every Pixar Movie, Ranked”

What follows is the result of that process-The Ringer’s official ranking of every Pixar movie.
Finding Dory Ben Lindbergh: Thirteen years elapsed between the releases of Finding Nemo in 2003 and Finding Dory in 2016, which seems like a dangerous span of time between an animated movie and its sequel/spinoff: long enough that the kids who watched the former have aged out of the audience, but not long enough that they’ve created tiny Pixar consumers of their own.
Which reunited Nemo director Andrew Stanton and stars Ellen DeGeneres and Albert Brooks, did billion-dollar business, becoming the highest-grossing animated movie ever in the domestic market and ranking second behind Nemo in inflation-adjusted dollars on the all-time Pixar earnings leaderboard.
Monsters, Inc. Alison Herman: If your favorite SNL cast is inevitably the one that was on the air while you were in high school, your favorite Pixar movie is undoubtedly one released when you were between the ages of 8 and 12.
You’re young enough to have the intensity of feeling that can imprint a movie in your brain for decades to come, but just old enough to understand the emotional sophistication that comes with all the best Pixar projects.
To my mind, Monsters, Inc. is the movie that best exemplifies that Pixar blend, even if you remove the nostalgia factor.
In a profile of Inside Out director Pete Docter around the time of its release, the writer Lisa Miller noted that, “In my house, the movie has given us a new way to talk about how we feel.” While riding bikes, she asks her young daughter, “Who’s driving now?” Her answer is inspired by the movie: “Joy, and a little bit of Fear.” Talk about a mind-altering children’s movie.
I judge a Pixar movie by its ability to destroy me emotionally, and thus Up is, by my estimation, the best Pixar movie ever, a tale of sad widower Carl learning to live after losing his love, with the help of a child and a flying house.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Can John Lasseter Ever Return to Disney?”

The acceptance speeches included thanks to many people, but one name was conspicuously omitted: John Lasseter, the absent chief creative officer of both pillars of Disney’s animation empire.
Lasseter, 61, was on what Disney described as a six-month “Sabbatical”; in an October memo to staff announcing the leave, he had acknowledged unspecified “Missteps.” As The Hollywood Reporter first reported then, Lasseter was known by insiders for grabbing, kissing and making comments about physical attributes of women.
Now, with the six months of his leave drawing to a close, many animators are convinced that Lasseter will not return.
Insiders say Lasseter had amassed so much power that his underlings at one point told Iger they needed to check with Lasseter before carrying out Iger’s instructions.
Now if Lasseter returns, there is likely to be a negative reaction from some employees at Pixar and Disney who felt that Lasseter had bullied and belittled them and hogged credit for years.
Former Lasseter associates say for many years, Jobs was not the only governor on Lasseter’s engines.
For a time, Klubien and Lasseter went their separate ways; Lasseter met Ed Catmull, who invited him to work at a new Bay Area computer graphics unit within Lucasfilm.
In meetings on the project, Klubien says, Lasseter often seemed to echo things that he or Ranft had just said – but the person taking notes included only Lasseter’s words, making it appear that Lasseter had originated thoughts he was merely repeating.

The orginal article.